---------- S--------
San Diego Serenade
Saving All My Love For You
Scarecrow
Sea Of Love
Semi Suite
Shake It
Shiny Things
Shiver Me Timbers
Shore Leave
Silent Night
Singapore
Sins Of The Father
Sleep Tonight
Small Change
Smuggler's Waltz
So It Goes
Soldier's Things
So Long I'll See Ya
Somewhere
Spare Parts 1
Spare Parts 2
Spidey's Wild Ride
Standing On The Corner
Starving In The Belly (Of A Whale)
Step Right Up
Story (Spoken Word)
Straight To The Top
Strange Weather
Stray Dog Help Yourself
Such A Scream
Sweet And Shiny Eyes
Swordfishtrombone
---------- T--------
Tabletop Joe
'T Ain't No Sin
Take Care Of All Of My Children
Take It With Me
Take Me Home
Tango Till They're Sore
Telephone Call From Istanbul
Temptation
Tell It To Me
That Feel
That's The Way
The Big Rock Candy Mountain
The Black Rider
The Briar And The Rose
The Fall Of Troy
The Ghosts Of Saturday Night
The Goodnight Loving Trail
The Heart Of Saturday Night
The Last Rose Of Summer
The Movie
The Ocean Doesn't Want Me
The One That Got Away
The Other Side Of The World
The Part You Throw Away
The Piano Has Been Drinking
The Pontiac
There's Only Alice
The Return Of Jackie And Judy
The Wages Of Love
World Keeps Turning
This One's From The Heart
Thousand Bing Bangs
Tijuana
'Til The Money Runs Out
Time
Tommy The Cat
Tom Tales (Spoken Word)
Tom Traubert's Blues (Aka Waltzing Matilda)
Top Of The Hill
Town With No Cheer
Train Song
Trampled Rose
Trash Day
Trouble's Braids
Two Sisters
---------- U V--------
Underground
Union Square
Virginia Avenue
----------W--------
Waiting For Waits
Walk Away
Walking Spanish
Warm Beer And Cold Women
Watch Her Disappear
Way Down In The Hole
We're All Mad Here
What Became Of Old Father Craft?
What Else Is New?
What Keeps Mankind Alive?
What's He Building?
When You Ain't Got Nobody
Whistle Down The Wind
Whistlin' Past The Graveyard
Who Are You?
Whose Sports Coat Is That?
Widow's Grove
With A Suitcase
World Of Adventure
Woe
Wrong Side Of The Road
---------- X Y Z--------
Yesterday Is Here
You Can Never Hold Back Spring
You Can't Unring A Bell
Young At Heart


---------- S--------



San Diego Serenade

 



I never saw the mornin' 'til I stayed up all night

I never saw the sunshine 'til you turned out the light

I never saw my hometown until I stayed away too long

I never heard the melody until I needed the song



I never saw the white line 'til I was leavin' you behind

I never knew I needed you until I was caught up in a bind now

I never spoke "I love you" 'til I cursed you in vain

I never felt my heart strings until I nearly went insane



I never saw the east coast until I moved to the west

I never saw the moonlight until it shone off of your breast

I never saw your heart until someone tried to steal, tried to steal it away

I never saw your tears until they rolled down your face



I never saw the mornin' 'til I stayed up all night

I never saw the sunshine 'til you turned out your love light, baby

I never saw my hometown 'til I stayed away too long

I never heard the melody until I needed the song



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974(1)

Official release: "The Heart Of Saturday Night", Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

Something New. Barbie Benton, 1976. Playboy Records, PB-411

Staying Power/ San Diego Serenade. Barbie Benton, 1976. Trio/ Playboy Records, PB-203 (7" single w. tracks from "Something New", 1976)

Sweet Surprise. Eric Andersen. 1976. Arista Records

Right Side Up. Ralph McTell. 1976. Warner Bros K56296 (re-released in 1982 and 2001)

It Makes Me Feel Good. Cilla Black. March 1976. EMI Records

Lost And Found. Keith Carradine. 1978. Asylum 6E114 (re-released in 2004: "I'm Easy/ Lost & Found")

Get It Out In The Open. Freddy Henry. 1979. Cloud Records (Clouds 8809)

Take Heart. Juice Newton. 1979. Capitol ST-12000

Weather The Storm. Ralph McTell. 1982. Mays TG002 (LP - Reissue of Right Side Up. 1976)

Out Of The Dark. Claudia Schmidt. January, 1985. Flying Fish Records (re-released in 1993)

Love Comes To The Simple Heart. Dean Stevens. 1985. Vulcano Records

Yo Frankie. Dion (DiMucci). January, 1989. Bmg Special Prod.

Late Night Grande Hotel, Nanci Griffith, 1991. MCA Records, MCAD-10306

I Got Thunder. Baby Jane Dexter. January, 1993. Elba Records (re-released in 1998)

Blues Britannia. Various artists. 1993. Bridge Recording, various re-releases until 2004 (performed by Cliff Aungier)

Covers. Thomas Lang. 1994. Portazul Nippon Columbia

Horizon. Big Sky (Steve Louw). 1995. Polygram BPCD 1 (South-Africa)

Versions. Thomas Lang. 1996. Telegraph Records

Editions. Thomas Lang. 1997. Portazul Nippon Columbia

The Full Spectrum Of Sound. Sch�tze & St�ckle. 1997. Self-released (Germany)

In The Middle Of A Life. George Grove. June 1998. Folk Era Records

Bare Bones. David Gogo. January 2000. Ragged Pup Records

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Heimatserenade")

Good Vibrations. Kate Dimbleby. October 10, 2000. Black Box Jazz

Old Friends. Marcus Dagan. November 1, 2000. Self-released

Right Side Up. Ralph McTell. November 2001. Leola TPGCD19 (CD version of the 1976 album)

This Is Me. Lynne Rothrock. November 29, 2002. Self-released

Homegrown. Nussbaumer/ Weber/ Kreil. 2003. Self-released

In An Otherwise Ordinary World. Eli Emily. 2003. NoVo Records

Long Way Down. Jason Myles Goss. May, 2003. Self-released

It's Not The Moon. Sara Leib. June, 2003. Panfer Records

Chamber Music. Norma Winstone and Klaus Gesing. 2004. Universal/ Emarcy

I'm Easy/ Lost And Found. Keith Carradine. April 6. 2004. Collector's Choice (originally released by Asylum in 1978 on "Lost and Found")

Slide It On Over. Les Wilson and The Mighty Housrockers. October, 2004. Self-released

Music For Torching. Reflectiostack. October, 2005. Self-released

And Then I Did. Jodie Borl�. November 2005. Self-released (Canada)

Run All Night. Rachael Cantu. February 7, 2006. Self-released

This Time. Michael Stern. August 2, 2006. Self-released

The Perfect Face. Arthur Dodge. March 20, 2007. Remedy Records

Real Emotional. Curtis Stigers. March 26, 2007. Universal

In Order. John Spendelow. November 18, 2007. Self-released



Notes:



(1) San Diego Serenade:

- Tom Waits (1973): "Writing on the piano is different than writing on guitar, you get different feels, in fact a lot of times you you write a tune with some other artist in mind which is, in fact, I got one of those right here, I kind of had Ray Charles in mind, it's called: San Diego Serenade." Interviewer - You wrote that with Ray Charles in mind? TW: " Yeah, I kind of thought he'd like to do it, I don't know. I don't know him, I don't talk to him." (Source: Folkscene 1973, with Howard and Roz Larman (KPFK-FM 90.7). Date: Los Angeles/ USA. August 12, 1973)

Tom Waits (1977): "That song was about a girl I knew once," Waits said about "San Diego Serenade," one of his few compositions that displays any sort of personal reflection. "I was crazy about her," he said. "So was her husband. But that went the way of all flesh." (Source: "Waits: 'A Rumor In My Spare Time'" The Dallas Morning News (USA). November 13, 1977 by Pete Oppel)



Saving All My Love For You

 



(Foreign Affairs sessions alternate take, 1977)(1)



[Studio chat and count-in:]



We get rolling and make some mistakes,

you can just keep going cause it's almost Friday night (?)

Three... four...



It's too early for the circus, it's too late for the bars

Everyone's sleepin' but the paperboys

And no one in this town is makin' any noise

But the dogs and the milkmen and me



The girls around here all look like Cadillacs

And no one likes a stranger here

I'd come home but I'm afraid that you won't take me back

But I'd trade off everything just to have you near



I know I'm irresponsible and I don't behave

And I ruin everything that I do

And I'll probably get arrested when I'm in my grave

But I'll be savin' all my love for you



I paid fifteen dollars for a prostitute

With too much makeup and a broken shoe

But her eyes were just a counterfeit, she tried to gyp me out of it

But you know that I'm still in love with you



Don't listen to the rumors that you hear about me

Cause I ain't half as bad as they make me out to be

Well, I may lose my mind but baby, can't you see

That I'll be savin' all my love for you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: Heartattack And Vine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. July, 2000)





 



Saving All My Love For You



(Heartattack And Vine studio version, 1980)(1)



It's too early for the circus, it's too late for the bars

Everyone's sleepin' but the paperboys

And no one in this town is makin' any noise

But the dogs and the milkmen and me



The girls around here all look like Cadillacs

And no one likes a stranger here

I'd come home but I'm afraid that you won't take me back

But I'd trade off everything just to have you near



I know I'm irresponsible and I don't behave

And I ruin everything that I do

And I'll probably get arrested when I'm in my grave

But I'll be savin' all my love for you



I paid fifteen dollars for a prostitute

With too much makeup and a broken shoe

But her eyes were just a counterfeit, she tried to gyp me out of it

But you know that I'm still in love with you



Don't listen to the rumors that you hear about me

Cause I ain't half as bad as they make me out to be

Well, I may lose my mind but baby, can't you see

That I'll be savin' all my love for you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: Heartattack And Vine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980



Known covers:

For The City. Johnny Hooper. January, 1994. Townsend Records

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1980): "That's an old song, about four years old. It was scratched off of another album, I think Foreign Affairs. SP: There's a line in that tune about a prostitute with too much makeup and a broken shoe. On your last LP, Blue Valentine, the tune "$29.00" talks about another lady of the night who had a broken shoe... TW: (laughs) Same girl!" (Source: "Heartattack and Vine". Us promo pack: Stephen Peeples. September 4, 1980)



Scarecrow

 



Buzzards drive a crooked sky

Make a junkie's promise in a courier's eye

And a bankrupt corduroy wad on the thigh

A strangled acre by a thirsty stream

A crucified body, just a three day stubble

On the chin of a nightmare stampede

And tomorrow'll be hirin' a two dollar gun

And I tell you that someone's gonna pay

Cause when the weathervane's sleeping

And the moon turns its back

And crawl on the belly on the railroad tracks

And keep well hidden till the porchlights dim

And pump sixteen shells in the belly of a scarecrow(1)

And blame it all on him



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1977

Unofficial release: A Nickle's Worth of Dreams, Triangle/ PYRAM PYCD 081

Recorded during the 'Foreign Affairs' sessions, July through August, 1977



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Scarecrow

Foreign Affairs sessions, 1977.



Notes:



(1) Scarecrow was recorded during the "Foreign Affairs" sessions in 1977. It was never officially released. Waits did however recycle parts of the song for "16 Shells From A Thirty Ought Six" (Swordfishtrombones, 1983) and "Potter's Field" (Foreign Affairs, 1977)



Sea Of Love

 



Come with me, my love

To the sea, the sea of love

I wanna tell you how much I love you

But I'm drowning in a sea of love



Do you remember the night we met?

That's the night I knew you were my pet

I wanna tell you how much I love you

But I'm drowning in a sea of love



Come with me to the sea, yeah



Do you remember the night we met?

Well, that's the night I just knew you were my pet

I wanna tell you how much I love you

But I'm down here in the sea of love



Come with me to the sea, yeah



Oh and do you remember the night we met?

That's the night I just knew you were my pet

I wanna tell you how much I love you

Goin' down here in the sea of love



Come with me to the sea, oh yeah



Do you remember the night we met?

That's the night I just knew you were my pet

I wanna tell you how much I love you

But I'm down here in the sea of love



Oh come with me to the sea, oh yeah



Come with me, my love

To the sea, the sea of love

I wanna tell you how much I love you

But I'm down here in the sea of love



Oh come with me to the sea, oh yeah



Written by: John Philip Baptiste (aka. Phil Phillips) and George Khoury, � 1959(1)

Published by: Forth Knox Music, Inc. (BMI)/ Tek Publishing (BMI), Trio Music Co. Inc/ Windswept Holdings , LLC (BMI)

Original recording by Phil Phillips and the Twilights, 1959.

Official release (Waits version): Sea of Love (original motion picture soundtrack). Various artists. November, 1989. Label: Polygram (mercury 842 170-2)

Re-released on: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Covering: "Sea Of Love" written by John Philip Baptiste (aka. Phil Phillips) and George Khoury, 1959. Original recording by Phil Phillips and the Twilights, 1959: "...Come with me, my love. To the sea, the sea of love. I want to tell you how much I love you. Do you remember when we met? That's the day I knew you were my pet. I want to tell you how much I love you. Come with me to the sea of love. Do you remember when we met? That's the day I knew you were my pet. I want to tell you how much I love you. Come with me to the sea of love. Do you remember when we met? That's the day I knew you were my pet. I want to tell you how much I love you".



Semi Suite

 



[One, two, three, four]



Well, you hate those diesels rollin'

Those Friday nights out bowlin'

When he's off for a twelve-hour lay over night

You wish you had a dollar

For every time he hollered

That he's leavin' and he's never comin' back



But the curtain-laced billow

And his hands on your pillow

And his trousers are hangin' on the chair

You're lyin' through your pain, babe

But you're gonna tell him he's your man

And you ain't got the courage to leave



He tells you that you're on his mind

You're the only one he's ever gonna find that's

Kinda special, and understands his complicated soul

But the only place a man can breathe

And collect his thoughts is

Midnight and flyin' away on the road



But you've packed and unpacked

So many times you've lost track

And the steam heat is drippin' off the walls

But when you hear his engines

You're lookin' through the window in the kitchen and you know

You're always gonna be there when he calls



Cause he's a truck drivin' man, stoppin' when he can

He's a truck drivin' man, stoppin' when he can



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974

Official release: The Heart Of Saturday Night, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974



Notes:



(1) Live intro from Tokyo, 1977: "I'd like to do a little American soap opera for you tonight It's called 'The Days of Our Lives' And as the world is turning on you You're falling on the edge of night In a small little town outside of Albuquerque I'll be there with bells on, baby You are my sunshine" (Transcription by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. July, 2000)



Shake It

 



Strip Poker Motel

Got a small blue tail

Hot ice, cold cash

I never been no good at staying out of jail



Wheel spin, roulette

Who's giving, don't get

Ripped shirt, black eye

Tuxedo, bow tie

Dark sound, straight road

Get lost, get loaded

Enlisted men, off duty

Stolen clouds, dark beauty

Cold gun, wild rose

Night clerk, door closed



Lie down baby 

Your love is a faucet



Called China, cell phone

Chun King, not home



You know I feel like a preacher waving a gun around(1)

Shake it, shake it. shake it baby!



Shake it, shake it, shake it now

Shake it, shake it, shake it baby

Shake it, shake it, shake it now

Shake it, shake it, shake it baby

Shake it, shake it, shake it now



Outside, it's damp

Put a towel on that lamp

You look hot in this light

I can love you all night

Shoes off, hair down

Got a pink nightgown

Mike Tyson, KO'ed

On the wild, blue road

Small town, straight road

That rooster, done crowed

Flat tire, homemade cross



You know I feel like a preacher waving a gun around

Shake it, shake it, shake it baby!



Shake it, shake it, shake it now

Shake it. shake it, shake it baby



Shake it, shake it, shake it now



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Like a preacher waving a gun around: this line was inspired by American comedian Bill Hicks (1961-1994)

Tom Waits (1999): "Bill Hicks, blowtorch, excavator, truthsayer and brain specialist, like a reverend waving a gun around. Pay attention to Rant in E Minor, it is a major work, as important as Lenny Bruce's. He will correct your vision. His life was cut short by cancer, though he did leave his tools here. Others will drive on the road he built. Long may his records rant even though he can't." (Source: "Tom Waits, Artist Choice". Hear Music Artist's Choice October, 1999. Re-printed in "It's Perfect Madness". The Observer (UK). March 20, 2005)

Tom Waits (2005): "Als ich diese Zeile, "I feel like a preacher waving a gun around", geschrieben habe, dachte ich an Bill Hicks. Das ist vermutlich der wichtigste amerikanische Komiker seit Lenny Bruce. Er ist 1994 gestorben. Er war sehr lustig und hatte einen sehr dunklen und verdrehten Humor. Bill Hicks ist dieser Prediger. Oder Jerry Lee Lewis - auch so ein Waffen wedelnder Prediger." Transl.: "When I wrote that line "I feel like a preacher waving a gun around" I was thinking of Bill Hicks. He's probably the most important comedian since Lenny Bruce. He died in 1994. He was very funny and had a dark and twisted humour. Bill Hicks is this preacher. Or Jerry Lee Lewis - another gun waving preacher." (Source: "Tom Waits: Familienmensch". WOM magazine (Germany). October, 2004. By Michael Ernst)



Shiny Things

 



(Woyzeck theatre version, 2000)(1)



The things a crow puts in his nest

They are always things he finds that shine best

Somehow they'll find a shiny dime, a silver twine

From a Valentine

The crows all bring them shiny things



Leave me alone you big ol' Moon

the light you cast is just a liar

You're like the crows, 'cos if it glows

You're dressed to go, you guessed I know

You'll always cling to shiny things



Well, I'm not dancing here tonight

But things are bound to turn around

Though the only I want that shines is to be king

here in your eyes

To be your only shiny thing



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story





 



Shiny Things



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



The things a crow puts in his nest

They are always things he finds that shine best

Somehow he'll find

a shiny dime

a silver twine

from a Valentine

The crows all bring

them shiny things



Leave me alone you big ol' moon

the light you cast is just a liar

You're like the crows

'cos if it glows

you're dressed to go

you guessed I know

You'll always bring

 them shiny things



Well, I'm not dancing here tonight

But things are bound to turn around

The only thing

I want that shines

is to be king

there in your eyes

To be your only

shiny thing



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000/ 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)



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Listen to audio excerpt of Shiny Things as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Benjamin Boe Rasmussen (as Karl).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Karl the fool in act 2, scene 5.



Shiver Me Timbers

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



I'm leavin' my fam'ly and leavin' my friends

My body's at home and my heart's in the wind

Where the clouds are like headlines on a new front page sky

My tears are salt water and the moon's full and high



And I know Martin Eden(2) is gonna be proud of me

And many before me who've been called by the sea

To be up in the crow's nest and singin' my say

And shiver me timbers I'm a-sailin' away



The fog's liftin' and the sand's shiftin' and I'm driftin' on out

And Ol' Captain Ahab(3) he ain't got nothin' on me

So come on and swallow me, don't follow me I travel alone

Blue water's(4) my daughter and I'm skipping like a stone



So please call my missus, tell her not to cry

My goodbye is written by the moon in the sky

Hey, and nobody knows me I can't fathom my stayin'

And shiver me timbers I'm a-sailin' away



And the fog's liftin' and the sand's shiftin' and I'm driftin' on out

Ol' Captain Ahab he ain't got nothin' on me

So come on and swallow me, don't follow me I travel alone

Blue water's my daughter and I'm skipping like a stone



And I'm leavin' my family leavin' my friends

My body's at home but my heart's in the wind

where the clouds are like headlines on a new front page sky

And shiver me timbers I'm a-sailin' away



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Shiver Me Timbers



(The Heart Of Saturday Night studio version, 1974)



I'm leavin' my family, I'm leavin' all my friends

My body's at home, but my heart's in the wind

Where the clouds are like headlines on a new front page sky

My tears are salt water, and the moon's full and high



And I know Martin Eden's(2) gonna be proud of me now

And many before me, who've been called by the sea

To be up in the crow's nest, and singin' my say

Shiver me timbers, cause I'm a-sailin' away



And the fog's liftin', and the sand's shiftin', and I'm driftin' on out

Ol' Captain Ahab(3), he ain't got nothin' on me now

So swallow me, don't follow me, I'm travellin' alone

Blue water's(4) my daughter, and I'm gonna skip like a stone



So please call my missus, gotta tell her not to cry now

Cause my goodbye is written by the moon in the sky

Hey, and nobody knows me, I can't fathom my stayin'

And shiver me timbers, cause I'm a-sailin' away



And the fog's liftin', and the sand's shiftin', and I'm driftin' on out

And ol' Captain Ahab, he ain't got nothin' on me

So come and swallow me, follow me, I'm travellin' alone

Blue water's my daughter, I'm gonna skip like a stone



And I'm leavin' my family, I'm leavin' all my friends

My body's at home, but my heart's in the wind

Where the clouds are like headlines upon a new front page sky

And shiver me timbers, cause I'm a-sailin' away



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974

Official release: The Heart Of Saturday Night, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974



Known covers:

Songs For The New Depression. Bette Midler, 1976. Atlantic

Live At Last. Bette Midler, 1977. Atlantic

Divine Madness. Bette Midler, 1980. Atlantic

Coming To My Own. John Lone. 1990. Japanese issue WPCL-187

Experience The Divine. Bette Midler, 1993. Atlantic (re-released in 1997)

Mister No Good. Ole Friis. September 21, 1994. Poul Hansen/ Kick Records (Denmark)

Live At The Troubadour. Glenn Yarbrough. October 31, 1994. Folk Era Records (recorded live in 1978)

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Singer! Tom Lewis. 1995. Borealis (Canada)

I Could Have Been A Sailor. Glenn Yarbrough. May 3, 1995. Folk Era Records

Rockall. The House Band. June, 1996. Green Linnet Records GLCD 1174

Experience The Divine. Bette Midler, 1997 (Canadian re-release of the 1993 original)

Street Songs, Jazzy Tunes & Down Home Blues. Richard Ray Farrell. 1998. Stormy Monday Records MO - 80035 (Germany)

Listen to my Heart. Laurie Beechman. 1999. Excelsior LB CD001; DRG 5216 (medley w. "Sail Away")

Random White Boy. Kirk Detweiler. May 1999. Dancing Bull Music

Blessed Are The Sheepherders. Zen For Primates. October, 1999. Bummer Tent Records

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Nach mir die Sintflut")

The Day The Tall Ships Came. Glenn Yarbrough & The Shaw Brothers. November, 2000. Folk Era Records

Hawaiki Nui - 'Something to Say', Pomaika'i and Friends. 19 December, 2000 Hawaiki Nui Entertainment Group

The Song Is Mine. John DePalma. March 12, 2002. LML Music

Half Cocked And Fully Loaded. Front Porch Swingin Liquor Pigs. May 2002. Neckless Records

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Paper Heart. Diane Jarvi. 2004. Lupine Records

Let Me Be Strong. Valerie Sneade. September 21, 2004. Turning Leaf Records

The Holly Cole Collection - Vol. 1. Holly Cole. October 12, 2004. Magada International (Japanese release)

Seemannsbraut Ist Die See. Angelika Thomas & Anna Sch�fer. November 8, 2004. Bear Family Records

Off the Cuff. Troubadours Of Divine Bliss. April, 2005. Self-released

Song Ablaze. Tommy O'Sullivan. May 17, 2006. Self-released

Into The Midnight Waltz. Susan Welch. October 4, 2005. Self-released

Songs For The Jesse. Kirk Detweiler & Friends. January 6, 2007. Dancing Bull Music (same version as on Random White Boy, 1999)

Bein' Green. Paul L. Martin. June 10, 2007. MMP Ltd.

My Heart´s In The Wind. Deborah Shulman. November 13, 2007. Self-released

All Done And Dusted. Alexa Rodrian. September 1, 2008. NRW Records

Finding Home. Rena Strober. June 24, 2008. Self-released

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music)

Covers. James Taylor. February 2, 2009. UMTV (UK)

Fragile. Joni Keen Jazz. February 5, 2009. Skylark Records



Notes:



(1) Shiver me timbers: "This is one of those supposedly nautical expressions that seem to be better known through a couple of appearances in fiction than by any actual sailors' usage. It's an exclamation that may allude to a ship striking some rock or other obstacle so hard that her timbers shiver, or shake, so implying a calamity has occurred. It is first recorded as being used by Captain Frederick Marryat in Jacob Faithful in 1835: "I won't thrash you Tom. Shiver my timbers if I do". It has gained a firm place in the language because almost fifty years later Robert Louis Stevenson found it to be just the kind of old-salt saying that fitted the character of Long John Silver in Treasure Island: "Cross me, and you'll go where many a good man's gone before you ... some to the yard-arm, shiver my timbers, and some by the board, and all to feed the fishes". Since then, it's mainly been the preserve of second-rate seafaring yarns." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(2) Martin Eden: Character from the same titled book by Jack London from 1909



(3) Ahab: Also Achab. Main character in "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville.



(4) Blue water: The open ocean (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



Shore Leave

 



Well, with buck shot(2) eyes and a purple heart(3)

I rolled down the national stroll(4)

And with a big fat paycheck strapped to my hip-sack

And a shore leave wristwatch underneath my sleeve

In a Hong Kong drizzle(5) on Cuban heels(6)

I rowed down the gutter to the Blood Bank



And I'd left all my papers on the Ticonderoga(7)

And I was in bad need of a shave

I slopped at the corner on cold chow mein

And shot billiards with a midget until the rain stopped



And I bought a long sleeved shirt with horses on the front

And some gum and a lighter and a knife

And a new deck of cards with girls on the back

And I sat down and wrote a letter to my wife



And I said, baby, I'm so far away from home

And I miss my baby so

I can't make it by myself

I love you so



And I was pacing(8) myself, trying to make it all last

Squeezing all the life out of a lousy two-day pass

And I had a cold one(9) at the Dragon with some Filipino floor show

And I talked baseball with a lieutenant over a Singapore Sling(10)

And I wondered how the same moon outside over this Chinatown fair

Could look down on Illinois and find you there(11)

I know I love you, baby



And I'm so far away from home

I'm so far away from home

Yeah, I miss my baby so

I can't make it by myself

I love you so



Shore Leave, shore leave, shore leave, shore leave, shore leave

shore Leave, shore leave, shore leave, shore leave, shore leave

shore Leave, shore leave, shore leave, shore leave, shore leave

shore Leave, shore leave



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1983-1998

Official release: "Swordfishtrombones", Island Records Inc., 1983 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Also included in Big Time movie (1988). Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Wicked Grin. John Hammond. March 13, 2001. Emd/ Virgin

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Blue Whisper. The Headhunters. April 3, 2007. Self-released (Italy)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Shore Leave" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre Los Angeles/ USA. November 9, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) Shore Leave

- Tom Waits 
(1983): "It's kind of an oriental Bobby "Blue" Bland approach. Musically it's essentially very simple. It's a minor blues. I tried to add some musical sound effects with the assistance of a low trombone to five a feeling of a bus going by, and metal aunglongs the sound of tin cans in the wind, or rice on the bass drum to give a feeling of the waves hitting the shore. Just to capture the mood more than anything, of a marching marine or whatever walking down the wet street in Hong Kong and missing his wife back home. I worked in a restaurant in a sailor town for a long time. It's Porkcola/ National City. So, it was something I saw every night. It was next to a tattoo parlor and a country & western dance hall and a Mexican movie theater. So I imagined this Chinese pinwheel in a fireworks display spinning, spinning and turning and then slowing down. As it slowed down it dislodged into a windmill in Illinois. That same of... and then looked down on us. A home. Where a woman is sitting in the living room sleeping on chairs with the television on. When he's having eggs at some grumulant (?) joint, you know, thousands of miles away"(Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)

Tom Waits (1983): "Some of the stuff on Shore Leave is like sound effects, the low trombone is like a bus going by and I got a little more adventurous, I'm still a little timid about it but melody is what really hits me first, melody is the first thing that seduces me" (Source: Unidentified Swordfishtrombones Interview (interviewer's tape). Date: 1983/ 1984)

Tom Waits (1983): "Shore Leave is a Chief Botswain's mate's nightmare with a bottle of 10 High and a black eye" (Source: "The Beat Goes On" Rock Bill magazine (USA). October 1983, by Kid Millions)



(2) Buckshot: n.: 

- A large lead shot for shotgun shells, used especially in hunting big game (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition) 

- One variation of the little metal pellets that fill a shotgun shell. An individual piece of buckshot is larger and more damaging than some other types, like birdshot. Larger pellets for larger animals (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000).

- Waits might be playing with the common phrase "bloodshot eyes":

- Bloodshot: blood�shot adj. Red and inflamed as a result of locally congested blood vessels: bloodshot eyes (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company) 



 (3) Purple heart

- n. [1960s] (drugs) 1. amphetamines 2. (rarely) barbituates. (the colour of the pills) (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)

- Any barbituate or mixture of a barbituate and morphine used as a narcotic by addicts, esp. a Nembutal (trademark) capsule; a "goof ball" or "yellow jacket" Orig. W.W.II Army addict use, when the addicts would take or mix any drugs they could obtain from military medical supplies. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- American military decoration awarded to members of the armed forces of the U.S. who are wounded by an instrument of war in the hands of the enemy and posthumously to the next of kin in the name of those who are killed in action or die of wounds received in action. It is specifically a combat decoration.



(4) Stroll:

- n.: A road, highway, or street. c1935 jive use; some Negro use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "Nighthawk Postcards" (With the tight knots of moviegoers and out-of-towners on the stroll...), "Drunk On The Moon" (Tight-slack clad girls on the graveyard shift, 'Neath the cement stroll, catch the midnight drift...)



(5) Drizzle: A fine, gentle, misty rain (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company) 



(6) Cuban heels: mens boot, half boot or shoe with high heels (e.g. Manhattan half boot, Wincklepicker, Chelsea boot, etc.)





Tom Waits (1999): "When I started looking for pointed shoes, I used to go to Fairfax on Orchard Street in New York City, one of those little pushcart guys. I'd say, "You got any pointy shoes?" They would go way, way in the back and come back with a dusty box, blow the dust off the top and say, "What do you want with these things? Give me 20 bucks. Go on, get outta here!" And that was the beginning. From there, I saw it grow into a burgeoning industry, a pointy industry. The ultimate was the pointy toe and Cuban heel. But I was younger then. Now, I go for comfort and roadability" (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf" Magnet magazine, by Jonathan Valania. Date: Astro Motel/ Mission Cafe, Santa Rosa. June-July, 1999)



(7) Ticonderoga: Leadship of a U.S. navy class of cruisers (CV-14, later CVA-14 & CVS-14), active 1944-1974. In 1944 Ticonderoga transported aircraft to Hawaii, took part in underway ordnance replenishment experiments and trained her crew and air group for participation in the war against Japan. After steaming to the western Pacific in October, the carrier launched her first strikes on 5 November 1944, hitting targets ashore and afloat in the northern Philippines area. In January 1945, Ticonderoga took part in raids against Japanese assets in Indochina, China, Luzon and Formosa. Hit by two "Kamikaze" suicide planes on 21 January, she lost over 140 crewmen and had to go to the U.S. for repairs. Ticonderoga returned to the combat area in late May. For the remaining two and a half months of the Pacific War, her planes made regular attacks on the Japanese home islands. From September 1945 into January 1946, she transported veterans home across the Pacific. Ticonderoga deployed ten times to the western Pacific in 1957-69. In August 1964, during her sixth WestPac cruise, her planes participated in air strikes against North Vietnamese targets during the "Tonkin Gulf Incident" that gradually led to massive U.S. involvement in Southeast Asian combat operations. Vietnam War missions dominated Ticonderoga's next four Seventh Fleet deployments. In October 1969, she was redesignated CVS-14 and converted to an antisubmarine warfare support carrier. The ship made two more cruises to Asian waters in that capacity. In 1972, she took part in space flight recovery efforts for the Apollo 16 and 17 Moon flights. Decommissioned in September 1973, USS Ticonderoga was sold for scrapping a year later. (Source: Naval Historical Center home page, 2001-2003)





(8) Pace: v. [1970s] (US black) to live a fast, exciting and varied life (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(9) Cold one: n. [1920s+] (orig. US) a bottle of beer, [orig. a conscious euph. for a cold beer, used during Prohibition (1920-33) when it was better not to mention alcohol in any form) (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(10) Singapore Sling: The Singapore Sling was created at Raffles Hotel in 1915 by Hainanese-Chinese bartender, Mr. Ngiam Tong Boon. Originally, the Singapore Sling was meant as a woman's drink, hence the attractive pink color. Today it is very definitely a drink enjoyed by all. "Probably no mixed drink has been as mistreated as this one". As Dale DeGroff, mixologist of Blackbird Restaurant in New York City, says, "The only thing most bartenders know about the Singapore Sling is that it's supposed to be red." This is an adaptation of the original recipe from Raffles Hotel in Singapore. Fill a shaker with ice. Add 6 tablespoons pineapple juice, 2 tablespoons gin, 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, 1 tablespoon Cherry Heering, 1 tablespoon grenadine, 1/2 tablespoon Benedictine, a dash of Triple Sec and 3 dashes of Angostura bitters. Shake for 1 minute and strain over ice into a tall glass





(11) Could look down on Illinois and find you there: Might refer to Kathleen Brennan as also mentioned in Johnsburg, Illinois, 1983: "And she grew up outside McHenry in Johnsburg, Illinois..."



Silent Night

 



Silent night, Holy night

All is calm, all is bright

Round yon Virgin Mother and Child

Holy Infant so tender and mild

Sleep in Heavenly peace

Sleep in Heavenly peace



Silent night, Holy night

Shepherds quake at the sight

Glories stream from Heaven afar

Heavenly hosts sing Hallelujah

Christ, the Savior is born

Christ, the Savior is born



Silent night, Holy night

Son of God, love's pure light

Radiant beams from thy Holy face

With the dawn of redeeming grace

Jesus, Lord, at thy birth

Jesus, Lord, at thy birth



Written by: Joseph Mohr (translated)(1)

Music by: Franz Gruber, 1818

Official release: SOS United, SOS United charity album, 1989



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Original version "Silent Night". Traditional, written by: Joseph Mohr (translated). Music by: Franz Gruber. Written in 1818. Also used during the late 1970s in a medley with Christmas Card From A Hooker In Minneapolis



Singapore

 



We sail tonight for Singapore, we're all as mad as hatters(2) here

I've fallen for a tawny moor, took off to the Land of Nod(3)

Drank with all the Chinamen, walked the sewers of Paris(4)

I danced along a colored wind, dangled from a rope of sand

You must say goodbye to me



We sail tonight for Singapore, don't fall asleep while you're ashore

Cross your heart and hope to die, when you hear the children cry

Let marrowbone and cleaver choose, while making feet for children's shoes(5)

Through the alley, back from hell, when you hear that steeple bell

You must say goodbye to me.



Wipe him down with gasoline, till his arms are hard and mean

From now on, boys, this iron boat's your home

So heave away, boys



We sail tonight for Singapore, take your blankets from the floor

Wash your mouth out by the door, the whole town's made of iron ore

Every witness turns to steam, they all become Italian dreams

Fill your pockets up with earth, get yourself a dollar's worth

Away boys, away boys, heave away



The captain is a one-armed dwarf, he's throwing dice along the wharf

In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is King(6)

So take this ring



We sail tonight for Singapore, we're all as mad as hatters here

I've fallen for a tawny moor, took off to the Land of Nod

Drank with all the Chinamen, walked the sewers of Paris

I drank along a colored wind, I dangled from a rope of sand

You must say goodbye to me



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985-1998

Official release: "Rain Dogs", Island Records Inc., 1985 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Unplugged. Anne B�renz & Frank Wolff. 2003. B�chergilde (Germany)

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

Sex In Obertrubach. Feinton. March 1, 2006. TP9 Records (Germany)

Bye-Bye. Anne B�renz. October, 2006. Stalburg Theater (Germany)

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



Notes:



(1) Singapore

Tom Waits (1985): "Sometimes I close my eyes real hard and I see a picture of what I want, the song. 'Singapore' started like that, Richard Burton with a bottle of festival brandy preparing to go on board ship. I tried to make my voice like his - "In the kingdom of the blind the one-eyed man is king" - I took that from Orwell I think. NME - Which book? TW - Mary Poppins, one of the big ones." (Source: "Hard Rain". New Musical Express: Gavin Martin. October 19 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "Nowadays, if you want a certain sound you don't have to get it now, you can get it later. When you're mixing, electronically. I wanted to get it now, so I felt I cooked it and I ate it. You can establish percussion sounds later electronically. But I ended up banging on things so I felt that it really responded. If I couldn't get the right sound out of the drum set we'd get a chest of drawers in the bathroom and hit it real hard with a two-by-four. Things like that. That's on "Singapore". Those little things made me feel more involved that sampling on a synthesizer." (Source: "Tom Waits for no man". Spin Magazine: Glenn O'Brien. November 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "Singapore is kind of like Dick Burton in Taiwan and he can't get a drink." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "Ehm... I was thinking about what would happen if Richard Burton got stranded in Hong Kong somewhere or... y'know. He's this burly English with... y'know? You know a sheet mantras of... somewhere in eh...somewhere off. y'know? Taiwan or Guam, Hong Kong, Canton, Shanghai eh Philippines, somewhere over there y'know? So I tried to imagine what would be going through eh... Make it like a Richard Burton number." (Source: "Nightlines Interview" Nightlines on CBC Stereo (Canada) conducted by Michael Tearson. Date: New York. Late 1985)

Tom Waits (1998): "It's an adventure song. I like adventure songs and I always remembered that in the studio the drum sound that we used was a two by four attacking somebody's chest of drawers and the whole song played and all the backbeats were played with a two by four hitting the chest of drawers repeatedly and on the last bar of the song the whole piece of furniture had collapsed and there was nothing left of it and the song was over but it was just a - That's what I think of when I hear the song. I see the pile of wood and it excites me. Michael Blair was the percussionist. It wasn't a very expensive chest of drawers - it was just one that we'd found out on the sidewalk." (Source: "KCRW-FM: Morning Becomes Eclectic (interviewed by Chris Douridas)" Date: March 31, 1998) 



(2) Mad hatter

- Someone who sells drugs and other illegal substances. ("I'm going to go pick some stuff up from the madhatter up on Main.") (Source: The Online Slang Dictionary, Walter Rader).

- Mad as a hatter phr. [mid-19C] very mad, utterly insane. [the use in 18C of mercurous nitrate in tanning of felt hats. This was absorbed by the hatters, in whom the effects could produce mental problems]. (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Might also refer to the Alice character. Also mentioned in "Diamonds And Gold": "There's a hole in the ladder, a fence we can climb Mad as a hatter, you're thin as a dime."

- "These days we associate mad as a hatter with a bit of whimsy in Lewis Carroll's famous children's book Alice in Wonderland of 1865. Carroll didn't invent the phrase, though. By the time he wrote the book it was already well known; the first example I can find is from a work by Thomas Chandler Haliburton (Judge Haliburton), of Nova Scotia, who was well-known in the 1830s for his comic writings about the character Sam Slick; in The Clockmaker; or the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slickville of 1836, he wrote: "Father he larfed out like any thing; I thought he would never stop-and sister Sall got right up and walked out of the room, as mad as a hatter". As the author felt no need to explain it, by then it was clearly well known in his part of North America. Whether it was invented there, I don't know, but it seems likely. An early British reference is in Pendennis by William Makepeace Thackeray, serialised between 1848-50: "We were talking about it at mess, yesterday, and chaffing Derby Oaks-until he was as mad as a hatter". Note, by the way, that mad is being used in both these cases in the sense of being angry rather than insane, so these examples better fit the sense of phrases like mad as a wet hen, mad as a hornet, mad as a cut snake, mad as a meat axe, and other wonderful similes, of which the first two are American and the last two from Australia or New Zealand. But Thomas Hughes, in Tom Brown's Schooldays, used it in the same way that Lewis Carroll was later to do: "He's a very good fellow, but as mad as a hatter". Few people who use the phrase today realise that there's a story of human suffering behind it; the term actually derives from an early industrial occupational disease. Felt hats were once very popular in North America and Europe; an example is the top hat. The best sorts were made from beaver fur, but cheaper ones used furs such as rabbit instead. A complicated set of processes was needed to turn the fur into a finished hat. With the cheaper sorts of fur, an early step was to brush a solution of a mercury compound-usually mercurous nitrate-on to the fur to roughen the fibres and make them mat more easily, a process called carroting because it made the fur turn orange. Beaver fur had natural serrated edges that made this unnecessary, one reason why it was preferred, but the cost and scarcity of beaver meant that other furs had to be used. Whatever the source of the fur, the fibres were then shaved off the skin and turned into felt; this was later immersed in a boiling acid solution to thicken and harden it. Finishing processes included steaming the hat to shape and ironing it. In all these steps, hatters working in poorly ventilated workshops would breathe in the mercury compounds and accumulate the metal in their bodies. We now know that mercury is a cumulative poison that causes kidney and brain damage. Physical symptoms include trembling (known at the time as hatter's shakes), loosening of teeth, loss of co-ordination, and slurred speech; mental ones include irritability, loss of memory, depression, anxiety, and other personality changes. This was called mad hatter syndrome. It's been a very long time since mercury was used in making hats, and now all that remains is a relic phrase that links to a nasty period in manufacturing history. But mad hatter syndrome remains common as a description of the symptoms of mercury poisoning." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(3) Nod, the land of

- To go to the land of Nod is to go to bed. There are many similar puns and more in French than in English. Of course, the reference is to Gen. iv. 16, "Cain went ... and dwelt in the land of Nod;" but where the land of Nod is or was nobody knows. In fact, "Nod" means a vagrant or vagabond, and when Cain was driven out he lived "a vagrant life," with no fixed abode, till he built his "city." (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 

- Jonathan Swift turned the phrase into a pun when he wrote that he was "going into the Land of Nod" meaning that he was going to sleep. (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. October, 2000. From "2,107 Curious Word Origins, Sayings and Expressions" by Charles Earle).

- Could be inspired by: "The Land Of Nod." Children's song. Written by: Robert Louis Stevenson. Copyright: unknown: "From breakfast on all through the day At home among my friends I stay; But every night I go abroad Afar into the land of Nod All by myself I have to go, With none to tell me what to do. All alone beside the streams And up the mountainsides of dreams The strangest things are there for me, Both things to eat and things to see, And many frightening sights abroad Till morning in the land of Nod Try as I like to find the way, I never can get back by day, Nor can remember plain and clear The curious music that I hear."



(4) Walked the sewers of Paris

- Might refer to the club that used to be behind the Ivar Theatre in L.A. It was later called "The Gaslight" and it has been remodeled and renamed "The Opium Den" in 1996. 1605 1/2 N. Ivar Hollywood, CA USA

Ross MacLean (2004): "The T. Waits quote, "Andr� is at the piano behind the Ivar in the sewers" (The One That Got Away, 1976) probably refers to a piano player at a gay bar, located down the alley by the stage door, called "The Sewer of Paris." There was a garbage dumpster in the corner between the two doorways, and girls could go from the theater straight to the bar. The bar held 70's glitter queens, lots of ageing closet cases, servicemen (the U.S.O. was half block down the street from the Ivar), runaways fresh from the Greyhound bus station who had come to Hollywood to become famous, thugs fresh out of jail, and drag queens of any race. I had a couple pretty scarey nights there." (Source: email message by Ross MacLean to Tom Waits Library. February, 2004. Copyright 1994 from "The Ivar Memoirs" by Ross MacLean, produced & published playwright. Ross has written a memoir on the Ivar, and is completing a play on the same subject)

Tom Waits in 1981 on the Ivar Theatre: "A burlesque house in Hollywood, right next door to the library. It was originally a legitimate theatre. Lord Buckley and Lenny Bruce played there. Now it's just a strip joint, full of transsexuals. Behind the Ivar is another nightclub called The Gaslight(9). Used to be called the Sewers Of Paris." (Source: "Tom Waits: Waits And Double Measures" Smash Hits magazine by Johnny Black. March 18, 1981)



(5) Making feet for children shoes: To have sex. (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)



(6) In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is King: Attributed to Desiderius Gerhard Erasmus, Dutch scholar, philosopher and writer (1465 - 1536). [Lat., In regione caecorum rex est luscus.] - Adagia (III, IV, 96)



Sins Of The Father

 



God said: don't give me your tin horn(2) prayers

Don't buy roses off the street down there

Took it all and took the dirt road home

Dreaming of Jenny with the light brown hair(3)



Night is falling like a bloody axe

Lies and rumors and the wind at my back

Hand on the wheel and gravel on the road(4)

Will the pawn shop sell me back what I sold



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

I'm gonna take the sins of my mother

I'm gonna take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond



Birds cry warning from a hidden branch

Carving out a future with a gun and an axe

I'm way beyond the gavel(5) and the laws of man

Still living in the palm of the grace of your hand



The world's not easy, the blind man said

Turns on nothing but money and dread

Dog's been scratching at the door all nite

Long neck birds flying out of the moonlight



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

I'm gonna take the sins of my mother

I'm gonna take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond

Down to the pond



Smack dab (6) in the middle of a dirty lie

The star spangled glitter of his one good eye

Everybody knows that the game was rigged(7) 

Justice wears suspenders and a powdered wig



Dark town alley's been hiding you

Long bell tolling is your Waterloo

Oh baby, what can you do

Does the light of god blind you

Or lead the way home for you?



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

Take the sins of my mother

I'm gonna take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond

Down to the pond



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

Take the sins of my mother

And take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond

Down to the pond



God all mighty for righteousness sake

Humiliation of our fallen state

Written in the book of tubold Cain(8)

A long black overcoat will show no stain



Feel the heat and the burn on your back

The rip and the moan the stretch of the rack

All my belongings in a flour sack

Will the place I come from take me back



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

Take the sins of my mother

And take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond

Down to the pond



They'll hang me in the morning on a scaffold(9) yea big

To dance upon nothing to the Tyborn Jig(10)

Treats you like a puppet when you're under his spell

Oh the heart is heaven but the mind is hell



Jesus of Nazareth told Mike of the weeds(11)

I's born at this time for a reason you see

When I'm dead I'll be dead a long time

But the wine's so pleasing and so sublime(12)



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

Take the sins of my mother

I'm gonna take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond

Down to the pond



Kissed my sweetheart by the China ball tree

Everything I done is between god and me

Only he will judge how my time was spent

29 days of sinning and 40 to repent



The horse is steady but the horse is blind

wicked are the branches on the tree of mankind

The roots grow upward and the branches grow down

it's much too late to throw the dice again I've found



I'm gonna take the sins of my father

Take the sins of my mother

Take the sins of my brother

Down to the pond



I'm gonna wash them

I'm gonna wash them

I'm gonna wash the sins of my father

I'm gonna wash the sins of my mother

Wash the sins of my brother

Till the water runs clear

Till the water runs clear

Till the water runs clear



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Sins Of The Father:

- Tom Waits
 (2004): "We started with a rock-steady beat on "Sins of My Father," and Larry Taylor said: "I won't play that reggae s--t. I don't play that (rock-steady style)." He's played with Jerry Lee Lewis, Canned Heat - he's played with everybody - and he said: "I won't do it, man!" (laughing) I said: "Come on, Larry!"" (Source: "Tom Waits Interview". San Diego Union Tribune (USA). October 3, 2004. By George Varga) 

Tom Waits (2004): "Well, "Sins Of My Father" is political. "Hoist That Rag" is. There's a bunch of soldier songs. JV: "Sins Of My Father': Are you talking about George W. Bush? TW: I'm talking about my father, I'm talking about your father, I'm talking about his father. The sins of the father will be visited upon the son. Everybody knows that." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. Magnet magazine (UK). October 5, 2004)



(2) Tin horn: tinhorn adj. [late 19C+] second-rate, inferior, superficially, flashy., [abbr. gambling use tinhorn gambler, a second-rate class gambler. (Source: "Cassel's Dictionary Of Slang. Jonathan Green. Cassel & Co, 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(3) Dreaming of Jenny with the light brown hair: In the late 1970s Waits often used to perform "I Wish I Was In New Orleans" as a medley with the Foster classic "I Dream Of Jeannie With The Light Brown Hair" (Written by Stephen Foster, 1854) "I dream of Jeannie with the light brown hair Borne like a vapor on the summer air I see her tripping where the bright streams play Happy as the daisies that dance on her way. Many were the wild notes her merry voice would pour, Many were the blithe birds that warbled them o'er I dream of Jeannie with the light brown hair Floating like a vapor on the soft, summer air. I sigh for Jeannie, but her light form strayed Far from the fond parts round her native glade; Her smiles have vanished and her sweet songs flown Flitting like the dreams that have cheered us and gone."



(4) Gravel on the road: Notice same phrase being used in Day After Tomorrow (Real Gone, 2004): "I just do what I've been told. We're just the gravel on the road."



(5) Gavel: The mallet of the presiding officer in a legislative body, public assembly, court, masonic body, etc. (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



(6) Smack dab: Smack-dab adv. [late 19C+] (US) exactly, precisely. [echoic] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998)



(7) Everybody knows that the game was rigged:  

- Rigged: To manipulate dishonestly for personal gain: rig a prizefight; rig stock prices. (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company) 

- Could be hinting at accusations against G.W. Bush not actually having had enough votes for being elected president (2000). Or accusations against the US government for spreading false justifications for invading Afghanistan (October, 2001) and Iraq (March, 2003). Note: "God all mighty for righteousness sake, Humiliation of our fallen state."



(8) Written in the book of tubold Cain

- Refering biblical Cain: According to Genesis 4: 1-16. 'The Mahometan tradition of the death of Abel is this: Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. (Source: The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer). 

- Notice other references to Cain and Abel: Dirt In The Ground, 1992 ("Now Cain slew Abel, he killed him with a stone"), Walk Away, 1995 ("Dot King was whittled from the bone of Cain") and Make It Rain, 2004 ("I'm not Able, I'm just Cain")

- Also transcribed as "Tubol Cain, Tubal Cain": Tubal-cain/ Tubalcaine the son of Lamech and Zillah, "an instructor of every artificer in brass and iron" (Gen. 4:22; R.V., "the forger of every cutting instrument of brass and iron").(Source: WebBible Encyclopedia. Eden Communications. Copyright 2000-2003, Eden Communications)



(9) Scaffold: n. 1. A temporary structure of timber, boards, etc., for various purposes, as for supporting workmen and materials in building, for exhibiting a spectacle upon, for holding the spectators at a show, etc. 2. Specifically, a stage or elevated platform for the execution of a criminal; as, to die on the scaffold. (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



(10) To dance upon nothing to the tyborn jig:

Tom Waits (2004): "When someone was being hung, the dance they would do at the end of the rope was called the Tyburn Jig. It was also called "the dance upon nothing"; that kind of explains itself. The reason theaters traditionally have no performances on Monday night is because Monday night was Hanging Night, and nobody could compete with Hanging Night. To this day, theaters are dark on Mondays ." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. Magnet magazine (UK). October 5, 2004) 

- Tyburn was the principal location in London for public executions by hanging. It was an extreme western suburb of London, and executions took place there for many centuries. Tyburn gallows, as depicted by William Hogarth in his print, The Idle 'Prentice executed at Tyburn (1747), was a triangle in plan, having three legs to stand upon. It came first into existence in 1571 at the execution of Dr. John Story. It was fixed in the open space at the end of Edgware Road, formed by the junction of the roads near where the Marble Arch now stands. The location was well known, appearing in many cant phrases and folk songs: "Tyburn Tree" being the scaffold; "To dance the Tyburn Jig" meaning to be hanged, etc. In 1759, the old Triple Tree was removed, and a new movable gallows, set up near the union of Bryanston Street and Edgware Road, superseded it. The last person executed at Tyburn was John Austin on November 3, 1783.



(11) Jesus of Nazareth told Mike of the weeds:

Jonathan Valania (2004): What about some of these characters on the new album? There's the line "Jesus of Nazareth told Mike of the weeds." TW: Well, if there is a Jesus of Nazareth, there had to be a Mike of the weeds and a Bob of the parking lot, Jim of the river, Steve of the backyard. JV: Was Weeds the next town over from Nazareth? TW: No, Mike lived in the weeds. Jesus lived in Nazareth. They corresponded. JV: There was a guy back in Jesus' time named Mike? TW: I don't know if they pronounced it like that. (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. Magnet magazine (UK). October 5, 2004)



(12) Jesus of ... so sublime: On the RaindogsToo Listserv discussionlist (October 6, 2004) Gary Tausch (Tom Waits Miscellania) pointed out that this verse was already used during the Mule Variations tour (as an extra verse to Get Behind The Mule. Hummingbird Centre. Toronto/ Canada. August 23/24, 1999). It could be Sins Of The Father is actually a Mule Variations outtake.



Sleep Tonight

 



You better get some sleep tonight

You better get some sleep tonight

Honey, just warn your friends

You better get some sleep tonight



They say you watch the sun go down

The same old shadows crawl over town

Those thoughts of you, it shivers me

The moon grows cold in memory



Baby, yeah, you better get some sleep tonight

All you gotta do is close your eyes

You better get some sleep tonight



I wish you, baby, all the best

If you turn out like all the rest

This darkness, baby, it's chilling me

The stars stare down in sympathy



Baby, yeah, you better get some sleep tonight

All you gotta do is close your eyes

Baby



You better get some sleep tonight

Oh baby, you better get some sleep tonight

Warn all your friends

You better get 'em out of sight

You better get some sleep tonight



They robbed you of your dignity

They even steal your heart from me

It ain't revenge, you understand

Babe, I just wanna know who dealt this hand

Baby, that's alright

Baby, git it up, git it up



All you gotta do is close your eyes

You better get some sleep tonight

You better

You better get 'em out of sight



Maybe in your dreams...

Better get some sleep tonight

Honey, warn all your friends

Oh, you better...



Words and music by: "Mick Jagger" and Keith Richards, �1986

Published by: (?) � 1986

Official release: "Dirty Work", The Rolling Stones, 1986

Keith Richards: vocals. Tom Waits: backing vocals and piano(?)



Known covers:

N/A



Small Change

 



(Got Rained On With His Own .38)



Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight

And nobody flinched down by the arcade

And the marquees weren't weeping, they went stark raving mad

And the cabbies(2) were the only ones that really had it made

And his cold trousers were twisted, and the sirens high and shrill

And crumpled in his fist was a five-dollar bill

And the naked mannequins with their Cheshire grins(3)

And the raconteurs and roustabouts said, Buddy, come on in, cause...

Cause the dreams ain't broken down here now, they're walking with a limp

Now that Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight

And nobody flinched down by the arcade

And the burglar alarm's been disconnected and the newsmen start to rattle

And the cops are telling jokes about some whorehouse in Seattle

And the fire hydrants plead the Fifth Amendment(5)

And the furniture is bargains galore

But the blood is by the jukebox on an old linoleum floor

And what a hot rain on 42nd Street, and now the umbrellas ain't got a chance

And the newsboy's a lunatic with stains on his pants, cause...

Cause Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight

And no one's gone over to close his eyes

And there's a racing form in his pocket, circled 'Blue Boots' in the third

And the cashier at the clothing store didn't say a word

As the siren tears the night in half, and someone lost his wallet

Well, it's surveillance of assailants, if that's what you wanna call it

And the whores hike up their skirts(6) and fish for drugstore prophylactics(7)

With their mouths cut just like razor blades and their eyes are like

stilettos

And her radiator's steaming and her teeth are in a wreck

Nah, she won't let you kiss her, but what the hell did you expect?

And the Gypsies are tragic and if you want to buy perfume

Well, they'll bark you down like carneys, sell you Christmas cards in June,

but...

But Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight

And his headstone's a gumball machine

No more chewing gum or baseball cards or overcoats or dreams

Someone's hosing down the sidewalk, and he's only in his teens, cause...

Cause Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight

And a fistful of dollars can't change that

And someone copped his watch fob, and someone got his ring

And the newsboy got his pork-pie Stetson hat(8)

And the tuberculosis old men at the Nelson wheeze and cough

And someone will head south until this whole thing cools off, cause...

Cause Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight, yeah

Small Change got rained on with his own thirty-eight



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "Small Change", Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986



Known covers:

Vox Poppin'. Stormy Weather. 1993. Street Gold. "Small Change/ The One That Got Away" (a cappella medley). Re-released on "Looking For An Echo", 1999

Looking For An Echo. Stormy Weather. July 13, 1999. Street Gold. Songs covered: "Small Change/ The One That Got Away" (a cappella medley). Same version as on "Vox Poppin'", 1993



Notes:



(1) Small Change: n. [1970s+] (US) an insignificant, weak person [monetary imagery] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

Tom Waits (1976): "It was the first time I ever covered a homocide, and the incident is a true one. I was in New York City, stayin' at the Chelsea Hotel, and a young cat was shot and killed across the street from the restaurant where I was goin' to eat - just as I walked in the door. It happened two years before I wrote anything about it. I just didn't know how to deal with it, y'know" "I was just trying to deal with the whole murder thing in New York, the whole ambience... It's all just like 'so what?, somebody got shot and killed, I don't care.' By the time you read it in the newspapers, it's gone. I mean, a newspaper doesn't weep, it's not wet, it doesn't bleed, doesn't croak. It's just facts, no ideas, no mess, no funeral, no phone calls in the middle of the night explaining it to somebody, no tears, no nothing. "The night I saw this cat blown away, the cops were sittin' around sayin', 'Hey, Charley, where you goin' on your vacation?' And there's this little cat oozin' life, lyin' in his own blood. I don't know it was just... sssshhhheeewwww," Waits said, shaking his head, unable to find the words to describe it further. (Source: "For Waits City Life Is Small Change" by Bob Claypool. The Houston Post. December 12, 1976)

Barney Hoskyns (2009): "It was during this brief stay in New York [Sep. 16-20 1975] that Waits and [writer David] McGee witnessed a singularly shocking scene one night, just along 23rd Street from the Chelsea. The two men had left the hotel to eat at a nearby pizza parlour, only to find it blocked off with police tape. Inside, with his head at the foot of a gumball machine, was a black teenager, a puddle of blood fanning out from him as he lay dead on the floor. "Some guy had just shot him," Waits recalled. "He was sprawled right there against the wall. I was scared shitless." The two men speculated as to what had happened. "Tom said something like, 'Maybe he got rained on by the pizza man's 38 "' says McGee. Born in the conjecture of that conversation was the spoken word masterpiece "Small Change". (Source: David McGee email interview April 1, 2008 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)

Live intro from State Theatre, Sydney, Australia. May 2, 1979:"This is a story that takes place on 23rd street in New York City On a hot summer night A place called the Chelsea Hotel On this particular night, there was an incident that never made the papers No one squandered over this thing Kojak wasn't there this night Some little guy with bovine perspiration on the upper lip area walked over and said 'Bag 'im and tag 'im' It's about a guy named Small Change On this particular night he got rained on with his own thirty-eight..." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000).

Francis Thumm (1988): "When did you first see yourself as a songwriter?" TW: "Actually, even after I had made records. I didn't feel completely confident in the craft until maybe Small Change. When I first put a story to music. I fell I was learning and getting the confidence to keep doing it. "Tom Traubert's Blues" "Small Change" and "I Wish I Was in New Orleans" gave me some confidence." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)

- In the late 1970s Waits often used to perform Small Change as a medley with "Big Spender" Written by Coleman and Fields. Originally performed by Helen Gallagher, Thelma Oliver and The Girls in the musical "Sweet Charity " in 1965. Originally recorded by Shirley Bassey in 1967. Big Spender: "The minute you walked in the joint. I could see you were a man of distinction. A real big spender. Good looking, so refined. Say wouldn't you like to know what's going on in my mind. So let me get right to the point. I don't pop my cork for every gal I see. Hey big spender. Spend a little time with me."



(2) Cabbie n. A cab-driver; now specif. a taxi driver (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(3) Cheshire grin

- He grins like a Cheshire cat. Cheese was formerly sold in Cheshire moulded like a cat. The allusion is to the grinning cheese-cat, but is applied to persons who show their teeth and gums when they laugh. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also quoted in "Nighthawk Postcards": "Lookin' for some kind of a Cheshire billboard grin."



(5) Plead the fifth/a five

- To refuse to do something; to refuse to state one's opinion, reason, or objection. Derived from taking the Fifth Amendment (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

phr. [1950s+] (US) to avoid committing oneself, to refuse to take an action or make a statement. [the Fifth Amendment (1791) to the US Constitution states that no person 'shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself'] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 



(6) And the whores hike up their skirts: In earlier versions this goes: "But the whores still smear on Revlon and they all look like Jayne Meadows." (American actress and sex symbol. As Meadows got older she became known for using too much make-up, hence the reference). In later versions of Small Change the above line is removed for legal reasons (Revlon) and replaced with "And the whores hike/ kike up their skirts, and fish for drug-store prophylactics". The censored booklet of the Small Change album gives the incorrect and incomplete lyrics. Strangely enough the orginal lyrics are used again on the later album Asylum Years.

Jay S. Jacobs (2000): "Here, in the details, is everything that Waits had learned about telling a story with music. Unfortunately, a couple of those details had to be edited out. Tom was forced to change the lines, "The whores all smear on Revlon / And they look just like Jayne Meadows," when the cosmetic giant threatened legal action. And Meadows - the wife of Steve Allen, who had performed on Waits's favorite Jack Kerouac album - also had a problem with this vivid image. When the LP Small Change was reissued the offending passage was replaced with, "The whores all hike up their skirts / And fish for drug-store prophylactics." On the CD version of the album Waits sings the compromise lines, but the printed lyrics read: "The whores all smear on / And they look just like." Apparently Waits wasn't willing to let Revlon and Meadows off the hook so easily after all." (Source: Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. Jay S. Jacobs, 2000).

Clark Peterson (1978): "You (also) got into trouble for singing your 'Small Change' song when you said, 'And the whores still smear on Revlon and they all look like Jayne Meadows.' When you recorded it, you changed it to, 'But the whores still kike up their skirts and search for drug store prophylactics. Tom Waits "I deleted the Jayne Meadows reference from the album 'cause Steve Allen (her husband) would have been upset. You can use a personality's name in a song but not if it's slanderous. If you say that all the whores like Jayne Meadows, regardless of whether they look like her or not you can't say that ... 'cause the whores'll get pissed off." (Source: "Sleazy Rider - A man who works at being a derelict". RELIX magazine by Clark Peterson. May - June, 1978. Vol. 5 No. 2)





(7) Prophylactic n.: A rubber; a condom. "A thin rubber sheath worn over the penis during sexual intercourse, usually as a contraceptive device, but legally available only 'for prevention of [veneral] disease." :-)(Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(8) Pork-pie hat

- n. [1920s+] a style of men's hat. [resemblance] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

- Etymology: from its shape. Date: 1860: a hat with a low telescoped crown, flat top, and brim turned up all around or up in back and down in front (Source: Merriam-Webster online dictionary. � 2003 by Merriam-Webster, Incorporated) 

- "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat" was a tune written by Charles Mingus. The tune came up instinctively when at a gig Mingus learned that Lester Young (who most often was seen wearing the hat) had died. (Source: "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat" on the album "Mingus"). 

- Stetson, John B. Stetson: A hat made by the John B. Stetson hat company. "My good old John B. Stetson. That was 'the' hat in those days.' L. Armstrong, Satchmo, My life in New Orleans. Any man's hat, regardless of make (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)





Smuggler's Waltz

 



(Also known as: Bronx Lullaby)



Daggers of moonlight

Murder the sheets

in the stink of a four dollar room

And Daddy's gone a-hunting(1)

for a dimebag(2) of schoolboy(3)

Tied up with a yellow balloon(4)



So hush little baby

daddy must go

I'll cover you up with a blanket of snow

By the time I make Jersey

you'll be in heaven

In a pretty blue shoe box(5), I know



So sing a song of ten grand

with a pocket full of dough(6)

And I can't take you to Baltimore

Wake God up in heaven

Have him look down below

There's a little lost angel

blooming in the snow



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?]., � 1982

Official release: TV documentary "Poetry In Motion", 1982

Released on video by Miramax in 1982. Released on video and CDV by Voyager in 1992



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)



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Waits performing "Bronx Lullaby" (Poetry in Motion, 1982). TV documentary directed by Ron Mann.

Released on video by Miramax in 1982, released on LD/ CD-ROM by Voyager Press (the Criterion company) in 1992 (VP1020L)



Notes:



(1) And Daddy's gone a-hunting: Quoting: "Bye Baby Bunting" (Traditional: writer/ author unknown).

- Version 1: "Bye baby bunting. Daddy's gone a'hunting. Mummy's gone a'milking. Sister's gone a'silking. Brother's gone to buy a skin. To wrap the baby bunting in."

- Version 2: "Bye, O baby bunting. Daddy's gone a hunting. To get a little rabbit skin. To wrap his baby bunting in. Bye, O baby bunting. Daddy's gone a hunting. To get a little lambie skin. To wrap his baby bunting in. Bye, O baby bunting. Daddy's gone a hunting. A rosy wisp of cloud to win. To wrap his baby bunting in."



(2) Dime bag: Ten dollars' worth of a drug, as a half-ounce of marijuana. Drug culture and student use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) Schoolboy n.

- Street name for Codeine (phosphate). This alkaloid is found in opium in concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 percent. Most codeine used in the United States is produced from morphine (Source: Drug Free Workplace, Daniel C. Drew, M.D.)

- [1960s-1970s] (drugs) cocaine, codeine, cough syrup, anything seen (by heroin users) as a drug for 'beginners'. [1970s+] (US Black) a neophyte in the street life, an apprentice criminal. (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(4) Balloon n.: 1. A toy rubber balloon used to hold heroin, narcotics (Source: New dictionary of American slang, Chapman) 2a. (drugs) a condom that is used to carry heroin, cocaine or any other powdered narcotic drug 2b. (drugs) a heroin supplier [portions of heroin are often sold in a contraceptive, tied off at the end] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(5) Shoe-box n.: Something resembling or suggestive of a shoe-box, as a plain, rectangular building or a cramped room or dwelling (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(6) Sing a song of ten grand with a pocket full of dough

Dough n.: Money, cash (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- This is a variation on the phrase "Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of rye", quoting from: Sing A Song Of Sixpence. Children's song. Written by: Unknown. Adapted by: Terry Kluytmans: " Sing a song of sixpence, A pocket full of rye; Four and twenty blackbirds Baked in a pie! When the pie was opened, The birds began to sing; Wasn't that a dainty dish To set before the king? The king was in his counting house, Counting all the money; The queen was in the parlor, Eating bread with honey The maid was in the garden, Hanging out the clothes; When down came a blackbird Who snapped off her nose!"

- Notice this phrase being used in Midnight Lullaby, 1971/ 1973: "Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of rye. Hush-a-bye my baby, no need to be crying."





Source: still from "Poetry in Motion" (1982)



So It Goes

 



If I was a seagull, high and aloof

I'd sail to your house and perch on your roof

But I ain't a seagull, you know my name

And the winds blow fortune, the winds blow pain



And so it goes, nobody knows

How to get to the sky, how to get to the sky



If I was a puppy dog in the early dawn

I'd make it to your house and sleep on your lawn

But I ain't a puppy dog, you know my name

And the winds are blowin' fortune, the winds blow pain



And so it goes, nobody knows

How to get to the sky, how to get to the sky

How to get to the sky, how to get to the sky



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

None



Soldier's Things

 



Davenports(2) and kettle drums(3) and swallow-tail coats

Table cloths and patent leather shoes

Bathing suits and bowling balls and clarinets and rings

All this radio really needs is a fuse



A tinker, a tailor(4), a soldier's things

His rifle, his boots full of rocks

Oh, and this one is for bravery

Oh, and this one is for me

And everything's a dollar in this box



Cufflinks(5) and hubcaps and trophies and paperbacks

It's good transportation, but the brakes aren't so hot

Neckties and boxing gloves, this jackknife is rusted

You can pound that dent out on the hood



A tinker, a tailor, a soldier's things

His rifle, his boots full of rocks

Oh, and this one is for bravery

Oh, and this one is for me

And everything's a dollar in this box



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1983

Official release: Swordfishtrombones, Island Records Inc., 1983

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

The Secret of Association. Paul Young. 1985. Sony Music

Things Left Unsaid. Eric Leeds, February 23, 1993. Warner Brothers

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Roll Tide Roll. Jan Johansen. October, 1997. Lionheart Records (Sweden)

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "Soldatens ting")

This 'N' That. Windmill Saxophone Quartet. May, 1998. Global Village

Santa Baby: Live In Toronto. Holly Cole. January 25, 2000. EMI International

Curio. Angela McCluskey & Tryptich. March 11, 2000. The Orchard/ Random Records

Hederos & Hellberg. Martin Hederos and Mattias Hellberg. April 6, 2004. Hidden Agenda

Star Belly. Stephanie Rearick. April 12, 2005. Uvulittle Records

Expressionism. The Slow Club Quartet. September 30, 2008. Rue de la Harpe Records



Notes:



(1) Soldier's Things

Tom Waits (1983): "It's like the things that you have in your pocket. If you are carrying them there long enough, they take on certain atomic human characteristics. Sometimes you go to a garage sale or you go to a pawn shop or anywhere and look through other peoples things. Shoes in particular, that have walked around with somebody else inside them for a long time, seem to have...Seem to be able to almost talk. So, it's just trying to string together different items that... Instruments are always like that. After you come home from...This guy comes home from service and "everything's a dollar in that box", you know." (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)

Tom Waits (1983): "Soldiers Things I imagined like a pawnshop and raining outside, a bunch of sailors, all the instruments hanging up, a guy pawning his watch. I lived in National City, every night the place was loaded with sailors so I at one point considered joining the navy but a friend of mine talked me out of it. I guess what made it most attractive was the $38.00 a month. I wanted to go to Hong Kong" (Source: Unidentified Swordfishtrombones Interview (interviewer's tape). Date: 1983/ 1984)

Tom Waits (1983): "Soldiers? Yeah. I worked in National City in a crummy restaurant for a long time, full of soldiers most every night, tattoo parlor next door, country-and-western diner-dance type of place down the street, Chinese restaurant, Chinese laundry, pool hall all real close, walking distance. So I called up some of my memories of that time. Sit out on the sidewalk, wearing the apron, paper hat, watching the traffic go by, you know?"... "It was a rainy night at the pawn shop, and all these sailors, and I looked around, I saw all these musical instruments, picture frames, and - uh - one of the sailors pawned a watch, and the song was just there, sitting there" (Source: "Tom Waits For No Man". Melody Maker. Brian Case. October 29, 1983)



(2) Davenport: A kind of small writing-desk with drawers each side, named after the maker (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 



(3) Kettledrum: A drum in the shape of a kiddle or fish-basket (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(4) A tinker, a tailor: Reference to the nursery rhyme: "Tinker, tailor." (aka Rich Man Poor Man): "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor, Rich man, Poor man, Beggar man, Thief!"



(5) Cufflinks: A fastening for a shirt cuff, usually consisting of two buttons or buttonlike parts connected with a chain or shank that passes through two slits in the cuff (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)




 




So Long I'll See Ya

 



 



Mama's in the kitchen, Daddy's on the phone

And nobody knows what's goin' on

But I've got them "So long, I'll see you

cause my Buick's outside waiting" blues



Well, one for the money, honey, two for the show

And it's three to get ready, Tom's gotta go

He's got them "So long, I'll see you

cause my Buick's outside waiting" blues



Well bye-bye-bye, baby, bye-bye-bye

Sing bye-bye, skooby-do-bye-bye

Gotta skeet-skat outta here, skeet-skat outta here



And your Mama's in the kitchen, and your Daddy's on the phone

And nobody knows what's goin' on

But I've got them "So long, I'll see you

cause my Buick's outside waiting" blues



Well, Tommy's gotta skeet-skat, he's gotta skeet-skat outta here

Skeet-skat right outta here



And one for the money, two for the show

And three to get ready, I gotta go

Cause I've got them "So long, I'll see you

Cause my Buick's outside waiting" blues

Outside waiting blues

It's outside waiting blues

Said the Buick's outside waiting blues



And skeet-skat outta here, gonna skeet-skat outta here

Skeet-skat outta here, gonna skeet-skat

Got the "So long, I'll see you, Buick's outside waiting" blues

And skeet-skat outta here, gonna skeet-skat outta here

Gonna skeet-skat

Cause I got the "So long, I'll see you, Buick's outside waiting" blues



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

Black & White and Blues All Over. Paul Zunno Band. 2002. Self-released



Somewhere

 



There's a place for us

Somewhere a place for us

Peace and quiet, and open air

Wait for us, somewhere



There's a time for us

Someday a time for us

Time together, a time to spare

Time to learn, and time to care



Someday, somewhere

We'll find a new way of living

We'll find a way of forgiving

Somewhere



There's a place for us

A time and a place for us

Hold my hand and we're halfway there

Hold my hand and I'll take you there



Somehow, someday, somewhere



Words by: Stephen Sondheim. Music by: Leonard Bernstein, � 1957

Originally performed by Reri Grist in the musical 'West Side Story', 1957

Recorded in 1966 by Len Barry

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), 1978 & Chapell Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "Blue Valentine", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1978 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986(1)





 



Known covers:

N.A



Notes:



(1) Somewhere. Bob Alcivar (2007): "Tom said, 'I've always wanted to do that song'. I said, 'How are we getting to do it?' He said: 'Why don't you pretend I'm Frank Sinatra and write what Nelson Riddle would write? ' And it was perfect." (Source: Bob Alcivar interview March 14, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



Spare Parts 1

 



(A Nocturnal Emission)



Well, the dawn cracked hard just like a bullwhip

Cause it wasn't takin' no lip from the night before

And it shook out the streets, as the stew bums(1) showed up

Like bounced checks(2), rubbin' their necks

And the sky turned the color of Pepto-Bismol(3)

Yeah, and the parking lots growled

My old sport coat full of promissory notes

And a receipt from a late night motel

The hawk(4) had his whole family out there in the wind

And he got a message for you to beware

Kickin' your ass in, in a cold-blooded fashion

And dishin' out more than a good man can bear



And I got shoes untied, my shirttail's out

Ain't got a ghost of a chance(5) with this old romance

Just an apartment for rent down the block

Ivar Theater(6) with live burlesque

Man, the manager's scowlin', with his feet on the desk

Boom boom against the curtain, you're still hurtin', ay-ay

And then push came to shove(7), and shove came to biff

Girls like that just lay you out stiff

Maybe I'll go to Cleveland and, you know, get me a tattoo or somethin'

My brother-in-law lives there



And it's a skid mark tattoo on the asphalt blue

Was that a Malibu?

Vroooooom, vroooooom

Yeah, it's Liz Taylor(8) and Montgomery Clift(9)

Coming on to the broads with the same ol' riff, yeah

'Hey baby, why don't you come up to my place?

We'll listen to some smooth music on the stereo' eh-he-he

'No thank you,' she said, eh-he-he, 'you got any Stan Getz(10 records?'

'No man, I got eh... Smothers Brothers'(11)



So I combed back my Detroit(12), jacked up my pegs(13)

I wiped my Stacy Adams(14) and I jackknifed my legs

Yeah, I got designs on a movin' violation

Yeah baby, you put me on hold and I'm out in the wind

And it's gettin' mighty cold

It's colder than a gut-shot bitch wolf dog with nine suckin' pups

pullin' a number 4 trap up a hill in the dead of winter

in the middle of a snowstorm with a mouth full of porcupine quills



Well, I don't need you, baby

You see, it's a well known fact, you know

I'm four sheets to the wind(15), I'm glad you're gone

I'm glad you're gone, cause I'm finally alone

Glad you're gone, but I wish you'd come home

Yeah, and I struggled out of bed



Cause the dawn was crackin' hard just like a bullwhip

And it wasn't takin' no lip from the night before

Yeah, as it shook out the streets and the stew bums showed up

Just like bounced checks, rubbin' their necks

And the sky turned the color of Pepto-Bismol(3)

And my old sport coat full of promissory notes

And the hawk had his whole family out there in the wind

He got a message for you to beware

Kickin' your ass in, in a cold blooded fashion

He'll be dishin' out more than a good man can bear

Well, let's take it to Bakersfield, get a little apartment somewhere



Written by: Tom Waits and Chuck E. Weiss

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Stewbum

- n.: An unemployed, homeless street beggar, or hobo, who has reached this lowly position through alcoholism. Orig. any beggar or hobo, as one who lives on stew; but the association has changed to one who is, or has too often been, stewed (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- Stew bum: n. [1900s-30s] a down-and-out alcoholic, the most deprived of vagrants (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(2) Bounced check n.: A check that is returned for lack of funds = "rubber check" (Source: New dictionary of American slang, Chapman) 



(3) Pepto-Bismol: A bright pink medicine that helps soothe your stomach. Sickly sweet to the taste. Anyone who grew up with it never forgets it... (Submitted by Andy and Jodi, September, 2000)



(4) Hawk: Person with agressive stance in life. In politics: advocate of active warfare.



 (5) Ghost of a chancephr. [mid-19C+] no chance whatsoever (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



 (6) Ivar Theater: Further reading: Ivar Theatre



(7) Push came to shovephr. [1950s+] (orig. US) in the final assesment, when all other alternatives have been exhausted [SE push is seen as less aggressive as shove] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(8) Taylor, Liz: Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor was born in London, England on February 27, 1932. Her parents were art dealers from St. Louis, Missouri. She lived in London for the first seven years of her life before the family left when the dark clouds of war began brewing in 1939. Liz was a close friend of Montgomery Clift until his death in 1966. They met for the first time when Paramount decided that she had to accompany him to the premiere of "The Heiress (1949) " because they were both to star in the upcoming "A Place in the Sun (1951) ". They liked each other right away. Clift used to call her "Bessie Mae". When he had the road accident a few years later that disfigured him, he came from a party at Liz's house. And it was she that found him first, got into the wreck and removed some teeth from his throat that threatened to choke him



(9) Clift, Montgomery: Edward Montgomery Clift born: 17 October 1920 Omaha, Nebraska. Died: 23 July New York. The release of "Red River" (1948) made Clift an overnight sensation and instant star. He embodied a new type of man on screen, the beautiful, sensual and vulnerable man that seemed to appeal to women and men alike. He was also by that time exclusively homosexual, though he maintained a number of close friendships with theatre women (heavily promoted by studio publicists). He was troubled with allergies and, along with pill problems he was alcoholic. After "A Place in the Sun" (1951) came out he was Hollywood's hottest male star and adored by millions. Clift's mental problems prevented him from staying at the top as his drinking and drug problem began to affect his acting and bankability. In 1956 during filming of "Raintree County" (1957) he ran his car into a tree after leaving a party at Elizabeth Taylor's; it was she who saved him from choking by pulling out two teeth lodged in his throat. What followed could be described as the longest suicide in show-business history. The accident left him with the left side of his face almost paralysed and with a small scar on his upper lip. The recurring pain in the rest of his body would remain for the rest of his life, only serving to increase his dependence on alcohol and prescription drugs. He never looked the same again and to a man who had greatly valued his looks, that was a blow. Producers and directors avoided him because of the problems he caused on set. But Elizabeth Taylor remained a loyal friend. It was Elizabeth Taylor who came to the rescue, using her position to win him a role in "Reflections in a Golden Eye" as her husband. On July 23 1966 his companion Lorenzo James found him lying nude on top of his bed, dead from what the autopsy called "occlusive coronary artery disease". Check out: The Montgomery Clift Shrine





(10) Stan Getz: Stanley Gayetzky. Born: Philadelphia, Penns., February 2 1927. American bandleader and jazz saxofonist. Worked with Astrid Gilberto amongst others. Is regarded as representative of Cool Jazz and West Coast Jazz



(11) Smothers Brothers: In the early 60s, Dick and Tom Smothers became famous for hilarious parodies of folksongs and recorded many wide-selling albums. They used this style of comedy for cutting social satire as well. Eventually they were given a CBS TV show in 1967 and it proved popular, introducing the public to a wide range of folk musicians and comedians, but it was seen as too controversial and eventually canceled. In 1975 Tom and Dick made a come-back on NBC (this is when Spare parts was recorded). Mr. Waits appeared on on their TV show in 1982 singing "Old boyfriends ". The brothers are still doing shows. To engage them go to: The Smothers Brothers Homepage



(12) Detroit n.: A type of men's haircut in which the hair on the top of the head is cut short and the hair on the sides long. Detroit cut, crew on top, normal trim on sides. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(13) Peg n. pl.: The legs; trousers. Jive use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(14) Adams, Stacy

- Slang expression: Born from Stacy Adams which is a fancy dress shoe. To buy your own Stacys check out this site.

- Also mentioned in Tom Traubert's Blues, 1976: "No one speaks English, and everything's broken And my Stacys are soaking wet."

Tom Waits (1976): "Stacey Adams once were a very prestigious shoe... if you had them on then nobody messed with you and you could go anywhere. Stacey's stayed ahead of current affairs and were considered extremely hip." (Source: "Tom Waits: Would You Say This Man Was Attempting To Convey An Impression Of Sordid Bohemianism" New Musical Express (UK), by Fred Dellar. Date: June 5, 1976) 



(15) Four sheets to the wind

- Drunk. Synonymous with the phrase "Three Sheets to the Wind" (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- Unsteady from over-drinking, as a ship when its sheets are in the wind. The sail of a ship is fastened at one of the bottom corners by a rope called a "tack;" the other corner is left more or less free as the rope called a "sheet" is disposed; if quite free, the sheet is said to be "in the wind," and the sail flaps and flutters without restraint. If all the three sails were so loosened, the ship would "reel and stagger like a drunken man." "Captain Cuttle looking, candle in hand, at Bunsby more attentively, perceived that he was three sheets in the wind, or, in plain words, drunk."- Dickens; Dombey and Son. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- "It's a sailor's expression, from the days of sailing ships. The terminology of sailing ships is excessively complicated and every time I refer to it people write in to say I've got it wrong, usually contradicting each other. So treat what follows as a broad-brush treatment, open to dispute on fine points. We ignorant landlubbers might think that a sheet is a sail, but in traditional sailing-ship days, a sheet was actually a rope, particularly one attached to the bottom corner of a sail (it actually comes from an Old English term for the corner of a sail). The sheets were vital, since they trimmed the sail to the wind. If they ran loose, the sail would flutter about in the wind and the ship would wallow off its course out of control. Extend this idea to sailors on shore leave, staggering back to the ship after a good night on the town, well tanked up. The irregular and uncertain locomotion of these jolly tars must have reminded onlookers of the way a ship moved in which the sheets were loose. Perhaps one loose sheet might not have been enough to get the image across, so the speakers borrowed the idea of a three-masted sailing ship with three sheets loose, so the saying became three sheets in the wind. Our first written example comes from that recorder of low life, Pierce Egan, in his Real life in London of 1821. But it must surely be much older. The version you give, incidentally, is comparatively recent, since the older one (the only one given in the big Oxford English Dictionary) is three sheets in the wind. However, online searches show that your version is now about ten times as common as the one containing in, so it may be that some day soon it will be the only one around. The version with to seems to be gaining ground because so many people think a sheet is a sail" (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004. All rights reserved)

- Also mentioned in Tom Traubert's Blues (sub title), 1976: "Four sheets to the wind in Copenhagen"



Spare Parts 2

 



I wanna thank you all very much for comin' this evening. It really made my

night. It would have been real strange here if nobody would have showed up.

I'd like to introduce my group this evening and... it's been a real pressure

and... A pressure and a pliviledge to work with these gentlemen.

I'd like to introduce...

Please give a warm round of applause for Michael Melvoin(1) on piano!

On saxophone, Pete Christlieb!(2)

On bass, Jim Hughart!(3)

And on drums, Bill Goodwin!(4)

Yeah... They all come from good families, but... over the years they just

kinda individually developed some ways about them that just aren't right,

you know.

I was real pleased... I noticed everybody coming in this evening, you're all

decked out in full regalia and everything and... appreciate you gettin'

dressed up for an affair such as this. You know, I think it's something that

I've always tried to be as concerned about as possible and... Somebody said

to me one day, 'Christ, Waits! You look so goddam raggedy, why don't you get

yourself something to wear, you know?'

I said, 'Yeah well, not a bad idea'. Maybe a serious seersucker(5) Saturday

evening cranberry accoutrement ensemble would be nice. So I went down to

Seider & Seider and I said, 'I want something sharp!' I said, 'I'm kinda in the

market, in the neighborhood of something like... maybe some green gabardines

with boneroo britches. And a leviticously duteronomous sort of catastrophic

lunch-box Stetson, you know. I'd like to get some Danger High Voltage

slacks, with high top, mid noon, brushed suede penny loafers, so I can be

passing out wolf tickets(6) regardless of where I go.' Walk into the 20 Grand

Club... And the Soul & Inspirations are playin'. Yeah, and you're cuttin' a

rug and pullin' on a coat and emotin'. Band is kickin' into some long

version of 'Harlem Nocturne' or somethin'. You get designs on a girl in the

corner. You say, 'Say baby... live around here?'

Yeah... I think I'm gonna plant(7) you now and I'm gonna dig you later. Make

like a bakery truck and haul buns. Make like a(8) hockey player and get the

puck out of here. I gotta go see a man about a dog(9), I'll see you later.

Thank you very much for comin' this evening!



Written by: Tom Waits and Chuck E. Weiss

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren as sent to: Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Michael Melvoin

- Born: Oshkosh/Wisc. May 10 1937. Orchestral arrangement and direction on: The heart of Saturday night. Piano on: Nighthawks at the diner. He is based in Los Angeles and has worked extensively in the studios. Has not yet gained the fame that he deserves for his impressive technique and strong jazz improvising talents. He began playing piano when he was three but graduated from Dartmouth in 1959 with a degree in English. However, Melvoin soon chose to become a professional musician. He moved to Los Angeles in 1961 and worked with many top West Coast players and performers including Frank Rosolino, Leroy Vinnegar, Gerald Wilson, Paul Horn, Terry Gibbs, Joe Williams, Peggy Lee, Gabor Szabo and off course Jim Hughart. Played for Phil Spector's "Wrecking Crew ". Although busy in the studios, he recorded for Concord in the mid-'70s. Has worked occasionally in L.A. area clubs and often teams up with singer Bill Henderson. He led two albums for Liberty in 1966 and one for Discwasher in 1979 

Michael Melvoin on studio recordings with Waits in 1974: "I knew that I was dealing with an extraordinary, different kind of talent. There were a couple of things about it. First of all, the lyrics ... I would describe them as top-rank American poetry. I thought then, and I still believe, that I was dealing with a world-class poet. My degree from school was in English literature, so I felt that I was in the presence of one of the great Beat poets. Tom's work was "a counterpoint to that experience. I was amazed by the richness of it. The musical settings that he was using reminded me of certain roots jazz experiences that I thought were very, very appropriate for that." (Source: "Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits". Jay S. Jacobs, ECW Press 2000. Telephone conversation. June 25, 1999)  



(2) Pete Christlieb: Born: Los Angeles, CA, 16-02-1945. American jazz-clarinetist, flutist and saxophonist. He also played on the 1976 "Mainstreet" album



(3) Jim Hughart: James David Hughart. Born: Minneapolis, MI, July 28 1936. American jazz bass player. Played together with Waits from 1975 till 1980. Also played with Ella Fitzgerald amongst others



(4) Bill Goodwin: William Richard Goodwin. Born: Los Angeles, Ca., January 8 1942. American percussionist. Played on the "Mainstreet" album of 1976. In 1995 he played on the Bellingham Festival of Music



 (5) Seersucker: n. A light thin fabric, generally cotton or rayon, with a crinkled surface and a usually striped pattern (Source: "The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language", Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)



(6) Wolf tickets

- Tom Waits
 (1988): "Another one I like is wolf tickets, which means bad news, as in someone who is bad news or generally insubordinate. In a sentence, you'd say, "Don't fuck with me, I'm passing out wolf tickets." Think it's either Baltimore Negro or turn-of-the-century railroad use." (Source: Tom Waits 20 questions. Playboy magazine: Steve Oney. -- March 1988) 

Sell a woof/ wolf ticket, to: phr. [1960s+] (US Black) 2a. To boast, to brag. 2b. to talk nonsense, to lie [trash talk] 2c. to threaten, to intimidate (buy a woof ticket) (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

"As early as 1985, Clarence Page of The Chicago Tribune defined selling woof tickets as "an invitation to fight." In 1996, Jane Kennedy of The San Francisco Examiner called it "telling lies." In The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, Betty Parham and Gerrie Ferris wrote in 1992, "Although its origin is uncertain, 'woof ticket' is a somewhat dated phrase that refers to an outrageous or exaggerated boast meant to intimidate or impress the listener." Woof is a Black English pronunciation of "wolf." According to Geneva Smitherman's 1994 "Black Talk," a woof ticket is "a verbal threat, which one sells to somebody; may or may not be real. Often used as a strategy to make another person back down and surrender to what that person perceives as a superior power." Tom McIntyre, professor of special education at Hunter College in New York, noted nearly a decade ago: "Woofing is especially effective against those who are unfamiliar with it and don't realize that it is most often 'all show and no go.' . . . The menacing behavior can usually be defused and eliminated by informed, tactful action." He advised teachers to "look secure and self-assured while you withdraw." In the context of the basketball star Howard's remarks, woof tickets are not to be bought; on the contrary, he uses the phrase to show that performance, and not intimidating attitude, is needed to "get it together." (Source: "On Language by William Safire, Crying Woof!". Copyright 2000 The New York Times Company. Submitted by Monika Kottenhahn, eGroups Tom Waits discussionlist. October, 2000)

- Also mentioned in Trouble's Braids, 1983: "Passin' out wolf tickets, downwind from the bloodhounds."



(7) Plant, to: v. [early 19C] to abandon, to leave (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



 (8) Make like a...: v. [1950s+] (US) as part of a number of phrs. all of which mean 'go away', 'get lost', e.g. make like a fart and blow away, ... dragster and lay rubber, ... drum and beat it, ... banana and splitt, ... cow pat and hit the trail, ... paper doll and cut out, ... tree and leave, ... rubber and roll on. (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



 (9) See a man about a dog, have to

- The traditional and jocular excuse to leave a person, group, or room. Thus = excuse me, I have to leave, c1920 usu. used to excuse oneself to go out and buy bootleg liquor. c1940 usu. used as an excuse to go to the bathroom(Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 

- phr. [mid-19C+] a euph. used to disguise one's need or desire to visit the lavatory.

- [mid-19C+] an excuse to absent oneself from home in order to visit one's mistress or to go out for a drink (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

- "This has been a useful (and usefully vague) excuse for absenting oneself from company for about 150 years, though the real reason for slipping away has not always been the same. Like a lot of such colloquial sayings, it is very badly recorded. However, an example turned up in 1940 in a book called America's Lost Plays, which proved that it was already in use in the US in 1866, in a work by a prolific Irish-born playwright of the period named Dion Boucicault, The Flying Scud or a Four-legged Fortune. This play, about an eccentric and superannuated old jockey, may have been, as a snooty reviewer of the period remarked, "a drama which in motive and story has nothing to commend it", but it does include our first known appearance of the phrase: "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog". I don't have access to the text of the play itself, so can't say why the speaker had to absent himself. From other references at the time there were three possibilities: 1) he needed to visit the loo (read WC, toilet, or bathroom if you prefer); 2) he was in urgent need of a restorative drink, presumed alcoholic; or 3) he had a similarly urgent need to visit his mistress. Of these reasons-which, you may feel, encompass a significant part of what it meant to be male in nineteenth-century America - the second became the most common sense during the Prohibition period. Now that society's conventions have shifted to the point where none of these reasons need cause much remark, the utility of the phrase is greatly diminished and it is most often used in a facetious sense, if at all." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004. All rights reserved)



Spidey's Wild Ride

 



 



The smoke from the battle fish and the rain soaked through

and the wheelman left the shore

and barns tumbled and silos flew across fifteen miles bad road tar

And big Bull Trometer hung on to the side

and the pig dogs trembled on Spidey's wild ride



And big John Jizom from downtown Chizom

flew away with old mrs. Storm(2)

And they found Bird Lundy neath a keg of nails crooked as a dog's hind leg

Keeping warm after twenty-nine days on hard assed bread

he drilled to the big outside and clung like a tick to his waterfront

life mooned and clouded, blued and skied

And all the clocks blew up on Spidey's wild ride



And the hills stood up in a great big 3

and left me whipped by the forces that were inside me(3)

Loud as the ocean, cold as a desk, red as the water on the river of flesh

And he was sewing up his pants while he was shoeing a mule

And he was bucking a head wind gale

But the crooked ass beauty was trapped to the side

and he shook on Spidey's wild ride



And all the statue ass makers, and the uprooted trees

And I shouted way up to where the rabbit digs his hole

and the wheelman, the jockeys the landlords and thee

were bucking a head wind south

and with nine lives spent, he landed on his rent

composed with a steele head salmon in his mouth(4)

and I never did see another day outside

cause I'd had enough travel on Spidey's wild ride



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Spidey's Wild Ride:

Tom Waits (2006): "I had fun doing that song - just some singing and some beatboxing. It's very rudimentary yet, at the same time, very complete. "What's interesting to me about hiphop is that it doesn't have any conventional wisdom -- the form is still being defined. You can put some hot sauce in the milkshake because it's still largely a lawless territory. If you want, you could record a mariachi calypso foxtrot with a Samoan singer in a bull ring... "The production can also be very cheap -- all you need is three fingers, a drum machine and a sampler and you can record a hit song in your closet. I've done some recording in the closet myself and the washroom, in the garage and in the car too, whatever." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Greg Kot (2006): "You've got that human beat-box thing going on "Spidey's Wild Ride." Has hip-hop had an influence on how you sing?" Tom Waits: "Yeah. Hip-hop is still kind of the Old West. It's a reasonably unsettled territory and truly the cutting edge of blues. They're still trying to put hot sauce in a milkshake. No one is going to pull you over and give you a ticket for it because it's still defining itself." (Source: "Tom Waits Still In The Driver's Seat", The Chicago Tribune (USA). November 21, 2006. By Greg Kot)



(2) Mrs. Storm

- Also mentioned in Kentucky Avenue (Blue Valentine, 1978): "Mrs. Storm will stab you with a steak knife, if you step on her lawn."

Tom Waits (1999): "When I was a kid, I had a friend whose dad was a truck driver. His name was Gale Storm. We had moved to National City, and his dad was coming through town, and he picked me up and he took me back up to L.A., to Whittier, to stay for a weekend. And I rode in the truck all the way up there. I was just like, "I'm gonna -- I don't know what I'm gonna do, but I'm changed." (Source: "Gone North, Tom Waits, upcountry" L.A. Weekly. Robert Lloyd. April 23-29, 1999)

Tom Waits (1976): "And there was a woman called Mrs. Storm. She lived with her sister. She used to sit in her kitchen with her window open and a twelve-gauge shotgun [sticking] out of it ... so we took the long way around." (Live at the Apollo Theatre, London, UK. March 23, 1976)



(3) Whipped by the forces that were inside me:

- Also mentioned in Come On Up To The House (Mule Variations, 1999): "And you been whipped by the forces that are inside you Gotta come on up to the house."

- Austin Chronicle (2002): Where are you, in an office or a small room fielding calls? Tom Waits: I'm out on my own recognizance in the day room, gluing pieces of macaroni on cardboard and painting it gold. After that I get to make a belt that says, "Whipped by the forces within me" on the back." (Source: "This Business Called Show", Austin Chronicle (USA) Vol. 21, No. 26. May 10-16, 2002 by Margaret Moser)



(4) Composed with a steele head salmon in his mouth:





Source: Orphans booklet, 2006. Date: unknown. Credits: unknown



Standing On The Corner

 



 



Well, I'm standin' on the corner, watchin' all the girls go by

I'm always standin' on the corner, underneath the springtime sky

Well, you can't go to jail for what you're thinkin'

Or for the "wooo" look in your eye

You been standin' on the corner, watchin' all the girls

Watchin' all the girls, watchin' all the girls, they go by



And it's Saturday and I'm so broke

And I couldn't buy a girl a nickel Coke

I'm goin', so what, I'm feelin' just like a millionaire

Now just take me down to Main Street

And I'll survey the harem waitin' for me there



I'm gonna be standin' on the corner, watchin' all the girls go by

Oh baby, what you do now?

Standin' on the corner, givin' all the girls the eye

Well this ain't much of an occupation

Give it a whirl, give it a try

And you'll be standin' on the corner, watchin' all the girls

Watchin' all the girls, watchin' all the girls, they go by



You know that I'm the cat that's got the cream

And I ain't got me a girl, but I can dream

I ain't got me a girl, but I can wish

Now just take me down to Main Street

And I'll select my own imaginary dish



I'm standin' on the corner, watchin' all the girls go by

I'm gonna be standin' on the corner, underneath the springtime sky

You know you can't get arrested for what you're thinkin'

Or for the "wooo" look in your eye

You been standin' on the corner, watchin' all the girls

Watchin' all the girls, watchin' all the girls, they go by



I'm gonna watch 'em go by

Oh, hubba hubba(1), man

Go by, yeah

I'm gonna watch 'em go by



Written by: Frank Loesser

Published by: [?] � 1956

Official release: Originally performed by Shorty Long, Alan Gilbert, John Henson, and Roy Lazarus,

in the musical 'The Most Happy Fella' in 1956 (2)

Recorded by the King Brothers in 1960 and by the Four Lads, also in 1960

Tom Waits version: Agora Ballroom, Cleveland/ Ohio. August 25, 1976



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Standing On The Corner.

Agora Ballroom, Cleveland/ USA. August 25, 1976.



Notes:



(1) Hubba-hubba

- excl. [1940s+] (US teen) term of approval, esp. when directed at a passing girl [hubba! hubba!, a college cheer] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Also mentioned in intro to Emotional Weather Report, 1975: "See, I... I used to know a girl... Yeah, and it was a hubba-hubba and ding ding ding, I said baby you got everything."



(2) Standing On The Corner (Original version: lyrics and music: Frank Loesser. From "The Most Happy Fella"): "Standing on the corner, watching all the girls go by Standing on the corner, watching all the girls go by Brother you don't know a nicer occupation Matter of fact, neither do I Than standing on the corner, watching all the girls Watching all the girls, watching all the girls go by I'm the cat that go the cream Haven't got a girl but I can dream Haven't got a girl but I can wish So take me down on Mainstreet And that's where I select my imaginary dish Standing on the corner, watching all the girls go by Standing on the corner, giving all the girls the eye Brother if you've got a rich imagination Give it a whirl, give it a try Try standing on the corner, watching all the girls Watching all the girls, watching all the girls go by Saturday and I'm so broke Couldn't buy a girl a nickel coke Still I'm living like a millionaire When I take me down on Mainstreet And I revue the harem parading for me there Standing on the corner, watching all the girls go by Standing on the corner, underneath the springtime sky Brother you can't go to jail for what you're thinking Or for the "oooh" look in your eye You're only standing on the corner, watching all the girls Watching all the girls, watching all the girls go by."



Starving In The Belly (Of A Whale)

 



(Woyzeck theatre version, 2000)(1)



Your life is whittled

Time's a riddle; man's a fiddle

That it plays on

When the day breaks

And the earth quakes; your life's a mistake

All day long



Who gives a good god damn

You'll never get out alive

There's no meaning; don't go dreaming

A man must test his mettle

In a crooked old world



Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story





 



Starving In The Belly (Of A Whale)



(Blood Money studio version, 2002)



Life is whittled

Life's a riddle;

Man's a fiddle

That life plays on

When the day breaks

And the earth quakes;

Life's a mistake

All day long



You tell me:

Who gives a good goddamn

You'll never get out alive

Don't go dreaming; don't go scheming

A man must test his mettle

In a crooked old world



Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale

Oh, you're starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale



Don't take my word

Just look skyward

They that dance must pay the fiddler(2)

Sky is darkening

Dogs are barking

But the caravan moves on



You tell me:

Who gives a good goddamn

You'll never get out alive

Don't go dreaming; don't go scheming

A man must test his mettle

In a crooked old world



Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale

Oh, we're starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale



As the crow flies

It's there the truth lies 

At the bottom of the well 

E-o-leven goes to heaven 

Bless the dead here as the rain falls 

Don't trust a bull's horn 

A Doberman's tooth

A runaway horse or me 

Don't be greedy, don't be needy 

If you live in hope you're 

Dancing to a terrible tune



Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale

You're starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly

Starving in the Belly of a Whale



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits Blood Money" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)



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Listen to audio excerpt of Starving In The Belly as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Ole Thestrup (as Captain).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Starving In The Belly (Early theatre version): Sung by The Captain in act 2, scene 2



(2) They that dance must pay the fiddler: American saying attributed to Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)



Step Right Up

 



Step right up, step right up, step right up

Everyone's a winner, bargains galore

That's right, you too can be the proud owner

Of the quality goes in before the name goes on

One-tenth of a dollar, one-tenth of a dollar, we got service after sales

You need perfume? we got perfume, how 'bout an engagement ring?

Something for the little lady, something for the little lady

Something for the little lady, hmm

Three for a dollar

We got a year-end clearance, we got a white sale

And a smoke-damaged furniture, you can drive it away today

Act now, act now, and receive as our gift, our gift to you

They come in all colors, one size fits all

No muss, no fuss, no spills, you're tired of kitchen drudgery

Everything must go, going out of business, going out of business

Going out of business sale

Fifty percent off original retail price, skip the middle man

Don't settle for less

How do we do it? how do we do it? volume, volume, turn up the volume

Now you've heard it advertised, don't hesitate

Don't be caught with your drawers down

Don't be caught with your drawers down

You can step right up, step right up

That's right, it filets, it chops, it dices, slices

Never stops, lasts a lifetime, mows your lawn

And it mows your lawn and it picks up the kids from school

It gets rid of unwanted facial hair

it gets rid of embarrassing age spots

It delivers a pizza, and it lengthens, and it strengthens

And it finds that slipper that's been at large under the chaise lounge(2) for several weeks

And it plays a mean Rhythm Master

It makes excuses for unwanted lipstick on your collar

And it's only a dollar, step right up, it's only a dollar, step right up

'Cause it forges your signature

If not completely satisfied, mail back unused portion of product

For complete refund of price of purchase

Step right up

Please allow thirty days for delivery, don't be fooled by cheap imitations

You can live in it, live in it, laugh in it, love in it

Swim in it, sleep in it

Live in it, swim in it, laugh in it, love in it

Removes embarrassing stains from contour sheets, that's right

And it entertains visiting relatives, it turns a sandwich into a banquet

Tired of being the life of the party?

Change your shorts, change your life, change your life

Change into a nine-year-old Hindu boy, get rid of your wife

And it walks your dog, and it doubles on sax

Doubles on sax, you can jump back Jack, see you later alligator

See you later alligator

And it steals your car

It gets rid of your gambling debts, it quits smoking

It's a friend, and it's a companion

And it's the only product you will ever need

Follow these easy assembly instructions it never needs ironing

Well it takes weights off hips, bust, thighs, chin, midriff

Gives you dandruff, and it finds you a job, it is a job

And it strips the phone company free take ten for five exchange

And it gives you denture breath

And you know it's a friend, and it's a companion

And it gets rid of your traveler's checks

It's new, it's improved, it's old-fashioned

Well it takes care of business, never needs winding

Never needs winding, never needs winding

Gets rid of blackheads, the heartbreak of Psoriasis(3)

Christ, you don't know the meaning of heartbreak, buddy

C'mon, c'mon, c'mon, c'mon

'Cause it's effective, it's defective, it creates household odors

It disinfects, it sanitizes for your protection

It gives you an erection, it wins the election

Why put up with painful corns any longer?

It's a redeemable coupon, no obligation, no salesman will visit your home

We got a jackpot, jackpot, jackpot, prizes, prizes, prizes, all work guaranteed

How do we do it, how do we do it, how do we do it, how do we do it

We need your business, we're going out of business

We'll give you the business(4)

Get on the business end of our going-out-of-business sale

Receive our free brochure, free brochure

Read the easy-to-follow assembly instructions, batteries not included

Send before midnight tomorrow, terms available

Step right up, step right up, step right up

You got it buddy: the large print giveth, and the small print taketh away

Step right up, you can step right up, you can step right up

C'mon step right up

(Get away from me kid, you bother me...)

Step right up, step right up, step right up, c'mon, c'mon, c'mon, c'mon, c'mon

Step right up, you can step right up, c'mon and step right up

C'mon and step right up



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976(5)



Known covers:

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by The Violent Femmes



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Step Right Up". With: Frank Vicari (tenor saxophone), Fitz Jenkins (upright bass), Chip White (drums). Taken from Rockpalast, WDR television concert documentary. WDR Studio's/ Studio-L. Cologne/ Germany (aired April 18, 1977).



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1977): "I'm learning about stuff, too. Through the songs I'm writing now I'm changing my attitude towards things. I'm becoming a little more shrewd, a little more ..." DG: Cynical? TW: "Yeah. I don't take things at face value like I used to. So I dispelled some things in these songs that I had substantiated before. I'm trying to show something to myself, plus get some things off my chest. 'Step Right Up' - all that jargon we hear in the music business is just like what you hear in the restaurant or casket business." (Source: "Smelling like a brewery, lookin' like a tramp". Rolling Stone: David McGee. 1977)

- Song might be inspired or referring to "Little Egypt" (The Coasters, 1961). Intro and theme certainly seem similar: "Step right up folks, and see Little Egypt do her famous dance of the pyramids, she walks, she talks, she crawls on her belly like a reptile; just one dime, one tenth of a dollar. Step right up folks! - I went and bought myself a ticket and I sat down in the very first row, wo wo. They pulled the curtain but then when they turned the spotlight way down low, wo wo, little Egypt came out strotting, wearing nothing but a button and a bow, wo wo, singing, "Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah''. She had a ruby on her tummy and a diamond big as Texas on her toe, wo wo. She let her hair down and she did the hoochie koochie real slow, wo wo, When she did her special number on a zebra skin, I thought she'd stop the show, wo wo, singing, "Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah!". She did a triple somersault and when she hit the ground, she winked at the audience and then she turned around. She had a picture of a cowboy tattooed on her spine, saying Phoenix, Arizona, nineteen forty-nine. Yeah, but let me tell you people, little Egypt doesn't dance there anymore, wo wo. She's too busy mopping and a taking care of shopping at the store, wo wo. 'Cause we got seven kids and all day long they crawl around the floor, wo wo, singing, "Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah! Yeah yeah!" (Thanks to Floris Cooman, 2005 for submitting lyrics)



(2) Chaise lounge: "Many visitors to the US are surprised to find that the name for the article of furniture is not only still known (in Britain, for example, it is now virtually obsolete outside historical contexts), but is indeed often called a chaise lounge (though by no means all Americans describe it thus). This spelling and pronunciation appears in dictionaries of American English and is now so established that no amount of remonstration, condemnation or ridicule will affect its status one jot. The original form, chaise longue, is French, meaning "long chair". Though the chaise lounge form is a classic example of folk etymology's changing an odd foreign word into something more meaningful, in one way it's hard to criticise-it is, after all, a seat that one lounges on. And it's an old error-I've found examples in American literature back into the 1850s. In the issue of Scribners Monthly for April 1876 appears this sentence, which suggests the confusion had even by then become common enough to need noting: "This particular 'chaise longue', or lounge, is said to be the one on which George Fox slept". (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004) 



(3) Heartbreak of Psoriasis: quoted from a very popular US 1970's Tegrin shampoo commercial



(4) Business, give (someone) the: Rough treatment; murder; a beating; a bawling out; planned rudeness (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(5) Linernotes to "Step Right Up": "For the lyrics to "Step Right Up" send by prepaid mail a photo of yourself, two dead creeping charlies, and a self addressed stamped envelope to: the Tropicana Motor Hotel, Hollywood, California c/o Young Tom Waits"

Creeping Charlie: Tom Waits (1980): "Ah yeah, well it's like a houseplant that you have to murder primar to sending it. And eh, what you do is eh you commit like first degree murder on your houseplant and you put it in an envelope and eh I would like send the lyrics to that particular selection. And eh I received a lot of enthusiasm over there. The offer has been discontinued so eh.." (Source: Interview for: "Radio-Radio" on W-PIX102 FM. New York. February 17, 1980)





Story (Spoken Word)

Story



(spoken word: Glitter And Doom tour, 2008)



"(crowd yells) Okay, I love you too babe! Uhhh... oh, oh! I knew if I'd stop talking YOU would start! (laughter). That's why I... that's why I'm compelled to continue here. Uh, okay... I went on eBay. I went on eBay, I shouldn't have gone on eBay, I was warned about eBay. I didn't even know what the fuck eBay was! Uh, but I was warned about it. They said: "Stay away from eBay!" And uh..: "Especially when you have money in your pocket". And uhm I had both.



I was on eBay and I had money in my pocket and I made a big mistake. Well, I don't think it was a mistake, I was TOLD I made a big mistake. You see how easy I am? I made a purchase. Okay, so what!? I made a purchase and it was my money and I spent it. Okay? Uh, now you be the judge... I bought (I swear) the last dying breath of Henry Ford (laughter).



Wait a minute! It was trapped in a Coke bottle with a corck in it. REALLY tight in there. And uh, I probably paid more then I should have for it, but when you think about it... it's a first edition you know? I mean, there's only one of them. And uh... okay let's get to something else... Uh, what's the first thing we're gonna do here? Oh, oh.. I guess... (attempts "Lucky Day", but can't get the right note) No, I'll stick with a different one (laughter). Oh, hell they ALL start like that! (laughter)."



Written by: Tom Waits

Official release: Glitter And Doom, Anti Inc. 2009



Known covers:

N/A



Straight To The Top



Strange Weather

Strange Weather



(Acoustic demo version, 1987)



Will you take me across the channel

London Bridge is falling down(2)

Strange, a woman tries to save

More than a man will try to drown



And it's the rain that they predicted

And the forecast every time

The rose has died because you picked it

I believe that brandy's mine



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same

It's the same



And the world is getting flatter

And the sky is falling all around

And nothing is the matter

For I'll never cry in town



And a love like ours, my dear

Is best measured when it's down

And I never buy umbrellas

For there's always one around



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same



And you know that it's beginning

And you know that it's the end

Once again we are strangers

As the fog goes rolling in



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

No official release: demo version broadcast on KCRW-FM, Santa Monica, August 24, 1987

The song was written for Marianne Faithfull: 'Strange Weather', 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)





 



Strange Weather



(Marianne Faithfull version, 1987)



Will you take me across the Channel,

London Bridge is falling down.

Strange a woman tries to save

What a man will try to drown.



And he's the rain that they predicted,

It's the forecast every time.

The rose has died because you picked it

An' I believe that brandy's mine.



And all over the world Strangers

Talk only about the weather.

All over the world

It's the same

It's the same

It's the same.



The word is getting flatter,

The sky is falling all around.

And nothing is the matter

For I never cry in town.



And a love like ours, my dear,

Is best measured when it's down.

And I never buy umbrellas,

For there's always one around.



And all over the world Strangers

Talk only about the weather.

All over the world

It's the same

It's the same

It's the same.



And you know that it's beginning,

And you know that it's the end

When once again we are strangers

And the fog comes rolling in.



And all over the world Strangers

Talk only about the weather.

All over the world

It's the same

It's the same

It's the same.



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Brennan

Official release (Marianne Faithfull): Strange Weather. Marianne Faithfull, 1987 PGD/ Polygram 842593 (CD).

Island Records 7 90613-1 (LP). Island 422 842 593-2 (CD)

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1987-1988-1998

Official release (Tom Waits): "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

(Recorded at The Wiltern Theatre, Los Angeles. November 9, 1987)

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)





 



Strange Weather



(Big Time live version, 1988)



Will you take me across the channel

London Bridge is falling down(2)

Strange, a woman tries to save

More than a man will try to drown



And it's the rain that they predicted

It's the forecast every time

The rose has died because you picked it

I believe that brandy's mine



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same



And the world is getting flatter

And the sky is falling all around

Oh, and nothing is the matter

For I'll never cry in town



And a love like ours, my dear

Is best measured when it's down

And I never buy umbrellas

Cause there's always one around



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same



And you know that it's beginning

And you know that it's the end

Once again we are strangers

As the fog goes rolling in



And all over the world

Strangers talk only about the weather

All over the world it's the same

It's the same

It's the same



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1987-1988-1998

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

(Recorded at The Wiltern Theatre, Los Angeles. November 9, 1987)

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Strange Weather. Marianne Faithfull, 1987. PGD/ Polygram 842593 (CD). Island Records 7 90613-1 (LP). Island 422 842 593-2 (CD, 1990)

Blazing Away. Marianne Faithfull. January 3, 1995. Island (Universal)

Marianne Faithfull, The Island Anthology. Marianne Faithfull. October, 1998. Island (Universal)

Silent House. Vera Coomans & Philip Hoessen. November 1998. Pink Records (The Netherlands)

Faithfull Covers. Andi Sexgang. April 4, 2000. Dressed to Kill

Devil May Care. Kate Hammett-Vaughan. April, 2002. Maximum Jazz MAX-1201

Voice & Bass. Georgette Dee. November 17, 2003. Dmd Music (DA Music Germany)

Spider And The Fly. Onalea. April 29, 2005. Dandi Productions (Canada)

Crow's Nest/ Nid De Pie. Claire Jenkins Avec Band. September 10, 2007. Self-released (Canada)

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Strange Weather" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre. Los Angeles/ USA. November 9, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum. 

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1987): "We did this at home, I haven't really listened to it all that much. Kathleen and I wrote this together so this is the first version of it and then we gave it to Marianne and she recorded it on an album that she did with Hal Willner - who may be listening." (Source: KCRW-FM interview. August 24, 1987)



(2) London Bridge is falling down: Quoting from "London Bridge" (Traditional, unknown copyright)

- Version 1: "London Bridge is falling down, Falling down, falling down. London Bridge is falling down, My fair lady! Build it up with iron bars, Iron bars, iron bars. Build it up with iron bars, My fair lady! Iron bars will bend and break, Bend and break, bend and break. Iron bars will bend and break, My fair lady! Build it up with needles and pins, Needles and pins, needles and pins. Build it up with needles and pins, My fair lady! Pins and needles rust and bend, Rust and bend, rust and bend. Pins and needles rust and bend, My fair lady! Build it up with penny loaves, Penny loaves, penny loaves. Build it up with penny loaves, My fair lady! Penny loaves will tumble down, Tumble down, tumble down. Penny loaves will tumble down, My fair lady! Build it up with silver and gold, Silver and gold, silver and gold. Build it up with silver and gold, My fair lady! Gold and silver I've not got, I've not got, I've not got. Gold and silver I've not got, My fair lady! Here's a prisoner I have got, I have got, I have got. Here's a prisoner I have got, My fair lady! What's the prisoner done to you, Done to you, done to you? What's the prisoner done to you, My fair lady! Stole my watch and broke my chain, Broke my chain, broke my chain. Stole my watch and broke my chain, My fair lady! What'll you take to set him free, Set him free, set him free? What'll you take to set him free, My fair lady! One hundred pounds will set him free, Set him free, set him free. One hundred pounds will set him free, My fair lady! One hundred pounds we have not got, Have not got, have not got. One hundred pounds we have not got, My fair lady! Then off to prison he must go, He must go, he must go. Then off to prison he must go, My fair lady!"

- Version 2 (Source: Zelo Nursery Rhymes ( (c) 1996-2000 C. Thomas Wright III): "London Bridge is falling down, Falling down, Falling down London Bridge is falling down, My fair lady Take a key and lock her up, Lock her up, Lock her up Take a key and lock her up, My fair lady How will we build it up, Build it up, Build it up? How will we build it up, My fair lady? Build it up with silver and gold, Silver and gold, Silver and gold Build it up with silver and gold, My fair lady Gold and silver I have none, I have none, I have none Gold and silver I have none, My fair lady Build it up with needles and pins, Needles and pins, Needles and pins Build it up with needles and pins, My fair lady Pins and needles bend and break, Bend and break, Bend and break Pins and needles bend and break, My fair lady Build it up with wood and clay, Wood and clay, Wood and clay Build it up with wood and clay, My fair lady Wood and clay will wash away, Wash away, Wash away Wood and clay will wash away, My fair lady Build it up with stone so strong, Stone so strong, Stone so strong Build it up with stone so strong, My fair lady Stone so strong will last so long, Last so long, Last so long Stone so strong will last so long, My fair lady."



Stray Dog Help Yourself

 



 



That old stray hound dog by the meat market now

Lickin' his chops(1) for some greasy chow

Top sirloin, pork chops, New York cut

Salisbury ground 'round, hangin' 'round downtown



Dropped out of school, naturally cool

Liftin' his leg on a fireplug

With greasy gravy drippings and the gristle on his mug(2)

Stray dog, help yourself



Now he's scratchin' his ass, he be swattin' them flies

Gettin' involved with his dinnertime, and that's no lie

I said, stray dog, be cool boy, go on pull your caper

Usin' yesterday's paper for a table cloth



That old stray hound dog by the meat market now

Lickin' his chops for some greasy chow

And if they catch him on a trash can bin

Stray dog, help yourself



Catch him on a trash can bin

Stray dog, help yourself

Stray dog, help yourself



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc., 1976

Unofficial release: Tales From The Underground Volume 3

From: Small Change sessions. July 15, 1976



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Stray Dog Help Yourself.

Small Change sessions. July 15, 1976.



Notes:



(1) Lick (one's) chops: To wait with anticipation. Common use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(2) Mug n.: The face. The mouth; the chin; the jaw. Prize fight use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Such A Scream

 



 



Well Pale Face(2) said

to the Eyeball Kid(3)

She just goes clank and boom and steam

A halo, wings, horns and a tail

Shoveling coal inside my dreams

There are no laws

She's made of cream

She's such a scream



Qui bon tres bien(4), nails in cement

A Donnie gal from mortal clay

The plow is red

The well is full

inside the dollhouse of her skull

A cheetah coat fills up with steam

She's such a scream



All crooked lines

Her fireplace

A milktrain so clean

Machine gun haste

You'll ride the only wall of shame

And drag that chain across the state

Her lips are red

She is the queen

She's such a scream



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Such A Scream:

(1992): "There are some horrific sounds on the record [Bone Machine]. I seem to hear choking demons on "Such a Scream." TW: "Oh, yeah --- that little field recording going through there. I wanted more of that stuff on it, and Kathleen and I had to play cards for it. I liked that stuff. Sounds like it was made in hell." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992) 

Tom Waits (1992): "It just came real fast. The plow is red, the well is fill inside the doll house of her skull --- there's more of that bone. It's a love song. It's Kathleen. It's like when you see people write the names on the rocks when you're drivin' across country. It's the same thing." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)



(2) Paleface, pale-face:

- n : 1. A white person. Negro use

A white homosexual (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). 

- Waits might be mis-quoting from Eddie Campbell's stories about the god of wine, Bacchus (1986). The tales tell the histories of Bacchus also known as Deadface in stead of Paleface



(3) Eyeball kid: full story here. Also featured in: Hang Me In The Bottle (Alice, 1992) and as the 1999 track from Mule Variations



(4) Que bon tres bien: French for "how good, very good"



Sweet And Shiny Eyes

 



Your sweet and shiny eyes are like the stars above Laredo

Like meat and potatoes to me

In my sweet dreams we are in a bar, and it's my birthday

Drinking salted Margaritas with Fernando



Young and wild, we drove five hundred miles of Texas highway

To the Mexican border as the day was coming on

We crossed the Rio Grande river and we swore we'd have things our way

When we happened to walk into Nuevo Leon



Your sweet and shiny eyes are like the stars above Laredo

Like meat and potatoes to me

In my sweet dreams we are in a bar, and it's my birthday

And we're having our picture taken with Fernando



In my sweet dreams we are in a bar, and it's my birthday

And we're having our picture taken with Fernando



Words and music by: Nan O'Byrne

Published by: Dry Clam Music - BMI, � 1975

Official release: "Home Plate", Bonnie Raitt, 1975

Tom Waits: backing vocals



Known covers:

N/A



Swordfishtrombone

 



Well, he came home from the war with a party in his head

And a modified Brougham DeVille(2)

And a pair of legs that opened up like butterfly wings

And a mad dog that wouldn't sit still

He went and took up with a Salvation Army band girl

Who played 'Dirty Water'(3) from a swordfishtrombone

He went to sleep at the bottom of Tenkiller Lake(4)

He said, 'Gee, but it's great to be home'



Well, he came home from the war with a party in his head

And an idea for a fireworks display

And he knew that he'd be ready with a stainless steel machete

And a half a pint of Ballantines each day

And he holed up(5) in room above a hardware store

Cryin' nothin' there but Hollywood tears

And he put a spell on some poor little Crutchfield girl

And he stayed like that for twenty-seven years



He packed up all his expectations, he lit out for California

With a flyswatter banjo on his knee

With Lucky Tiger(6) in his angel hair, and Benzedrine for getting there

They found him in a eucalyptus tree

Lieutenant got him a canary bird, and skanked her head with every word

And Chesterfielded moonbeams in a song

He got twenty years for lovin' her from some Oklahoma governor

Said everything this doughboy(7) does is wrong



Now some say he's doin' the obituary mambo

Now some say that he's hangin' on the wall

Perhaps this yarn is the only thing that holds this man together

Some say that he was never here at all



Some say they saw him down in Birmingham(8)

Sleepin' in a boxcar goin' by

And if you think that you can tell a bigger tale

I swear to god you'd have to tell a lie



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music admin. by Ackee Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1983

Official release: Swordfishtrombones, Island Records Inc., 1983



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Sv�rdfisktrombon")

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "Sverdfisktrompet")

Spectors. The Spectors. June 6, 2000. The Orchard/ Rio Dinero

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)

Ain't Your Train. The Tremors Bluesband. 2003. Self-released (live)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

Embarcadero Love. Clara Bellino. 2005. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Swordfishtrombone(s): There's some confusion over the spelling of the songtitle (with or without the S). The 1983 Ariola/ Eurodisc pressing has the song title spelled as "Swordfishtrombones". Other pressings seem to have it spelled as 'Swordfishtrombone".

Tom Waits (1983): "That's the title song. It has kind of a Cuban night club feel to it. It's a story to try and give an overview of a character. We tried it with a lot of different ways. It was arranged differently with electric guitar and drums. We had trombone on it and trumpet and ended up..we.. I had to discard most of what we had done and completely rearrange it just to get it as simple as possible. So that it just kind of rolled and allowed me to tell the story over it without any interruptions. Tenkiller Lake, that's in Tulsa, Oklahoma. So, 'He came home from the war with a party in his head and an idea for fireworks display.' " (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)



(2) Brougham DeVille: Classic Cadillac model. 

- Brougham: Cadillac first used the name in 1916 to designate an enclosed 5-pass. sedan body style. In the thirties, the name was given to a formal body style with open chauffeur compartment and enclosed rear quarters, metal roof and often "razor-edged" styling; the name was revived in 1954/55 for the prototype of the future, exclusive, Eldorado 4-door sedans of 1957 through 1960; later still it was used on Fleetwood-bodied top-of-the-line sedans starting in 1965. 

- DeVille: Refers to a town car that is "cut" by a division between the passenger and driver compartments. Cadillac began using the term - erroneously - in 1949 to designate a luxuriously appointed, two-door, pillarless 5-6 seater with no division between driver and passengers. After 1965 it came to designate the mid-range Cadillac models, between the "Calais" models, at the lower end of the price range, and the "Fleetwood" models at the top end. The name is still applied to a single model in the current [1997] diminutive range of Cadillac models. Alternative spellings have been witnessed: "Coupe (or Sedan) de Ville" and "deVille" [run together] (Source: The (new) Cadillac Database�, Glossary of Cadillac Terms and Definitions. � 1996, Yann Saunders and the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, Inc.)



(3) Dirty Water: Might refer to the blues classic "Dirty Water" by The Standells (1966). "Dirty Water" is a 12-bar blues song composed by Ed Cobb and first recorded by the California rock and roll band The Standells. The song is a paean to the city of Boston and its then-famously polluted Boston Harbor and Charles River: "I'm gonna tell you a story I'm gonna tell you about my town I'm gonna tell you a big bad story, baby Aww, it's all about my town Yeah, down by the river Down by the banks of the river Charles (aw, that's what's happenin' baby) That's where you'll find me Along with lovers, fuggers, and thieves (aw, but they're cool people) Well I love that dirty water Oh, Boston, you're my home (oh, you're the Number One place) Frustrated women (I mean they're frustrated) Have to be in by twelve o'clock (oh, that's a shame) But I'm wishin' and a-hopin, oh That just once those doors weren't locked (I like to save time for my baby to walk around) Well I love that dirty water Oh, Boston, you're my home (oh, yeah) Because I love that dirty water Oh, oh, Boston, you're my home (oh, yeah) Well, I love that dirty water (I love it, baby) I love that dirty water (I love Baw-stun) I love that dirty water (Have you heard about the Strangler?) I love that dirty water (I'm the man, I'm the man) I love that dirty water (Owww!) I love that dirty water (Come on, come on)"



(4) Tenkiller Lake: Lake Tenkiller is located in the Cookson Hills area of eastern Oklahoma. Further reading: Virtual TenkillerLake Tenkiller Area Visitors Guide : "In 1947, the U.S. Corps of Engineers began construction of the Tenkiller Dam to create Tenkiller Lake. Several of the structures from the town were moved to higher ground. Among these were the old store and several small cabins which were relocated to their present location on Hwy. 82, next to the Post Office in Cookson. If you are passing through Cookson, you may want to stop and with the owners of what is now called the Cookson Coutry Store and Cabins. The store is still a popular gathering place and a great source of information. Several structures from the old town could not be moved, were left behind at the bottom of the lake, and are popular underwater destinations for scuba divers." (Source: Lake Tenkiller Area Visitors Guide, 2003)





(5) Hole up v.: To hide out, as from the police; to hide or keep another person hidden. To secure temporary living quarters or a place to sleep, as a hotel room (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(6) Lucky Tiger

Lucky Tiger is a brand name for a line of haircare products including Butch Wax.

- Also mentioned in "Barbershop": "Bay rum, Lucky Tiger, butch wax, crackerjacks Shoe shine, jaw breaker, magazine racks."



(7) Doughboy n.: U.S. army infantry soldier. Very common during WW-1. Orig. commonly supposed to be that infantrymen pound the mud of roads into dough (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(8) Birmingham: Also mentioned in Gun Street Girl, 1985: "And now he's dancing in the Birmingham jail."



---------- T--------



Tabletop Joe

 



(Alice demo version, 1992)(1)



Tabletop Joe, Tabletop Joe

Everyone knows Tabletop Joe



Well, his mama didn't want him on the day he was born

Born without a body, he got nothing but scorn(4)

But he always loved music, all he had was his hands

And he dreamed he'd be famous, and he'd work at The Sands



Tabletop Joe, Tabletop Joe

Everyone knows Tabletop Joe



He had trouble with the pedals, but he had a strong left hand

And he could play Stravinsky on a baby grand



Tabletop Joe, Tabletop Joe

Everyone knows Tabletop Joe



He said, 'I'm gonna join the circus cause that's where I belong'

And he went to Coney Island,(3) singing this song

And they gave him top billing in the Dreamland show(3)

He had his own orchestra, starring Tabletop Joe

And the man without a body proved everyone wrong

He was rich and he was famous, and he was where he belonged



Singing Tabletop Joe (Tabletop Joe)

Tabletop Joe (Tabletop Joe)

Now everyone knows (Everyone knows)

Tabletop Joe (Tabletop Joe)

Now everyone knows (Everyone knows)

Tabletop Joe (Singing Tabletop Joe)

Tabletop Joe (Tabletop Joe)

Tabletop Joe (Tabletop Joe)

Tabletop Joe (Tabletop Joe) (2)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Tabletop Joe



(Alice studio version, 2002)(1)



I knew one day...

One. One, two. One, two, three...



Well, my mama didn't want me

on the day I was born

I was born without a body(4)

I got nothing but scorn

But I always loved music

all I had was my hands

I dreamed I'd be famous

and I'd work at The Sands



Singing: Tabletop Joe, Tabletop Joe

Now everyone will know

That I'm Tabletop Joe



I had trouble with the pedals

but I had a strong left hand

I could play Stravinsky

on a baby grand

I said, 'I'm gonna join the circus

cause that's where I belong'

So I went to Coney Island(3)

I was singing this song



Tabletop Joe, Tabletop Joe

Now everyone knows

Yeah I'm Tabletop Joe



They gave me top billing

in the Dreamland show(3)

I had my own orchestra

starring Tabletop Joe

And the man without a body

proved everyone wrong

I was rich and I was famous

I was where I belonged



Tabletop Joe, Tabletop Joe

Now everyone knows

Tabletop Joe



Sing it old boy!(2)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

Neptune Quartet. Neptune Quartet. 2003.: Self-released (with guest vocalist Wes Ivankovich)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

"Tabletop Joe" as performed in the theatre play

Alice rehearsals at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December 17, 1992

Taken from "Visions D'Alice" (1993), French/ German TV documentary by Thierry Thomas for La SEPT/ ARTE



Notes:



(1) Table Top Joe: Sung by the Caterpillar in scene 2.

Stage directions from the play: (scene 2: Advice From A Caterpillar): Alice sees an open door in the mushroom; she wants to go through it, but it closes. A voice calls to her, and she discovers a caterpillar seated upon the mushroom, smoking a pipe.CATERPILLAR: Say, boy! Where do you come from? ALICE: But I'm a girl... at least I thought I was - CATERPILLAR: Thinking has nothing to do with it. Either you are or you aren't. ALICE: I'm little. That's all I know. I want to grow. CATERPILLAR: Up, you mean? ALICE: What other way is there? CATERPILLAR: Oh, lots. You could grow down, like roots, You could grow long, like me. You could grow out, like a big fat pig. Grow in, like a toenail. Grow out of your clothes, grow into your shoes... You could grow boring, even. ALICE: But being so little is boring! Very boring! CATERPILLAR: On the contrary! Little is great! Listen! (Sings:)



(2) Stage directions from the play: "The Caterpillar grows larger and larger and larger. Alice knocks frantically at the door in the mushroom, as the Caterpillar's body engulfs the stage."



(3) Coney Island/ Dreamland:

Coney Island: American amusement park/ vacation destination in Brooklyn/ New York. Further reading: Coney Island 1Coney Island 2; Coney Island 3; Coney Island 4;Coney Island 5. Also mentioned in: Take it with me, 1999: "Old long since gone, now way back when we lived in Coney Island.", Table Top Joe, 1992/ 2002: "So I went to Coney Island, I was singing this song."

Tom Waits (2002): "I think it's impossible to avoid a romantic experience in Coney Island... I went to a shooting gallery there in February - it was the only place open in the whole park. It was one of those shooting galleries where the rifle shoots a beam of light instead of an actual bullet, and all the creatures in the gallery have these light-sensitive bullseye patches on their chests, so if you hit them their head comes off, a bell goes off or you hear a loud song. And I had a camera - I was taking a photo of my buddies - and I hit the flash on my camera and every animal in the cavalry went mad. And this Puerto Rican guy ran out shaking his fist at me and chasing me away, saying I was going to ruin his business. It's an extraordinary place." (Source: "Lying in Waits". The Age (Australia) by Patrick Donovan. May 10, 2002)

Dreamland: One of the Coney Island parks that operated from 1904-1911. It was destroyed by a fire. Further reading: Dreamland by Adam SandyDreamland pictures; Also mentioned in: Coney Island Baby ("Every night she comes To take me out to dreamland"), Flower's Grave ("Someday the silver moon and I Will go to Dreamland I will close my eyes And wake up there in Dreamland"), Everything You Can Think Of Is True ("We're fighting our way up Dreamland's spine With red flamingos and expensive wine").



(4) Born without a body: This is inspired by Johnny Eck (also mentioned in Lucky Day Overture, 1993: "You'll See: Johnny Eck, the man born without a body. He walks on his hands, he has his own orchestra and is an excellent pianist".)

- Johnny Eck was born John Echkardt (twenty minutes after his twin brother Robert) August 27, 1911, Baltimore, Maryland. The boys entered the sideshow circuit at the age of 12, where John was billed as "Johnny Eck, The Half-boy." Johnny went on to play a role in Tod Browning's "Freaks" before returning with his brother to Baltimore, where he became a screen painter. The only time Johnny and Rob were ever apart from each other was the time Johnny spent in Hollywood filming "Freaks". He climbed the stairs to the top of the Washington Monument, on his hands in 1938. In the late 1930's he was displayed in several Ripley's Believe It Or Not Odditoriums, where he was billed as "The Most Remarkable Man Alive!". Height 1' 6". Johnny died January 5, 1991, at the age of 79, in the house where he was born. Personal quote: "I met hundreds and thousands of people, and none finer than the midgets and the Siamese twins and the caterpillar man and the bearded woman and the human seal with the little flippers for hands. I never asked them any embarrassing questions and they never asked me, and God, it was a great adventure."

- Tom Waits (1999): "... The Ringling Brothers at one point were exhibiting Einstein's eyes, Napoleon's penis and Galileo's finger bones, all on the same bill. Different tents. 'Course I missed that. You ever hear of Johnny Eck? He was a Ringling act. The Man Born Without a Body. Johnny Eck had his own orchestra and was an excellent pianist and he'd stand on his hands and wear a tuxedo." (Source: "Gone North, Tom Waits, upcountry " L.A. Weekly: Robert Lloyd. April 23-29 1999)

Tom Waits (2002): "The Eck brothers they were twins. One was eh normal size anatomy and the other, Johnny, was eh. his body stopped at his waist. He was called "The Man Born Without A Body". But he played the piano and eh you know he had his own orchestra. He was a big hit in Coney island. Anyway, they had an act together on stage were he would. he would saw his brother in half. And eh, of course at the end of the procedure Johnny would come out of the box and walk of stage on his hands you know? To the thrill and astonishment of the viewers. Anyway it's just like eh kind of a tip of the hat. So I nicknamed him Table Top Joe cause he used to be on a, you know, on kind of a pedestal cause he had no legs. Kind of a tribute to Johnny Eck, or anybody really who is in show business or has the dream to go into show business, always discover something about them that makes them unique. You have a big nose or no hair or a funny way of talking or standing. (Source: "Interview with Tom Waits" Triple J's 2002 (Australia) radio show hosted by Richard Kingsmill. Copyright: C 2002 ABC online. Date: Telephone interview. Aired: May 12, 2002)

Tom Waits (2002): "Table Top Joe is a nickname that I gave a real life character. His name is Johnny Eck. He had a twin brother who was of normal height and size, they used to have a magic act on stage. His brother would saw Johnny in half. Johnny walked on his hands, he was about two feet tall, but he was an excellent pianist and he had his own orchestra. He was a sideshow attraction." (Source: "Make Mine A Double", Black + White magazine (USA). Issue 61. June/ July 2002. By Clare Barker)





'T Ain't No Sin

 



When you hear sweet syncopation, and the music softly moans

't ain't no sin to take off your skin, and dance around in your bones



When it gets too hot for comfort, and you can't get an ice cream cone

't ain't no sin to take off your skin, and dance around in your bones



Just like those bamboo babies, down in the South Sea tropic zone

't ain't no sin to take off your skin, and dance around in your bones



When you hear sweet syncopation, and the music softly moans

't ain't no sin to take off your skin, and dance around in your bones



When it gets too hot for comfort, and you can't get an ice cream cone

't ain't no sin to take off your skin, and dance around in your bones



Just like those bamboo babies, down in the South Sea tropic zone

't ain't no sin to take off your skin, and dance around in your bones



Words by Edgar Leslie

Music by Walter Donaldson

Published by: Edgar Leslie, Lawrence Wright Music Co. Ltd/ EMI Music Publishing Ltd., � 1992(1)

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Original Burroughs tape played in scene 9. 

- Tom Waits (2000): ... That's an old song from the Twenties. "T'ain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones." That was his reference point for the whole play. He was looking rather skeletal himself and singing that tune was a Halloween moment. So we just integrated it, wove that into the score. (Source: "Another Night at the Opera for Waits". Andrew Dansby. November 4, 2000. � 2001, RollingStone.com)

- Copyright: There's some confusion over the copyright. The American version of the CD has this copyright: "�1992 Edgar Leslie and Walter Donaldson", but the European version only says "�1992 Edgar Leslie". This could mean that they later realized they'd changed the tune around so much that Donaldson's music is no longer there. It really doesn't sound like an old show tune. (That 1992 copyright is renewed, by the way. They both did most of their work in the 20's and 30's.) Walter Donaldson is best known for 'Makin' Whopee!', 'My Baby Just Cares for Me', and 'Yes Sir, That's My Baby'. Lyricist Edgar Leslie's biggest moment seems to be 'Moon Over Miami', a No. 1 hit in 1935 for Eddy Duchin and his Orchestra. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)

Original lyrics: "(verse): Dancing may do this and that, and help you take off lots of fat. But I'm no friend of dancing when it's hot. So if you are a dancing fool, who loves to dance but can't keep cool, Bear in mind the idea that I've got. (chorus): When it gets too hot for comfort, and you can't get ice cream cones, Tain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones. When the lazy syncopation of the music softly moans, Tain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones. The polar bears aren't green up in Greenland, they've got the right idea. They think it's great to refrigerate while we all cremate down here. Just be like those Bamboo Babies, in the South Sea tropic zones, Tain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones.(verse): Dancing may do this and that, and help you take off excess fat. But I'm no friend of dancing when it's hot. No I'm not. So if you are a dancing fool, who loves to dance but can't keep cool, Bear in mind this idea that I've got. (chorus): When you're calling up your sweetie in those hot house telephones, Tain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones. When you're on a crowded dance floor, near those red hot saxophones, Tain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones. Just take a look at the girls while they're dancing. Notice the way that they're dressed. They wear silken clothes without any hose and nobody knows the rest. If a gal wears X-ray dresses, and shows everything she owns, Tain't no sin to take off your skin. Tain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones."



Take Care Of All Of My Children

 



 



Oh, take care of all my children

Don't let 'em wander and roam

Oh, take care of all of my children

For I don't know when I'm comin' back home



You can put all of my possessions here in Jesus' name

nail a sign on the door

Bright and early Sunday morning with my walking cane

I'm going up to see my lord



Oh, keep them together at the sundown

Safe from the devil's hand

You gotta make them a pillow on the hard ground

I'll be goin' up to Beaula Land(1)



You can put all of my possessions here in Jesus' name

and nail a sign on the door

Bright and early Sunday morning with my walking cane

I'm going up to see my lord



Oh, remember you never trust the devil

Stay clear of Lucifer's hand

Oh, and don't let 'em wander in the meadow

Or you'll wind up in the fryin' pan



You can put all of my possessions here in Jesus' name

and nail a sign on the door

Bright and early Sunday morning with my walking cane

I'm going up to see my lord



Put all of my possessions here in Jesus' name

and nail a sign on the door

Bright and early Sunday morning with my walking cane

I'm going up to see my lord



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1984

Official release: the film Streetwise, 1984 (no soundtrack album available)

Re-released on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Beula(h) (land)

Bible (Isa. lxii. 4). The land of Israel in the Old Testament

- The land of peace described in John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)

- In Pilgrim's Progress it is that land of heavenly joy where the pilgrims tarry till they are summoned to enter the celestial City; the Paradise before the resurrection. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also mentioned in "Telephone Call From Istanbul" (Follow me to Beulah's on Dry Creek Road), "Take It With Me" (We fell asleep on Beaula's porch)

Ralph Carney (2004): "Tom was doing a couple songs for a documentary called 'Streetwise' and he wanted to have a kind of Salvation Army sounding band," Carney says. "I had a street band at the time and we just hit it off, I guess. Sometimes he would ask me to play two horns at once, and he liked me to play the bass clarinet a lot. But he doesn't like flutes," Carney says, laughing. "It's hard not to become attached to working with him, but he seems to like to change players a lot, so I guess I was lucky to have worked with him more than most." (Source: "Carney's Little Carnival" by Joe Jarrell. San Francisco Chronicle. May 30, 2004)



Take It With Me

 



 



The phone's off the hook, no one knows where we are

It's a long time since I drank champagne(2)

The ocean is blue, as blue as your eyes

I'm gonna take it with me when I go



Old long since gone, now way back when

We lived in Coney Island(3)

There ain't no good thing ever dies

I'm gonna take it with me when I go



Far, far away a train whistle blows

Wherever you're goin', wherever you've been

Waving good bye at the end of the day

You're up and you're over, and you're far away



Always for you, and forever yours

It felt just like the old days

We fell asleep on Beaula's porch(4)

I'm gonna take it with me when I go



All broken down by the side of the road

I was never more alive or alone

I've worn the faces off all the cards

I'm gonna take it with me when I go



The children are playing at the end of the day

Strangers are singing on our lawn

It's got to be more than flesh and bone

All that you've loved is all you own



In a land there's a town, and in that town there's a house

And in that house there's a woman

And in that woman there's a heart I love

I'm gonna take it with me when I go



I'm gonna take it with me when I go



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Mule Variations, Anti Inc., 1999

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Mule Variations" (Amsco Publications, 2000)



Known covers:

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

For the Stars. Anne Sofie Von Otter, Elvis Costello. April 10, 2001. Uni/ Deutsche Grammophon

Wait For Me. Jubilant Sykes. June 26, 2001 Label: Sony Classical

Left Coast Life. Kitty Margolis. October 16, 2001. Mad Kat

Big As A Berry. Megan Mullally. September 17, 2002. Varese Records

The Spirit Store. Roesy. 2003. Blue Cloak Records

Now. Birgitte Damberg Trio. December, 2003. Self-released (Norway)

Silver. Solveig Slettahjell/ Slow Motion Quintet. March, 2004. Curling Legs (Norway)

Clear. Steve Butler. April 29, 2004. Sticky Music

Unarmed And Dazed. Efrat Alony. September 29, 2006. Enja Records (Germany)

Svevest�v EP. Svevest�v. October 16, 2006. Square Records (Norway)

Take It With Me. Ilmiliekki Quartet. November 29, 2006. Tum Records (Finland)

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Slow Down. Liane Carroll. September 24, 2007. Splashpoint Records

From A Wooden House. Eddie Nünning & Lara Schallenberg. December, 2007. Acoustic Music Records

Moss. Moss. April 8, 2008. Sunnyside Records

Notes From The Edge. Notes Fron The Edge. June 15, 2008. CitySound Music 

Standing On Chairs. Allen Savedoff. December 20, 2009. Big Round Records

Peaceful Wordl. Steve Gellman. May 15, 2010. Hidden Poet Music

Silhoutte. Georgia Mancio. May 18, 2010. Self-released

Come On Up. Dieter Weslowski. March 1, 2010. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Take It With Me

Tom Waits (1999): "... the old cliche, you can't take it with you, isn't true. Listening to this, I realized that you take a lot of stuff with you... We wanted to take the old expression `you can't take it with you' and turn it on its ear. We figure there's lots of things to take with you when you go. We checked into a hotel room and moved a piano in there and wrote it. We both like Elmer Bernstein a lot. My favorite line is Kathleen's. She said `all that you've loved is all that you own.' It's like an old Tin-Pan Alley song." (Source: A Q&A about Mule Variations. MSO: Rip Rense, early 1999)

Karen Schoemer (1999): I tell Waits there's a piano ballad on his new album, "Take It With Me," that makes me cry, mostly because of the last verse. In a land there's a town And in that town there's a house And in that house there's a woman And in that woman there's a heart I love I'm gonna take it with me when I go. He droops his head bashfully. "That's a very vulnerable song," he says. "We wrote that together, Kathleen and I, and that felt good. Two people who are in love writing a song about being in love." Then he puts two triangles of toast in front of his eyes, because I'm crying just thinking about it, and maybe behind the toast he's tearing up, too. (Source: "More Dylan than Dylan". Newsweek: Karen Schoemer. May 10 1999) 



(2) It's a long time since I drank champagne: attributed to Russian author Anton Chekhov 1860-1904 (last words)



(3) Coney Island: American amusement park/ vacation destination in Brooklyn/ New York. Further reading: Coney Island 1Coney Island 2; Coney Island 3; Coney Island 4; Also mentioned in: Table Top Joe, 1992/ 2002: "So I went to Coney Island, I was singing this song.", Coney Island Baby, 2000/ 2002: "She's my Coney Island Baby, She's my Coney Island Girl."

Tom Waits (2002): "I think it's impossible to avoid a romantic experience in Coney Island... I went to a shooting gallery there in February - it was the only place open in the whole park. It was one of those shooting galleries where the rifle shoots a beam of light instead of an actual bullet, and all the creatures in the gallery have these light-sensitive bullseye patches on their chests, so if you hit them their head comes off, a bell goes off or you hear a loud song. And I had a camera - I was taking a photo of my buddies - and I hit the flash on my camera and every animal in the cavalry went mad. And this Puerto Rican guy ran out shaking his fist at me and chasing me away, saying I was going to ruin his business. It's an extraordinary place." (Source: "Lying in Waits". The Age (Australia) by Patrick Donovan. May 10, 2002)



(4) Beula(h) (land)

- Bible (Isa. lxii. 4). The land of Israel in the Old Testament

- The land of peace described in John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)

- In Pilgrim's Progress it is that land of heavenly joy where the pilgrims tarry till they are summoned to enter the celestial City; the Paradise before the resurrection. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also mentioned in "Telephone Call From Istanbul" (Follow me to Beulah's on Dry Creek Road), "Take Care Of All Of My Children" (I'll be goin' up to Beulah land)



Take Me Home

 



Take me home, you silly boy

Put your arms around me

Take me home, you silly boy

All the world's not round without you



I'm so sorry that I broke your heart

Please don't leave my side

Take me home, you silly boy

Cause I'm still in love with you



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Alternate version (demo) released on the 2004 DVD re-issue of One From The Heart

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Point of Departure. Mary Ellen Bernard. March, 1995. Original Cast Record/ Triple Z

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Undercovers. Maria & Laginh Joao. March, 2003. Emarcy Rec (Universal)

Reprieve. The Blake Wilner Quartet. January, 2004. Ant Records

Collage. Luba Mason. October 5, 2004. P.S. Classics

Take Me Home. Kaz Simmons. March 28, 2005. 33 Jazz Records

Oud En Wijs Genoeg. Dorine Bijl. March 7, 2008. Bridgadoon

Take Me Home. Laura Hull. May 8, 2009. Hullarious Records

Saal 3. Fraucontrabass. August 21, 2009. Klangraum (Pool Music & Media)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Take Me Home" in the studio with Greg Cohen on upright bass 

Taken from "One From The Heart: Reportage" (1982) 

French TV documentary for TF1. Directed by Jean-Claude Arie. Date: Los Angeles. January 5, 1982



Notes:



(1) Take Me Home:

- Jay S. Jacobs (2002): "The last session Waits and Gayle had together was, in Howe's estimation, the most incredible one of all. They posed for the album-cover photos, and then they performed two duets, the centerpieces of the score: one was the angry lover's spat, "Picking Up After You"; and the other was "This One's from the Heart." Yet the perfect session came very close to being scuttled. While in L.A., Crystal learned that her mother had become gravely ill. She called Howe to say that she was too upset to come to the studio. "The rap on Crystal Gayle in those days was she had this beautiful voice but no soul," Howe recalls. "I thought she sounded really vulnerable and figured if I could get her to the studio now, I might really get something." He urged her to reconsider, saying that working might prove therapeutic for her - at the very least it would keep her mind off her mother's condition, a situation she couldn't control. "She came into the studio, and she and Tom sang those duets together that day. They sat at the piano together and sang those duets. It was such a wonderful, wonderful day in the studio." During that final session, Crystal also recorded the redemption piece of the score, a beam of sunlight that penetrates the dark, smoky atmosphere. Said Waits, "Toward the end of shooting, Francis said, Everything's so sad, we need something with hope in it.' That's when 'Take Me Home' came about. The musical idea came early on, but the words were some of the last ones I wrote. I tried to sing it and it sounded real soppy, so I gave it to Crystal. I sat down at the piano, played it three or four times for her, then she cut it. I liked the way she did it. " (Source: Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. Jay S. Jacobs, 2000)



Tom Waits (1982)"Is there Any Way Out of This Dream?" and "Take Me Home" were written for Crystal to sing. "Old Boyfriends" was originally for me, then for her, then it turned into a duet. "Picking Up After You" and "This One's From the Heart" were written as duets. I found that it was hard writing for a woman. There are certain words they're uncomfortable with. I can get away with a certain vernacular, while a woman singing it would have trouble. I had to change things around, put everything into her words. It was tough. I felt like I was writing lines for an actress (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



Q (1982): Do you feel your personal idea of romance is reflected in the songs in One From the Heart? Tom Waits: "The cynicism comes out, I think. There's not a lot of hope in the score. In fact, towards the end of the shooting Francis said, "Everything's so sad, we need something with some hope in it." That's when "Take Me Home" came about... The musical idea came early on, but the words were some of the last ones I wrote. I tried to sing it and it sounded real soppy, so I gave it to Crystal. She was in town for just this one day. I sat down at the piano, played it three or four times for her, then she cut it. I liked the way she did it." (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



Tango Till They're Sore

 



Well, you play that Tarantella(2), all the hounds they start to roar

The boys all go to hell, and then the Cubans hit the floor

They drive along the pipeline, they tango till they're sore

They take apart their nightmares and they leave 'em by the door



Let me fall out of the window with confetti in my hair

Deal out jacks or better(3) on a blanket by the stairs

I'll tell you all my secrets, but I lie about my past

Send me off to bed forever more



Make sure they play my theme song, I guess Daisies'll have to do(4)

Just get me to New Orleans and paint shadows on the pews

Turn the spit on that pig, kick the drum and let me down

Put my clarinet beneath your bed till I get back in town



Let me fall out of the window with confetti in my hair

Deal out jacks or better on a blanket by the stairs

I'll tell you all my secrets, but I lie about my past

So send me off to bed forever more



Just make sure she's all in calico(5) and the color of a doll

Wave the flag on Cadillac Day and a skillet on the wall

Cut me a switch, or hold your breath till the sun goes down

Write my name on the hood, send me off to another town



And just let me fall out of the window with confetti in my hair

Deal out jacks or better on a blanket by the stairs

Tell you all my secrets, but I lie about my past

Will you send me off to bed forever more



Fall out of the window with confetti in my hair

Deal out jacks or better on a blanket by the stairs

I'll tell you all my secrets, but I lie about my past

Send me off to bed forever more

Send me off to bed forever more

Send me off to bed forever more



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985

Official release: Rain Dogs, Island Records Inc., 1985

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Camping i Kuopio")

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

It Happened One Night. Holly Cole. June, 1995. Blue Note Records. Japan: 1995, USA/ EMD: 1996 (live version)

Into Temptation - Astrid Seriese sings Waits, Weill & more. Astrid Seriese. October, 1996 (September, 2003). Brigadoon

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Incarnation Blues. Seth Augustus. 2004. Self-released

Liking You Liking Me. Grace Chung. 2005. Owlsong Productions

Fast Grass. Britta Rex Quartett. January 11, 2005. Cattitude Records

Annamateur. Anna Maria Scholz. August, 2005. Self-released

Tango Scandale. Ulrich Kodjo Wendt Band. October 1, 2005. Liekedeler (New Music)

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

Cowboy Gypsy Party Music. Brook Adams. July 13, 2007. Self-released

Passione E Veleno (Tango di Capodanno) . Stefano Tessadri. March 28, 2008. Novunque/ Universal

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music)

Colorama. The Hofners. March 9, 2009. LongMan Records

The Zeitgeist Beckons. Vagabond Opera. May 9, 2009. Self-released 

Stereo Bang Bang. Children Of Celebrities. January 1, 2010. Self-released



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Tango Till They're Sore"

Live performance from Late Night With David Letterman (1985)

NBC television talkshow with David Letterman. New York/ USA.

(broadcast November 21, 1985. Also lists as December 1985 and February 6, 1986)



Notes:



(1) Tango Till They're Sore:

- Tom Waits 
(1983) (from a 'Rain Dogs' promo clip, as presented in 'Egos and Icons'): "I had this friend who fell out of the window on New Year's Eve. 12 storeys, not a scratch. His hat blew off. The only thing that broke his fall was the fact that he had a little confetti in his hair."

Tom Waits (1985): "That's kind of a New Orleans thing with trombone - I had a friend of mine who'd fallen out of a window - he sent me a card later that said "May you always have confetti in your hair" - that's kind of sums that up." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985)

Tom Waits (introducing Tango Till They're Sore, 1985): "Thank you eh. This is about a guy that eh fell out of a window on New Year's Eve. And eh, the only thing that broke his fall, was the fact that he had a little eh confetti in his hair. Needless to say he doesn't go anywhere without a little... confetti in his hair." (Source: "Late Night With David Letterman" (NBC TV show) Date: New York. December, 1985)

Tom Waits (introducing Tango Till They're Sore, Healdsburg, 1996): "This is a song about suicide. But it's a FUN song. So don't go gettin' depressed"



(2) Tarantella: "The tarantella (tarentule, tarentella, tarantelle, tarentelle, tarantel) is a traditional, southern Italian dance of 6/8 or 4/4 time, characterised by the rapid whirling of couples. There are several local variations of this dance, including the Neapolitan, Sicilian, Apulian and Calabrian tarantellas. It is led by a central singer/speaker. A tarantella is also a song that can be played by instrumentalists. Sometimes the word used for the song is taranta ("tarantella" is in fact a diminutive dialectal form for "tarantula", a common kind of spider). The time signature, the fact that it is led by a caller, and several of the figures suggest that the tarantella may be related to contra dance. It is named after Taranto in southern Italy, and is popularly associated with the large local wolf spider or "tarantula" spider (Lycosa tarantula) whose bite was allegedly deadly and could be cured only by frenetic dancing (see tarantism). One variation of the legend said the dancer must dance the most joyous dance of her life or she would die, another says the dancer will go in to the most joyous dance of her life before she dies. In actual fact the spider's venom is not dangerous enough to cause any severe effects. The spiders, far from being aggressive, avoid human contact." (Source: Wikipedia/ GNU Free Documentation License, 2007)



(3) Jacks or better: A version of 5 card draw (poker) that requires a pair of Jacks or better to open the betting. If no one has at least this, the hand is thrown in, everyone puts money into the pot again, and the hand is re-dealt. (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)



(4) Dasies: Might refer to one of these titles: "The Garden of Daisies", "Pushing Daisies", "When Daisies Pied", "Sweet Bunch of Daisies"



(5) Calico: n. 1. A coarse, brightly printed cloth. Chiefly British. 2. A plain white cotton cloth, heavier than muslin (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition) In the US the term calico is applied only to the printed fabric.



Telephone Call From Istanbul

 



(Frank's Wild Years studio version, 1987)



All night long on the broken glass

Livin' in a medicine chest

Mediteromanian hotel back

Sprawled across a roll top desk



The monkey rode the blade on an overhead fan

They paint the donkey blue if you pay(2)

I got a telephone call from Istanbul

My baby's comin' home today



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat(3)

Never drive a car when you're dead(4)



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye your hair yellow and raise your hem

Follow me to Beulah's(5) on Dry Creek Road

I got to wear the hat that my baby done sewed, whoo!



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye your hair yellow and raise your hem

Follow me to Beulah on Dry Creek Road

I got to wear the hat that my baby done sewed



Well, take me down to buy a tux on Red Rose Bear

I got to cut a hole in the day

I got a telephone call from Istanbul

My baby's comin' home today



Sell me one of those if I shave my head

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye your hair yellow and raise your hem

Follow me to Beulah's on Dry Creek Road

I got to wear the hat that my baby done sewed, whoo!



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play





 



Telephone Call From Istanbul



(Big Time live album version, 1988)



I was all night long on the broken glass

Livin' in a medicine chest

Mediteromanian hotel back

Sprawled across a roll top desk



My pet old monkey rode the blade on an overhead fan

They paint the donkey blue if you pay(2)

I got a telephone call from Istanbul

My baby's comin' home today



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat(3)

Never drive a car when you're dead(4)



Saturday's a festival

Oh now, Saturday's a gem

Follow me to Beulah's(5) on Dry Creek Road

I got to wear the hat that my baby done sewed, whoo!



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye your hair yellow, baby

And follow me to Beulah's

I just got to wear the hat that my baby done, pop!



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye your hair yellow, baby

Follow me to Beulah's

I just got to wear the hat that my baby done



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival

Now Friday's just a gem, sweetheart!

Follow me to Beulah's on Dry Creek Road

I got to wear the hat that my baby done



Ba-ba-ba-ba-ba....



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play





 



Telephone Call From Istanbul



(Big Time live movie version, 1988)



Well, I was all night long on the broken glass

Livin' in a medicine chest

Mediteromanian hotel back

Sprawled across a roll top desk



My pet old monkey rode the blade on an overhead fan

They paint the donkey blue if you pay(2)

I got a telephone call from Istanbul

My baby's comin' home today



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat(3)

Never drive a car when you're dead(4)



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye my hair yellow

Oh, Chantilly lace and a pretty face(6)



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's such a gem

I got to dye my hair yellow, baby

Oh, Chantilly lace and a pretty face

You know what I like!



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Dye my hair yellow and raise my hem

Follow me to Beulah's(4) on Dry Creek Road

I got to wear the hat that my baby done sewed



Will you sell me one of those if I shave my head?

Get me out of town, is what Fireball said

Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

Never drive a car when you're dead



Saturday's a festival, Friday's a gem

Oh, Chantilly lace and a pretty face

And a pony tail hangin' down

You know what I like!



Ba-ba-ba...



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

This All Is The Rock 'n' Roll. Brigada S. 1992. Self-released

Songs Of Tom Waits. Dolphin Blue. 1995. Self-released demo (Germany)

Phondue. Bourbon Street Jazz Band. 1995. Zebralution

Belle Chase Hotel. Fossanova. August 23, 2000. Emi

Your Favorite Band Live. Red Elvises. September 12, 2000. Shoobah-Doobah

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

The Jive Kings With Measha Br�ggergosman. Jive Kings. October, 2000. Tidemark 02 50879, Canada

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Changes. Alicia Wiley. October 11, 2007. Sakhara Records

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Telephone Call From Istanbul" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre. Los Angeles/ USA November 9, 1987 

and the Warfield Theatre. San Francisco/ USA November 5, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) Telephone Call From Istanbul

- Tom Waits 
(1987): "Started as a title, then became just a junkyard for uh . . . one banjo and drums there. Got a little eastern slant on it. I don't know, beyond that. Frank is just started to plummet here; things are starting to fracture a bit." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)

-Bill Forman (1987): "Waits' unconventional approach to recording doesn't end with his choice of instruments. "Telephone Call from Istanbul" goes rollicking along with banjo, guitar, bass, drums and the faint ghost of Waits improvising away on that cheesy Farfisa. When the track is nearly over, the Farfisa kicks in full strength, catapulting the listener into some hellish Turkish rollerskating rink. "I usually don't like to isolate the instruments," says Waits, explaining the appearance of the ghost early in the track. "On that song, I pulled out the Farfisa and then just put it in very hot at the end, just so it sounded kind of Cuban or something."(Source: "Better Waits Than Ever" Music & Sound Output (Canada/ USA), by Bill Forman. Vol. 7, No. 11. October, 1987)



(2) Paint the town (blue), paint oneself (blue)

- To go on a wild spree in a town or city; to celebrate wildly (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Notice the same phrase being used in Depot, Depot, 1974: "And outside the midnight wind is blowing Sixth Avenue, I'm gonna paint myself blue, At the depot."



(3) Never trust a man in a blue trench coat

- Q: Your line "Never trust a man in a blue trench coat," would that be a reference to Leonard Cohen and his "Famous Blue Raincoat?" TW: "No. It's just words, y'know? No deeper meaning there." (Source: "Sonicnet Full Chat Transcript" Sonicnet chat, hosted by Michael Goldberg & Gil Kaufman. Date: April, 1999)



(4) Deadadj. [19C] very drunk. [abbr. dead drunk] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(5) Beula(h) (land): 

Bible (Isa. lxii. 4). The land of Israel in the Old Testament 2a. The land of peace described in John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)

- In Pilgrim's Progress it is that land of heavenly joy where the pilgrims tarry till they are summoned to enter the celestial City; the Paradise before the resurrection. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also mentioned in "Take Care Of All Of My Children" (I'll be goin' up to Beulah land), "Take It With Me" (We fell asleep on Beaula's porch)



(6) Oh, Chantilly lace and a pretty face: Quoting: Chantilly Lace. Words and music by J. P. Richardson, �1958. Originally performed by the Big Bopper (J. P. Richardson) in 1958. Recorded in 1972 by Jerry Lee Lewis. Chantilly Lace: "Hello, Baby! Yeah, this is the Big Bopper speaking! Oh, you sweet thing! Do I what? Will I what? Oh baby, you know what I like! Chantilly lace and a pretty face, and a ponytail hangin' down A wiggle in her walk and a giggle in her talk Make the world go 'round There ain't nothing in the world like a big-eyed girl To make me act so funny, spend my doggone money I feel real loose, like a long necked goose, like a - Wow baby, that's what I like! Huh? Will I what? Do I what? Will I what? Can't never tell, baby Ha-ha-ha-ha, I might But honey, you know what I like Chantilly lace and a pretty face, and a ponytail a-hangin' down A wiggle in her walk and a giggle in her talk, Lord! They're gonna make the world go 'round There ain't nothing in the world like a big-eyed girl To make me act so funny, spend my doggone money I feel real loose, like a long necked goose, like a - Wow baby, that's what I like! Huh? Ha-ha-ha Huh? What's that? Pick you up at eight? And don't be late? You gotta be jokin', woman I thought you might pick ME up at eight and don't be late It don't make no difference, baby, you know what I really like! Chantilly lace and a pretty face, and a ponytail hangin' down A wiggle in her walk and a giggle in her talk, Lord! They're gonna make the world go 'round There ain't nothing in the world like a big-eyed girl To make me act so funny, spend my doggone money I feel real loose, like a long necked goose, like a - Wow baby, that's what I like! Wooo! Ha-ha-ha Honey, you're tearin' me up on this telephone I swear I don't know what I'm gonna do with you You yap and yap and yap and yap and yap But when you break it all down, you know what I like Chantilly lace and a pretty face, and a ponytail hangin' down A wiggle in her walk and a giggle in her talk They're gonna make the world go 'round."



Temptation

 



Rusted brandy in a diamond glass

Everything is made from dreams

Time made from honey, slow and sweet

Only the fools know what it means



Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

I can't resist



I just know that she's made of smoke

But I've lost my way, yeah

She knows that I am broke

But I must play, yeah



Temptation

Temptation, yeah

Temptation

I can't resist



Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

I just can't resist



Dutch pink(2) and Italian blue

She is there waitin' for you

My will has disappeared

My confusion is oh so clear



Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

I can't resist



Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

I can't resist



Rusted brandy in a diamond glass

Everything is made from dreams

Time made from honey, slow and sweet

Only the fools know what it means



Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

Temptation

Temptation



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1998

Official release: "Frank's Wild Years", Island Records Inc., 1987 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play



Known covers:

The Bobs Sing The Songs Of... The Bobs, 1991. Rhino Records

Nachtgedanken. The Piano Has Been Drinking (Gerd K�ster). May 6, 1991. Chlodwig (Sony BMG). In German/ K�lsch ("Ich Will Dich", by Marion Radke)

Sto Megaro Mouskis. Elli Paspala. September 1, 1993. Sony Music - BMG (Greece)

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Into Temptation - Astrid Seriese sings Waits, Weill & more. Astrid Seriese. October, 1996 (September, 2003). Brigadoon

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Being Tom Waits. Billy`s Band. 2001. Self-released demo album (Russia)

Such A Taste. Bigfoot In Paris. 2002. Self-released

A Postcard From... Billy's Band. 2003. Self-released (Russia)

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003.Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Careless Love. 2 Blue Shoes. 2004. Self-released (re-release in 2006).

Temptation/ I'll Never Be the Same. Diana Krall. March 16, 2004. Universal (CD single)

The Girl In The Other Room. Diana Krall. April 27, 2004. Verve Records

Quarter 'Til Three. Kimberly Carper. April 20, 2006. Self-released

Jazz Vocalists: Hear and Now. Various Artists. April 25, 2006. Concord Records (performed by Diana Krall)

2 Blues Shoes On 2er. 2 Blues Shoes. 2006. Self-released

Blues Travelling. Magda Piskorczyk. October 2005. Self-released (Poland)

Clara. Clara Bakker. July 10, 2006. Claraphon (Netherlands)

Now Or Never. Dave Holt Band. August 17, 2006. Lucky Lobster (USA)

Casserole. Nathan. September 27, 2006. Nettwerk (EP)

Charmed Life. Julie Mason and the Jazz Divas. December 2007 Vox (New Zealand)

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music) 

The Shape Of You. Nina Vox. January 6, 2009. Scarab Music (Australia)

NCIS - The Official TV Soundtrack. Various artists. February 10, 2009. CBS Records (performed by Cote de Pablo) 

Picnic Glamour. Las Damas Y La Orquesta Invisible. May 24, 2009. Producciones Malditas (Spain)

Distance. Ina Hagenau. August 21, 2009. Self-released (Germany) 

Le Souffle De Ma Vie. Andrea Rehm Quartett. October 24, 2009. Self-released

Blue Moon On The Bayou. Randy Heddon & Fat Tuesday. February 16, 2010. Self-released



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Listen to audio excerpt of Temptation as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Performed by Tom Irwin (as Tony Profit).

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Music video promoting: "Temptation" (Island, 1987)

Directed by Betzy Bromberg. Date: August 19, 1987

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1987): "That one started out real tame. I added a bunch of stuff to it, and it started to swing a little bit. Now it sounds practically danceable to me. The whole thing was sung in falsetto. RR: The falsetto gives it a nasty edge --- TW: Gazzari's on the Strip. RR: Did you have something in mind for the vocal setting, or did you change it as you went along? TW: I wasn't sure. The song was there; it obviously needed an injection of some kind, so I tried to sing it in a new way. If you have enough time to live with a song, you can find it." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)



(2) Dutch Pink

- n. [19C] blood [Dutch Pink, a yellow pigment] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

- Notice the same phrase being mentioned in Jockey Full Of Bourbon, 1985: "Edna Million in a drop dead suit. Dutch pink on a downtown train."



Tell It To Me

Louise



(Friends Of Mine version, 1998. Also known as "Tell It To Me")



They say you're seeing someone, you're wearing his ring

They say you laughed when you heard my name

They say he takes you dancing, he holds you so near

They say he'll buy you anything

Tell me am I foolish, I don't believe these stories

Darling, I'll be coming home soon



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me



Well, I know you will not see me, but I hear you have a daughter

I hear she has my eyes

They say she calls him "father", and that he's proud of her

And that he believes all of your lies

But for all your faithless beauty, I give all my tomorrows

And if you're still thinking of me



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me



Took a job in Tennessee

To build a life for us

Give a kiss to win a heart

Take a kiss to break apart



They say you're seeing someone, you're wearing his ring

They say you laughed when you heard my name

They say he takes you dancing, he holds you so near

They say he'll buy you anything

Well, tell me am I foolish, I don't believe these stories

Darling, I'll be coming home soon



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me

Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me

Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1998/ 2006

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording Studios, Cotati, CA, on May 28, 1998

Official release (as "Louise"): Friends Of Mine - Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998





 



Tell It To Me



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



They say you're seeing someone, you're wearing his ring

They say you laughed when you heard my name

They say he takes you dancing, he holds you so near

They say he'll buy you anything

Tell me am I foolish, I don't believe these stories

And I'll be coming home soon



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me



I know, you will not see me, but I know you have a daughter

And I hear she has my eyes

They say she calls him "father", and he's proud of her

And even believes all of your lies

But for all your faithless beauty, I'd give all my tomorrows

And if you're still thinking of me

Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me



Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me

Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1998/ 2006

Official release (as "Louise"): Friends Of Mine - Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998

Re-released (as "Tell It To Me") on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Steel guitar by Bobby Black



Known covers:

Friends Of Mine. Ramblin' Jack Elliott. 1998. HighTone Records

Monsters Of Folk. Various artists. 1998. HighTone Records promo CD (performed by Ramblin' Jack Elliott, same version as on "Friends Of Mine", 1998)

15 Years Of American Music. Various artists. 1998. HighTone Records (performed by Ramblin' Jack Elliott, same version as on "Friends Of Mine", 1998)



Notes:



(1) Tell It To Me: (Bone Machine outtake)

- Jim Jarmusch (1993): Man, you have so many songs. There are other songs you played for me that aren't on 'Bone Machine', like "Filipino Box Spring Hog". TW: Yeah, and "Tell It to Me", and "Mexican Song", "In the Reeperbahn", one called "Shall We Die Tonight", a suicide pact ballad, and then a couple for John Hammond at the same time, one called "Down There By the Train". JJ: Did he record it? TW: No, nobody did. And we couldn't find a way to do it either that felt good, so we just left it, and it's just sitting there. (Source: "Straight No Chaser" Straight No Chaser magazine (UK), by Jim Jarmusch. Date: October, 1992 (published early 1993)



(2) Ramblin' Jack Elliott version:

- Ramblin' Jack Elliott (on: Louise): "I've known Tom for over 20 years. He sent me a letter with a tape of this song. I didn't know how our voices would sound together, but we got a good take." (Source: Ramblin' Jack Elliott official site, 2006)

Edvins Beitiks (1996): "Waits will be on Elliot's next album [Friends Of Mine" Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998], along with Arlo Guthrie, Jerry Jeff Walker, Guy Clark and Bob Weir. It was a labor of love, says Waits. "We did one song with Guy Clark - 'That Old Time Feeling' - that came off pretty good, I thought. Jack brings it with him when he comes, and that's rare these days. "You could say Jack wears in his songs - they're well used and well sung," says Waits, adding with a characteristically raspy chuckle, "Some people would say he wears 'em in and wears 'em out, but he wears 'em, that's for sure. "When he's learning a song he kind of tries it on like a pair of gloves. I got a chance to watch him do that when he recorded a song my wife and I wrote. He's got a way of doing things that's uniquely his own. He makes a song his own. That's the beauty of it." Waits has been itching to record with Elliott ever since he first heard his music getting good play, in the days when he was working as a doorman at the Heritage Club in San Diego's Mission Beach. "I was about 19, and his record was one of the most-played at this little coffee house. Jack's record was on the turntable all the time the one where he's on the cover with his horse and he's roping something [Ramblin' Jack Elliott: Young Brigham", Reprise R/RS 6284, 1968]. "It had '912 Greens' on there, spoken out, the song that so moved me. It had his version of "Tennessee Stud' and some Woody Guthrie songs," says Waits. He paused, then added that Elliott "was a real hero of mine - the idea of meeting him one day and recording with him is pretty fantastic." Waits, caught up in American music, did a lot of listening to Elliott, to Blind Lemon Jefferson, to Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, before stepping onstage at the Heritage Club to give the music a try himself. "I think I made more as a doorman than I did playing," he said. "Eight dollars a night on the door, $6 a night on stage. A little strange." Waits laughed at the memory of it, and the laughter was contagious. He called back easy-going roams with Elliott when both men were moving through Los Angeles in the high-water years of California folk. "We bumped into each other a couple of times," said Waits, making it matter-of-fact. "Hung with him in clubs in L.A., him and his dogs and his motorhome." After listening to the long-sleeve best of Elliott's stories, Waits is convinced "Jack should sit down somewhere with a tape recorder and talk all day and they should put it in the Library of Congress. "He's got one of those stories that is a novel unto itself, and I'd like to read it," says Waits. "Because his story is also the story of the country." (Source: "On The Road Tom Waits Talkin' About Hanging And Recording With Ramblin' Jack Elliott...". San Francisco Examiner, by Edvins Beitiks. August 4, 1996(?))





Source: Official Guy Clark website. W. Guy Clark and Ramblin' Jack Elliot.

Date: Prairie Sun Studios, Cotati. During the recording sessions for Ramblin' Jack Elliot's "Friends Of Mine".

Recorded between February 26, 1996 to October 14, 1997



That Feel

 



Well, there's one thing you can't lose, it's that feel

Your pants, your shirt, your shoes, but not that feel

You can throw it out in the rain, you can whip it like a dog

You can chop it down like an old dead tree

You can always see it, when you're comin' into town

Once you hang it on the wall, you can never take it down



But there's one thing you can't lose, and it's that feel

You can pawn your watch and chain, but not that feel

It always comes and finds you, it will always hear you cry

I cross my wooden leg, and I swear on my glass eye

It will never leave you high and dry, never leave you loose

It's harder to get rid of than tattoos



But there's one thing you can't lose, and it's that feel

There's one thing you can't lose, it is that feel

You can throw it off a bridge, you can lose it in a fire

You can leave it at the altar, it will make you out a liar

You can fall down in the street, you can leave it in the lurch(2)

Well, you say that it's gospel, but I know that it's only a church



But there's one thing you can't lose, and it's that feel

Yes, there's one thing you can't lose, and it's that feel

There's one thing you can't lose, and it's that feel

And there's one thing you can't lose, and it's that feel



Written by: Tom Waits and Keith Richards

Published by: Promopub B.V. (PRS) / Jalma Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Lil' Band O' Gold. Lil' Band O' Gold. April 25, 2000. Shanachie

The Mirrors and Uncle Sam. John Guilt. February, 2003. Munich Records

Passion, Prayer, Poison. Karen Vieno Paurus. March 15, 2008. Self-released



Notes:



(1) That Feel:

Tom Waits (1992): "We wrote a bunch of songs, but that's the only one that made it on there. Yeah, he writes songs in some ways similar to the way I do. Which, you know, you kind of circle it, and you sneak up on it. It was a real joy to write with him. You can't drink with him, but you can write with him. It was really a joy. I felt like I have known him a long time, and he's made out of very strong stock, you know. He's like pirate stock. He loves those shadows in music. And he's totally mystified by music, like a kid. He finds great joy in it, and madness and abandon. And it's still there, very much, for him. He looks at the guitar, and his eyes get all big, and he starts shakin' his head. He's made out of something that music likes to be around." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)

Tom Waits (1992): "I love this song. We played it hundreds of times and then I made a version of it and then I took it to New York and he was there and he sang on it and played. I really have a soft spot in my heart for this song." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic" Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992 (?))

Jim Jarmusch (1993): Did you write "That Feel" with Keith Richards or did he just play on it? Tom Waits: No, we wrote it together. JJ: You've written stuff with him before. TW: Yeah, he's all intuition. I mostly play drums, he plays guitar. He stands out in the middle of the room and does those Chuck Berry splits, y'know, and leans over and turns it up on 10 and just grungg! I mostly just play drums. He plays drums, too, he plays everything. It was good. I'm just recently starting to collaborate in writing and find it to be really thrilling. And Keith is great 'cause he's like a vulture, he circles it and then he goes in and takes the eyes out. It was great. I guess we maybe wrote enough for a record, but everything didn't get finished, so -- There was one called "Good Dogwood", about the carpenter that made the cross that Jesus hung on." (Source: "Straight No Chaser" Straight No Chaser magazine (UK), by Jim Jarmusch. Date: October, 1992 (published early 1993)



(2) Lurch, leave in the: Left to face a great perplexity. In cribbage a lurch is when a player has scored only thirty holes, while his opponent has made sixty-one, and thus won a double. In cards it is a slam, that is, when one of the players wins the entire game before his adversary has scored a single point or won a trick (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



That's The Way

 



That's the way the stomach rumbles(2)

That's the way the bee bumbles

That's the way the needle pricks

That's the way the glue sticks

That's the way the potato mashes

That's the way the pan flashes

That's the way the market crashes

That's the way the whip lashes

That's the way the teeth gnashes

That's the way the gravy stains

That's the way the moon wanes(3)



Written by: William Burroughs

Published by: Jalma Music Inc./ Nova Lark Music (ASCAP), � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling. June 14, 2004. Buschfunk (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Original Burroughs take played in scene 3 prior to K�tchen/ Wilhelm love duet



(2) That's the way the stomach rumbles

Tom Waits (2004): "Burroughs is kind of like a demonic Mark Twain. He's like the real dark heart of America. Comes from the Burroughs Adding Machine family, you know, and he threw off all the shackles of his inheritance and struck out on his own. Like they say, when you're in hell, keep going. So at times he was much more in the realm of Philip K. Dick in science fiction. Anyway, very inspiring. And I was very romantic about all the Beats when I was first coming on the scene myself. And that voice. My favorite thing is [quoting from "That's the Way," which Burroughs performs on the CD] "That's the way the cookie crumbles, that's the way the stomach rumbles, that's the way the needle pricks, that's the way the glue sticks--" That stuff really killed me." (Source: "One Wild Ride" San Francisco Magazine by Pamela Feinsilber. September, 2004)



(3) That's the way the moon wanes

- Wane: intr.v. waned, wan�ing, wanes. To decrease gradually in size, amount, intensity, or degree; decline. To exhibit a decreasing illuminated area from full moon to new moon (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)

- Also mentioned in Drunk On The Moon, 1974: "Hearts flutter and race, the moon's on the wane"



The Big Rock Candy Mountain

 



On the Big Rock Candy Mountain

The cops have wooden legs

The bulldogs all have rubber teeth

And the hens lay soft-boiled eggs



(...edit...)



On the Big Rock Candy Mountain

You never change your socks

And little streams of alcohol

Come trickling down the rocks



I'm bound to go

Where the wind don't blow

On the big rock Candy Mountain



On the big rock Candy Mountain

It's a land that's fair and bright

Handouts grow on bushes

And you sleep out every night



I'm bound to go

Where the wind don't blow



Traditional hobo ballad attributed to Harry "Haywire Mac" McClintock

Published by: [?], � 1987

No official release. From the film "Ironweed", 1987

Unofficial release: "Tales From The Underground, Vol. 3" (1)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of The Big Rock Candy Mountain.

From the film "Ironweed", 1987.



Notes:



(1) The Big Rock Candy Mountain:

- Version 1:  (children-friendly version): "In the big rock candy mountains There's a land that's fair and bright Where the handouts grow on bushes And you sleep out ev'ry night Where the boxcars are all empty And the sun shines ev'ry day Oh, I'm bound to go where there ain't no snow Where the rain don't fall and the wind don't blow In the big rock candy mountains Oh, the buzzin' of the bees in the peppermint trees 'Round the soda water fountains Where the lemonade springs and the bluebird sings In the big rock candy mountains In the big rock candy mountains You never change your socks And little streams of lemonade Come a-tricklin' down the rocks The hobos there are friendly And their fires all burn bright There's a lake of stew and soda, too You can paddle all around 'em in a big canoe In the big rock candy mountains Oh, the buzzin' of the bees in the peppermint trees 'Round the soda water fountains Where the lemonade springs and the bluebird sings In the big rock candy mountains." 

Version 2: (Harry "Haywire Mac" McClintock): "On a summer day In the month of May A burly bum came hiking Down a shady lane Through the sugar cane He was looking for his liking As he roamed along He sang a song Of the land of milk and honey Where a bum can stay For many a day And he won't need any money Oh the buzzin' of the bees In the cigarette trees Near the soda water fountain At the lemonade springs Where the bluebird sings On the big rock candy mountain There's a lake of gin We can both jump in And the handouts grow on bushes In the new-mown hay We can sleep all day And the bars all have free lunches Where the mail train stops And there ain't no cops And the folks are tender-hearted Where you never change your socks And you never throw rocks And your hair is never parted Oh, a farmer and his son They were on the run To the hay field they were bounding Said the bum to the son Why don't you come To that big rock candy mountain? So the very next day They hiked away The mileposts they were counting But they never arrived At the lemonade tide On the big rock candy mountain One evening as the sun went down And the jungle fires were burning Down the track came a hobo hiking He said: Boys, I'm not turning I'm heading for a land that's far away Beside the crystal fountain I'll see you all this coming fall In the big rock candy mountain In the big rock candy mountain It's a land that's fair and bright The handouts grow on bushes And you sleep out every night The boxcars all are empty And the sun shines every day I'm bound to go Where there ain't no snow Where the sleet don't fall And the winds don't blow In the big rock candy mountain In the big rock candy mountain You never change your socks And little streams of alcohol Come trickling down the rocks O, the shacks all have to tip their hats And the railway bulls are blind There's a lake of stew And ginger ale too And you can paddle All around it in a big canoe In the big rock candy mountain In the big rock candy mountain The cops have wooden legs The bulldogs all have rubber teeth And the hens lay soft-boiled eggs The box-cars all are empty And the sun shines every day I'm bound to go Where there ain't no snow Where the sleet don't fall And the winds don't blow In the big rock candy mountain In the big rock candy mountain The jails are made of tin You can slip right out again As soon as they put you in . There ain't no short-handled shovels No axes, saws nor picks I'm bound to stay Where you sleep all day Where they hung the jerk That invented work In the big rock candy mountain."



The Black Rider

 



 



Come on along with the Black Rider

We'll have a gay old time(2)

Lay down in the web of the black spider

I'll drink your blood like wine

So come on in

It ain't no sin

Take off your skin

And dance around in your bones(3)

So come on along with the Black Rider

We'll have a gay old time



Step right up...

Hey, hold on there, little sailor!

Have your tickets ready!

Under 12 are for free



You just come on along

Anchors away with the Black Rider

I'll drink your blood like wine

I'll drop you off in Harlem with the Black Rider

Out where the bullets shine

And when you're done

You cock your gun(4)

The blood will run

Like ribbons through your hair

Just come on along with the Black Rider

We'll have a gay old time



Line forms to the left

Have your tickets ready

See the dog face boy(5)

Hello, sailor!



Well, just come on along with the Black Rider

I've got just the thing for thee

Come on along with the Black Rider

I want your company

Well, I think I'll have the veal

A lovely meal

That's how I feel

Oh, may I use your skull for a bowl

Just come on along with the Black Rider

We'll have a gay old

We'll have a gay old

We'll have a gay old

We'll have a gay old

We'll have a gay old time



Step right up, have your tickets ready (Ha ha ha ha)

Step right up, have your tickets ready (Ha ha)



Thank you, thank you

Thank you, thank you

You're too kind



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990-1993-1998

Official release: "The Black Rider", Island Records Inc., 1993 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology 1983-2000" (Nuova Carisch s.r.l. Milan/ Italy, 2001)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

Gerd K�ster und... Gerd K�ster. March 22, 1999. Chlodwig (Pavement Records)

Black Letter Days and Devil's Workshop. Frank Black & The Catholics. August, 2002. spinART Records/ Cooking Vinyl

Live Sessions. Frank Black. August 20, 2007. iTunes EP



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits' encore at "The Black Rider" premiere

Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. March 31, 1990

Taken from German WDR television documentary "The Black Rider - Der Schwarze Reiter", 1990 (Theo Janssen and Ralph Quinke)



Notes:



(1) Sung by Pegleg as cast is introduced in the prologue. Backing vocals by full cast (theme played in scene 10 as Wilhelm is at the Crossroads).



(2) We'll have a gay old time: this might be taken from the famous television cartoon series "The Flintstones" (William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, 1960-1966). The theme song's lyrics were written by Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera, with music by Hoyt Curtin: "Flintstones, meet the Flintstones They're the modern stone-age family From the town of Bedrock They're a page right out of history Let's ride with the family down the street Through the courtesy of Fred's two feet When you're with the Flintstones Have a yabba-dabba-doo time A dabba-doo time You'll have a gay old time."



(3) And dance around in your bones: notice this quoting from "T'ain't No Sin"



(4) Cock a gun: To set the hammer of (a firearm) in a position ready for firing (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(5) Dog Face(d) Boy: That would be Jo Jo from "Lucky Day Overture". Human oddity. The 16-year-old Russian Fedor Jeftichew was contracted in 1884 by P.T. Barnum and quickly renamed Jo-Jo the dog-faced-boy. According to Barnum's flyers he was found in the woods of Kostrama (Central Russia), where he and his father lived in a cave. In reality JoJo had been travelling through Russia for years, showing himself to paying audiences. To further enhance his doglike appearance he was told to growl and bark at the audience





The Briar And The Rose

 



(Black Rider demo version, 1990)(1)



Oh blood and bone, and clocks and trains

My coat will keep you from the rain

Alas our love is all in vain

The briar and the rose



I will not wait, I cannot thread 

The tenor of the things you said(2)

My love is true and we must wed

The briar and the rose



I don't know how, I don't know why

I never meant to make you cry

My love is blind and so I chose

The briar and the rose



Out in the meadow, ablaze with green

Our love was meant to be

Oh tell me have you ever seen

A briar without the rose



Our love will tear us both apart

I'll never change my father’s heart

And I will cry and you must go

The briar and the rose



And when I'm buried in my grave

And November's wind will blow

Your tears will fall

To make them grow

The briar and the rose



And when I'm buried in my grave

November's wind will blow

And your tears will fall

To make them grow

The briar and the rose



Your tears will fall

To make them grow

The briar and the rose



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990

Unofficial release: The Black Rider, Alka-Seltzer Medien GmbH: 0-51111-12042-2, 1990-1992. March, 1990

Demo recording. Recorded by Gerd Bessler in Hamburg, Germany 1990

(Thanks to Ben Rinehart for help with transcript)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story





 



The Briar And The Rose



(Black Rider studio version, 1993)



I fell asleep down by the stream

And there I had the strangest dream

And down by Brennan's Glenn there grows

A briar and a rose



There's a tree in the forest

But I don't know where

I built a nest out of your hair

And climbing up into the air

A briar and a rose



I don't know how long it has been

But I was born in Brennan's Glenn

And near the end of spring there grows

A briar and a rose



I picked the rose one early morn'

I pricked my finger on a thorn

They'd grown so close

Their winding wove

The briar around the rose



I tried to tear them both apart

I felt a bullet in my heart

And all dressed up in spring's new clothes

The briar and the rose



And when I'm buried in my grave

Tell me so I will know

Your tears will fall

To make love grow

The briar and the rose



And when I'm buried in my grave

Tell me so I will know

Your tears will fall

To make them grow

The briar and the rose



Your tears will fall

To make them grow

The briar and the rose



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. November, 1999)

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story.



Known covers:

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Third Weeks a'lightnin. Tory Voodoo/ Tammerlin. December, 1996. Binky Records 1006CD

Loosen Up. Niamh Parsons. July 1, 1997. Green Linnet (Ireland).

Her Infinite Variety. Various Artists. January 13, 1998. Green Linnet (performed by Loose Connections)

North Amerikay. Dale Russ & Finn Mac Ginty. August 24, 1999. Aniar Records

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Strangest Dream. Popcorn Behavior (Assembly). December, 2000. The Orchard

Dolly Bird. Liane Carroll. February 5, 2001. Ronnie Scott's Jazz House

Sowing Seeds. The Granary Girls. March, 2001. Self-released

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Violet Sarah And Muckle John. Cloudstreet. 2002. Self-released

Ladies View. Ladies of Longford. 2002. Self-released (Ireland)

Made In Cape Breton. The Cottars. April 29, 2002. Rego Irish

After Albany. Acabella. 2003. Self-released

Milestone. Dave Donohoe. February 2, 2003. Self-released

Tramps and Hawkers. The Muses. 2004. Self-released

Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling. June 14, 2004. Buschfunk (Germany)

North Atlantic Drift. Tena Palmer. March, 2005. Self-released

Sincerely. Harry O'Donoghue. May 28, 2005. Columbine Blue Music

Standard Issue. Liane Carroll. September 18, 2005. Splash Point Records

Live at Fylde. Niamh Parsons and Graham Dunne. November, 2005. Self-released

Atlantic Standards. Various artists. May 30, 2006 (performed by The Cottars)

Fair Play To You. Bow Triplets. September 8, 2006. Self-released (Switzerland)

Tributes. The Alexander Brothers. November 6, 2006. Scotdisc

Just Before Sunrise. Nathan Gunn. August 7, 2007. Sony Classical/ BMG

Songs From The Glen. Bob O'Donnell. August 23, 2007. AngelSong Music

Northern Tide. Grace Notes. January 14, 2008. Fellside Recordings

Twentig. Knightsong. September 18, 2009. Self-released



Notes:



(1) The Briar And The Rose:

- Sung as a love duet in scene 3 by K�tchen and Wilhelm. 

- Might be referring to the German brothers Grimm fairytale "Dornröschen" (Kinder und Hausmärchen, 1812-1815), which translates as "Briar Rose".



(2) The tenor of the things you said: phrase as previously used in Empty Pockets (One From The Heart, 1981): "The shadows fall, I cannot thread the tenor of the things you've said."



The Fall Of Troy

 



It's the same with men as with horses and dogs

Nothing wants to die

Evelyn James they killed in a game

With guns too big for their hands

Just off St. Charles in no man's land

And you'll have to find your own way home, boys

You'll have to find your own way home



The oldest was Troy, an eighteen year old boy

Shot dead in March in a robbery

His brother started out to hell and to ruin

Troy's killer was never caught, they say

Young Nick, he just went bad that day

Now he'll have to find his own way home, boys

He'll have to find his own way home



Why cook dinner, why make my bed

Why come home at all?

Out the door and through the woods

There's a world where nothing grows



It's hard to say grace and to sit in the place

Of someone missing at the table

Mom's hair sprayed tight and her face in her hands

Watching TV for answers to me

After all she's only human

And she's trying to find her own way home, boys

She's trying to find her own way home



My legs ache

my heart is sore

The well is full of pennies



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1995

Official release: Dead Man Walking, Columbia (Sony Music Entertainment Inc.), 1995

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1995

Re-released on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

The Executioner's Last Songs: Volumes 2 & 3. Pine Valley Cosmonauts. 2003. Bloodshot Records (vocals by Kurt Wagner)



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1998): "This was a news article about 2 kids that were involved in a shooting and they were very young kids and it was in New Orleans." (Source: "KCRW-FM: Morning Becomes Eclectic (interviewed by Chris Douridas)" Date: March 31, 1998)




 




The Ghosts Of Saturday Night

 



(After Hours At Napoleone's Pizza House)(1)



A cab combs the snake, tryin' to rake in(2) that last night's fare

And a solitary sailor, who spends the facts of his life like small change on strangers

paws(3) his inside P-coat(4) pocket for a welcome twenty-five cents

and the last bent butt from a package of Kents(5)

as he dreams of a waitress with Maxwell House eyes

and marmalade thighs with scrambled yellow hair

Her rhinestone-studded moniker(6) says "Irene"

as she wipes the wisps of dishwater blonde from her eyes



And the Texaco beacon burns on

The steel-belted attendant with a "Ring and Valve Special"cryin':

Fill 'er up and check that oil

You know it could be your distributor and it could be your coil



The early mornin' final edition's on the stands

and the town cryer's cryin' there with nickels in his hands

Pigs in a blanket(7), sixty-nine cents

Eggs, roll 'em over, and a package of Kents

Adam and Eve on a log(8), you can sink 'em down straight

Hash browns, hash browns(9), you know I can't be late



And the early dawn cracks out a carpet of diamonds

across a cash crop car lot, filled with twilight Coupe Devilles(10)

leaving the town in the keeping

of the one who is sweeping

up the ghosts of Saturday night



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "The Heart Of Saturday Night", Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Napoleone: A pizza house in National City (San Diego). Read full story: Napoleone Pizza House





Napoleone Pizza House. Summer, 2001. Photography: Dalsh



- Tom Waits: (Intro to The Ghosts of Saturday Night. Folkscene, 1974): "It's about National City which is primarily a sailor town, a suburb of San Diego, where the infamous Mile Of Cars is on National Avenue and at the north end of National Ave is the Burge Roberts Mortuary and the Golden Barrel, Escalante's Liquor Store, sandwiched in between a Triumph Motorcycle shop and Burge Robert's is Napoleone's Pizza House, it's been there for a good 25 years and I worked there when I was real young. I've worked since I was 15 there and I guess not till I was away from it for a long time I could really sit down and write something constructive about it. This is called Ghosts Of Saturday Night or Looking Out From Napoleone's... All we did with that song was bass and guitar, we taped a little traffic on Cahuenga, just stuck his microphones out there and got about 20 minutes of rush hour and cut it down and put it on there, it really sets it up." (Source: Folkscene 1974, with Howard and Roz Larman (KPFK-FM 90.7) Source: audio tape. Date: Los Angeles/ USA. July 23, 1974 (June 10?))

Tom Waits: (Intro to The Ghosts of Saturday Night. Coffee Break radio show, 1975): "Well, I eh after I quitted I was working at a Mobil station and I was 15. I started working as a dishwasher and a cooker at a place called "Napoleone Pizza House". And eh, worked there for years... And eh for Joe Sardo and Sal Crivello. And eh... it was a gas... Ehm... well like every night about 4 o'clock in the morning and eh all the white vinyl booted go-go dancers... and all the sailors would come over at about a quarter to 4. And eh... Just about that time Joe would go out in front just to check out the traffic on the street y'know? He would like leave his paper hat and he'd fold his apron and he would go out and stand in front of Napoleone's. And across the street from The Golden Barrel, and Escelani's Liquor and Mario's Pizza, there's a Shell station right on the corner. And a Westerner and a Club 29 and a Melody Club, Phil's Porno, and Ebu Jima Eddie's Tattoo Parlor... And there'd be a cab out there combing the snake..." (Source: Coffee Break Concert Interview: The Coffee Break Concert radio show on WMMS-FM (Cleveland/ USA). Conducted by Kid Leo (Lawrence James Travagliante). December 3, 1975)



(2) Rake in v.: 1. To earn, usually money (Source: The Online Slang Dictionary, Walter Rader)



(3) Paw v.: 1. To touch or strike at with a paw 2. To feel or touch clumsily, rudely, or sexually 3. To scrape or beat with or as if with a hoof 4. To flail at or grab for wildly (Source: Merriam - Webster collegiate dictionary)



(4) Peacoat, P-coat n.: A heavy, hip length, dark blue jacket, which is the official overcoat of a USN enlisted man's uniform. Orig. USN use; the style has been adopted by civilian clothiers since WW2 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) Package of Kents: American cigarette brand name (produced by Lorillard)

Tom Waits (introducing Kentucky Avenue, 1976): "I grew up on a street called Kentucky Avenue in Whittier, California. My dad was teaching night school at Montebello. I had a little tree fort and everything. I had my first cigarette when I was about seven years old. It was such a thrill. I used to pick 'em up right out of the gutter after it was raining. My dad smoked Kents. Now, I never liked Kents - I tried to get him to change brands." (Source: Live at the Apollo Theatre, London, UK. March 23, 1976)





(6) Moni(c)ker, monniker, monacer, monica n.: A person's name, nickname, or alias; the name by which a person wishes to be known; a name. Orig. hobo use, then underworld, now common (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(7) Pig between two sheets, pig in a blanket

- A ham sandwich. Some lunch-counter use c1925; prob. synthetic (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- More often used of hotdogs or sausages than ham (Submitted by Richard Beckwith, Raindogs Listserv Discussionlist. August, 2000)



(8) Adam and Eve on a log:

n.: Adam and Eve on a raft; bacon and eggs. Lunch-counter use in relaying an order; never common (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- Adam and Eve n. [20C] (orig. US short-order jargon) two poached or fried eggst; thus Adam and Eve on a raft, two poached eggs on toast; thus Adam and Eve on a raft and wreck 'em, scrambled eggs on toast (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)  



(9) Hash browns, Hash-brown potatoes

- Finely chopped, cooked potatoes that are fried (often in bacon fat) until well browned. The mixture is usually pressed down into a flat cake in the pan and browned on one side, then turned and browned on the other. It's sometimes only browned on one side. Other ingredients such as chopped onion and green pepper are often added for flavor excitement (Source; Epicurious food dictionary, Cond�Net Inc.).

- Notice "hash browns" also being mentioned in Eggs And Sausage, 1975: "Hash browns over easy, chile in a bowl"



(10) Coupe Deville: French terms meaning "cut [or open in the front] for the city". In France, a chauffeur-driven car with an open area over driver. The first Cadillac "Coupe de Ville" by Fleetwood [which was not a town car by a long shot) was shown during the 1949 "Autorama". "Coupe de Ville" was the name given to a new Cadillac production model that made its appearance late in 1949; the car had no "B" pillars (B-pillars: In sedan styles, the second set of roof supports (between the windshield and rear portion of the roof)); three chrome ribs [roof bows] were apparent on the headliner, simulating the top bows of a convertible. The Coupe de Ville remained a popular Cadillac model for some 44 years; production stopped at the end of April 1993 (Source: The (new) Cadillac Database�, Glossary of Cadillac Terms and Definitions. � 1996, Yann Saunders and the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, Inc.)



The Goodnight Loving Trail

 



 



Well, you're too old to wrangle or ride in the swing

You beat the triangle and you curse everything

Now if dirt were a kingdom, well you would be king



On the Goodnight trail, on the Loving trail

Our old woman's lonesome tonight

And your French harp is crying just like a lone bawling calf

Well, it's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Get in there and blow out the light



Now the cook fire's out, the coffee's all gone

Now the old boys are up and they're raising the dawn

You're sitting there, you are lost in a song



On the Goodnight trail, on the Loving trail

Our old woman is lonesome tonight

Now your French harp is crying just like a lone bawling calf

It's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Get in there and blow out the light



Ah, with your snake oils, your herbs and your liniment too

You can do anything that a doctor can do

Well, except find a cure for your own goddam stew



On the Goodnight trail, on the loving trail

Our old woman is lonesome tonight

And your French harp is crying like a lone bawling calf

It's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Get in there and blow out the light



Some day I know that I'll be just the same

I'll be wearing an apron instead of a name

Now no one can change it, no one's to blame

Cause the desert's a book writ in lizards and sage

You know, it's easy to look just like an old torn out page

You're all faded and cracked with the colors of age



On the Goodnight Trail, on the Loving Trail

Our old woman is lonesome tonight

And your French harp is crying like a lone bawling calf

It's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Go in there and blow out the light



Written by: Bruce "Utah" Phillips

Published by: Strike Music, � (?)

No official release: Ebbets Field, Denver, Colorado. October 8, 1974

Tom Waits: Vocals and guitar

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. January, 2000)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of The Goodnight Loving Trail.

Ebbets Field, Denver/ USA. October 8, 1974.



Notes:



(1) Live intro from "Ebbets Field, Denver, Colorado. October 8, 1974": "This is a song by Utah Phillips, the golden voice of the great Southwest. And it's about a... it's about a... like a cook on a wagon trail, you know. They used to call him the old woman... Oh, hush up now, I'm trying to sing this damned thing now! I ain't opening the show tonight! Well, this is Utah Phillips, the golden voice of the great Southwest, and it's about a cook on a wagon trail. And they used to call him... they called him the old woman, see. Cause he can't work anymore and he can't ride. So it's kinda like... Charlie Wooster. They'd give him an apron. Always got a five o'clock shadow, and they'd just whop up a good mess of (?) And it's called 'The Goodnight-Loving Trail', which is an old cattle trail, named after Mister Goodnight and Mister Loving." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. January, 2000)



The Heart Of Saturday Night

(Looking For) The Heart Of Saturday Night



(The Heart Of Saturday Night studio version, 1974)



Well, you gassed her up, behind the wheel

With your arm around your sweet one in your Oldsmobile

Barrelin' down the boulevard

You're lookin' for the heart of Saturday night



And you got paid on Friday, your pockets are jinglin'

Then you see the lights and you get all tinglin'

Cause you're cruisin' with a six(2)

You're lookin' for the heart of Saturday night



Then you comb your hair, you shave your face

Tryin' to wipe out every trace

Of all the other days in the week

You know that this'll be the Saturday you're reachin' your peak



Stoppin' on the red, you're goin' on the green

Cause tonight'll be like nothin' you've ever seen

And you're barrelin' down the boulevard

You're lookin' for the heart of Saturday night



Tell me, is it the crack of the poolballs, neon buzzin'

Telephone's ringin', it's your second cousin

Is it the barmaid that's smilin' from the corner of her eye

Magic of the melancholy tear in your eye



Makes it kind of quiver down in the core

Cause you're dreamin' of them Saturdays that came before

And now you're stumblin'

You're stumblin' onto the heart of Saturday night



You gassed her up and you're behind the wheel

With your arm around your sweet one in your Oldsmobile

Barrelin' down the boulevard

You're lookin' for the heart of Saturday night



Is it the crack of the poolballs, neon buzzin'

Telephone's ringin', it's your second cousin

And the barmaid is smilin' from the corner of her eye

Magic of the melancholy tear in your eye



Makes it kind of special down in the core

And you're dreamin' of them Saturdays that came before

It's found you stumblin'

Stumblin' onto the heart of Saturday night



And you're stumblin'

Stumblin' onto the heart of Saturday night



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "The Heart Of Saturday Night", Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986





 



Looking For) The Heart Of Saturday Night



(Kansas City live version. October 8, 1979)



Well thankya... . I used to work in an Italian restaurant in a small place called National City. And it was right across the street from the Golden Barrel. It was right next to a place called the Westerner. There was a place called Ybu Ima Eddie's tattoo-parlour. Burge Robert's Mortuary... And I had this 1958 Buick Super at the time and eh.. it kinda made everything a little easier to handle... And on Saturday nights, well I was going with a girl called Margaret Tarrentino. Her father owned this big restaurant and eh... I asked her to the prom... it was the biggest mistake in my life... (laughter). Huh, huh, huh... Her parents couldn't stand me, they said I'd never amount to nothing. So this one's for you Margaret! (huge roar)



Well, you gassed her up, you're behind the wheel

with your arm around your sweet one, Oldsmobile.

You're Barrelin' down the boulevard,

lookin' for the heart of Saturday night.



You got paid on Friday, your pockets are jinglin',

then you see the lights and you get all tinglin'.

You're cruisin' with a six,(2)

lookin' for the heart of Saturday night.



And you're combing your hair, oh you're shaving your face.

Tryin' to wipe out every trace. All the other days in the week,

this would be the Saturday reachin' your peak.

Stoppin' on the red, goin' on the green.

Oh and tonight'll be like nothin' you ever seen.

You're barrelin' down the boulevard

lookin' for the heart of Saturday night.



Tell me, is it the crack of the poolballs or the neon buzzin'.

Telephone's ringin', it's your second cousin.

The barmaid she's smilin' from the corner of her eye.

Magic of the melancholy tear in your eye.



It makes it kind of special, down in the core.

And you're dreamin' of them Saturdays that came before.

And they found you stumblin',

stumblin' on the heart of Saturday night.



And you gassed her up, you're behind the wheel

with your arm around your sweet one in your Oldsmobile.

Barrelin' down the boulevard,

lookin' for the heart of Saturday night.



Tell me, is it the crack of the poolballs or the neon buzzin'.

Or the Telephone ringin', it's your second cousin.

Well the barmaid is smilin' from the corner of her eye.

Magic of the melancholy tear in your eye.



Makes it kind of special down in the core.

And you're dreamin' of them Saturdays that came before

they found you stumblin' oh you're stumblin'

on the heart of Saturday night.



Stumblin', stumblin'. Stumblin' on the heart,

oh now you're stumblin' on the heart of Saturday night.

Stumblin' on the heart, stumblin' on the heart of Saturday night... .



And there's some cat walking down the street, and he's singing "Since I Fell For You". Ohhh and I'm huddled in front of this liquor store, I'm pumping dimes into the phone. Ohhh and they're lonely on Sunset and Vine. Ohhh and they're lonely on 32nd and Downing. Lonely on Broadway tonight. Oh, and they're lonely on 5th and Main. They're lonely on Harlem 125th Street, Lennox Avenue, and they're lonely on 23rd street and 8th Avenue. And they're lonely on 12th Street and Vine (applause)(3) They're lonely on Gordon, they're lonely on Bandit(?). And they're lonely on Bourbon Street tonight baby. Oh, they're lonely on Canal Street...



So put your arm around the one you love. You gotta hold her tight, on this lonely, lonely Saturday night. They're lonely on Hollywood Boulevard baby. Someone's all alone and blue. All they need is you, on this lonely Saturday night. They wanna be stumblin' baby, they wanna be stumblin' on the heart, on the heart of Saturday night. Stumblin' on the heart... stumblin' on the heart of Saturday night.



All you need is a full tank of gas... to be with the one that you love... A lot of times you think you can make it all by yourself... They're lonely on Sunset and Boulevard tonight and they're stumblin'... stumblin' on the heart, on the heart of Saturday night...



Known covers:

It's A Good Night For Singin'. Jerry Jeff Walker, 1976. MCA - MCA2022

The Return Of The Wanderer, Dion DiMucci. 1979/ 1996. Lifesong (1979)/ Ace (Return Of The Wanderer & Fire In The Night 1996)

Fjorton Sånger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hjärtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Lördagshjärtat")

Long Term Lovers Of Pain. Hue And Cry. 1991. Circa YRCD71

Paper Doll. The Picketts. October, 1992. Popllama Records

Is My Love Enough. Chris Daniels & The Kings. September, 1993. Flying Fish Records

Cover Girl, Shawn Colvin. 1994. Columbia/ Sony 477240 2 (live version)

Street Corner Singers. Reunion. June, 1994. Collectables Records (Doo-Wop/ a-cappella version)

You Must Ask The Heart. Jonathan Richman. April, 1995. Rounder Records

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Jonathan Richman

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Stained Glass. Steve Gibbons. 1996. Incog Records IncogCD001 (UK, 1996), Havic Records HirCD7003 (USA, 1997)

Bloodied But Unbowed. Desperado. 1996. Destroyer

You. John Joseph Nolis. 1998. Nolis Internationale Records

Poultry Motion. Amazing Rhythm Chickens. 1998. Big Medicine Records (June 16, 2004)

Collection. Holly Cole Trio. September, 1998. EMI (Australia)

Joe's Pub. Rickie Lee Jones. 1999. Great Big Island

Heart Of Saturday Night. Showvinistics. May 18, 1999. Forevermore Records (a cappella)

Limbo: Motion Picture Soundtrack. Various artists. June 1, 1999. Sony (performed by Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio)

This Time From The Heart. Marie Mazziotti. May 2, 2000. The Orchard

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Samstag Nacht")

Mosquitoville (revisited). Frenchy Burrito. 2002. Self-released

Action Packed: The Best Of Jonathan Richman. Jonathan Richman. February, 2002. Rounder Records

Traveler. Steve Hass. October, 2003. The Orchard

Using That Thing. Reet Petite & Gone. August, 2002. Terra Nova/ UK

Double Back. Lannie Garrett. 2003. Self-released

Careless Love. 2 Blue Shoes. 2004. Self-released (re-release in 2006)

Greatest Hits Live at the Bottom Line. Lou Christie. August 3, 2004. Varese Records

Bittersweet And Blue. Gwyneth Herbert. September, 2004. Ucj

On The Road - Chicago, IL - October 30, 2004. String Cheese Incident. 2005. Self-released OTR11.103004

Kindred Spirits. Billy Davidson and Steve Webb. 2005. Self-released

We Get A Kick Out Of Jazz. Various artists. January, 2005. Verve Records (performed by Diana Krall)

The Wanderlust Diaries. Mary Karlzen. June 5, 2006 (re-released on March 20, 2007). Dualtone

Half The Perfect World. Madeleine Peyroux. September 3, 2006. Universal Music

Way Past Ready. Tim Pritchett. February 28, 2007. Self-released

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

The Very Best Of Diana Krall. Diana Krall. September 18, 2007. Verve Records

5 am. Steve Crawford and Spider Mackenzie. March 22, 2008. Self-released

Don't Let Go. Jack Williams. April 30, 2008. Wind River

Nobody Wins. Gemma Vicens Band. May 20, 2008. Temps Records

Live At the Anchorage 2.0. Niagara Rhythm Section. October 30, 2008. Shed Records

Saturday Freedom. Bruce Stephens. November 19, 2008. Rear Window Music 

My Name Is Hope Webster. Karen Lano. October 1, 2009. BeeJazz (France)

Love You Forever. Catherine Reed. January 30, 2010. Winterwood Records

Ride The Times. Iain Matthews & Ad van der Veen. May 14, 2010. Turtle Records

Trio. Rita Bolton. October 15, 2010. Self-released



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "The Heart Of Saturday Night". Taken from Soundstage Show #208 (1975).

PBS television show on Tom Waits and Mose Allison. Chicago/ USA.

Aired December 22, 1975, recorded November 3, 1975 or earlier.



Notes:



(1) The Heart Of Saturday Night

- Tom Waits (introducing The Heart Of Saturday Night, 1973): "It's a new song, I'm anxious to play it, it's kind of about driving down Hollywood Boulevard on Saturday night, Bob Webb and I were kicking this around one afternoon, Saturday afternoon it was, the idea of looking for the heart of Saturday night, hadn't really worked on any tune about it yet, we're both real Jack Kerouac fans and this is kind of a tribute to Kerouacians I guess." (Source: Folkscene 1973, with Howard and Roz Larman (KPFK-FM 90.7). Los Angeles/ USA. August 12, 1973)

Barney Hoskyns (2009) quoting from a letter to girlfriend Bobi Thomas: “In one letter Waits mentioned the possibility of upcoming studio dates for his second album. Determined to be truer to his vision of himself as a jazz centric Beat poet, he was busy writing songs that depicted the American street life he'd absorbed from Kerouac and others. Pride of place went to "(Looking for) The Heart of Saturday Night," a wistful slice of streetwise optimism born one Saturday afternoon as Waits and Bob Webb drove along Alvarado Street and then cruised Hollywood Boulevard in search of kicks and inspiration. The idea of "looking for the heart of Saturday night" came directly from Visions of Cody, in which Kerouac's eponymous hero was "hurrying for the big traffic, - ever more exciting, all of it pouring into town - Saturday night.' Waits claimed he'd written the song in five minutes. "We struck on Kerouac's concept of wanting to be at 'the cen¬ter of Saturday night in America,"' Bob Webb recalls. "We got caught up in that literary notion and decided that each of us would create something around the theme. I drove home and stayed up all night writing a short play about some denizens of a backstreet poolroom. Some time after I left, Tom picked up a guitar and wrote the lyrics and music for ‘Heart of Saturday Night.’ He had it the next day” (Source: “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



(2) Cause you're cruisin' with a six: this would probably refer to having a six-pack of beers while driving, in a time drink-and-drive wasn't regarded to be such a crime yet. Jerry Yester (2007): "He liked to buy a six-pack of Coors and go park somewhere and just talk. He'd talk about whatever was on his mind, and I'd talk about what was on my mind. I really liked that part of the relationship. He was real genuine, absolutely down to the nickel" (Source: Jerry Yester interview June 8, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



(3) 12th Street and Vine: A reference to the W. Harrison song "Kansas City", which says: "I'm goin' be standin on the corner. Twelfth Street and Vine. I'm goin' be standin on the corner. Twelfth Street and Vine. With my Kansas City baby. And a bottle of Kansas City wine." Wilibert Harrison also penned "Let's Stick Together" which appears on the "Down In The Groove" Bob Dylan album. In the actual city of Kansas City, there is no corner of 12th Street and Vine. The two streets do not intersect. (Thanks to Mikael Borg, as sent to Tom Waits Library, December 15, 2003)



The Last Rose Of Summer

 



 



I love the way the tattered clouds(2)

blow wind across the sky

The summer goes and leaves me

with a tear in my eye



I'm taking out my winter clothes

my garden knows what is wrong

The petals of my favorite rose

been in the shadows dark and long



Though every year it's very clear

I should be carrying on

But I can be found in the garden, singing this song

when the last rose of summer is gone

the last rose of summer is gone



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

Treasure. Holly Cole Trio. October, 1998. EMI



Notes:



(1) Sung by Pegleg in scene 12 as he disappears in the Black Box.



(2) Tattered clouds: 

Marianne Faithfull (2004): "The Black Rider is the last thing Burroughs wrote certainly the last thing he wrote after The Western Lands, the novel about Egypt, which I love. I know Burroughs's work very well, and he threw a lot from it into The Black Rider: there is a lot of The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, and some of The Black Rider's imagery is from Naked Lunch. Tattered clouds is one of his images, and there are a lot of tattered clouds in The Black Rider."(Source: "The Devil? That Was His Own Dark Side", interview with Marianne Faithfull, by Tim Cumming. The Guardian (London). May 12, 2004. Copyright @ 2004 Guardian Newspapers Limited.).

- Also mentioned in Just The Right Bullets (1993): "It takes much more than wild courage, Or you'll hit the tattered clouds."



The Movie

 



 



KN: I was talking to Tom about this movie that nobody wants me to make. It's a musical called 'M', starring Siamese twins connected by the lips.

TW: Connected by the lips? That's...

KN: I figured out how to do that too. You see, I have this dentist friend, a very religious guy. In fact he believes in the laying on of hands. He really would touch your tooth, and they'd get better. That's why I go to him, I can't stand pain.

TW: Right! Hehehe...

KN: But I'm getting off the track. He has a... you know, I think he'd go along. He could be in the movie, okay? I think he should be in the movie.

TW: All right. Does he have any acting experience?

KN: No no no.

TW: No?

KN: He'd be a re-actor.

TW: Ah! Ah!

KN: He has this yellow mask that he wears.

TW: Yeah.

KN: And yellow gloves. He's afraid, you know... he's very nervous.

TW: Oh.

KN: But I'd get the camera on him, wide-angled camera, and I'd ask him if he could make a double mouth piece.

TW: Mhm.

KN: What I'm thinking of, you've seen these things that they use in the circus, where the girl bites into this mouth piece and they pull her up to...

TW: Ah yeah, yeah. They suspend her by it, and she's biting on to some kind of a stick or something.

KN: Up to the top of the tent.

TW: Yeah, right.

KN: Well, he'd make a double thing with a little rubber holding it together. And then we'd audition these identical twins, and that would hold them together, so it would seem... you know, it would look like what I'm talking about.

TW: Right. Hmm.

KN: Maybe we should have a boy and girl. Are there boy and girl identical twins?

TW: I'd rather not... I wouldn't call them identical if they were boy and girl.

KN: Maybe they could be. And then they could get separated in the film. See, the idea is not just that though. That's just part of it. There's another guy in the film that I try to help. Cause I thought of calling the movie 'The Devout Catalyst'. There's the title. And there's another guy who is a tattoo artist, and... but he's avant-garde, he wants to do something very special.

TW: Something new... in a way.

KN: Yeah, so we go to this chemist that I know, and he makes a slippery ink, so the tattoo, you know, it just doesn't sit there. It moves slowly across the surface of the skin towards the nearest opening. You see, there's... how many openings are there?

TW: Oh, you mean orifice? Uh... how many actual...?

KN: One two three...

TW: Two three four five uh... six

KN: Whichever one it's closest to, it goes in there, and then it moves inside your body through the Endothelium, and... Say it was an eagle. It gets inside of you and it gets digested. Maybe it gets stuck behind your right knee cap.

TW: Right, yeah!

KN: You rub it, it gets lose and when it comes out it looks like a Klee, or maybe a Rouault or, you know... or Thurber. You know...

TW: That's wild. Oh yeah, I got a little money laying around that... I've been... you know...

KN: What we have to have with that is... Well, that's a special effect. We'll have to get some kind of decal slide across this... But the trouble is when I tell anyone about this, they laugh and...

TW: Hehe...

KN: So what I figured I'd do is put my own money in it.

TW: Yeah! There! There you go, yeah...

KN: In the movie, the kids, my three kids, and my wife wanna have me committed. That's the plot. If you really do what you wanna do, they'll commit you!

TW: Yeah... Wow...

KN: It'd be a great movie.

TW: Well, are you gonna direct...?

KN: Well, if we can get Jerry to do the music track...

TW: The music, yeah.

KN: And you could, you know...

TW: Yeah, I could play a part.

KN: Well, you could be the guy I'm talking to you about.

TW: Yeah.

KN: Get a far-out bar and sit there and... star!

TW: Yeah.

KN: Yeah. In a musical called 'M'.

TW: Well, I'm looking to diversify my investment portfolio, and I've been looking to get into something strange, you know, so...

KN: Hey! What we could do is, we could have you in it, you take out your wallet, and moths fly out.(1)

TW: Yeah...

KN: That's a special effect too.

TW: Hehehehe. You get a bug guy for that. They have bug guys in Hollywood. All they do is, they work in the insect world. You're gonna have a lot of medical footage in this too, I guess?

KN: Yeah, I could put that thing in about the January flies too, in our bedroom.

TW: January flies, what...?

KN: That was insane.

TW: What are January flies?

KN: Well, we don't have them in Chicago, but in the middle of January, you went to the bedroom and there were twenty of these... almost as big as horse flies, on the pink walls, and...

TW: That's annoying.

KN: Oh, it's terrible. And they were sluggish, cause it was January.

TW: They were a little slow.

KN: And I couldn't hit them with the paper, cause they'd splat.

TW: Yeah.

KN: And I couldn't spray them... you know...

TW: You're going to sleep, you don't want that in the room.

KN: No, I'd kill myself that way. So I got the bright idea to get the vacuum cleaner and, with the long hose, we sucked them into the vacuum cleaner. And then they were all gone.

TW: Well, but they were in the vacuum cleaner really.

KN: Yeah, and still alive too. Cause that's like a wind tunnel. They went down there... so we... I put some, you know, tissue paper at the end so that they wouldn't get out. But they'd come back! The next night there were twenty or thirty more. So... well, what I did then, I called the chimney sweep.

TW: Chimney sweep?

KN: Yeah, there's a girl by the name of Debbie Dove.

TW: She's a chimney sweep?

KN: Yeah, from Vermont.

TW: Ah!

KN: And she said, let me check your chimney!

TW: Yeah yeah, that's a good place to start. I mean, if you have a fly problem, a lot of people will look at the chimney first.

KN: And she took the barricade that I had so that nobody could come in through the chimney. There were two dead squirrels inside there, you know. That's the... sad end.

TW: Aaawww...

KN: The flies belonged to the squirrels.

TW: All right, yeah...

KN: Yeah. She sold us three squirrel traps for the chimney and... we're safe now!

TW: Yeah, no more flies!

KN: Do you think we could get her in the film?

TW: Gee, I don't know. We could write a part for her.

KN: Yeah, we should!

TW: Does she have any film experience?

KN: Guess we'd have to get two dead squirrels in the film too.

TW: Yeah well, you get an animal guy for that.

KN: Yeah. Gee, I'm so glad that you're interested in this, really!

TW: Yeah, I think... I'm ready to go into production, so you just let me know.

KN: Ah, great. We'll call it 'The Devout Catalyst'.

TW: I love it!

KN: Yeah, good title.

TW: A lot of action in the film too, I guess?

KN: Oh yeah yeah yeah. I have one thing. I have this picture window ant colony, that I'll have for the titles.

TW: So the ants will actually spell out the title of the film, and the credits?

KN: Well, they'll actually pull little tissue paper credits through it.

TW: Nice.

KN: Yeah. Or a fly with a little trailer, with the title of the film on, flying around the bed.

TW: Nice, nice...

KN: Well, Tom, you've made me feel a lot better. Thanks, I... seriously, I thought no one cared, but... thanks!

TW: I'm there for you, Ken!

KN: You're a pal.

TW: Thanks.



Written by: Ken Nordine & Tom Waits

Published by: LYRICS Rubber frog Publishing (ASCAP)/ MUSIC Ice Nine Publishing (ASCAP), � 1991

Official release: Devout Catalyst - Ken Nordine, Grateful Dead Productions Inc., 1992

Spoken word: Nordine & Waits



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) And moths fly out

- From "Franks Wild Years" (the play, 1986): Frank: "I needed to get out. The air is invigorating... life's rich pageant... and I don't care who I have to step on on my way back down! With a song in my shoe, and a nail in my heart, I stand before you with moths in my change purse. ha-ha..."

- "Tom Waits saves cigarette coupons. Moths fly from his change purse. The keys fall off his piano. Business as usual. (Source: "Boho Blues" Spin Magazine, by Bart Bull. September, 1987)



The Ocean Doesn't Want Me

 



We're rolling...

The ocean doesn't want me today(1)

But I'll be back tomorrow to play

And the strangels(2) will take me down deep in their brine

The mischievous braingels(2)

Down into the endless blue wine

I'll open my head and let out all of my time

I'd love to go drowning

And to stay and to stay

But the ocean doesn't want me today

I'll go in up to here

It can't possibly hurt

All they will find is my beer and my shirt

A riptide is raging and the lifeguard's away

But the ocean doesn't want me today

But the ocean doesn't want me today

The ocean doesn't want me today



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP) , 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) The Ocean Doesn't Want Me:

Tom Waits (1993): "Well, ultimately it [the Chamberlain] was mass produced, and they were out there like Fender Rhodes, only on a much smaller scale. But they were marketed, advertised and sold in music stores, and they had displays, and everyone heard this name Chamberlain.JJ: Did you use it on 'Bone Machine'? TW: Only on two songs, on "The Earth Died Screaming" and "The Ocean Doesn't Want Me". (Source: "Straight No Chaser". Spring, 1993. Interview by Jim Jarmusch)

Tom Waits (1992): "One of the local papers up here printed two photographs. One was a picture of a woman on the beach holding a bottle of beer and a cigarette, looking out at the ocean. And the next picture was the same day, a couple hours later, of her floating face-down in the brine, the beer still in her hand. And the photographer had walked past her and heard her say under her breath 'the ocean doesn't want me today.' He just clicked a picture. He went all the way down to the end of the jetty, turned around and came back, and then he spotted her floating in the surf. So it's a little suicide note. See, the riptide is raging and the lifeguard's away, it's like I can make my break now. Strangels. Like strange angels. Kellesimone said that. So if you have strangels, then you can have braingels. Those are the angels that live in your head." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)



(2) Braingels/ strangels:

Tom Waits (1998): "Eh, my little girl said, she has a word called, the word is "strangels." It's a cross between "strange" and "angels." Strange angels. Strangels. They're called "strangels." Or I said, or you could have "braingels." Those are the strange angels that live in your head would be "braingels." We just went around and around with it, and it wound up in "The Ocean Doesn't Want Me Today." [clears throat] That little suicide note on the album. Yeah, kids. Great for the... Hey, kids write thousands of songs before they learn how to talk. They write better songs than anybody. So, you hope you can write something a kid would like." (Source: "Morning becomes Eclectic ". KCRW radio Interview: Chris Douridas. Rebroadcast January 2, 1998)

Tom Waits (1992): "There's a song on here - The Ocean Doesn't Want Me Today - my little girl came up with a word called Strangels, Strangels are strange angels. Then I said, well, yeah, then we can have Braingels too- those are the strange angels living in your head would be called Braingels. So we put it in there." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic" Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992 (?))



The One That Got Away

 



Well, this gigolo is jumpin' salty(1), ain't no trade out on the streets

Half past the unlucky(2), and the hawk's a front-row seat

Dressed in full orchestration, stage-door Johnny's(3) got to pay

And send him home and talkin' about the one that got away



Could have been on Easy Street(4), could have been a wheel(5)

With irons in the fire and all them business deals

But the last of the big time(6) losers shouted before he drove away

'I'll be right back, as soon as I crack the one that got away'



The ambulance drivers they don't give a shit, they just wanna get off work

And the short stop(7) and the victim already gone berserk

And the shroud tailor measures him for a deep six holiday(8)

The stiff is froze, the case is closed on the one that got away



Now Jim Crow's(9) directin' traffic with them cemetery blues

With them peculiar looking trousers, them old Italian shoes

And a wooden kimona(10) was all ready to drop in San Francisco Bay

But he's mumblin' something all about the one that got away



Costello was the champion at the St. Moritz Hotel(11)

And the best this side of Fairfax, reliable sources tell

But his reputation is at large, and he's at Ben Frank's(12) every day

Waiting for the one that got away



He's got a snake skin sports shirt, and he looks like Vincent Price(13)

With a little piece of chicken, and he's carvin' off a slice

Someone tipped her off(14), and she'll be doin' a Houdini(15) now any day

She shook his hustle, and a Greyhound bus'll take the one that got away



Andre's at the piano behind the Ivar(16) in the Sewers

With a buck a shot for pop tunes(17), and a fin for guided tours

He could've been in 'Casablanca', he stood in line out there all day

Now he's spillin' whiskey and learnin' songs about the one that got away



Well, I've lost my equilibrium and my car keys and my pride

The tattoo parlor's warm, and so I hustle(18) there inside

And the grindin' of the buzz-saw, 'What you want that thing to say?'

I say, 'Just don't misspell her name, buddy, she's the one that got away'



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976(19)



Known covers:

Vox Poppin'. Stormy Weather. 1993. Street Gold. Re-released on "Looking For An Echo", 1999

Looking For An Echo. Stormy Weather. July 13, 1999. Street Gold. Same version as on "Vox Poppin'", 1993

BVNovik. Billy's Band. 2003. Self-released (Russia)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "The One That Got Away"

at the Expo Theatre, Montreal/ Canada (July 3, 1981).

As featured in Canadian television concert documentary "T�l�-Jazz - Montreal Jazz Festival"

With Teddy Edwards (tenor saxophone) and Greg Cohen (upright bass)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

The One That Got Away as featured in "Tom Waits For No One" (1979)

Animated short directed by John Lamb

Character design by Keith Newton. Head animator: David Silverman

Filmed live on a set in 1978 in Hollywood at the La Brea stage and completed in 1979



Notes:



(1) Jump salty v.: To become angry; enraged; to become malicious. Negro use; orig, jive and teenage street-gang use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(2) Half past the unlucky: Midnight on Friday (Source: The Jive Glossary in "Really the Blues" by Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe, Random House Inc.1946. Submitted by Mikael Borg, 2007)



(3) Stage-door Johnnie/ Johnny: n. [late 19C+] a man, poss. rich, who hangs around theatre stage doors hoping to meet his female idols (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(4) Easy street: 1. Financial independance 2. A way of life characterized by wealth and luxury; a pleasant and successful life; successful business dealings (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) Wheel

- n.: A person in authority (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Big wheel: n. [1930s] an important, influential person, esp. in business [the image of a smooth-running powerful machine] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Also mentioned in Paradise Alley, 1978: "And come on, you old scarecrow, and be a wheel, not a lamppost."



(6) Big Time: adv. [1950s+] (US black) very much, completely, absolutely, e.g. she really loves him big time (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(7) Short stop: [1969's-70s] a fool, a dupe, a coward. [baseball imagery] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(8) Deep six, deep-six

- n. [1920s-40s] a grave[it is six feet under]

- v. [1940s+] (orig. US) to get rid of, to abandon.

- v. [1950s+] (orig. US) to ruin, to destroy (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9). From the phrase "give (something) the deep six," an extension of the nautical term "deep six," burial at sea prob. in six or more fathoms of water (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang - Supplement, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also refered to in No One Knows I'm Gone: "Six feet underground."



(9) Jim Crow: 1. [early 19C+] a complaisant, subservient Black person (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 2. (derog.) A Negro (Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 3. Brought out at the Adelphi in 1836. The character of Jim Crow played by T. D. Rice, as the original of the "nigger minstrels" since so popular. A renegade or turncoat is called a Jim Crow, from the burden of the song, Wheel about and turn about. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(10) Wooden kimona, wooden kimono

- A coffin. Some underworld and fictional use since c1920 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 

Steve Oney (1988): "What are some of your other favorite bits of slang, phrases you'd like to see get more everyday use? TW: For starters, I'd like to see the term wooden kimono return to the lexicon. Means coffin. Think it originated in New Orleans, but I'm not certain..." (Source: "Tom Waits 20 questions". Playboy magazine: Steve Oney. -- March 1988) 



(11) St. Moritz Hotel:

- George Duke: "Ladies and gentlemen, direct from the St. Moritz Hotel on the Sunset Strip, a friend of ours from Los Angeles, Mister Tom Waits! Sodden and wistful as he might be. How are you doing, buddy? Your beard's getting very good. He holds the distinction of being the only person at the St. Moritz Hotel in Los Angeles able to room next to Ray Collins for longer than three weeks at a time." (Transcription by Ulf Berggren as sent to Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





St. Moritz Hotel, Los Angeles. Photo credit: Dorene LaLonde



(12) Ben Frank's: Coffeeshop bar-restaurant in Los Angeles, 8585 Sunset Boulevard. Untill 1965 this was a famous gathering place within the bohemian scene. After circa 1966 it was populated by the rising hippie-generation.





(13) Price, Vincent: Born: 1911; St Louis, Missouri. Died: 1993. Vincent Price is best remembered for his roles in horror movies, specifically the Roger Corman adaptations from Edger Allan Poe. Although these gave him a wide variety of characters to play and were striking enough, they type cast him for the remainder of his career. Price's love of art never left him and he used his education to good advantage. He was responsible, in 1951, for founding the Vincent Price Gallery on the campus of East Los Angeles College. Price's niche in the horror movie genre was carved in 1960 with the classic movie "The Fall of the House of Usher". In his later years, Price became involved with the rock industry, he was involved in music videos with performers including Alice Cooper, Ringo Starr, and Michael Jackson.





(14) Tip off: To warn of something impending; to put someone wise; to inform, to forewarn; also, to point out a victim to a crook (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(15) Do a Houdini/ pull a Houdini

- phr. [20C] (US) to escape, to vanish suddenly [do + escapologist Harry Houdini] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9). 

- Houdini: Erich Weiss. Born: Appleton, WI, 1874 - Died: Detroit, 1926. American magician/ actor. He became famous for sensational stunts, escaping from: cuffs, ropes, chains, straitjackets and locked suitcases, submerged in water.

- Also mentioned in The Part You Throw Away (Punishing Kiss, 2000. Blood Money, 2002): "St. Mary's prayers, Houdini's hands."



(16) Behind the Ivar in the Sewers

Ross MacLean (2004): "The T. Waits quote, "Andr� is at the piano behind the Ivar in the sewers" (The One That Got Away, 1976) probably refers to a piano player at a gay bar, located down the alley by the stage door, called "The Sewer of Paris." There was a garbage dumpster in the corner between the two doorways, and girls could go from the theater straight to the bar. The bar held 70's glitter queens, lots of ageing closet cases, servicemen (the U.S.O. was half block down the street from the Ivar), runaways fresh from the Greyhound bus station who had come to Hollywood to become famous, thugs fresh out of jail, and drag queens of any race. I had a couple pretty scarey nights there." (Source: email message by Ross MacLean to Tom Waits Library. February, 2004. Ross J. MacLean is a produced & published playwright. Ross has written a memoir on the Ivar, and is completing a play on the same subject.)

Tom Waits (1981) on the Ivar Theatre: "A burlesque house in Hollywood, right next door to the library. It was originally a legitimate theatre. Lord Buckley and Lenny Bruce played there. Now it's just a strip joint, full of transsexuals. Behind the Ivar is another nightclub called The Gaslight. Used to be called the Sewers Of Paris. (Source: "Tom Waits: Waits And Double Measures" Smash Hits magazine by Johnny Black. March 18, 1981)

Read full story: Ivar Theatre



(17) Buck a shot for pop tunes, and a fin for guided tours

- One dollar tip per song, five dollar tip for a medeley (Source: Submitted by El RayoX. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)

- One dollar for popular tunes, five dollar with the story to go with them (tips for the piano player) (Submitted by Mark/PETSKI1, Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(18) Hustle: The "hustle" in the last verse should really be "huddle". And so it is in all the live versions. Not on 'Small Change' though. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(19) The One That Got Away:

Dan Forte (1977): "One of the reasons Waits is able to pull off such an anachronous deception is that he spends a lot of time blending in at such haunts as pool halls, all-night diners, movie houses, and places where he is usually surrounded by men two or three decades his senior. One such hangout is the local musicians' union hall: "You go down there on Thursday afternoon " he details, "walk into the rec room downstairs. All these old cats smoking cheap cigars, checkin' out the billboard, playing snooker, and telling stories about the one that got away"(Source: "Tom Waits - Offbeat Poet And Pianist" Contemporary Keyboard magazine, by Dan Forte. April, 1977)

- This song was used for the 1978 animated short "Tom Waits For No One" by John Lamb and Bruce Lyon. Full story: Tom Waits For No One



The Other Side Of The World

 



There's a blue eyed(1) girl with a red bow tie

And a string of pearls, with one good eye

In a rainy town the chimney smoke will curl

No one likes clowns on the other side of the world

And the children know she'll never let me go



There's a one legged priest that tangos with the farmer's wife

Beauty and the beast is taking her own life

And a tear on a letter back home turns into a lake of your own

And a crow turns into a girl on the other side of the world

And she tastes like the sea and she's waiting for me



In the spring the weeds will show, he brought back the only rose

And he gave it to his girl on the other side of the world

And I drink champagne from your thin blue veins



She visits his grave wearing her mother's shawl

Should I shave or end it all?



There's an old sailor song that the children know

As their fingers curl 'round the other side of the world



On a bone white mare lost in Kathleen's hair



In the spring the weeds will show, he brought back the only rose

And he gave it to his girl on the other side of the world



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP) administered by Ackee Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1991

Official release: Night On Earth (Original Soundtrack Recording), Island Records Inc., 1992



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Blue eyed: adj. 1. Drunk. c1850; obs. 2. Innocent, gullible; idealistic; unworldly. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Blue: adj. 1. [late 18C-19C] confused, terrified, disappointed. 2. [late 18C+] miserable, depressed (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

Blue eyed boy/ girl: A man/ woman, not necessarily a youth, who is most favored by those in power (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "Whistle Down The Wind" (Where the blue-eyed girls, and the red guitars, and the naked rivers flow)



The Part You Throw Away

 



(Ute Lemper version, 2000)



You dance real slow

And you wreck it down

Walk away and you turn around

What did that old blonde guy say

That's the part you throw away



I want that beggar's eyes

The winning horse

A tidy Mexican divorce

St. Mary's prayers Houdini's(1) hands

And a barman who always understands



Will you loose the flowers

Hold on to the vase?

Will you wipe all those teardrops away from your face?

And I can't help feeling as I close the door

I have done all of this many times before



The bone must go

The wish can stay

A kiss don't know what the lips will say

Forget I ever hurt you

Put stones in our bed

Remember to never mind instead



But all of your letters burned up in the fire

And time is just memory mixed with desire(2)

That's not the road It's only the map, I say

Gone just like matches from a closed down cabaret



In a Portuguese saloon(3)

A fly is circling round the room

You'll soon forget the tune that they play

For that's the part you throw away

For that's the part you throw away



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Punishing Kiss - Ute Lemper, 2000 (performed by Ute Lemper)





 



The Part You Throw Away



(Blood Money studio version, 2002)



You dance real slow

You wreck it down

Then you walk away you turn around

What did that old blonde gal say?

That is the part you throw away



I want that beggar's eyes

a winning horse

A tidy Mexican divorce

St. Mary's prayers, Houdini's(1) hands

And a barman who always...

understands



Will you loose the flowers

Hold on to the vase?

Will you wipe all those teardrops

away from your face?

I can't help feeling as I close the door

I have done all of this...

many times before



But the bone must go

The wish can stay

The kiss don't know what the lips will say

Forget I've hurt you

Put stones in our bed

And remember to never...

mind instead



But all of your letters burned up in the fire

And time is just memory mixed with desire(2)

That's not the road It is only the map, I say

Gone just like matches...

from a closed down cabaret



In a Portuguese saloon(3)

A fly is circling around the room

You'll soon forget the tune that you play

Cause that is the part...

you throw away

Oh that is the part...

you throw away



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002



Known covers:

Punishing Kiss. Ute Lemper. March 2000/ April 4, 2000. Polygram (Japan), Uni/ Decca (USA)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Steve Evans Quartet, 2 Sets. Steve Evans. December 4, 2006. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Houdini: Erich Weiss. Born: Appleton, WI, 1874 - Died: Detroit, 1926. American actor/ magician. He became famous for sensational stunts, escaping from: cuffs, ropes, chains, straitjackets and locked suitcases, submerged in water.

- Also mentioned in The One That Got Away (Small Change, 1976): "Someone tipped her off, and she'll be doin' a Houdini now any day."



(2) Memory mixed with desire

- Might be inspired by or referring to "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" (short story by J.D. Salinger first published in the January 31, 1948 issue of The New Yorker, and later collected in 1949's 55 Stories from the New Yorker, as well as his 1953 collection, Nine Stories.): "Sybil immediately stooped and began to dig in the sand. "Let's go in the water," she said. "All right," said the young man. "I think I can work it in." "Next time, push her off," Sybil said. "Push who off?" "Sharon Lipschutz." "Ah, Sharon Lipschutz," said the young man. "How that name comes up. Mixing memory and desire." (Submitted by Zs�fi Szab� as sent to Tom Waits Library. January, 2006)

- Might be inspired by the opening of T.S Eliot's The Wasteland: "... April is the cruelest month, breeding lilacs out of the dead land, mixing memory and desire, stirring dull roots with spring rain" (Submitted by Silvio Darío, October 2008).



(3) In a Portuguese saloon

Terry Gilliam (2002): I'm looking down at [lyrics I've written] here and I keep seeing things like, "On the porch, geese salute."Is that the way the lyrics go? Tom WaitsOh no. That's even better. "In a Portuguese saloon." But I like that better. I'm going to write that down. [Terry repeats as Tom writes] (Source: "Grimm's Reapers": Black Book magazine (USA) June, 2002 by Terry Gilliam. Date April 10, 2002)

Tom Waits (2002): "I like the missing pieces. I don't like things too tidy. (Filmmaker) Terry Gilliam heard the line "in a Portuguese saloon" (from The Part You Throw Away), and he thought I was saying, "On the porch, the geese salute." That's better! I hope more people misunderstand me." (Source: "I hope more people misunderstand me": USA Today (USA), by Edna Gundersen. Date: Published: June 17, 2002)



The Piano Has Been Drinking

The Piano Has Been Drinking (Not Me)



(An evening with Pete King)(1)



The piano has been drinking, my necktie is asleep

And the combo went back to New York, the jukebox has to take a leak

And the carpet needs a haircut, and the spotlight looks like a prison break

Cause the telephone's out of cigarettes, and the balcony is on the make(2)

And the piano has been drinking

The piano has been drinking, and the menus are all freezing

And the light man's blind in one eye and he can't see out of the other

And the piano tuner's got a hearing aid, and he showed up with his mother

And the piano has been drinking

The piano has been drinking

As the bouncer(3) is a sumo wrestler, cream-puff(4) Casper Milktoast(5)

And the owner is a mental midget with the IQ of a fence post

Cause the piano has been drinking

The piano has been drinking

And you can't find your waitress with a Geiger counter

And she hates you and your friends and you just can't get served without her

And the box-office is drooling, and the bar stools are on fire

And the newspapers were fooling, and the ashtrays have retired

Cause the piano has been drinking

The piano has been drinking

The piano has been drinking

not me

not me

not me

not me

not

me



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: "Small Change", Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984





 



The Piano Has Been Drinking



(Live version: Dublin. March, 1981)



Well, the piano has been drinking, my necktie is asleep

and the combo went back to New York, and left me all alone

And the jude-box has to take a leak

Have you noticed that the carpet needs a haircut?

and the spotlight looks just like a prison break

and the the telephone's out of cigarettes

and as usual, the balcony is on the make(1)

and the piano has been drinking

heavily



And the piano has been drinking, he's on the hard stuff tonight

The piano has been drinking

And you can't find your waitress, even with a Geiger counter

And I guarantee you that she will hate you from the bottom of her glass

and all of your friends

But mind you, you just can't get served without her

And the piano has been drinking



The piano has been drinking



The lightman was blind in one eye and he can't see out of the other

The piano-tuner has got a hearing aid and he showed up with his mother

And the piano has been drinking



Without fear of contradiction I say:

the piano has been drinking



Our Father who areth in Cribari

hallowed it be

Thy glass, thy kingdom come, I will be done

Ah yeah, as it is in the lounges

Give us this day our daily splash

Forgive us our hangovers

as we forgive all those who continue to hang over against us

And lead us not into temptation

but deliver us from evil

and someone give us all a ride home



Cause the piano has been drinking

and he's your friend not mine

The piano has been drinking

and he's not my responsibility

The bouncer(2) is this Sumo wrestler, kinda cream-puff(3) Casper Milktoast(4)

And the owner is just a mental midget with the I.Q. of a fence post

And I'm going down

Hang on to me, I'm going down

Watch me skate across an acre of linoleum

I know I can do it

I'm in total control



And the piano has been drinking

and he is embarrassing me

The piano has been drinking

he raided his mini bar

The piano has been drinking

And the bar stools are all on fire

and all the newspapers were just fooling

and the ashtrays have retired

and I've got a feeling that the piano has been drinking

It's just a hunch



The piano has been drinking

and he's going to lose his lunch

And the piano has been drinking

not me

not me



The piano has been drinking

not me



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: "Bounced Checks", WEA/ Asylum Records, 1981(6)



Known covers:

Live 1989-1993. The Piano Has Been Drinking. November 15, 1993. Chlodwig (BMG/ Germany)

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "Pianoet er dritings")

Beatin' The Heat. Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks. August 29, 2000. Surfdog Records SD-67113-2

Alive & Lickin'. Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks. August 7, 2001. Surfdog Records

Lazy Sunday Afternoons. Dressy Vagabonds. November, 2003. Self-released



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "The Piano Has Been Drinking" in 1977

Taken from "Fernwood 2Night" sequel 21.

Syndicated television comedy show with Martin Mull and Fred Willard/ USA

Broadcast August 1, 1977



Notes:



(1) Pete King: Peter 'Pete' Stephen George King, co-founder and club director of Ronnie Scott's Club (Soho London), in October, 1959. Waits played Ronnie Scott's Club, Soho/ London. May 31 - Jun. 12, 1976. King was born in Bow, East London, 23rd August, 1929. He worked as a semi-professional, on tenor saxophone and clarinet, with Jack Oliver's band, playing every Saturday night at the Stoke Newington Town Hall, where he first met Ronnie Scott, playing with the Tito Burns Sextet, the 'name' booked for the night. It was to be a fruitful encounter. Turning professional, Pete played with Leslie 'Jiver' Hutchinson, Kathy Stobart, Harry Parry and Jack Parnell. It was with the latter that he was given the sack, as the female vocalist Parnell had booked insisted her husband be in the band. It was a measure of Pete's popularity that six members of the band gave notice in protest, but this led to him forsaking the reed in his mouthpiece for another mouthpiece - the telephone, in a career of management, representing Ronnie Scott and Tubby Hayes, the two pairing for the historic Jazz Couriers. When Ronnie and Pete opened the club in October, 1959, it was a different world





(2) On the make: To be receptive to or to encourage sexual advances from the opposite sex, usu. said of females; to make sexual advances or desire sexual intercourse with one of the opposite sex, usu. said of males; to seek or readily enter into sexual intercourse, said of both sexes (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(3) Bouncer n.: A person employed to eject unwanted customers from a saloon, restaurant, dance hall, etc. Late 1800s (Source: New dictionary of American slang, Chapman) 



(4) Cream puff, creampuff n.: A weakling; a person of slight physique; a sissy (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(5) Milquetoast n.: Any shy, timid, or extremely gentle person. From H.T. Webster's cartoon character Caspar Milquetoast, central figure of the comic strip "The Timid Soul". First published in the N.Y. "World"; later in many other forms and publications (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- "The usual sense is that of a person who is timid or meek, unassertive. Such people may appear apathetic or unmotivated, but that's not the reason for their being quiet. It's an eponym, named after a fictional cartoon character named Caspar Milquetoast, invented by the American illustrator Harold T Webster in 1924. The strip was called The Timid Soul and appeared every Sunday in the New York Herald Tribune up to his death in 1953. Mr Webster said that his character was "the man who speaks softly and gets hit with a big stick". The name is just a Frenchified respelling of the old American English term milk toast, an uninspiring, bland dish which was created from slices of buttered toast laid in a dish of milk, usually considered to be food for invalids. There's an even older foodstuff, milksop, which was untoasted bread soaked in milk, likewise something suitable only for infants or the sick. From the thirteenth century on, milksop was a dismissive term for "an effeminate spiritless man or youth; one wanting in courage or manliness", as the Oxford English Dictionary puts it. Mr Milquetoast is in the same tradition." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(6) In the mid 1970s Waits sometimes performed this song in a medley with "Makin' Whoopee!" Written by: Gus Kahn/ Walter Donaldson, 1928. Prime artist: Ella Fitzgerald/ Louis Armstrong. Performed as part of: The Piano Has Been Drinking (Agora Ballroom, Cleveland, USA, August 25, 1976): "Another bride, another June Another sunny honeymoon Another season, another reason For makin' whoopee A lot of shoes, a lot of rice The groom is nervous, he answers twice Its really killin' That he's so willin' to make whoopee Now picture a little love nest Down where the roses cling Picture the same sweet love nest Think what a year can bring, yes He's washin dishes and baby clothes He's so ambitious he even sews But don't forget folks, Thats what you get folks, for makin' whoopee Another year, maybe less What's this I hear? Well, can't you guess? She feels neglected, and he's suspected Of makin' whoopee Yeah, she sits alone, Most every night He doesn't phone, he doesn't write He says he's busy, But she says, "Is he?" He's makin' whoopee Now he doesn't make much money Only five thousand per Some judge who thinks he's funny Says, "You'll pay six to her." He says, "Now judge, suppose I fail?" Judge say, "Budge. Right into jail. You'd better keep her. I think it's cheaper Than makin' whoopee. "Yes, yeah, you better keep her Daddy", I think it's cheaper Then makin' whoopee."



The Pontiac

 



Well, let's see... we had the eh Fairlane. Then the u-joints went out on that,

and the bushings. And then your mother wanted to trade it in on the Tornado,

so we got the Tornado. God, I hated the color of that sonufa bitch! And

the dog destroyed the upholstery on the Ford. Boy, that was long before you

were born. We called it the Yellowbird, two-door, three on the tree. Tight

little mother. Threw a rod, sold it to Jacobs for a hundred dollar



Now the special eh... four-holer, you've never seen body panels line up

like that. Overhead cam, dual exhaust. You know I had... let's see I had...

four Buicks, loved 'em all



Now your Uncle Emmet, well he drives a Thunderbird, it used to belong to your

Aunt Evelyn(1). Well, she ruined it, drove it to Indiana with no gear oil. That

was the end of that! Sold that Cadillac to your mom. Your mom loved that

Caddy. Independent rear suspension, Landau top, good tires. Gas hog. I swear

it had the power to repair itself



I loved the Olds... Dan Steele used to give 'em to me at a discount. Showroom

models and that. And then there was the Pontiac and...



God, I loved that Pontiac.

Well, it was kind of an oxblood god

but It handled so beautifully.

Yeah, I miss that car.

Well, that was a long time ago

a long time ago



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(2)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1987/ 2006

Official release: "Smack My Crack", 1987 (spoken word)

Re-released on: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Aunt Evelyn

- Also mentioned in Pony, 1999: "I wish I was home, in Evelyn's kitchen."

Austin Chronicle (1999): The song "Pony" has a lot of characters. These names, "Burn-Face Jake," "Blind Darby." I think you're in "Evelyn's Kitchen." Are these real people that live in these songs? Tom Waits: "Evelyn's Kitchen," that's my Aunt Evelyn, who passed away during the making of the record. Her and my uncle had 10 kids and lived in a place called Gridley. I guess I've been far away from home, and have thought about her kitchen a lot and that a lot of people feel the same way when they've been far away from home. I dreamed about getting back home to her kitchen. That's why we put her in there -- a tribute to Evelyn. The other people are just different people I've come across over the years -- known, heard about, read about." (Source: Mule Conversations. Austin Chronicle: Jody Denberg. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "My Aunt Evelyn died while we were making the record [Mule Variations]. She was my favorite aunt. She and my Uncle Chalmer had ten kids, and raised prunes and peaches. They lived in Gridley, and there have been a lot of times when I've been far away from home, and I've thought about Evelyn's kitchen. And I know there are a lot of people that loved them, that thought about that same kitchen. So that's why we put that in there. They had an old dog named Gyp. If you make up songs, sometimes you just get up in the morning and start singing something on the way to work. You don't know why, and maybe it's worth remembering, or maybe it's not." (Source: "A Q&A about Mule Variations ". MSO: Rip Rense. January, 1999)



(2) The Pontiac:

The Plain Dealer (2006): "How autobiographical is "The Pontiac"? Tom Waits: "That's my father-in-law, a ride down to the corner store with my father-in-law, talking about endless catalog of cars he's owned and the detail with which he remembers each one lovingly." (Source: "Songwriter's Wandering Orphans' Will Always Find A Musical Home", The Plain Dealer (Cleveland/ USA). November 19, 2006.Telephone interview by John Soeder)



There's Only Alice

 



(Alice demo version, 1992. Also known as: There's Only Alice)(1)



It's dreamy weather we're on

You waved your crooked wand

Along an icy pond, with a frozen moon

A murder of silhouette crows, I saw in the tears on my face

And the skates on the pond, they spelled Alice(2)



I disappear in your name, but you must wait for me

Somewhere beneath the sea, there's the wreck of a ship

Your hair is like meadow-grass on the tide

And the raindrops on my window, and the ice in my drink

Baby, all I can think of is Alice



Arithme-tic, arithme-toc,(4) turn the hands back on the clock

How does the ocean rock the boat?

How did the razor find my throat?

The only strings that hold me here are tangled up around the pier



And so a secret kiss brings madness with the bliss

And I will think of it when I'm dead in my grave

It set me adrift, and I'm lost in your hair

And I must be insane, to go skating on your name

And by tracing it twice, I fell through the ice of Alice



There's only Alice(3)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Alice



(Alice studio version, 2002)(1)



It's dreamy weather we're on

You waved your crooked wand

Along an icy pond, with a frozen moon

A murder of silhouette crows, I saw

in the tears on my face

And the skates on the pond, they spell Alice(2)



I'll disappear in your name, but you must wait for me

Somewhere across the sea, there's the wreck of a ship

Your hair is like meadow-grass, on the tide

And the raindrops on my window,

and the ice in my drink

Baby, all I can think of is Alice



Arithmetic, arithmetock,(4) turn the hands back on the clock

How does the ocean rock the boat?

How did the razor find my throat?

The only strings that hold me here

are tangled up around the pier



And so a secret kiss brings madness with the bliss

And I will think of this when I'm dead in my grave

Set me adrift, and I'm lost over there

And I must be insane, to go skating on your name

And by tracing it twice, I fell through the ice of Alice



And so a secret kiss brings madness with the bliss

And I will think of this when I'm dead in my grave

Set me adrift, and I'm lost over there

And I must be insane, to go skating on your name

And by tracing it twice, I fell through the ice of Alice



There's only Alice(3)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992/ 2002

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

The Music Never Ends. Johanna Olsson. March 23, 2004. Self-released (Sweden)

Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling. June 14, 2004. Buschfunk (Germany)

Todo Chueco. Danilo Gallo & The Roosters. 2005. El Gallo Rojo Records (Italy)

Fictions. Jane Birkin. March 20, 2006 Label: Capitil/ EMI



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "There's Only Alice" and theatre footage (excerpt)

at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December, 1992.

Taken from The Late Show "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice" (1993)

BBC TV documentary presented by Beatrix Campbell. Aired March 4, 1993



Notes:



(1) There's Only Alice: Sung by the White Rabbit in scene 1. Stage directions from the play: Scene 1: "Down The Rabbit hole". Alice falls down the rabbit hole; numerous objects fall past her. She sees a mirror with her name written on it. The mirror breaks and her name is lost. [The White Rabbit sings:]



(2) And the skates on the pond, they spell "Alice": Notice analogy with: "And the branches spell "Alice", and I belong only to you" (Barcarolle, 1992/ 2002).



(3) Stage directions from the play: "Meanwhile, Alice has come to rest beside a little glass table. She has landed in the White Rabbit's house. The White Rabbit picks up his camera, goes through a door, and disappears. Alice attempts to go through the door, but it shrinks to a tiny opening. Alice stretches out on the floor and peers through. She sees a beautiful flower garden beyond, but cannot reach it."



(4) Arithmetic, arithmetock: This might be inspired by the Mock Turtle's puns from the original "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll. Chapter 9: The Mock Turtle's Story: "Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with," the Mock Turtle replied; "and then the different branches of Arithmetic - Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision." (Source: "Lewis Carroll The Annotated Alice", Martin Gardner. Penguin Books, 1960).



The Return Of Jackie And Judy

 



Oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Well, Jackie is a punk, and Judy is a runt

They went down to the Mudd Club

and they both got drunk

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah



Well, Jackie is a bookie, and Judy's taking loans

They both came up to New York

just to see the Ramones

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah



And oh, I don't know why she wrote that letter

I don't know why, we can't forget her

Oh-no



Well, Jackie's playing hooky, Judy's playing pool

They both got caught for cutting

Now they're goin' to summer school

Oh-yeah



Now Jackie's playin' Hooky, Judy's getting rammed

They both got kicked outside

They ain't got no time, na-na-na.

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah



And oh, I don't know why she wrote that letter, oh yeah

I don't know why, we can't forget her

Oh-no



Well, Jackie is a punk, and Judy is a runt

They went down to the Mudd Club

and they both got drunk

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah



Now Jackie's playing hooky, Judy's playing pool

They both got caught for cutting

Now they're goin' to summer school

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah, oh-yeah

Oh-yeah



Written by: Joey Ramone, Johnny Ramone and Dee Dee Ramone.

WB Music Corp. (ASCAP) and Taco Tunes (ASCAP). All rights adminstered by WB Music Corp.(1)

Official release (Tom Waits version): "We're A Happy Family - A tribute To The Ramones". Various Artists (Columbia/ Sony, February 11, 2003). Re-released on "Orphans (Brawlers)", (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) The Return Of Jackie And Judy

Greg Kot (2006): "You also cover a couple of Ramones songs. Do they rank up there as songwriters with some of the other people you cover, like Brecht and Weill? Tom Waits: Oh, God, yeah. There's a trick to playing in a rudimentary fashion like that and staying true to what originally inspired you. Everyone wants to see someone that loves what they do and do it well. They were that. They sound like a big motor. Greg Kot. What makes their voice unique to you in a song like "The Return of Jackie and Judy"? Tom Waits. I wanted to try and T-Rex it somehow. It's a weird lyric. Who the hell are these people? Every time you wrap yourself around somebody else's song you're going to bring yourself to it. You're going to turn it inside out. You remove stuff and replace stuff. It's like when you think about songs you know and you've heard. If somebody just holds a gun to you and says what do you want to do? Gloria! I'll do "Gloria" right now! [Sings] G-l-o-r-i-a! Gloria! You don't know why it's in your head or how it stayed there that long or when it would come out if somebody pushed you. You don't really know. It's song logic. It's not really rational." (Source: "Tom Waits Still In The Driver's Seat", The Chicago Tribune (USA). November 21, 2006. By Greg Kot)




 




The Wages Of Love

 



Down through the ages, all of the sages

Said, don't spend your wages on love

It's graft and collusion about the intrusion

And preceding foreclosures, there's overexposure



Down at the crossroads the question is posed

Bridge is washed out and the highway is closed

Gotta have good reason to firmly believe

Love was designed to exploit and deceive



There's an addendum, wherever you send 'em

(?) in your chest, you will see

Simple addition keeps with tradition

Don't spend your wages on love



Take any burgh, any city or town

Just get on Main Street and drive all the way down

You see, love has a graveyard nurtured for those

That fell on their sabers and paid through the nose(2)



Your shovel's a shot glass, dig your own hole

Bury what's left of your miserable soul

Down through the ages, all of the sages

Said don't spend your wages on love



It's graft and collusion about the intrusion

And preceding foreclosure, there's overexposure

Down at the crossroads the question is posed

And the bridge is washed out and the highway is closed



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Alternate version (demo) released on the 2004 DVD re-issue of One From The Heart

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Wages of Love: Might refer to "The Wages Of Sin". To earn the wages of sin. To be hanged, or condemned to death. "I believe some of you will be hanged unless you change a good deal. It's cold blood and bad blood that runs in your veins, and you'll come to earn the wages of sin."- Boldrewood: Robbery under Arms, ii. "The wages of sin is death."- Rom. vi. 23. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)

Tom Waits (1982): "Francis and Richard Beggs were constantly trying different songs against different scenes. They were very experimental in that way, always thinking, "What would happen if we moved this song there and replaced it with another one?" There was a song called "Empty Pockets" that was originally designed for the opening. Francis' brother August had mentioned the line to me. I wrote it down and later developed it into a song. So it was in, then out, then in again... now it's been replaced by a song called "Wages of Love." (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



(2) Pay through the nose

- To pay excessively (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- To pay reluctantly or to pay an exorbitant price. (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. October, 2000. From "2,107 Curious Word Origins, Sayings and Expressions" by Charles Earle).

- Lyrics might also refer to using cocaine. Also mentioned in Nighthawk Postcards, 1975: "As I attempt to consolidate all my missed weekly rendezvous into one low monthly payment, through the nose."



World Keeps Turning

 



On our anniversary

There'll be someone else where you used to be

The world don't care and yet it clings to me

And the moon is gold and silvery(1)



Who knows where the sidewalk ends

Well, the road will turn and the road will bend

They always say: he marks the sparrow's fall(2)

How can anyone believe it all?



Well, the band has stopped playing but we keep dancing

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning

On his hand he wore the ring of another

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning



We broke the bank and we tore up the place

And we disappeared, oh without a trace

Now the sun it falls into the sea

I know I'm the only one for me



I was so green and the dress you wore was yellow

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning

The sun is down and the moon is in the meadow

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning



Put a hat on your head

Will you paint the whole damn town red with me?(3)



Well, the band has stopped playing but we keep dancing

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning

On his hand he wore the ring of another

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning



The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning

The world keeps turning, the world keeps turning



Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2001/ 2006

Official release: "Pollock - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack", 2001. Label: Unitone 5301.

Produced by Jeff Beal. Adam Lane: Bass.

Re-released on Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Silver moon: Notice the same phrase being mentioned in: Drunk On the moon, 1974: "And the moon's a silver slipper, It's pouring champagne stars." All The World's Green, 2000/ 2002: "The moon is yellow silver, On the things that summer brings." Flower's Grave, 2002: "Someday the silver moon and I, Will go to Dreamland."



(2) They always say: he marks the sparrow's fall:

- Biblical reference (Matthew 10:29). Jesus said: "Are not two sparrows sold for a cent? And yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from your Father." (meaning: whatever the circumstance of a sparrow's fall, it could not have done so unless god had in some sense determined that it would).

- Might be quoting from or referring to Lord Byron's "The Adieu" (1807, first published 1832, written under the impression that the author would soon die). Excerpt: "Father of Light! to Thee I call; My soul is dark within: Thou who canst mark the sparrow's fall, Avert the death of sin. Thou, who canst guide the wandering star, Who calm'st the elemental war, Whose mantle is yon boundless sky, My thoughts, my words, my crimes forgive: And, since I soon must cease to live, Instruct me how to die."

- Might be quoting from or referring to Emma Hart Willard's "Rock Me in the Cradle of the Deep" (1840). Excerpt: "Rocked in the cradle of the deep, I lay me down in peace to sleep; Secure I rest upon the wave, For thee, O Lord, hast powet the save: I know thou wilt not slight my call, For thou dost mark the sparrow's fall: And calm and peaceful is my sleep, Rocked in the cradle of the deep."



(3) Paint the town red, tophr. [late 19C+] (orig. US) to go on a spree (paint the town pink). [? the excesses of the Marquis of Waterford and a bunch of aristocratic vandals who on the night of 5-6 April 1837 literally painted Waterford red. daubing the buildings with paint] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



This One's From The Heart

 



I should go out and honk the horn, it's Independence Day

But instead I just pour myself a drink

It's got to be love, I've never felt this way

Oh baby, this one's from the heart



The shadows on the wall look like a railroad track

I wonder if he's ever comin' back

The moon's a yellow stain across the sky

Oh baby, this one's from the heart



Maybe I'll go down to the corner and get a racin' form

But I should prob'ly wait here by the phone

And the brakes need adjustment on the convertible

Oh baby, this one's from the heart



The worm is climbin' the avocado tree

Rubbin' its back against the wall

I pour myself a double sympathy

Oh baby, this one's from the heart



Blondes, brunettes, and redheads put their hammer down

To pound a cold chisel(2) through my heart.

But they were nothin' but apostrophes

Oh baby, this one's from the heart



I can't tell, is that a siren or a saxophone?

But the roads get so slippery when it rains

I love you more than all these words can ever say

Oh baby, this one's from the heart



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Sax At The Movies - 2. Jazz At The Movies Band. January 17, 1995. Discovery/ Wea (instrumental)

Bedroom Mixes. Jazz at the Movies Band. November 7, 2000. Warner Brothers (instrumental, same version as on "Sax At The Movies - 2", 1995)

A Minor Work. The Priestess And The Fool. February 20, 2008. Exotic Recordings

The Movie Songbook. Sharleen Spiteri. May 1, 2010. Mercury



Notes:



(1) The last session Waits and Gayle had together was, in Howe's estimation, the most incredible one of all. They posed for the album-cover photos, and then they performed two duets, the centerpieces of the score: one was the angry lover's spat, "Picking Up After You"; and the other was "This One's from the Heart." Yet the perfect session came very close to being scuttled. While in L.A., Crystal learned that her mother had become gravely ill. She called Howe to say that she was too upset to come to the studio. "The rap on Crystal Gayle in those days was she had this beautiful voice but no soul," Howe recalls. "I thought she sounded really vulnerable and figured if I could get her to the studio now, I might really get something." He urged her to reconsider, saying that working might prove therapeutic for her - at the very least it would keep her mind off her mother's condition, a situation she couldn't control. "She came into the studio, and she and Tom sang those duets together that day. They sat at the piano together and sang those duets. It was such a wonderful, wonderful day in the studio." During that final session, Crystal also recorded the redemption piece of the score, a beam of sunlight that penetrates the dark, smoky atmosphere. Said Waits, "Toward the end of shooting, Francis said, Everything's so sad, we need something with hope in it.' That's when 'Take Me Home' came about. The musical idea came early on, but the words were some of the last ones I wrote. I tried to sing it and it sounded real soppy, so I gave it to Crystal. I sat down at the piano, played it three or four times for her, then she cut it. I liked the way she did it. " (Source: Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. Jay S. Jacobs, 2000)



(1982): Did you write any songs that were specifically designed for her to sing? TW: "Is there Any Way Out of This Dream?" and "Take Me Home" were written for Crystal to sing. "Old Boyfriends" was originally for me, then for her, then it turned into a duet. "Picking Up After You" and "This One's From the Heart" were written as duets. I found that it was hard writing for a woman. There are certain words they're uncomfortable with. I can get away with a certain vernacular, while a woman singing it would have trouble. I had to change things around, put everything into her words. It was tough. I felt like I was writing lines for an actress (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



(2) Cold-chisel

- A chisel of tempered steel for cutting cold metal. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also mentioned in "Black Wings": "When the moon is a cold chiseled dagger."



Thousand Bing Bangs

 



TW: She drove a big ol' Lincoln with suicide doors(1) and a sewing machine

  in the back

KN: Thousand bing bangs near the end. Nothing's ever what it was

TW: And a light bulb that looked like an alligator egg was mounted up

  front on the hood

KN: Had myself a kind of brainstorm. Took a table spoon of buzz

TW: And she had a tattoo gun that she'd made herself from a cassette

  motor and a guitar string(2)

KN: X-ray eyes can see right through me. Naked thought, put on your

  clothes

TW: And she always had leaves in her hair

KN: You hear that funny laughing? Just the caw of ancient crows

TW: And she cut two holes in the back of her dress, cause she had these

  scapular wings

KN: Somewhere near the raveled edges, by the pool of Think-a-Bit

TW: And they were covered with feathers and electrical tape, and when

  she got good and drunk she would sing

KN: Once again the notion hits me: Half is quite a bit of wit

TW: About Elkhart, Indiana, where the wind is tall and folks mind their

  own business

KN: Power up that upper story. Ten percent is all you use

TW: And she had a hundred old baseballs that she'd taken from kids, and

  she collected bones of all kinds

KN: Take a flight of simple fancy. You're the one who has to choose

TW: And she lived in a trailer under the bridge, and she made her own

  whiskey and gave cigarettes to kids

KN: Okay. All right for you. Look into the tiger's eye

TW: And she'd been struck by lightning seven or eight times, and she

  hated the mention of rain

KN: See if you can see the desert. Pour a drink, my throat is dry

TW: And she made up her own language and she wore rubber boots. She

  could fix anything with string

KN: Poetry ain't gonna catch me. Climb up this high plateau

TW: And her lips were like cherries, and she was stronger than any man,

  and she smelled like nutmeg and piss

KN: Finish up what you were thinking, just a day or so ago

TW: And she put mud on a bee sting I got at the crick, and she gave me

  my very first kiss

KN: Illustrate for visionaries: Go buy a doodle pad. Basically



Written by: Ken Nordine

Published by: LYRICS Rubber frog Publishing (ASCAP)/ MUSIC Ice Nine Publishing (ASCAP), � 1991

Official release: Devout Catalyst - Ken Nordine, Grateful Dead Productions Inc., 1992

Recorded in February and mixed in April 1991 at Club Front in San Rafael

Spoken word: Nordine & Waits



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Suicide doors

- Door configuration rear-opening [front doors are hinged at the "B" pillars and the rear ones at the "C" pillars]. B-pillars: In sedan styles, the second set of roof supports (between the windshield and rear portion of the roof). C-pillars: In sedan styles, the third set of roof supports located between the rear window and �- window in the roof �-panel.

- Also mentioned in Putting On The Dog (Liberty heights soundtrack, 1999/ Orphans-Brawlers, 2006): "Well, we could go into a zuki jump It's rainin', it pours Big old Lincoln with suicide doors." (Source: The (new) Cadillac Database�, Glossary of Cadillac Terms and Definitions. � 1996, Yann Saunders and the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, Inc.)



(2) A tattoo gun that she'd made herself from a cassette motor and a guitar string:

Robert Sabbag (1987): "Speaking about the need to impose limitations, about constructing a framework within which to write, he draws an analogy. TW: "Like the guy in prison who made a tattoo machine out of a Bic pen, a guitar string and a cassette loader. Some red ink. He wrapped the handle in such a way, with a T-shirt, it felt just like a bird in your hand." (Source: "Tom Waits Makes Good" Los Angeles Times: Robert Sabbag. February 22, 1987)

Tom Waits (1988): "I'll tell you, the best thing I ever saw was a kid who had a tattoo gun made out of a cassette motor and a guitar string. The whole thing was wrapped in torn pieces of T-shirt, and it fit in your hands just like a bird. It was one of the most thrilling things I'd ever seen, that kind of primitive innovation. I mean, that's how words develop, through mutant usage of them. People give new meaning, stronger meaning, or they cut the meaning of the word by overusing if, or they use it for something else... I just love that stuff." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years". Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)

Tom Waits (2004): "I know a guy who applied for a job teaching guitar to prison inmates, some kind of rehab therapy. This was at San Quentin, one of the toughest prisons we've got. The first day he gave them all a guitar and the next day everybody needed strings. Not just one string. They aII needed six more strings. So the guards all thought, "That's it. End of the programme. They're using the guitar strings for weapons." But they were aII being used to make needles for tattoo guns And they would wrap the device in cut up pieces of T-shirt and make the most beautiful handle for it." (Source: "Coffee With Tom Waits" Zembla magazine - Issue 7, by Richard Grant. December, 2004)

- From Circus (Real Gone, 2004): "And me and Molley Hoey drank Pruno and Koolaid and she had a tattoo gun made out of a cassette motor."



Nordine's poem without Waits':



 



Thousand bing bangs near the end. Nothing's ever what it was

Had myself a kind of brainstorm. Took a table spoon of buzz

X-ray eyes can see right through me. Naked thought, put on your clothes

You hear that funny laughing? Just the caw of ancient crows

Somewhere near the raveled edges, by the pool of Think-a-Bit

Once again the notion hits me: half is quite a bit of wit

Power up that upper story. Ten percent is all you use

Take a flight of simple fancy. You're the one who has to choose

Okay. All right for you. Look into the tiger's eye

See if you can see the desert. Pour a drink, my throat is dry

Poetry ain't gonna catch me. Climb up this high plateau

Finish up what you were thinking, just a day or so ago

Illustrate for visionaries: Go buy a doodle pad

Basically





 



Waits' poem without Nordine's:

(In 2006 released as "First Kiss" on Orphans)



She drove a big ol' Lincoln with suicide doors

and a sewing machine in the back

And a light bulb that looked like an alligator egg

was mounted up front on the hood

And she had a tattoo gun that she made herself

from a cassette motor and a guitar string

And she always had leaves in her hair

And she cut two holes in the back of her dress

cause she had these scapular wings

And they were covered in feathers and electrical tape

And when she got good and drunk

she would sing about Elkhart, Indiana

Where the wind is tall and folks mind their own business

And she had a hundred old baseballs that she'd taken from kids

And she collected bones of all kinds

And she lived in a trailer under the bridge

And she made her own whiskey and gave cigarettes to kids

And she'd been struck by lightning seven or eight times

And she hated the mention of rain

And she made up her own language and she wore rubber boots

She could fix anything with string

And her lips were like cherries

And she was stronger than any man

And she smelled like nutmeg and piss

And she put mud on a bee sting I got at the creek

And she gave me my very first kiss



Tijuana

 



(Live version, 1973)



I got lost on my way home from Tijuana

I didn't think the main road was that far

But I had to stop some place to ask directions

And I guess that's how I wound up in this bar



Now I'm stuck in this bar, and I can't find my car

And I'm wishing on a star like a fool in the night

In my mind things keep changing, but outside it just keeps raining

The lonesome night can be so cruel



Then I (...?...) that eight ball [they're singing different words!]

He made a fancy railshot one time

I bet him that he couldn't do it again

And that's when I lost my last dime



And I'm stuck in this bar, and I can't find my car

And I'm wishing on a star like a fool in the night

In my mind things keep changing, but outside it just keeps raining

The lonesome night can be so cruel



This reminds me of the time, drinking red mountain wine

In the back of a Volkswagen bus

And I wound up in jail, with no one to go my bail

But at least I knew where I was



And I'm stuck in this bar, and I can't find my car

And I'm wishing on a star like a fool in the night

And in my mind things keep changing, but outside it just keeps raining

The lonesome night can be so cruel



Written by: Tom Waits and Jack Tempchin

No official release

Transcribed from live version by Ulf Berggren (Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





 



Tijuana



(Studio version, 1978)



Well, I got lost on my way home from Tijuana

I didn't think highway five went that far

But I had to stop someplace and get directions

And I guess that's how I wound up in this bar.



Now I'm stuck in this bar 'Cause I can't find my car

I'm wishing on a star like a fool

I need a dime for the phone I wish I was home

The lonesome night can be so cruel.



Well, I lost all my paycheck playing eight ball

Foxy waitress made a rail shot one time.

I bet her that she couldn't do it again.

And that's when I lost my last dime.



And now I'm stuck in this bar 'Cause I can't find my car

I'm wishing on a star like a fool

I need a dime for the phone God, I wish I was home

The lonesome night can be so cruel.



Well, this reminds me of the time We were drinkin' Red Mountain wine

In the back of a Volkswagen bus

And I wound up in Jail with no one to go my bail

But at least, I knew where I was



Written by: Tom Waits and Jack Tempchin

Published by: Night River Publishing, � 1978

Official release: "Jack Tempchin". Jack Tempchin, (1978, Arista AB 4193)

(Submitted by Hans Nijs. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Live intro from: Folk Arts Rare Records, San Diego, USA. November 16, 1973 (also lists as: November 10, 1973 KCRW-FM Snap Sessions and November 19, 1973 KPFK Snap sessions). "TW: Jack, you wanna come up and do that... song? [off-mike confusion over the title of the thing]. JT: I don't know... TW: Eh... maybe... You got me in a spot there! I don't know. JT: Tijuana... Sun? TW: Tijuana... eh... Tijuana! We'll just call it 'Tijuana'!"



'Til The Money Runs Out

 



 



Check this strange beverage that falls out from the sky

Splashin' Bagdad on the Hudson in Panther Martin's eyes

He's high and outside, wearin' candy apple red

Scarlet gave him twenty-seven stitches in his head

With a pint of green Chartreuse, ain't nothin' seems right

You buy the Sunday paper on a Saturday night



Can't you hear the thunder, someone stole my watch

I sold a quart of blood and bought a half a pint of Scotch

Someone tell those Chinamen on Telegraph Canyon Road(1)

When you're on the bill with the spoon, there ain't no time to unload

So bye bye baby, baby bye bye



Droopy Stranger, Lonely Dreamer, Toy Puppy and the Prado

Were laughin' as they piled into Olmos' Eldorado(2)

Jesus whispered eeni meany miney moe

They're too proud to duck their heads, that's why they bring it down so low

So bye bye baby, baby bye bye



The pointed man is smack dab in the middle of July

Swingin' from the rafters in his brand new tie

He said, 'I can't go back to that hotel room, all they do is shout

But I'll stay with you, baby, till the money runs out'

So bye bye baby, baby bye bye



So bye bye baby, baby bye bye

Bye bye, bye

By bye baby, baby bye bye

Bye bye baby, baby bye bye.



Bye bye baby, baby bye bye

Bye bye baby, baby bye bye

Bye bye baby, baby bye bye

Oh, bye bye baby

Bye bye baby, baby bye bye



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: Heartattack And Vine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Tills pengarna tar slut")

Wicked Grin. John Hammond. March 13, 2001. Emd/ Virgin

Raw Deal. Bill Perry. August 31, 2004. Blind Pig



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1980): "It's an old mambo-type beat. SP: Do you know any of the Chinamen on Telegraph Road? TW: It's just a line about some Chinamen on Telegraph Road. Got outta that one pretty good, huh? SP: Okay. Just curious." (Source: "Heartattack and Vine". Us promo pack: Stephen Peeples. September 4, 1980)



(2) Olmos' Eldorado: The Eldorado model was part of the Cadillac line from 1953 to 2002. The Cadillac Eldorado was the longest running American personal luxury car as it was the only one sold after the 1999 model year. Although cars bearing the name varied considerably in bodystyle and mechanical layout during this long period, the Eldorado models were always near the top of the Cadillac line.



Time

 



(Rain Dogs studio version, 1985)



The smart money's(2) on Harlow, and the moon is in the street

And the shadow boys are breakin' all the laws

And you're east of East St. Louis(3), and the wind is making speeches

And the rain sounds like a round of applause



And Napoleon(4) is weepin' in a carnival saloon

His invisible fiancee's in the mirror

And the band is goin' home, it's rainin' hammers, it's rainin' nails

And it's true, there's nothin' left for him down here



And it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



And they all pretend they're orphans, and their memory's like a train

You can see it gettin' smaller as it pulls away

And the things you can't remember tell the things you can't forget

That history puts a saint in every dream



Well, she said she'd stick around until the bandages came off

But these mama's boys just don't know when to quit

And Matilda(5) asks the sailors, 'Are those dreams or are those prayers?'

So close your eyes, son, and this won't hurt a bit



Oh, it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



Well, things are pretty lousy for a calendar girl

The boys just dive right off the cars and splash into the street

And when they're on a roll(6), she pulls a razor from her boot

And a thousand pigeons fall around her feet



So put a candle in the window(7) and a kiss upon his lips

As the dish outside the window fills with rain

Just like a stranger with the weeds in your heart

And pay the fiddler(6) off till I come back again



Oh, it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



And it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time

And it's time, time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985-1998

Official release: "Rain Dogs", Island Records Inc., 1985 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)





 



Time



(Big Time live version, 1988)



The smart money's(2) on Harlow, and the moon is in the street

And the shadow boys are breakin' all the laws

Oh, and it's east of East St. Louis(3), and the wind is making speeches

And the rain sounds like a round of applause



And Napoleon(4) is weepin' in a carnival saloon

His invisible fianc�e is in the mirror

And the band is goin' home, it's rainin' hammers, it's rainin' nails

It's true, there's nothin' left for him down here



And it's time, time, time

And it is time, and it's time

And it's time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



And they all pretend they're orphans, and their memory's like a train

You can see them gettin' smaller as they pull away

Oh, and the things you can't remember tell the things you can't forget

That history puts a saint in every dream



Oh, she said she'd stick around 'til the bandages came off

But these mama's boys just don't know when to quit

And Matilda(5) asks the sailors, 'Are those dreams or are those prayers?'

Close your eyes, son, and this won't hurt a bit



And it's time, time, time

And it is time, time, time

And it's time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



Oh, and things are pretty lousy for the calendar girls

The boys just dive right off the cars and splash into the street

Oh, and when she's on a roll(6), she pulls a razor from her boot

And a thousand pigeons fall around her feet



So put a candle in the window(7) and a kiss upon my lips

As the dish outside the window fills with rain

Oh, and just like a stranger with the weeds in your heart

Pay the fiddler(8) off till I come back again



And it's time, time, time

And it is time, time, time

And it's time, time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



And it's time, time, time

And it is time, time, time

And it's time, time, time that you love

And it's time, time, time



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1985-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Also included in Big Time movie (1988). Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

T-Bone Burnett. T-Bone Burnett, 1986/ 1994. DOT Records (MCA) MCAD-31296/ 5809. Universal Special Products (1994)

Navidades Furiosas. Various artists. 1993. La Fábrica Magnética, Spain. (performed by: El Inquilino Comunista)

Roll Tide Roll. Jan Johansen. October, 1997. Lionheart Records (Sweden)

Canto Per Te. Andrea Mingardi. February 2, 1999. Sony/ Columbia, COL 489585-2 (in Italian)

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Vieux Carre. Torn Curtain. March, 2001. Self-released

Strange Little Girls. Tori Amos. September 18, 2001. WEA/ Atlantic

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Fram Till Nu. Jan Johansen. December, 2001. IND/ Sweden (same version as on Roll Tide Roll, 1997)

Unplugged. Anne Bärenz & Frank Wolff. 2003. Büchergilde (Germany)

Mens Te Koop. Kees Meerman. 2003. Self-released

The Music Never Ends. Johanna Olsson. March 23, 2004. Self-released (Sweden)

And How. Xanda Howe. June, 2004. Songphonic Records (bonus track)

"23". Golly. July, 2004. Media - Arte (Knopf Germany)

Your Town. 5 Mile Chase. October, 2005. Self-released

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

Gabelfrühstück. NOX (Gerd Köster & Dirk Raulf). May 11, 2006. Poise (Germany)

Leonard Cohen Auf Swedisch II (bonus track "Tid" in Swedish). Jan Erik Lundqvist. May 26, 2006. Meyer Records (Germany)

Bye-Bye. Anne Bärenz. October, 2006. Stalburg Theater (Germany)

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

American Storyteller Vol 2 & 3. Chris Chandler And Davd Roe. September 4, 2007. Self-released

Domestic Songs. Solveig Slettahjell. September 28, 2007. Act (Edel) 

In Love + Light. Heidi Talbot. February 25, 2008. Self-released

Just Doin´Time. Breeze the Creaze/ Golly. January 7, 2008. Knopfstudio (Germany)

Overcast - The Music Of Ed Partyka. The Sunday Night Orchestra. May 30, 2008. Mons Records, Germany



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Time" taken from Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre. Los Angeles/ USA. November 9, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) Time

Tom Waits (commenting on the song "Time", 1985): "Time: Time is a precious commodity..." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985) 



(2) Smart money

- Money bet or invested by those in the know, or by influential or wealthy people who are supposedly in a position to know that their bet or investment will be profitable (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- Money paid by a person to obtain exemption from some disagreeable office or duty; in law it means a heavy fine; and in recompense it means money given to soldiers or sailors for injuries received in the service. It either makes the person "smart," i.e. suffer, or else the person who receives it is paid for smarting. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 



(3) St. Louis

- Also mentioned in: I Beg Your Pardon, 1982: "Please don't go back to St. Louis, can't you tell that I'm sincere.", Train Song, 1987: "Well I broke down in East St. Louis, on the Kansas City Line." Hold On, 1999: "Well, God bless your crooked heart, St. Louis got the best of me.".

- Notice that East St. Louis is a notably rough and tough black side of town, very distinct from plain St. Louis. Being East of East St. Louis might be a Waitsian metaphor for being in the worst part possible of any town.

Jonathan Valania (1999): Getting back to the names of places, St. Louis seems to pop up a lot, in "Hold on" from the new record and "Time" from Rain Dogs and you've mentioned it a lot in interviews. Ever live there? TW: "No, never lived there. It's a good name to stick in a song. Every song needs to be anatomically correct: You need weather, you need the name of the town, something to eat - every song needs certain ingredients to be balanced. You're writing a song and you need a town, and you look out the window and you see "St. Louis Cardinals" on some kid's T-shirt. And you say, "Oh, we'll use that." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/ July, 1999)



(4) Napoleon

- On "The heart of Saturday night" Napoleon is credited for the cover illustration. According to Cal Schenkel Napoleon is the guy on the floor in front of the diner on the cover of "Nighthawks at the diner".

- Also mentioned in Diamonds And Gold (Rain Dogs, 1985): "Small time Napoleon's shattered his knees, But he stays in the saddle for Rose."





(5) Matilda: Might be Waits is refering to Matilda from Tom Traubert's Blues, 1976: "Waltzing Matilda, you'll go waltzing Matilda with me." The rhytmn and feeling of both songs are certainly alike



(6) Roll

- v.t.:To rob a drunk or sleeping person, usu. a drunk. To rob any person, as by a hold-up, or esp. to rob a prostitute's customer when he is sleeping or has left his clothing unwatched (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

On a rollphr. [1970s+] (orig. US gambling) on a winning streak, enjoying a period of success, whether lit. or fig.

- Roll: n. [1970s+] a spell of good fortune, a winning streak, whether lit. or fig. [roll, the roll of a dice] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Also mentioned in Depot, Depot, 1974: "I'm on a roll, just like a pool ball, babyEmpty Pockets/ Purple Avenue, 1981: "What happened to my roll, September fell right through the hole."



(6) Put a candle in the windowMany cultures around the world practice the "candle in the window" tradition. In colonial America a "candle in the window" was used to honor dignitaries, announce births and just plain celebrate(Source: Libbey Hodges, Oliver and Mary Miley Theobold. Williamsburg Christmas. New York. Harry N. Abrams Inc. 1999). In today's America it is a tradition practiced throughout the year as a gesture of welcome and a promise of warm hospitality to guests (thanks to Celso Lazaretti for pointing out this reference).



(7) Fiddler/ piper, pay theWho's to pay the fiddler/ piper? The phrase comes from the tradition about the Pied Piper of Hameln, who agreed to cure the town of rats and mice; when he had done so, the people of Hameln refused to pay him, whereupon he piped again, and led all the children to Koppelberg Hill, which closed over them. From the corresponding French phrase, "payer les violons," it would seem to mean who is to pay the fiddler or piper if we have a dance [on the green] (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



Tommy The Cat

 



"Well, I remember it as though it were a meal ago,"



  Said Tommy the Cat, as he reeled back to clear whatever foreign

  matter may have nestled its way into his mighty throat.

  Many a fat alley rat had met its demise while staring point blank

  down the cavernous barrel of this awesome prowling machine.

  Truly a wonder of nature, this urban predator!

  Tommy the Cat had many a story to tell

  but it was a rare occasion such as this that he did:



"She came slidin' down the alleyway like butter drippin' off a hot biscuit.

The aroma, the mean scent, was enough to arouse suspicion in

even the oldest of the Tigers that hung around the hot spot in those days.

The sight was beyond belief!

Many a head snapped double, even triple, takes

as this vivacious feline made her way into the delta of the alleyway,

where the most virile of the young tabbys were known to hang out.

They hung out in droves.

Such a multitude of masculinity could only be found in one place,

and that was O'Malley's Alley!

The air was thick with cat calls (no pun intended),

but not even a muscle in her neck did twitch

as she sauntered straight to the heart of the alleyway.

She knew what she wanted!

She was lookin' for that stud bull.

She was lookin' for that He cat.

And that was me.

Tommy the Cat is my name, and I say unto thee,



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby

Say baby"



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby

Say baby



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby

Say baby



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby

Say baby



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby

Say baby



Say baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby, do you wanna lay down by my side?

Baby, do you wanna lay down with me?

Say baby

Say baby



Written by: Les Claypool

Music by: Primus. Guitar melodies by: Todd Huth

Published by: Sturgeon Music, � 1991

Official release: "Sailing The Seas Of Cheese", 1991

Tom Waits: Voice of Tommy the Cat



Known covers:

N/A



Tom Tales (Spoken Word)

 



(spoken word: Glitter And Doom tour, 2008)



"Okay, alright, thank you, alright… now we can chat a bit. Okay, um, this is really weird. You know, vultures, I’ve seen a lot of vultures since I’ve entered the Texas border, a lot of vultures. The interesting thing about vultures is that, well, the reason they spend so much time in the air is because they’re so light because they eat so infrequently. So they’re mostly feathers, so a lot of times you’ll see them doing this and you’ll think “Oh, he’s probably going to land soon and eat,” but a lot of times he’s thinking to himself “How the fuck am I gonna get down there?” Now here’s the sad part and imagine if you had to make the same choice yourself. After dining, and frankly most vultures that are injured, this is according to the Bird Rescue… most vultures that are injured were injured while dining. That’s kinda sad… to be hit by a car while you’re eating, but the problem is that once they’ve landed and they’d eaten a lot, they eat so much cause they eat so infrequently, they eat so much that they can’t take off without throwing up. I know, that’s tough… so what a choice, you know, you just had a big meal and you have to lose the whole damn thing just to get back up in the sky again. I think of that all the time when I’m having hard times.



Here’s another interesting thing about them, the gas company has started using them to spot gas leaks in the field, because, well… think about it. They think it’s a dead animal but it’s just a gas leak, you know, so they gather… anyway, I find it interesting anyway. Okay, enough about me. Okay, uh, one last thing… you know during World War II, they made, this is in Germany… they made a soup, like an alphabet soup, only instead of the alphabet it was swastikas and they called it pastika soup and apparently it was very popular in Berlin. I’m sorry about that one too.



Okay, here’s something really interesting, I found interesting anyway. You know, rats don’t eat because they are hungry… they’re just grinding down their teeth, and if you don’t believe that, well… my dad found a rat in a room, a concrete room where there was absolutely nothing to eat, not even a rock… and he’d been in there for two weeks and hadn’t had nothing to eat. What happened with his lower teeth is they’d grown through the roof of his mouth and had come out through the top of his head and his uppers had gone down through his chin and they looked like a little goatee. I know, I know… it’s hard to find people that are as interested in these things as I am.



One last thing. Now, they found out that elephants in India, you know they have to wear a big bell around their necks so people know where they are all the time, and you can imagine how fucking annoying that must be, you know, especially in the middle of the night when you’re hungry. So now, elephants scoop up a big hunk of mud and they stick it in the bell to dampen the clapper and then they go off in the middle of the night and steal bananas. Pretty good.



Okay, well… we were in Oklahoma for a while, boy it’s weird in Oklahoma… well it’s weird everywhere if you think of it like that but in Oklahoma, they’ve got laws, there’s laws down there that are still on the books that they feel compelled to enforce. That’s what bothers me and I’m not traveling with an attorney so it makes it difficult, you know, you can’t wash your car on Sunday using wooled underwear, especially if you are wearing an unusual haircut. I never got the connection there between the haircut and the underwear… the other thing that’s weird is that chewing tobacco is strictly enforced, that took some getting used to. Uh, what else? You can’t photograph a rabbit in the middle of the week for some reason, it’s okay on the weekends, I guess they like it better on the weekends… I don’t get it. The other thing is you can’t eat some place that is also on fire. That really limited our choices. Okay, uh, let’s see… there’s something else, here’s another weird one… you can’t get a fish drunk in Oklahoma. They just had a lot of problems with that, they finally had to put an end to it… and you can’t make a monkey smoke a cigarette, that’s the other thing… I know, I know, I know…



Okay, let’s see. Do you know that shrimp, this is really disturbing though, but shrimp... they never give anything to charity. I’ve never known a shrimp to give anything to charity and it’s always bothered me and finally someone told me that basically they’re shellfish and it’s gonna happen… okay, I knew I went too far with that. Thank you for putting a stop to it. Okay, does anybody out there have a parrot? Do you own a parrot is the question. Does anybody in the whole audience own a parrot? Okay, well then you can understand why I went on E-Bay and bought a year’s supplies of parrot diapers. Man, I’m telling you… parrots, I like the conversations; I like the fellowship, but damn… get a grip. Here’s a theory that I have and I’ll run it by you because you’re here… my theory is that if everybody in China, on the very same day, at the very same time, on the very same day, got up on a ladder and jumped as high as they could and came down on the ground, you know, that it would throw the whole Earth off its axis. I haven’t been able to get anybody to go with me with that, like the United Nations or anything… uh, anyway, we should be ready on our side. We’ll pick a day, buy a ladder, get ready… uh, just to keep things… okay.



Okay, what else? Oh, the graveyard shift. Now, when I was a kid I always worked jobs at night and I always had graveyard shifts and everybody kind of threw that expression around very loosely and I wondered what the hell is a graveyard shift is anyway? Other than the fact that you’re working at night, okay I know that much, but what’s the origin of the expression graveyard shift? And then I worked for a while in a graveyard and my boss, Joe Corvello, he explained it to me. What happened in the old days, way, way, way back, hundreds of years ago, people were very nervous about being buried alive, not anymore nervous than we are today it’s just that the technology was not really with it, you could be taking a nap and they’d fucking bury you. So, there was a law that everybody who got buried had to have a string tied around their wrist in the coffin and then they’d run it up through the roof of the coffin and then they’d go up through the dirt and then they’d go over the branch of a tree on which they’d put a bell… and then there’s a guy who sits in the graveyard all night long waiting to hear a bell… that’s the graveyard shift. You’ll like this one too… the bell and the whole apparatus and everything, you know if you find the guy who actually is alive and underground, he’s called a dead ringer. I’m not kidding.



You know, about a year ago… this is really weird and I don’t tell everybody this… during the summer I ingested some pond water, you know, and it’s the weirdest thing… a couple of days later I started to feel something moving in there. I thought, am I pregnant? I don’t know… Anyway, several months went by and I finally had to go to the doctor and they put an ultrasound on me and they found three toads in my stomach… oh boy. But you know they’re off to themselves, they’re off to one side, and you know… why put them on such a bummer… it’s only a drag when we’re watching television and they get really loud and other than that, you know, I’m fine with it, it’s just a thing.



Okay, who has the largest brain in proportion to its body? No, no, no… the ant, swear to god. Who has the largest penis in proportion to its body? No, no, no, no… the barnacle, thank you. Okay, we’ll get on to some actual songs in a minute here… there are more insects in one square mile of Earth then there are people on the entire Earth, think about that, more insects in one square mile than there are people! Imagine if they got to vote or drivers licenses or anything… now, um, you know what the moon smells like? (People yell: “cheese!”) Wrong again, you’ll love this… fireworks. That’s what Neil Armstrong told me, “It smells just like fireworks, man.” And it makes perfect sense, doesn’t it? That’s where we’ve been shooting them for all these years. He says it’s just crazy up there with the fireworks… Do you know how many omelets you can get out of an ostrich egg? Fourteen… that’s a lot of omelets. I’ve gotten along with most of the ostriches I met and um okay… let’s see…



Here’s one… you know the word “bamboozled”… didn’t you ever wonder what the hell they mean when they say “bamboozled”… well way, way, way back, thousands of years ago in China when you got busted for something, they take a piece of bamboo and they’d whack you. You know if you took like fourteen candy bars, you get fourteen whacks. You see the connection though? Bamboozled, bamboo, bamboo, bamboozled… okay, that’s all. One last thing about Sara Bernhardt, the famous American actress… hey, she was a babe, man… she was a total babe. She had her own train car, she slept in a coffin and when she was seventy, she was playing Juliet, babe. Think about that, Juliet… at seventy… and she lost a leg and when she lost her leg, Barnum and Bailey bought her leg, of course… and put it in formaldehyde and charged like, six, eight bucks to come see it. And that was depressing for her, of course… cause she was working across the street, you know, the full her… and to know that your leg is over there making more money than you was so depressing for her… but that’s the business, that’s the business that we’re in. One day, Moe Green got a bullet in the eye but this is the business that we’re in. (Man yells: “Hey Tom, I want to have your baby.” Oh Jesus… well you know, nowadays, I think it’s possible. See my manager, Stuart Ross, but I gotta tell you, my sperm is very expensive now. I’m like a fucking race horse, baby.



Have you’ve wondered why you can never swat a fly? How do they know we’re coming? They don’t know what a swatter is. Do they say “Yeah, swatter coming, swatter coming…”They have no idea what a swatter is. I’ll tell you what happens… they take off backwards. It’s that simple… they’ve taken off backwards their entire lives… okay, that’s all. (Audience members yelling) Uh, my health? My health is fine… you know what, write it down and pass it forward and I’ll take a look at it.



Anyway, Neil Armstrong was the first man on the moon who actually walked on the moon and the guy right behind him on the ladder going down to get to the surface of the moon, now that was Buzz Aldrin… he said “Neil, you are the first man to walk on the moon… I am the very first man to wet his pants on the moon.” He said that, really, he did. He said it to me personally. I know Neil and I know Buzz, so there… and you don’t… okay. But then again, Science Magazine said that the compression of actual moon rocks, the closest thing that they can find on Earth that is closest to the compression of the rocks from the moon is provolone cheese or Vermont cheddar… I’m not shitting you, I wouldn’t shit you… and pig fetuses, you know, they are injecting pig fetuses now with human hormones because they want to use their organs to transplant them into humans so they want to give them some kind of humanistic juice in there so that when the transfer happens, it’ll be a little more commensurate with the… it’s crazy. But now pigs, the fetuses are being born with strangely human faces… one looked just like my Uncle Phil, exactly like my Uncle Phil, even Phil said it looked like him. Ok, I know, I know… we’ll get on, we’ll get on, we’ll get on… What was that for? Because we’re getting on, right? Oh, I see… you’re trying to push me into a song… I know that trick. You know the problem here? The problem here is you guys have never worked together before and you have no actual elected officials so it’s kind of like the early days of America, you know, and everybody’s kind of yelling shit out and somebody’s going “Shut up, shut up…” What? See… you have no President; this is what we call Marshall law.



Ah, okay, do you want another little story or a song? What do you want? That sounded like a cross between a story and a song… you see you can’t get all in line… get in line, babe. Okay, alright, it’s up to me, that’s it… I’m gonna have to take over… Oh, oh, way down in Oklahoma we went to the Spam museum, that was really amazing. They’ve got stuff carved out of Spam, they have portraits of people carved out of Spam… never seen anything like it, but as a Spam fan, I took some of that home with me and I got some of that in my living room and all like little portraits, you know, and “Whoa, whoa… what is that Tom, what is that?” and I said: “Whoa, it’s Spam, it’s Spam”. The thing is it never really deteriorates, the smell is not like it’s decomposing… it’s impossible for it to decompose… and that’s what you’re smelling is really the freshness of it, the eternal freshness of it… it’s kind of embalmed meat is what it really is… what? Oh, oh, oh…I read today that one out of every ten men is important. One out of every ten… and then I realized I read it wrong, I went back and it said “One out of every ten men is impotent”. I don’t know how I changed… I left the R out… so which are you, are you important or are you impotent? I guess that’s all there is to choose from.



I don’t know about you but I spent my entire day at the lost baggage center, you know, have you ever been over there? Fascinating… how they advertise it… things from all over the world… at incredible prices. Its lost baggage is basically what it is… if you ever have lost a bag, your bag is there being sold to somebody else… and it’s right here in Birmingham, I swear to God. So, here’s the ironic thing… I flew in to go to the last baggage center early so that I could shop for basically underwear and socks and they lost my bag. Isn’t that crazy? Okay… here’s one that maybe you’ll like… spiders, spiders, our little eight legged friends, the spider… when the male spider is done building his web, you know those elaborately beautiful webs that they build at night while you’re sleeping and you wake up in the morning and it’s glistening and beautiful like that… when he’s done building the web, he reaches out one of his legs… we assume it’s a leg that he’s reaching out, not certain but we assume it’s a leg… and he strums the web and the sound that that makes… that’s not the actual sound, how could I know the actual sound? But it’s not bad, is it? I mean, if you were a female spider, you’d be like… anyway, what happens is that the sound that the web makes is irresistible to the female spider and she comes… some of them come in from different states when they hear that and they get in line for the big guy. Anyway, it’s just kind of a kooky thing that happens in the world.



In Oklahoma, you can get in trouble for kissing a stranger. Think about that, I mean you can go to jail for kissing a stranger. I mean, we’re all strangers at a certain point, how could the world continue if somebody didn’t kiss a stranger, right? But, uh, I travel with an attorney so… here’s another thing; you know that a mink and an ermine are the same thing? And you know that a mink and an ermine are all members of the weasel family? And if you see a beautiful woman wearing a mink, you can walk right up to her and say “I love your weasel.” And she can’t slap you… I mean, theoretically she can’t slap you. I would do it with an attorney present at all times… so every time in the world there’s a male ejaculation, I know that’s a tough word so from now on we’re just gonna say “it”… whenever “it” happens, it releases two hundred and fifty million sperm… now only one of those sperm obviously can actually fertilize the egg… so if you’re here, you’re already a winner. You know what I mean? That’s the way I see it.



Okay, here’s a little story for everybody now… you know what really gets me? I was in a community, let’s just say it was a bad neighborhood and I used to refer to it and I’d say 9th and Hennepin, boy, 9th and Hennepin… here’s what bothers me, they really cleaned the place up and every time I said 9th and Hennepin, people looked at me like I was doing card tricks for a dog… and some guy would say “You know my wife, she got some sandals down there… they have a little frozen yogurt place”. And I went: “You could get killed for sandals down there!”

Anyway… okay, you know I’ve always been a word guy, I like weird words and I like American slang and all that and words that are no longer being used… I like to drag them out of the box and wave them around… this is an interesting one, it’s amazing how in addition to punctuation just a little pause in the wrong place can just completely transform the meaning of something. I’ll give you a really good example… you know, you’re at the ball game and you got your hot dog and you look around and say “Where are all the condiments?” and they point over there and you go “Oh, okay there’s the condiments.” I’m so glad that they said it like that because when I said it I heard “Where are the condom mints?” That’s just me and I have to live with me. I didn’t say it back to her or she would have slapped me but then I thought that’s not a bad idea… someone could get a hold of something like that and come up with a whole new product… I just offer it to you tonight and we’ll just wait and see what happens.



I made one really ridiculous purchase… you know this is really weird… somebody took a picture of me and they got a picture of my watch, you know, and they said “Well he was wearing a really ratty suit but I think he had about $300,000 watch on. I really got a kick out of that… $9.99 at CVS, but hey, if it looks like $300,000, it is! I’m in show business. (Audience member yells: play everything!) Everything? Play everything? I don’t have that much time. I was out there earlier and I sat in some of those chairs you’re sitting in now… pretty damn comfortable, maybe a little too comfortable. You have your own TV? You mean in the chair? You see some of the seats are better than others… she has a VCR and an I-Pod thing you can hook into. Does your chair vibrate? That’s the vibrating chair. I heard it’s against the law to have an unusual haircut here… and you can’t buy booze without a note from your wife. That’s really weird… I travel with an attorney, of course…



Here’s another thing… a little food thing. You know how every time you get a piece of fish they give you a little piece of lemon with it and everybody thinks that it’s because the flavor is so much better with lemon on it… untrue. The idea was when people ate fish originally, they were so afraid of ingesting bones and having the bone caught in their throat and dying, somebody told them if you put a little lemon in your mouth after you have a bite of fish, it will kill the bone, it’ll dissolve the bone, it’ll just disintegrate the bone, which of course is total bullshit but that’s what happened and now we’ve got lemon and fish and all that… I had a math teacher when I was a kid whose name was Mr. Falby and he had a piece of fish during a test we were having and he choked on a fish bone and he died in the middle of our math test… it was kind of an answer to a prayer that I made earlier. It wasn’t that specific… I didn’t mention anything about the fish or the bone or even on that day… but we have a connection I guess.



I’m sorry, what? You’re still working at the airport? I’m happy for you. I’ll see you on our way out. Here’s a deal… pardon me? Piano is just on beer and wine now. You know what really bothers me is when somebody tells you that their cell phone is also a camera. I just hate that. What’s wrong with having something that’s just what it is and being happy about it? It makes me want to say to them… “My sunglasses are also a tricycle.” But I don’t… okay, we’ve been traveling for about two months now so the laws change from community to community. It’s just bizarre the kind of laws that are still on the books… that’s one of the laws here in Edinbourough that you can no longer order eggs and sausage and it’s sad but it’s just the way it happened with that new mayor. What do we have, what do we have, what do we have? Oh we were gonna try and do this one, we’ll see, this is um…"



(Picture In A Frame, solo at the piano)



Written by: Tom Waits

Transcript: Anti, 2009. 

Official release: Glitter And Doom, Anti Inc. 2009



Known covers:

N/A



Tom Traubert's Blues (Aka Waltzing Matilda)

Tom Traubert's Blues



(Four sheets to the wind(1) in Copenhagen)



Wasted(2) and wounded, it ain't what the moon did

I got what I paid for now

See you tomorrow, hey Frank, can I borrow

A couple of bucks from you?

To go waltzing Matilda(3), waltzing Matilda

You'll go waltzing Matilda with me



I'm an innocent victim of a blinded alley(4)

And I'm tired of all these soldiers here

No one speaks English, and everything's broken

And my Stacys(5) are soaking wet

To go waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda

You'll go waltzing Matilda with me



Now the dogs are barking and the taxi cabs parking

A lot they can do for me

I begged you to stab me, you tore my shirt open

And I'm down on my knees tonight

Old Bushmills(6) I staggered, you buried the dagger

In your silhouette window light

To go waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda

You'll go waltzing Matilda with me



Now I've lost my St. Christopher(7), now that I've kissed her

And the one-armed bandit(8) knows

And the maverick Chinamen, and the cold-blooded signs

And the girls down by the strip-tease shows go

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda

You'll go waltzing Matilda with me



No, I don't want your sympathy, the fugitives say

That the streets aren't for dreaming now

And manslaughter dragnets, and the ghosts that sell memories

They want a piece of the action anyhow

Go waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda

You'll go waltzing Matilda with me



And you can ask any sailor, and the keys from the jailer

And the old men in wheelchairs know

That Matilda's the defendant, she killed about a hundred

And she follows wherever you may go

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda

You'll go waltzing Matilda with me



And it's a battered old suitcase to a hotel someplace

And a wound that will never heal

No prima donna, the perfume is on

An old shirt that is stained with blood and whiskey

And goodnight to the street sweepers, the night watchmen, flame keepers

And goodnight, Matilda, too



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1976

Official release: "Small Change", Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976 &

"Bounced Checks", WEA/ Asylum Records, 1981 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

Home And Deranged. The English Country Blues Band. 1984. Rogue FMSL2004

Unplugged And Seated. Rod Stewart. March, 1993. Warner Bros. Records

Lead Singer. Rod Stewart. March 12, 1993. Wea/ Warner

Tubas From Hell. Dave Gannet. February 28, 1994. Summit/ D'Note Classics

Dry County. Bon Jovi. March 31, 1994. Polygram International (sung by Tico Torres)

Mister No Good. Ole Friis. September 21, 1994. Poul Hansen/ Kick Records (Denmark)

Irish Cream. Seasons. November 23, 1994. Edel

Tanz Um Den Heiligen Bim Bam. Gerd K�ster. October 30, 1995. Chlodwig (BMG)

Stars On Classic, Rod Stewart. Classic Dream Orchestra. May, 1997. Ariola (Germany)

Street Jams. David Roe. October 1998. Self-released

Gerd K�ster und... Gerd K�ster. March 22, 1999. Chlodwig (Pavement Records)

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German)

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Sand And Water. Tommy Fleming. March 15, 2002. Clann Records (Ireland)

Unruly. English Country Blues Band. June, 2002. Weekend Beatnik

The Collection. Tommy Fleming. December, 2002. Clann Records/ Ireland (same version as on "Sand And Water", 2002)

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Undercovers. Maria & Laginh Joao. March, 2003. Emarcy Rec (Universal)

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

Waltzing Matilda. Waltzing Matilda. September 15, 2003. Factory Ou (Leicom)

Lazy Sunday Afternoons. Dressy Vagabonds. November, 2003. Self-released

Somebody's Darling. Carol Noonan. May, 2004. Noonan Music/ Self-released

Rein Alexander. Rein Alexander. November, 2004. Sony/ Epic (Norway)

Austropop Kult. Wolfgang Ambros. January, 2005. Sony BMG/ Ariola (same version as on "Nach Mir Die Sintflut", 2000)

Playing For Change. Various artists. February 15, 2005. Higher Octave (performed by The Royal Rounders)

Deep Forbidden Lake. Jazz Mandolin Project. May 3, 2005 Label: Doyle Kos Dk.E.

15 Jahre Buschfunk. Various artists. December 9, 2005. Buschfunk/ Germany (performed by: Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling)

Heroes And Villains. Heroes And Villains. March 14, 2006. Emeritus Records



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Watch Waits performing "Tom Traubert's Blues"

With Frank Vicari: tenor saxophone, Dr. Fitz(gerald) Jenkins: upright bass and Chip White: drums.

Taken from The Old Grey Whistle Test (1977).

BBC television live music show with Bob Harris. London/ UK. May 3, 1977



Might be Waits' most famous song. Covered by artists like: Rod Steward, The Pogues, The Dubliners, Rolf Harris, John McDermott and Dave Gannet. Featured on the Basquiat soundtrack (Polygram, 1996). A tune easily recognized and easy to sing along. It's 1976, Waits at the crowning moment of his" beatnik-glory-meets-Hollywood-noir period". But "Tom Traubert's Blues" stands out from his other more jazzy tunes. Waits himself must have had special feelings for the song, because in the 1970's and 1980's he used to close his shows with this song, giving his audience some food for thought on their way home. And unlike most of his other songs, he kept it unchanged for over 20 years. It's finished, nothing to add, it doesn't get any better.



It's the opening track on the album "Small Change", recorded from July 15 to July 20 1976 at the Wally Heider Studios in Hollywood and released in September 1976 by Asylum Records. Most of the songs were written in May/ June 1976 in London after his gig at: "Ronnie Scott's Club", Soho/ London. It is said Waits stayed there for about two weeks after which he continued to tour Europe.



(1988): "When did you first see yourself as a songwriter?"

Tom Waits: "Actually, even after I had made records. I didn't feel completely confident in the craft until maybe Small Change. When I first put a story to music. I fell I was learning and getting the confidence to keep doing it. "Tom Traubert's Blues" "Small Change" and "I Wish I Was in New Orleans" gave me some confidence." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)



Tom Traubert's Blues is evidently based on the Australian hymn Waltzing Matilda (written by A.B. "Banjo" Paterson). So it's tempting to assume both songs deal with the same subject-matter. But this is not the case. The only thing similar in both songs is the chorus.



In 2007 Waits was asked by Mojo Magazine to nominate a record for their list of “100 records that changed the world”. Waits nominated Harry Belafonte’s “Streets I Have Walked” (RCA/ Victor LPM-2695) which features Waltzing Matilda. So Waits had been familiar with the song from a very young age.



Tom Waits (2007): "Streets I Have Walked (RCA 1963) is a beautiful record. It's collected songs - lullabies from Japan, Woody Guthrie, Waltzing Matilda, cowboy songs, Jewish songs, all kinds of things. Belafonte was a great collector of songs - he had that Lomax bone, I think. And he introduced a lot of songs from different cultures that had never , in that sense, been heard. The first time I heard Hava Nagila it was Harry Belafonte who sang it... I think I was maybe 13 when I first heard , and I still have it. It definitely had an impact. You see, he loved melody, and I was at a time in my life when I was really nourished by that, by melody itself. I know that with kids, at a certain point, music becomes a costume - you wear the music, and there's certain music that you wouldn't be caught dead wearing - but to me music was always a completely interior experience, not a fashion." (Source: “100 records that changed the world”, Mojo Magazine 163. June, 2007/ May 2, 2007).



There has been a lot of discussion about the origins and copyrights of the Australian version. For more info on "Waltzing Matilda" go to this site by Roger Clarke, or try WaltzingMatilda.com.



Waltzing Matilda:

'Banjo' (A.B.) Paterson, c. 1890


(Lyrics submitted by Wayne T Pickett as sent to Tom Waits Library April 26, 2002)



Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong

Under the shade of a coolibah tree

And he sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled

You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me



Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda

You'll come a waltzing Matilda with me

And he sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled

You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me



Down came a jumbuck to dri-ink at that billabong

Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee

And he sang as he stuffed that jumbuck in his tucker-bag

You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me



Up rode the squatter, mounted on his thoroughbred

Up Jumped the troopers, one, two, three

"Who's [
as in "whose IS"] that jolly jumbuck you've got in your tucker-bag?"

You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me
 (10)



Up jumped the swagman and sprang into the billabong

"You'll never take me alive!", said he

And his ghost may be heard as you pa-ass by the billabong

You'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me 



In Australia the song gained such popularity, it more or less became their second national anthem, an Australian icon.



Waits introducing "Tom Traubert's Blues" in Sydney Australia, March 1979: 

"This is eh, a song here uh. I kinda borrowed your unofficial national anthem on this whole thing... I'll give it back when I'm done! Uh, well I met this girl named Matilda. And uh, I had a little too much to drink that night. This is about throwing up in a foreign country. The feeling..."



Roger Clarke did some interesting research into the copyrights of the song:

"The copyrights in the song and the words passed through several hands. At one stage it was owned by the once-famous Billy Tea' company; Copyright can of course exist in variants and performances of the song; The copyright has expired in Australia (and in almost every other country in the world), because in civilized countries copyright lasts for 50 years after the death of the originator, and Banjo Paterson died in 1941. In that renegade nation, the U.S.A., other rules hold, and copyright still exists. The copyright is owned by Carl Fischer New York Inc. As a result, the use of the Australian tune in the Atlanta Olympics Closing Ceremony resulted in a payment by the Australian organisers to an American company. Ergo ... If we decide to make 'Waltzing Matilda' the real national anthem, we will have to either buy back the copyright from an American company, or pay royalties on such occasions as our national anthem is played in the United States. "



One wonders whether "Tom Traubert's Blues" is subject to these Fischer owned copyrights.



Some claim "Tom Traubert's Blues" to be about Vietnam. The lyrics however don't give any reason to assume this is true. The idea probably came about after Eric Bogle's 1972 version: "Eric Bogle wrote, performed and recorded a song that ends with a haunting rendition of "Waltzing Matilda" (And the band played waltzing Matilda). It's an anti-war song, nominally about Gallipoli, but really about Vietnam (different decades, different countries, different protagonists, but much the same outcome)".



Its title suggests it is about a guy named Tom Traubert. But other than this title Waits never referred to this character. Some people claim to have known Tom Traubert, some claim to be his only legal child, some claim to be Tom Traubert. For now he will probably remain a mystery forever. Only Waits himself could give us a clou, but he won't.



What does Waltzing Matilda mean? There are numerous explanations. Most of them have to do with traveling. Here's an explanation by Senani Ponnamperuma: "The phrase Waltzing Matilda is believed to have originated with German immigrants who settled in Australia. Waltzing is derived from the German term auf der Walz which meant to travel while learning a trade. Young apprentices in those days traveled the country working under a master craftsman earning their living as they went - sleeping where they could. Matilda has teutonic origins and means Mighty Battle Maiden. It is believed to have been given to female camp followers who accompanied soldiers during the Thirty Year's War in Europe. This came to mean "to be kept warm at night" and later to mean the great army coats or blankets that soldiers wrapped themselves with. These were rolled into a swag tossed over their shoulder while marching. So the phrase Waltzing Matilda came to mean: to travel from place to place in search of work with all one's belongings on one's back wrapped in a blanket or cloth."



One would expect "Waltzing Matilda" to be used in this context but this doesn't seem to be the case. The same words, the same rhythm, but a different meaning. In Tom Traubert's Blues "Waltzing Matilda" has become a metaphor for: alcoholism, seduction and self-destruction.



Jay S. Jacobs quotes Bones Howe in "Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits" remembering when Waits wrote Tom Traubert's Blues. Somehow this memory doesn't feel right as Tom Traubert's Blues isn't about skid row or about being penniless or being abandoned. This memory seems to fit better with the song On The Nickel (Heartattack And Vine, 1980)



Jay S. Jacobs (2000): "Tom Traubert's Blues (Four Sheets to the Wind in Copenhagen)" is the album's stunning opener, and it sets the tone for what follows. It tells the story of a man who finds himself stranded and penniless in a foreign land "where no one speaks English, and everything's broken." Traubert is etched as a sympathetic character, but it's clear that he inhabits a hell of his own making. He'll never make his way home again because any cash he gets his hands on he squanders on drink. The song's chorus incorporates "Waltzing Matilda," the classic Australian ballad of aimless travel. ("Matilda" is Aussie slang for "backpack," and "waltzing matilda" means being on the road or hitchhiking.) Bones Howe distinctly remembers when Waits wrote "Tom Traubert's Blues." Howe's phone rang in the middle of the night. It was Tom. Howe had long since become accustomed to the fact that being Tom's friend meant receiving calls from him at all hours. "He said the most wonderful thing about writing that song," Bones recalls. "He went down and hung around on skid row in L.A. because he wanted to get stimulated for writing this material. He called me up and said, 'I went down to skid row ... I bought a pint of rye. In a brown paper bag.' I said, 'Oh really?"' Waits replied to Howe, "Yeah - hunkered down, drank the pint of rye, went home, threw up, and wrote 'Tom Traubert's Blues."' Howe was even more struck by what Waits said to him next: "Every guy down there ... everyone I spoke to, a woman put him there." Howe was amazed when he first heard the song, and he's still astonished by it. "I do a lot of seminars," he says. "Occasionally I'll do something for songwriters. They all say the same thing to me. 'All the great lyrics are done.' And I say, 'I'm going to give you a lyric that you never heard before."' Howe then says to his aspiring songwriters, "A battered old suitcase to a hotel someplace / And a wound that will never heal." This particular Tom Waits lyric Howe considers to be "brilliant. " It's "the work of an extremely talented lyricist, poet, whatever you want to say. That is brilliant, brilliant work. And he never mentions the person, but you see the person." (Source: "Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits". Jay S. Jacobs, ECW Press, 2000)



So according to Bones Howe "Tom Traubert's Blues" was inspired by Los Angeles skid row. There have been rumours however about a Danish singer called Mathilde Bondo claiming to be the muse for this song. This story seems to be confirmed by a 1998 article from Danish newspaper Politiken.



Peter Sander (2000): "Back in the 70's Tom had been doing a gig in Copenhagen, and attending the concert was this Danish folk-singer by the name Mathilde. She was pretty popular in Denmark in the 70's, even though I never thought much of her myself. But after the show she somehow met Waits, and they got along so well that they went out bar-crawling through Copenhagen, and finally ended up at his hotel room, drunk as skunks. What happened there, in that very hotel room? Nobody except the two of them knows, because Mathilde wont tell! The story was a rumor until a DJ on national Danish radio heard about it, about 5 years ago, told his listeners about it, and called up Mathilde live on air. She was surprised to hear that anyone knew, but she confirmed the story. She even said that a few months later Tom sent her the "Small Change" album as a memory of a good night, with Waltzing Mathilda as first cut." (Submitted by Peter Sander. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000)



COPENHAGEN SONGS - Songs of a city(11)

By Janus K�ster-Rasmussen and Henrik Vesterberg, 1998



THE STREETS AREN'T FOR DREAMING

Tom Waits



With the subtitle Four Sheets To The Wind in Copenhagen, Tom Traubert's Blues is the first song on the American nightowl-singer Tom Waits' 1976-album Small Change. From streets where "No one speaks English and everything's broken", our hero tells us of a city which clearly, it seems, could be Copenhagen seen through whisky-wet eyes. He passes the striptease shows, and must realize that "the streets aren't for dreaming now."



But it's the chorus, which paraphrases the well known Australian folk tune, which is most important for these matters: "Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda, You'll go waltzing Matilda with me... "



For a long time the story has been told, that Tom Waits wrote the song for the violinist Mathilde Bondo, one half of the duo Lasse & Mathilde. And that's the truth, Mathilde assures us: 'He was in Copenhagen in 1976 to perform in a tv-show, in which I played the violin. And afterwards I of course had to show him the City - we were in Tivoli and on Christianshavn. It was a lovely night out", says Mathilde Bondo.



Did you waltz? "Yes, we waltzed a lot."

Did you talk to him since then? "We've kept in contact per letter. But I do hope to meet him again. We swinged together so well, and I'm really proud to have been the muse for his song. It's a shame you don't have copyright for muses, because Rod Stewart made the song into a giant hit later on, you know." What do you think of Tom Waits' description of Copenhagen? "It is somewhat ambiguous, but it's a wonderful song."



Tom Waits was indeed in Copenhagen in June, 1976. And he did indeed do a TV show (DR2 TV, known as "Sange Efter Lukketid". Copenhagen/ Denmark. June, 1976). And it is indeed assumed Waits wrote most of the songs for Small Change during this tour (to be recorded in July, 1976). It is therefore plausible to assume the subtitle "Four sheets to the wind in Copenhagen" is inspired by Waits' stay in Copenhagen in 1976.


























Mathilde Bondo, 1976



Mathilde Bondo, 1977



Mathilde Bondo, 1996



(Pictures taken from Lasse & Mathilde official site (Lasse Helner & Mathilde Bondo)




In conclusion: there doesn't seem to be an explanation for Waits re-working "Waltzing Matilde" other then the song having the name "Matilde" in it. Waits wasn't interested in its original meaning, he only took the melody and the verse. So the Mathilde Bondo interpretation seems very plausible. Waits himself has never confirmed (nor denied) this story, but the sub-title mentioning Copenhagen is yet another pointer falling in place. It might be, Waits didn't want the general public to know about his Copenhagen memoire. Maybe that is why he gave the song such a misleading title, making the listener believe it was the story of another Tom.



Here's what Waits himself said about the song...




  • "All right, thank you, like to do a couple of tunes here. A new song here. New uncharted territory here. This is about throwing up on yourself in a foreign country. You think it's eh inconvenient here. Try explaining it to someone who doesn't speak English. Will incarcerate your ass, put you in the barbed wire hotel for a couple of years and no one will ever hear from you again. Couldn't even get a post card off. This is eh.... " (Cleveland USA, 1976)

  • "This is a new song and it's called 'Waltzing Matilda'. Well it's really called 'Tom Traubert's Blues'..." (Sunday Night Live At Faces", The Faces Club, Dallas USA, 1976)

  • "This a new song about throwing up in a foreign country..." (Royal Oak Theatre, Detroit USA. November 14 1976)

  • Vin Scelsa:... Do we know eh the origin of "Waltzing Matilda"? Did someone actually write that or is that just one of those old folk things that goes back and...

    TW: Oh, you mean the original?

    VC: The Australian song "Waltzing Matilda" yeah...

    TW: Well, I believe it was a 1903 eh... Yeah I think it was 1903, and eh what happened was eh...Originally I believe it was a poem, it was a poem and eh... And it eh was put to music and became the unofficial national anthem of eh Australia I believe. A Matilda is a eh backpack. So "Waltzing Matilda" just means, really just to take off, you know? Like blow town, you know? And eh, you know, that's what the song means, maybe.
     (WNEW FM: Tom Waits Radio Special w. Vin Scelsa, MediaSound Studios NYC. December 14, 1976)

  • "This is about vomiting in a foreign country... " (Trenton State College Trenton New Jersey USA, December 15 1976)

  • "I'm gonna do a song called 'Waltzing Matilda'. It's not really the original 'Waltzing Matilda', I kinda bent it out of shape. And eh... but eh.. I was eh around this beautiful girl for a while and I was really crazy about her... so was her husband. So we could've made quit a trio on piano bass and drums. So eh what happened was eh... Well it's eh... Actually it's a real short story. I drank too much and I threw op over my tennis shoes and went to sleep in a men's room..." (West Chester Jazz Festival. West Chester, USA, 1976)

  • "You're all right, eh? .. You know now it'll start get a little quiet in here..." (Club Roslyn Long Island New York USA, October 10 1977)

  • "This is eh, a song here eh. I kinda borrowed your unofficial national anthem on this whole thing... I'll give it back when I'm done. Eh, well I met this girl named Matilda. And eh, I had a little too much to drink that night. This is about throwing up in a foreign country. The feeling..." (Sydney Australia, May 2, 1979)

  • Q: What do you consider your best work? TW: "I like the story in "Burma Shave" off Foreign Affairs, "Tom Traubert's Blues" off the new album. I like "Dave The Butcher" and "In The Neighborhood" ("One From The Heart & One For The Road ". New Musical Express magazine. October 1, 1983. Interview by: Kristine McKenna)

  • "Eh this is about throwing up in a foreign country. They look on you different eh. It's not like throwing up here. It's hard to get people understand eh. This is about eh going away... You got 60 dollars on a car. Drive all the way to eh Florida..." (Beverley Theatre Los Angeles USA -early show, November 23 1985)

  • "This is kind of an old song eh..." (Italian Dream San Remo Italy, 22 November 1986)

  • "Ok, eh let's see... You're seeing a moment of indecision. I may jump right in. Ok, oh here's one! Eh, no we'd better do this one..." (Wiltern Theatre Los Angeles USA, November 9 1987)

  • "This is a eh, a lullaby for people who can't sleep..." (Dragen Theatre Stockholm Sweden, November 27 1987)

  • "It's funny eh. This is one of those songs that I sung[?] and I never quite figured it out. It's like a rug, you know some rugs have a design and you go: "Hey what is that?" Oh it's not like a rug! That was a bad eh analogy, well you know. Well it's just one of those songs that puzzles me. And eh, so I sing it and I get further puzzled. Eh, alcohol and eh writing don't mix. If they do it takes a long time to unravel them..." (Center for the performing arts San Jose USA, December 30 1990)

  • Q: Did you share many fans' view that Small Change was the crowning moment of your beatnik-glory- meets-Hollywood-noir period? TW: "Well, gee. I'd say there's probably more songs off that record that I continued to play on the road, and that endured. Some songs you may write and record but you never sing them again. Others you sing em every night and try and figure out what they mean. Tom Traubert's Blues was certainly one of those songs I continued to sing, and in fact, close my show with." ("Mojo interview with Tom Waits". Mojo: Barney Hoskyns. April, 1999)

  • TW: He is a friend of a friend of mine. DD: Really! TW: Yeah, who lives in Denver... and died in jail. DD: Oh... TW: And uh... So, he's a real guy. And uhm... so that's you know, a song that is about a lot of things. But mostly I think, you know, the idea that uh... A "Mathilda" is a backpack, you know? So it's about going on the... being on the loose. Out on the road. Chasing your dream and all the things you encounter in the process." (Source: "Tom Waits: Rock Classics, With A Gravelly Rasp", NPR's World Caf� from WXPN (USA) by David Dye. December 15, 2006)



Notes:



(1) Four sheets to the wind

- Also mentioned in Spare Parts 1: "Well, I don't need you, baby You see, it's a well known fact, you know I'm four sheets to the wind, I'm glad you're gone I'm glad you're gone, cause I'm finally alone." (Nighthawks At The Diner, 1975)

- Drunk. Synonymous with the phrase "Three Sheets to the Wind" (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- Unsteady from over-drinking, as a ship when its sheets are in the wind. The sail of a ship is fastened at one of the bottom corners by a rope called a "tack;" the other corner is left more or less free as the rope called a "sheet" is disposed; if quite free, the sheet is said to be "in the wind," and the sail flaps and flutters without restraint. If all the three sails were so loosened, the ship would "reel and stagger like a drunken man." "Captain Cuttle looking, candle in hand, at Bunsby more attentively, perceived that he was three sheets in the wind, or, in plain words, drunk."- Dickens; Dombey and Son. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)

- "It's a sailor's expression, from the days of sailing ships. The terminology of sailing ships is excessively complicated and every time I refer to it people write in to say I've got it wrong, usually contradicting each other. So treat what follows as a broad-brush treatment, open to dispute on fine points. We ignorant landlubbers might think that a sheet is a sail, but in traditional sailing-ship days, a sheet was actually a rope, particularly one attached to the bottom corner of a sail (it actually comes from an Old English term for the corner of a sail). The sheets were vital, since they trimmed the sail to the wind. If they ran loose, the sail would flutter about in the wind and the ship would wallow off its course out of control. Extend this idea to sailors on shore leave, staggering back to the ship after a good night on the town, well tanked up. The irregular and uncertain locomotion of these jolly tars must have reminded onlookers of the way a ship moved in which the sheets were loose. Perhaps one loose sheet might not have been enough to get the image across, so the speakers borrowed the idea of a three-masted sailing ship with three sheets loose, so the saying became three sheets in the wind. Our first written example comes from that recorder of low life, Pierce Egan, in his Real life in London of 1821. But it must surely be much older. The version you give, incidentally, is comparatively recent, since the older one (the only one given in the big Oxford English Dictionary) is three sheets in the wind. However, online searches show that your version is now about ten times as common as the one containing in, so it may be that some day soon it will be the only one around. The version with to seems to be gaining ground because so many people think a sheet is a sail" (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(2) Wasted adj.: Extremely inebriated, usually to the point of vomiting heavily and/or passing out. (Source: The Online Slang Dictionary, Walter Rader)



(3) Matilda: An Australian folk anthem, written by poet Banjo Paterson, about a hobo (swagman) being arrested for stealing a sheep (jumbuk) and escaping by diving into a creek (billabong) where he drowns. It's so popular in Australia it's regarded as the unofficial national song. Around the time the song was written, a pack on someone's back was called a "Matilda". If you walked behind someone with a pack on his back for a long time, the pack moved up and down and appeared to "waltz"



(4) Blind/ blinded alley

- A "cul de sac," an alley with no outlet. It is blind because it has no "eye" or passage through it. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)

- [late 19C+] an unlicensed drinking house (cf. BLIND PIG) (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(5) Stacey's

Slang expression, born from Stacy Adams which is a fancy dress shoe. To buy your own Stacys check out this site.

- Also mentioned in Spare Parts 1, 1975: "So I combed back my Detroit, jacked up my pegs, I wiped my Stacy Adams and I jackknifed my legs."

- Tom Waits (1976): "Stacey Adams once were a very prestigious shoe... if you had them on then nobody messed with you and you could go anywhere. Stacey's stayed ahead of current affairs and were considered extremely hip." (Source: "Tom Waits: Would You Say This Man Was Attempting To Convey An Impression Of Sordid Bohemianism" New Musical Express (UK), by Fred Dellar. Date: June 5, 1976)



(6) Bushmills: Bushmill's: Irish whiskey from the: "Old Bushmills Destillery" Ireland



(7) Christopher, St.: Catholic patron saint of travellers, or the religious medal dedicated to him. There are several legends about him including the one in which he was crossing a river when a child asked to be carried across. When Christopher put the child on his shoulders he found the child was unbelievably heavy. The child, according to the legend, was Christ carrying the weight of the whole world. His former holy day is July 25. The religious medal dedicated to this saint says: "Protect me" or "Protect us". So losing one's St. Christopher could mean, one feels unprotected. Later also mentioned in the Frank's Wild Years track of the same name





(8) One-armed-bandit, one-arm bandit : A slot machine. Because the operative lever of the machine resembles an arm, and because the odds on winning are fixed against the player (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) Lyrics only refer to this expression



(10) Who's that jolly jumbuck: "We didn't have 'Policemen' - we had (much-hated) British troops 'enforcing the law'.. the line means they were accusing the swaggie of stealing the sheep - and you could get hanged for that ..." (Submitted by Wayne T Pickett as sent to Tom Waits Library April 26, 2002)



(11) Translated from Danish. Original text: K�benhavnersange: Sange om en by Politiken 18 december 1998, I byen side 6 Af Janus K�ster-Rasmussen og Henrik Vesterberg. THE STREETS AREN'T FOR DREAMING Tom Waits - Med undertitlen Four Sheets To The Wind In Copenhagen er Tom Traubert's Blues den f�rste sang p� den amerikanske natuglesanger Tom Waits' 1976-album Small Change. Fra gader hvor No one speaks English and everything's broken fort�ller vores helt om en by, der alts� sagtens kan v�re K�benhavn set gennem whiskyv�de �jne. Han kommer forbi the striptease shows og m� indse at the streets aren't for dreaming now. Men det er omkv�det, der parafraserer den kendte australske folkemelodi, der er vigtigt i denne forbindelse: Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda, you'll go waltzing Matilda with me... Der har l�nge verseret en historie om, at Tom Waits skrev sangen til violinisten Mathilde Bondo, den ene halvdel af duoen Lasse & Mathilde. Og det er ogs� sandheden, forsikrer Mathilde: "Han var i K�benhavn i 1976 for at optr�de i et tv-show, hvor jeg spillede violin. Og bagefter m�tte jeg jo vise ham byen - vi var i Tivoli og p� Christianshavn. Det var en dejlig bytur", siger Mathilde Bondo. Valsede I? "Ja, vi valsede meget". Har du snakket med ham siden? "Vi har holdt kontakt pr. brev. Men jeg h�ber da p� at m�de ham igen. Vi swingede godt sammen, og jeg er virkelig stolt over at v�re muse til hans sang. Det er en skam, at der ikke findes en muse-afgift ligesom koda-afgiften, for Rod Stewart gjorde jo sangen til et k�mpe hit senere". Hvad synes du om Tom Waits' beskrivelse af K�benhavn? "Den er noget tvetydig, men det er en vidunderlig sang". (Article provided by Jakob S�rensen as sent to Tom Waits Library October 11, 2002. Translated by Jakob Dall as sent to Tom Waits Yahoo Groups discussionlist October 15, 2002. I byen ["In Town" = Fridays Cultural weekend section in Politiken])



Top Of The Hill

 



I'm gonna get me on the ride up

I'm gonna get...



(...Can I have a little more on my voice? ...)



... get me on the ride up

I'm on the top of the hill

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



New corn yellow and slaughterhouse red

The birds keep singing baby after you're dead

I'm gonna miss you plenty big old world

With our abalone earrings(1) and your mother of pearl



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



I need your moon to be the sky against

Don't get your trouser button stuck on the fence

Diego red and bedlam money are fine

Why don't you come up here and see me sometime



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



There's very little leeway(2)

I seen a mattress on the freeway

The moon rises over Dog Street(3)

Jefferson said not every thing's reet(4)

Have all the lights burned out on heaven again

I'll never roll the number 7 again



I'm made of bread and I'm on an ocean of wine

I hear all the birdies on the phone just fine



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



Black joke and the bean soup

Big sky and the Ford Coupe

Old maid and the dry bones

A red Rover and the Skinny Bones Jones

47 mules to pull this train

We're getting married in the pouring rain

You need your differential and plenty of oil

You load the wagon till the end of the world



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



What's your throttle made of, is it money or bone

Don't you doddle or you'll never get home

Opium, fireworks, vodka and meat

Scoot over and save me a seat



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



If I had it all to do all over again

I'd try to rise above the laws of man

Why don' cha gimme 'nother sip of your cup

Turn a Rolls Royce into a Chicken Coup(5)



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin'

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill



I'm only goin' to the top of the hill

Hey!



Stop and get me on the ride up

Stop and get me on the ride up

I'm only goin' to the top of the hill

Ha! Ha!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(6)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Notes:



(1) Abalone earrings: Abalone: Any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis, having an ear-shaped shell with a row of holes along the outer edge. The colorful pearly interior of the shell is often used for making ornaments. Also called ear shell. (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company)



(2) Leeway: 1. The drift of a ship or an aircraft to leeward of the course being steered. 2. A margin of freedom or variation, as of activity, time, or expenditure; latitude.(Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved)



(3) The moon rises over Dog Street: Notice same mention in Circus, 2004: "And they played 'Lopsided heart' And 'Moon over Dog Street'"



(4) Reet: Reat/ reat: adj. 1. Satisfactory; good; correct; pleasing; right; stylish. 2. All right, great, wonderful; extremely attractive, appealing, exciting, satisfying; hep (Source: "Dictionary of American Slang". Wentworth and Flexner, 1975.Thomas Y. Crowell Company)



(5) Chicken Coup: Pete Millar (1929 -2003) was an American drag racer, and later became a cartoonist (drag cartoons). Millar's super charged dragster race car was the steel-bodied 'Chicken Coupe', which competed heads-up in Top Gas and Competition Eliminator. Its 260-inch engine was originally plucked from a Fairlane.



(6) Might be inspired by RL Burnside's "Over The Hill" (Mr. Wizard, Epitaph Records 1997). Written by Mississippi Fred McDowell (1964): "I'm goin' over the hill I'm goin' on over the hill I'm goin' over the hill Yeah, as soon as I can make me a few round Finally master see me, just a few more ups and down I'm goin' on over the hill I'm goin' over the hill, I'm goin' over the hill, I'm goin' over the hill, Oh well, I went in the valley, I didn't go to stay Soon God had me child, I stay down there all day I went on over the hill When I get to heaven, gon' sit right down Askin' master, just to get my starry down."



Town With No Cheer

 



Well, it's hotter than blazes(2), and all the long faces

There'll be no oasis for a dry local grazier(2)

There'll be no refreshment for a thirsty jackaroo(2)(3)

From Melbourne to Adelaide on the Overlander(4)

With newfangled(5) buffet cars and faster locomotives

The train stopped in Serviceton(6) less and less often



No, there's nothing sadder than a town with no cheer

Vic Rail(2)(7) decided the canteen was no longer necessary there

No spirits, no bilgewater(8), and eighty dry locals(6)

And the high noon sun beats a hundred and four

There's a hummingbird(2) trapped in a closed down shoe store

This tiny Victorian rhubarb kept the waterin' hole(9) open for sixty-five years



Now it's boilin' in a miserable March twenty-first(2)

Wrapped the hills in a blanket of Paterson's curse(2)(10)

The train smokes down the xylophone, there'll be no stoppin' here

All you can be is thirsty in a town with no cheer



No Bourbon, no branchwater(11)

Though the townspeople here fought her Vic Rail decree tooth and nail

Now it's boilin' in a miserable March twenty-first

Wrapped the hills in a blanket of Paterson's curse

The train smokes down the xylophone, there'll be no stoppin' here

All you can be is thirsty in a town with no cheer



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music admin. by Ackee Music Inc.(ASCAP), � 1983

Official release: Swordfishtrombones, Island Records Inc., 1983



Known covers:

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records



Notes:



(1) Town With No Cheer

Tom Waits (1983): "When my wife heard that for the first time she said: "Oh gee, you must have loved her very much." So I said: "Wait a minute. This is not a love song. This is about a guy who can't get a drink!" It's about a miserable old town in Australia that made the news when they shut down the only watering hole. We found an article about it in a newspaper when we were over there and hung on to it for a year. So I said: "Ah, I 'm going to write something about that someday." and finally got around to it. That's a freedom bell upfront just trying to get a feel of a ghost town, tumbleweeds and that kind of thing. It's basically a folk song" (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)

Brian Case (1983): The lead in the "Town With No Cheer", for example, uses a struck Freedom Bell and bagpipes to convey the lonesomeness and tumbleweed of a ghost-town. "Yeah, Anthony Clark-Stewart played the bagpipes, looked like he was strangling a goose, had to record him separately," said Tom. (Source: "Tom Waits For No Man" Melody Maker, by Brian Case. Date: October 29, 1983)



(2) Some research by Colin Hubert, from the Listserv Raindogs discussionlist:

- "After the bagpipe intro to "Town With No Cheer", Tom Waits' voice comes out powerfully exasperated "Well it's hotter than blazes" which is a very rural Australian way to describe a hot day. I'm sure that I have said that very thing myself a few hundred times. "A dry local grazier"? A grazier is any farmer who runs livestock - the American equivalent is probably "rancher". "A thirsty jackeroo". Well a jackeroo is generally a young man brought up on a farm who is working for a few years on a more prosperous farm elsewhere for experience or because his own family's farm can't support him yet. The really big cattle runs in Queensland and the Northern Territory and Western Australia employ lots of sons and daughters (jilleroos) from the southern states, although some city kids who fancy themselves on horseback do it too. Just last summer, two city kids were left alone to look after a property in WA that was probably bigger than many US states and they died of thirst somewhere away from the homestead. The owner of the property may face manslaughter charges for not adequately taking account of their limited experience and ability. "Vic Rail" is the Victorian State Government instrumentality that runs the rural railways, and like every corporate or state entity, when they find cheaper ways to run things, they dismiss the needs and past contributions of small and dependent communities.There are no hummingbirds native to Australia, so the "Hummingbird trapped in a closed down shoe store" must have been someone's exotic pet. This is an image of the abandoned opulence of better times. Now we get to the contentious references - "Now it's boiling in a miserable March 21st / Wrapped the hills in a blanket of Patterson's curse" Paterson's Curse is officially a noxious weed, but there is not much that farmers can do to get rid of it. I have not been able to find out if it is native or introduced, but it grows throughout southern Australia anywhere away from the coast, particularly on farmland pasture. It is not so harmful for livestock, but it is not at all nutritious either, so farmers prefer better grasses to take up the soil's limited goodness. However, sometimes patersons curse will keep livestock going through a drought when no grass will show itself. It is a vivid looking green weed with much leaf growth close to a bound, grassy stem which doesn't quite grow thick enough to be woody, but when it flowers - boy does it flower. What look like small elongated tulips appear in a bright purple hue in crowns at the tops of each plant. En masse, and this is how anyone who has seen it will remember it, patersons curse really does "Wrap the hills in a blanket", a bright purple doona. It looks lush and really does smother the entire countryside with colour. Too bad March 21st is at the wrong end of the year for such an effect. And, 104 degrees in a Victorian town on that date is only barely possible. I must mention again that patersons curse is sometimes sold by city florists with the name Riverina Bluebell, which amuses the visiting countryfolk no end. So, the song is a tribute to a town deprived of its former opulence and reason for being by an apparently arbitrary decision made by some pen pushers in the city, and it relates by sly allusion to that most well known and barely remembered of Australian drinking songs, "Pub With No Beer". So, how did Tom Waits come up with this song? How does he even know of patersons curse, much less its blanketing effect when in bloom? Tom Waits has done some Australian tours many years ago, but I presume he just did the capital cities and jetted away. He may have travelled by road down the Hume Highway between Sydney and Melbourne, where in spring he would certainly have seen patersons curse and probably asked about it, but I have a different theory. The Australian Prime Minister from late 1975 till early 1983 was a Victorian grazier called Malcolm Fraser. He ran a sheep station called Nareen in western Victoria probably not more than a hundred miles or so from Serviceton. Mr. Fraser was a large, imposing man with a stony face that the Easter Island statues might have been modeled on, and was very much a product of the old establishment. He was a staunchly conservative politician of the old kind of conservatism which maintained an element of 'noblesse oblige', so while he would use 'reds under the bed' rhetoric with the most fervent of ultra-right radicals, he was not quite such a threat to state largesse as the 'economic rationalists' of today. Shortly after losing the 1983 election to the Oxford educated union organiser of the Labor Party, Bob Hawke, there was a strange little scandal involving Malcolm Fraser on an American trip. The full story never came out, but apparently, one night in Memphis, our recent prime minister was drugged and robbed and woke up in a hotel with no wallet, no identification papers, and no trousers. Did he perhaps meet Tom Waits in a bar and get induced into a bender of some sort? Do we owe the information which inspired this song to that authoritarian bane of our struggling innocence? " (Submitted by Colin Hubert. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist) 

Pub With No Beer (Gordon Parsons, Australia 1959. Original version "A Pub Without Beer" by Dan Sheahan, Australia 1943): "It's lonesome away from your kindred and all By the campfire at night where the wild dingos call But there's nothin' so lonesome, so dull or so drear Than to stand in the bar of a pub with no beer. Now the publican's anxious for the quota to come There's a faraway look on the face of the bum The maid's gone all cranky and the cook's acting queer What a terrible place is a pub with no beer. The stockman rides up with his dry, dusty throat He breasts up to the bar, pulls a wad from his coat But the smile on his face quickly turns to a sneer When the barman says suddenly: "The pub's got no beer!" There's a dog on the verandah, for his master he waits But the boss is inside drinking wine with his mates He hurries for cover and he cringes in fear It's no place for a dog round a pub with no beer. Then in comes the swagman, all covered with flies He throws down his roll, wipes the sweat from his eyes But when he is told he says, "What's this I hear? I've trudged fifty flamin' miles to a pub with no beer!" Old Billy, the blacksmith, the first time in his life Has gone home cold sober to his darling wife He walks in the kitchen; she says: "You're early, me dear" Then he breaks down and he tells her that the pub's got no beer. It's lonesome away from your kindred and all By the campfire at night where the wild dingos call But there's nothin' so lonesome, so dull or so drear Than to stand in the bar of a pub with no beer."



(3) Jackaroo n.: A cowboy; Australian slang "jackeroo", a young fellow. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Overlander: Australian railway. The Overland commenced service in 1887, pioneering intercapital rail travel between Melbourne and Adelaide. The century old name came from the term "Overlander", an adventurer who had travelled across the country. A century on, this historic service still provides a journey between Melbourne, Victoria and Adelaide. These days the 828 kilometre overnight journey takes 11 hours.



(5) Newfangled: Different from what one is used to; objectionably new (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(6) Serviceton: Further reading: Serviceton factsheet. Among other things, you can read that the population is still 80 dry locals, but the place seems to be slowly dying. The estimated population for the year 2010 is 73. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren/ Alicia Fontana. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(7) Vicrail: The government instrumentality in the state of Victoria in charge of railways.



(8) Bilgewater

- Filthy drainings. The bilge is the lowest part of a ship, and, as the rain or sea-water which trickles down to this part is hard to get at, it is apt to become foul and very offensive. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 

- Filthy water that collects inside the bilge (the lowest internal portion of the hull on a boat).

- n. [late 19C+] thin beer, thus any thin, tasteless drink, alcoholic or otherwise. [bilgewater, the foul water that collects in a vessel's bilges] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

- Also mentioned in "Wrong Side Of The Road" (And get the eyeball of a rooster and the stones from a ditch and wash 'em down with bilgewater and say you'll never snitch...)



(9) Water hole, watering hole: A bar or a tavern (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang - Supplement, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(10) Patterson: A native plant of Southern Europe. It appears that the plant was first introduced into Australia by John McArthur in 1843 to his Camden gardens where it was subsequently sold as a garden plant.The first record of this plant occurring as a weed in Australia was on a Mr Patterson's property at Albury NSW in 1880. In South Australia it is known as Salvation Jane whilst in the eastern states it is commonly called Patterson's Curse. South Australians adopted the name of Salvation Jane as it first appeared in the Pastoral/ Northern regions of this state where the plant escaped from gardens. Mid Northern graziers found that this plant was a salvation for them as it survived during dry winter periods to provide valuable sheep feed, although cattle found it unpalatable. From there the plant gradually moved south into higher rainfall regions including the Adelaide Hills. It can turn the entire countryside a vivid purple. It is occasionally sold by Sydney florists to city folk as "Riverina Bluebell", which amuses visiting farmers no end





(11) Branchwater: Just water that you drink with Bourbon (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Train Song

 



(Frank's Wild Years studio version, 1987)



Well, I broke down in East St. Louis(2), on the Kansas City line

Drunk up all of my money, that I borrowed every time

And I fell down at the Derby, the night's as black as a crow

It was a train that took me away from here, but a train can't bring me home



What made my dreams so hollow, was standin' at the depot

With a steeple full of swallows, that could never ring a bell(3)

And I've come ten thousand miles away, with not one thing to show

It was a train that took me away from here, but a train can't bring me home



Well, I remember when I left, without botherin' to pack

Don't you know I up and left, with just the clothes I had on my back

Now I'm so sorry for what I've done, and I'm out here on my own

It was a train that took me away from here, but a train can't bring me home

It was a train that took me away from here, but a train can't bring me home



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play





 



Train Song



(Big Time live version, 1988)



Well, I broke down in East St. Louis(2), on the Kansas City line

And I drunk up all of my money, that I borrowed every time

And I fell down at the Derby, now the night's as black as a crow

Must've been a train that took me away from here

But a train can't bring me home



What made my dreams so hollow, I was standin' at the depot

With a steeple full of swallows, that could never ring a bell(3)

Oh, I've come ten thousand miles away, and I ain't got one thing to show

Must've been a train took me away from here

But a train can't bring me home



Well, I remember when I left, without botherin' to pack

You know I up and left, with nothin' but the clothes I had on my back

Now I'm so sorry for what I've done, and I'm out here on my own

Must've been a train that took me away from here

But a train can't bring me home

It must've been a train that took me away from here

But a train can't bring me, can't bring me home



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Eyes And Ears. Bim Skala Bim. January, 1995. Bib Records

It Happened One Night. Holly Cole. June, 1995. Blue Note Records (Japan: 1995, USA/ EMD: 1996)

Nomad. Polarity Percussion Ensemble with John Kenny & David Moss. 1997. Self-released

Promised Land. The Holmes Brothers. January, 1997. Rounder Records

Collection. Holly Cole Trio. September, 1998. EMI (Australia)

Righteous: The Essential Collection. Holmes Brothers. July 16, 2002. Rounder/ Pgd (same version as on "Promised Land", 1997)

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

The Best Of Holly Cole. Holly Cole. November, 2000. Blue Note Records

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Train Songs. Spring String Quartet. 2002. CCn'C Records



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Listen to audio excerpt of Train Song as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Train Song" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre. Los Angeles/ USA. November 9, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum. 

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) Train Song:

- Tom Waits (1987): "Kind of a gospel number. Frank is on the bench, really on his knees and can't go any further. At the end of his rope on a park bench with an advertisement that says "Palladin Funeral Home." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)

Tom Waits (1987): "Well, that's where it starts. When you're young you think everything is possible and that you're in the sun and all that. I always liked that Bob Dylan song, "I was young when I left home and I rambled around and I never wrote a letter to my home, to my home. Never wrote a letter to my home." You don't always know where you're going till you get there. That's the thing about train travel, at least when you say goodbye they get gradually smaller. Airplanes, people go through a door and they're gone. Very strange. They say now that jet lag is really your spirit catching up to your body." (Source: "Tom Waits is flying upside down (on purpose)". Musician (a Billboard publication) Mark Rowland October, 1987)

Live intro as heard on Big Time: This is really the intro to 'Johnsburg, Illinois' but it's been edited in as an intro to 'Train Song' instead. You can hear the edit at 1.20]: "All right. Actually I get asked... Well... look, I think the question I get asked the most is... I mean, it happens a lot. Enough that I would remark on it. A lot of people come up to me and they say, 'Tom, is it possible for a woman to get pregnant without intercourse?' And my answer is always the same. I say, 'Well, listen. We're gonna have to go all the way back to the Civil War.' Apparently, a stray bullet actually pierced the testicle of a Union soldier, and then lodged itself in the ovaries of an eighteen year old girl, who was All right. Actually I get asked... Well... look, I think the question I get asked the most is... I mean, it happens a lot. Enough that I would remark on it. A lot of people come up to me and they say, 'Tom, is it possible for a woman to get pregnant without intercourse?' And my answer is always the same. I say, 'Well, listen. We're gonna have to go all the way back to the Civil War.' Apparently, a stray bullet actually pierced the testicle of a Union soldier, and then lodged itself in the ovaries of an eighteen year old girl, who was actually a hundred feet from him at the time. Well, the baby was fine. She was very happy, guilt free and... Of course, the soldier was a little pissed off. When you think about it, it's actually a FORM of intercourse, but... not for everyone. Those who love action maybe." actually a hundred feet from him at the time. Well, the baby was fine. She was very happy, guilt free and... Of course, the soldier was a little pissed off. When you think about it, it's actually a FORM of intercourse, but... not for everyone. Those who love action maybe." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(2) St. Louis

- Also mentioned in: I Beg Your Pardon, 1982: "Please don't go back to St. Louis, can't you tell that I'm sincere.", Time, 1985: "And you're East of East Saint Louis and the wind is making speeches.", Hold On, 1999: "Well, God bless your crooked heart, St. Louis got the best of me."

Jonathan Valania (1999): Getting back to the names of places, St. Louis seems to pop up a lot, in "Hold on" from the new record and "Time" from Rain Dogs and you've mentioned it a lot in interviews. Ever live there? TW: "No, never lived there. It's a good name to stick in a song. Every song needs to be anatomically correct: You need weather, you need the name of the town, something to eat - every song needs certain ingredients to be balanced. You're writing a song and you need a town, and you look out the window and you see "St. Louis Cardinals" on some kid's T-shirt. And you say, "Oh, we'll use that." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/ July, 1999)



(3) Ring the bell: To succeed; to meet with approval or make a hit with someone (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Trampled Rose

 



Long way going to

get my medicine(1)

Sky's the autumn grey of a lonely wren



Piano from a window played

Gone tomorrow, gone yesterday



I found it in the street

At first I did not see

Lying at my feet

a trampled rose



Passing the hat in church

It never stops going around



You never pay just once

to get the job done



What I done to me,

I done to you

What happened to the trampled rose?



In the muddy street

with the fireworks and leaves



A blind man with a cup I asked

Would he sing 'Kisses Sweeter Than Wine'(2)



I know that rose,

like I know my name

The one I gave my love,

it was the same

Now I find it in the street,

a trampled rose



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Raising Sand. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. October 23, 2007. Rounder

You Can Always Turn Around. Lucky Peterson. September 28, 2010. Dreyfus Records



Notes:



(1) Get my medicine 

Tom Waits (2004): "When you're making words for songs, the first thing you do is just make sounds. 'I waa for miiiles and miiiiiles and woosh auck through mordor...' You're just making sounds. And then you listen to that back, and you try to get it to explain what it's trying to say to you. Sometimes it sounds like, 'It's something about a sewing machine', or 'Jeez, it's something about going to get my medicine.' So, I get mystified by the spontaneous incantations. It's a perfectly valid musical approach to me. I consider anything that makes a sound valid. It's just how it's orchestrated and how it's organized." (Source: "Thrasher Interview With Tom Waits Thrasher Magazine (USA), by Eben Sterling. November 1, 2004)



(2) Kisses Sweeter Than Wine: "Kisses Sweeter Than Wine", by Jimmie Rodgers -Words by Paul Campbell and Music by Huddie Ledbetter -peak Billboard position # 3 in 1958-58 (21 total weeks in the Top 100) -originally a # 19 hit for the Weavers in 1951: "Well, when I was a young man never been kissed I got to thinkin' it over how much I had missed So I got me a girl and I kissed her and then, and then Oh, lordy, well I kissed 'er again CHORUS: Because she had kisses sweeter than wine She had, mmm, mmm, kisses sweeter than wine (Sweeter than wine) Well I asked her to marry and to be my sweet wife I told her we'd be so happy for the rest of our life I begged and I pleaded like a natural man And then, whoops oh lordy, well she gave me her hand CHORUS Well we worked very hard both me and my wife Workin' hand-in-hand to have a good life We had corn in the field and wheat in the bin And then, whoops oh lord, I was the father of twins CHORUS Well our children they numbered just about four And they all had a sweetheart a'knockin' on the door They all got married and they wouldn't hesitate I was, whoops oh lord, the grandfather of eight CHORUS Well now that I'm old and I'm a'ready to go I get to thinkin' what happened a long time ago Had a lot of kids, a lot of trouble and pain But then, whoops oh lordy, well I'd do it all again Because she had kisses sweeter than wine She had, mmm... kisses... sweeter... than... wine."



Trash Day

 



(Beacon Theatre, 1979 live version)



My baby's gone and I feel so bad

And I lost the best girl that I ever had

Go on and ask me why I feel so blue

You'd feel the same way if it happened to you



She didn't leave me on Monday

She didn't leave me on a Tuesday

She didn't leave me on Wednesday

She didn't leave me on Thursday

She didn't leave me on Friday

My baby left me on Trash Day



Trash Day

Trash Day

Now knock it off!

Shut up!

You hold it down!

I'm tryin' to get me some sleep

Knock it off!

Shut up!

Hold it down!

I'm tryin' to get me some sleep

It must be Trash Day

Trash Day

Trash Day

Goddamn Trash Day



She could've left me on a Christmas Day

Lincoln's Birthday

(?) day

Arbour Day

Any day but Trash Day

It must be Trash Day

Knock it off!



My baby left me on Trash Day

My baby left me on Trash Day

My baby left me on Trash Day



Trash Day

Trash Day

It must be Trash Day

Knock it off!

Oh, and darling, how appropriate for you to leave me on this particular

afternoon

considerin' all of the garbage you gave me over the years



Goddamit!

Trash Day

Trash Day

Trash Day

Trash Day

Trash Day



Trash Day

Trash Day

It must be Trash Day

Trash Day

Trash Day



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: (?), � 1979

No official release

Recorded live at the Beacon Theatre, New York, November 5, 1979

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





 



Trash Day/ Pasties And A G-String



(Uptown Theatre, 1979 live version)



My baby left me and I feel so bad

I lost the best girl that I ever had

You ask me why I feel so blue

But you'd feel the same way if it happened to you



She didn't leave me on Monday

She didn't leave me on Tuesday

She didn't leave me on Wednesday

She didn't leave me on Thursday

She didn't leave me on Friday

She didn't leave me on Saturday

She went and left me on Trash Day

My baby left me on Trash Day

She went and left me on Trash Day



She didn't leave me on Monday

She didn't leave me on a Tuesday

She didn't leave me on no Wednesday, babe

She could have left me on a Thursday

No no no no, it was Trash Day

It was goddamn Trash Day

My baby left me on a Trash Day



And that's why I'm smellin' like a brewery, and I'm lookin' like a tramp

And I ain't got a quarter, I got a postage stamp

I got a five o'clock shadow boxin' all around the town

Talkin' with the old men sleepin' on the ground



Bazanti bootin' al zootin' al hoot and Al Cohn

And I'm sharin' this apartment with a telephone pole

Fishnet stockings and spike heel shoes

Strip tease, prick tease, car keys blues



Porno floor show, live nude girls

Dreamy and creamy and brunette curls

Chesty Morgan and Watermelon Rose

Raisin' my rent, take off all your clothes



Because my baby left me and I feel so bad

I lost the best girl that I ever had

Go on and ask me why I feel so blue

You'd feel the same way if it happened to you



She could've left me on a Monday

She could've left me on a Tuesday

She could've left me on a Thursday

Or a Friday, or a Saturday

No, she went and left me on Trash Day

My baby left me on Trash Day

She went and left me on Trash Day



Trash Day

"Big John" Thomassie on the trash cans!

Oh, Trash Day

Trash Day

Trash Day

Goddamn Trash Day



Trash Day



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: (?), � 1979

No official release

Recorded live at the Uptown Theatre, Kansas City, October 8, 1979

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Trash Day.

Beacon Theatre, New York/ USA, November 15, 1979.



Trouble's Braids

 



Well, I pulled on trouble's braids(2)

And I hid in the briars out by the quickmud

Stayin' away from the main roads

Passin' out wolf tickets(3), downwind from the bloodhounds



And I pulled on trouble's braids

And I lay by a cypress, as quiet as a stone, 'til the bleeding stopped

And I blew the weathervane off some old roadhouse

And I built a fire in the skeleton back seat of an old Tucker



And I pulled on trouble's braids

And I spanked cold red mud where the hornet stung deep

And I tossed in the ditch in a restless sleep

And I pulled on trouble's braids



I hung my rain-soaked jacket on some old barbed wire

Poured cold rusty water on a miserable fire

And I pulled on trouble's braids



And the creek was swollen by daybreak

And I could just barely see

And I floated downstream on an old dead tree



And I pulled on trouble's braids

I pulled on trouble's braids

I pulled on trouble's braids



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Musicadmin. by Ackee Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1983

Official release: Swordfishtrombones, Island Records Inc., 1983



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Trouble's Braids:

- Tom Waits (1983): "Trouble's Braids: It's Victor Feldman on African talking drum, Stephen Taylor on parade bass drum and Larry Taylor on acoustic bass. It has a bit of a Mongolian feel. Try to get the image of trouble being this little girl. Pull on trouble's braids. He should chase you around and about a guy who's in trouble. Our hero is at this point being pursued by blood hounds. So he stays away from the main roads" (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983) 

Stephen Hodges (2007): "I played this standing talking drum with my knees and my hands while Victor [Feldman] played that fucking crackerjack drum, whacking it every time Tom said 'Trouble's Braids.' Victor was pretty dry, I just got in his face, all happy about that track, and he cracked a smile" (Source: Stephen Hodges interview November 20, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



(2) Braids: (braid, also called plait) is a complex structure or pattern formed by intertwining three or more strands of flexible material such as textile fibers, wire, or human hair.



(3) Wolf tickets

- Tom Waits
 (1988): "Another one I like is wolf tickets, which means bad news, as in someone who is bad news or generally insubordinate. In a sentence, you'd say, "Don't fuck with me, I'm passing out wolf tickets." Think it's either Baltimore Negro or turn-of-the-century railroad use" (Source: "Tom Waits 20 questions". Playboy magazine: Steve Oney. -- March 1988) 

Sell a woof/ wolf ticket, to: phr. [1960s+] (US Black) To boast, to brag. To talk nonsense, to lie [trash talk] To threaten, to intimidate (buy a woof ticket) (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

"As early as 1985, Clarence Page of The Chicago Tribune defined selling woof tickets as "an invitation to fight." In 1996, Jane Kennedy of The San Francisco Examiner called it "telling lies." In The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, Betty Parham and Gerrie Ferris wrote in 1992, "Although its origin is uncertain, 'woof ticket' is a somewhat dated phrase that refers to an outrageous or exaggerated boast meant to intimidate or impress the listener." Woof is a Black English pronunciation of "wolf." According to Geneva Smitherman's 1994 "Black Talk," a woof ticket is "a verbal threat, which one sells to somebody; may or may not be real. Often used as a strategy to make another person back down and surrender to what that person perceives as a superior power." Tom McIntyre, professor of special education at Hunter College in New York, noted nearly a decade ago: "Woofing is especially effective against those who are unfamiliar with it and don't realize that it is most often 'all show and no go.' . . . The menacing behavior can usually be defused and eliminated by informed, tactful action." He advised teachers to "look secure and self-assured while you withdraw." In the context of the basketball star Howard's remarks, woof tickets are not to be bought; on the contrary, he uses the phrase to show that performance, and not intimidating attitude, is needed to "get it together." (Source: "On Language by William Safire, Crying Woof!". Copyright 2000 The New York Times Company. Submitted by Monika Kottenhahn, eGroups Tom Waits discussionlist. October, 2000)

- Also mentioned in Spare Parts II, 1975: "So I can be passing out wolf tickets regardless of where I go..."



Two Sisters

 



There was an old woman, lived by the seashore

Bow and balance me(2)

There was an old woman, lived by the seashore

A number of daughters: one, two, three, four

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



There was a young man come there to see them

Bow and balance me

There was a young man come there to see them

and the oldest one got stuck on him

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



He bought the youngest a beaver hat

Bow and balance me

He bought the youngest a beaver hat

and the oldest one got mad at that

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Oh, sister oh, sister let's walk the seashore

Bow and balance me

Oh, sister oh, sister let's walk the seashore

and see the ships as they're sailing on

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



While these two sisters were walking the shore

Bow and balance me

While these two sisters were walking the shore

the oldest pushed the youngest o'er

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Oh, sister oh, sister please lend me your hand

Bow and balance me

Oh, sister oh, sister please lend me your hand

and you will have Willy and all of his land

And then I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



I'll never, I'll never will lend you my hand

Bow and balance me

I'll never, I'll never will lend you my hand

but I'll have Willy and all of his land

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Some time she swam and some time she swam

Bow and balance me

Some time she sank and some time she swam

untill she came to the old mill dam

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



The miller, he got his fishinghook

Bow and balance me

The miller, he got his fishinghook

and fished that maiden out of the brook

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Oh, miller oh, miller here's five gold rings

Bow and balance me

Oh, miller oh, miller here's five gold rings

to push the maiden in again

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



The miller received those five gold rings

Bow and balance me

The miller received those five gold rings

and pushed that maiden in again

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



The miller was hung in the old mill gate

Bow and balance me

The miller was hung in the old mill gate

for drowning little sister Kate

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Written by: folk traditional arranged by Waits/ Brennan(1)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Two Sisters:

- Folk ballad also known as "Twa Sisters", first printed version from 1656 known as "The Miller and the King's Daughter". Variants and alternate titles include: The Cruel Sister, The Bonnie Milldams of Binnorie, The Bonny Bows o' London, Binnorie and Sister and Dear Sister. Maybe best known as "Child #10" (Francis J. Child's five volume work, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads). Child has 21 versions of the lyrics of "The Twa Sisters"...

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)

Early version as printed in Jamieson's Popular Ballads (1806): "There was twa sisters in a bowr, Edinburgh, Edinburgh There was twa sisters in a bowr, Stirling for ay There was twa sisters in a bowr, There came a knight to be their wooer. He courted the eldest wi glove an ring, But he lovd the youngest above a' thing. He courted the eldest wi brotch an knife, But lovd the youngest as his life. The eldest she was vexed sair, An much envi'd her sister fair. Into her bowr she could not rest, Wi grief an spite she almost brast. Upon a morning fair and clear, She cried upon her sister dear: "O sister, come to yon sea stran, An see our father's ship come to lan." She's taen her by the milk-white han, An led her down to yon sea stran. The youngest stood upon a stane, The eldest came and threw her in. She tooke her by the middle sma, And dashd her bonny back to the jaw. "O sister, sister, tak my han, An Ise mack you heir to a' my lan." "O sister, sister, tak my middle, An yes get my goud and my gouden girdle." "O sister, sister, save my life, An I swear Ise never be nae man's wife." "Foul fa the han that I should tacke, It twin'd me and my wardles make." "Your cherry cheeks an yallow hair, Gars me gae maiden for evermair." Sometimes she sank, and sometimes she swam, Till she came down yon bonny mill-dam. O out it came the millers son, An saw the fair maid swimmin' in. "O Father, father, draw your dam, Here's either a mermaid or a swan." The miller quickly drew the dam, An there he found a drownd woman. You couldna see her yallow hair, For gold and pearle that were so rare. An by there came a harper fine, That harped to the king at dine. When he did look that lady upon, He sighd and made a heavy moan. He's taen three locks o her yallow hair, An wi them strung his harp sae fair. The first tune he did play and sing, Was, "Farewell to my father the king." The nextin tune that he playd syne, Was, "Farewell to my mother the queen." The lasten tune that he playd then, Was, "wae to my sister, Fair Ellen."



(2) Bow and balance me: refrain also interpreted as: "Bow and balance to me", "Binnorie, O Binnorie", "With a hy downe downe a downe-a", "Stirling for aye", "And the swan swims bonnie O", "At the bonnie bows o London town", "On the banks of the Banna, ohone and aree", "Bow down, bow down, bow down", "And the bough it was bent to me", "Fa la la la la la la la".



---------- U V--------



Underground

 



(Swordfishtrombones studio version, 1983)



Rattle big black bones in the danger zone

There's a rumblin' groan down below

There's a big dark town, it's a place I've found

There's a world going on underground



They're alive, they're awake

While the rest of the world is asleep

Below the mine shaft roads, it will all unfold

There's a world going on underground



All the roots hang down, swing from town to town

They are marching around down under your boots

All the trucks unload beyond the gopher holes

There's a world going on underground



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1983-1998

Official release: "Swordfishtrombones", Island Records Inc., 1983 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)





 



Underground



(Big Time live version, 1988)



Rattle big black bones in the danger zone

There's a rumblin' groan down below

Below the mine shaft roads, it will all unfold

There's a world going on underground

Underground



They're alive, they're awake

While the rest of the world is asleep

Below the mine shaft roads, it will all unfold

There's a world going on underground

Underground

Underground



All the roots hang down, swing from town to town

They are marching around down under your boots

Below the gopher holes, where they all unfold

There's a world going on underground

Underground

Underground



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1983-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Spiewomalowanie. Mariusz Lubomski. 1994. Self-released

Secret World. Astrid Seriese. October, 1994 (re-released in 2003). Brigadoon

Gerd K�ster und... Gerd K�ster. March 22, 1999. Chlodwig (Pavement Records)

Lubomski W Trojce. Mariusz Lubomski. July 18, 2000. EMI Records

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production/ Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Lullabies for the Discerning Baby. Ansty Cowfold. August 29, 2005. Wonky Atlas



Notes:



(1) Underground

Tom Waits (1983): "It was originally an opportunity for me to chronical the behavior of a mutant dwarf community and give it a feeling of a Russian march. People banging on steam pipes, thousand boots coming down on a wood floor at the same time. That chorus of men singing, kind of a 'Dr.Zhivago'-feel to it. It was the way I originally perceived it. I abbreviated some of the scope and wanted bass marimba to give it kind of an exotic feel. So, you get the note and you get that kind of a tall wood clang with the attack. That's Victor Feldman on bass marimba, Larry Taylor on acoustic bass, Randy Aldcroft on baritone horn, Stephen Hodges on drums and Fred Tackett on electric guitar. I had some assistance from a gentleman by the name of Francis Thumm, who worked on the arrangements of some of these songs with me. Who plays gramolodium with the Harry Partch Ensemble headed up by Daniel Mitchell. So he worked closely on most of these songs. But I originally saw this... the theme for some late night activity in the steam tunnels beneath New York City. Where allegedly there are entire communities of ladies and gentleman living under difficult circumstances beneath the subways. When I was a kid I used to stare in the gopherholes for hours and hours sometimes. I tried to think my way down through the gopherhole and imagine this kind of a 'journey to the center of the earth'- kind of thing" (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)

Tom Waits (1983): "Much more percussion than I'm used to in the past, I was trying to get it to imitate things that I'm already used to hearing rather than just being separate so it's more like an organized automobile accident and it has some shape to it but it also relates to the real event itself, some of the stuff on Shore Leave is like sound effects, the low trombone is like a bus going by and I got a little more adventurous, I'm still a little timid about it but melody is what really hits me first, melody is the first thing that seduces me. Underground had some - I thought it felt like a Russian march, the music to accompany the activities of a mutant dwarf community in the steam tunnels - that kind of a feel is what I was after" (Source: Unidentified Swordfishtrombones Interview (interviewer's tape). Date: 1983/ 1984)

Tom Waits (1983): "Underground'' is the score for a mutant dwarf community" (Source: "The Beat Goes On" Rock Bill magazine (USA). October 1983, by Kid Millions)

Stephen Hodges (2007): "I broke every stick in my bag trying to do 'Underground'. Finally I just went and found these parade drumsticks that were like big old logs, and I shoved cymbal felts on top of them so they were like a big felt mallet" (Source: Stephen Hodges interview November 20, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



Union Square

 



Well, time is always money

For all the boys on Union Square

Go on bust your ass till doomsday

But don't forget to say your prayers



Someone's knocked down on the backstreet

Said, papa got a brand new slack

And your baby is handcuffed on the front seat

Sit right there, boy, and you relax



Come on, honey, we're all goin' down

Down down downtown(2)

Down downtown

We're goin' down downtown

We're goin' down downtown



Well, they spill out of the Cinema 14

To that drag(3) bar down the block

Best live show by far on the whole east coast

With a bank rolled up in your sock



She stands right there for your pleasure

Half Puerto Rican Chinese

You got to find your baby somebody to measure

I'm gonna get me some of these, baby



Come on, honey, we're all goin' down

Down down down

Down down down downtown

Down downtown

I'm goin' down downtown



Well, four in the mornin' on a Sunday

Sacco drinkin' whiskey in church

Half pint of festival brandy

That babe will fall right off his perch



Well, that guy in the sweater's off duty

Well, he's out in front of the welfare hotel

The guy in the dress is a beauty

Go all the way, I swear you never can tell



Come on, honey, put on your socks

Down down down

I'm goin' down down down downtown

Down downtown

Oh looky here, down down down

Oh come on, honey



Oh babe, down down down

Come on, down downtown

I'm goin' down downtown

I'm goin' down downtown



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985

Official release: Rain Dogs, Island Records Inc., 1985



Known covers:

Knucklehead. Eric "Roscoe" Ambel. July, 2004. Lakeside Lounge Records

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records



Notes:



(1) Union Square

Tom Waits (1985): "Union Square, Keith Richards played on that, he plays that doghouse rhythm, it's just a killer." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "That's just real straight... y'know? Keith played on that again too. He played that eh... y'know eh... (laughs) that guitar. Gheesus! You know, he leans forward at like eh... almost eh... at like 2 o'clock. You know? I mean if this was like... 10 till 2, y'know? He leans so far forward, he must have a string attached to the back of his neck and it's run up and it's being held to the ceiling and it keeps him from falling flat on his face. It's unbelievable. He had these old shoes of... looked like a dog chewed 'em up. And eh he was drinking this eh Rebel Yellow sour mash whiskey and... he looks like a pirate. He's a killer." (Source: "Nightlines Interview" Nightlines on CBC Stereo (Canada) conducted by Michael Tearson. Date: New York. Late 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "I was going to throw that song out. I said call the dustman, this one's chewing on the dead. But somebody said, there's something there. Hell I said, there isn't. Then he came in - on the clock he stands with his head at 3 and his arm at 10. I said how can a man stand like that without falling over, unless he has 200lb test fishing line suspending him from the ceiling? It was like something out of Arthur, he comes in with his guitar valet and it's 'Oh Keef, shall we try the Rickenbacker?'" (Source: "Hard Rain". New Musical Express: Gavin Martin. October 19, 1985)



(2) Down townI am going down town, i.e. to the business part of the town. Down the country properly means down the slope of the land, or as the rivers run. We say "I am going up to town" when we mean out of the country into the chief city.(Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(3) Drag n.: A homosexual gathering or party in which the participants wear clothes appropriate to the opposite sex; a gathering or party of transvestites (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Virginia Avenue

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



Well, I'm walkin' down Virginia Avenue

I'm tryin' to find somebody to tell my troubles to

Harold's club(2) is closin', everybody's goin' on home

What's a poor sailor to do?



I guess I'll get on back into my short(3), make it back to the fort

Sleepin' off the craziness that's inside of my brain

Got to be some place that's better than this

This life I'm leadin's drivin' me insane

And I'm dreamin'



And I'm dreamin' to the twilight, cause this town has got me down

I've seen all of the highlights, I've been walkin' it around

I won't make a fuss, I'll take a Greyhound bus

Carry me away from here, now what have I got to lose?



I'm just a-walkin' down Columbus Avenue

Bars are all closin', cause it's quarter to two

Every town I go to is like a lock without a key

The blues I leave behind keep catchin' up on me



Catchin' up on me

They're catchin' up on me

Catchin' up on me

Catchin' up on me

Catchin' up on me



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Virginia Avenue



(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



Well, I'm walkin' on down Virginia Avenue

Tryin' to find somebody to tell my troubles to

Harold's club(2) is closin', and everybody's goin' on home

What's a poor boy to do?



I'll just get on back into my short(3), make it back to the fort

Sleep off all the craziness that's inside of my brain

There's gotta be some place that's better than this

This life I'm leadin's drivin' me insane

And let me tell you I'm dreamin'



Let me tell you that I'm dreamin' to the twilight

This town has got me down

I've seen all of the highlights, I've been walkin' all around

I won't make a fuss, I'll take a Greyhound bus

To carry me away from here now

Tell me, what have I got to lose?



Cause I'm walkin' on down Columbus Avenue

The bars are all closin', cause it's quarter to two

Every town I go to is like a lock without a key

The blues I leave behind keep catchin' up on me



Let me tell you they're catchin' up on me

They're catchin' up on me

Catchin' up on me

Catchin' up on me

Catchin' up on me



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973



Known covers:

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Knoxville Girls

Way Through. Toxic Blues Again. February, 2003. Self-released

Solo Cholo. Kid Congo Powers. August 1, 2006. New York Night Train (USA), Trans Solar (EU)



Notes:



(1) Live intro from "Boston Music Hall, Boston March 21, 1976": "This is a song about Reno, Nevada, Reno has a main drag called Virginia Street, it's called Virginia Avenue here cause it rhymes with do and blue and shit - everybody gets divorced in Reno - shit, it's the only goddamn place I've seen dentures in pawn shop windows - entire suburban families tryin' to hitchhike out and they're wearing Bermuda shorts, white socks, and wingtips and shit - real silly - I'd never pick em up. They take wedding rings and throw them in the river the day after they get married which is usually the day they get divorced - wake up and say, Who are you? - I don't know - who are you? My cousin took like a $2,500 wedding ring and threw it in the river - I said what'd you go and do that for - Christ - it's just tradition - expensive tradition - next afternoon I was in the middle of the river with my pants rolled up to my knees."(Transcribed by Gary Tausch. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(3) Harold's Club: A real casino in Reno/ Nevada, closed in 1995. "After running carnival games in Vermont and California, Raymond I. "Pappy" Smith and his two sons, Raymond A. and Harold, moved to Reno in 1935 and started Harolds Club on Virginia Street in a red-lined area where the city council permitted gambling. Other casinos had a reputation for trying to take all of the player's money as fast as they could, but the Smiths tried a different approach. Pappy Smith regularly walked the floor, joked with players, and gave every losing player a meal and enough money for a bus ride home. The Smiths were Nevada gaming's first real promoters. They tried "mouse roulette," with a mouse released into a cage with a circular board with numbered holes. The mouse would evenually go into one of the holes, and the number on the hole would be the winning number. When players found that they could make noises that made the mouse run into the nearest hole, the casino lost too much money and removed the game. The Smiths launched casino gambling's first national (and world) advertising campaign along highways, placing 2300 billboards featuring a covered wagon and "Harolds Club or Bust." They also tried to attract women players by being the first casino to hire women dealers. When Pappy Smith died in 1967, Harolds Club was Nevada's largest casino. In 1970, his heirs sold to Howard Hughes. Harolds Club closed in 1995 and Harrah's bought the building and imploded it in 1999." (Source: Nevada Online Encyclopedia �2004. Thanks to Adam Gilson for pointing out this reference)



(2) Short n.: An automobile. Prob. orig. used in the term "hot short" = a stolen car, or a car stolen to be used as a getaway car by gunmen, thieves, or the like. Prob. orig. in Chicago underworld (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



----------W--------



Waiting For Waits

 



Waiting for Waits

I think his music's great

His stories are true

And pure as pure can be, I tell ya



Always in style

He'll melt you with his smile

I'm waitin' for Waits

Waitin' for Waits

Waitin' for Waits



The piano has been drinking

I heard Tom Waits singing

Yes, (?) the piano's drunk, not me

He's a killer



Sure loves to swing

The truth flows when he swings

So don't hesitate

Never be late

Listen to Waits



Godfather, tell us how you feel

[scat sings]

Hey, Tom Waits

Won't you come in and sing your song for me

We'll find you

Straight to the top of the piano, wait and see



Oh, Tom Waits

You're just the thing, a boppin' cat like me



The piano has been drinking

I heard Tom Waits singing

Yeah, (?) the piano's drunk, not me

He's a thriller



Sure loves to swing

The truth flows when he'll sing

So don't hesitate

Listen to Waits

Mister Tom Waits



So listen to Waits

Listen to Tom

Mister Tom Waits



You better come soon

Eddie Jefferson's waited too long

Where's Tom Waits, man?



TW: "Oh, Eddie baby, I'm sorry, man, I'm deeply apologetic, man. I tried

to make the gig, man, but I ended up on the corner of Heartattack

and Vine, man, with this little bitch named Lola, see. We was

drinkin' some green Chartreuse in a (?) little joint called

Dupree's Paradise. Had a couple of Highballs, see man. Ended up at

a little rib joint for some barbecue, man. I'm sorry, I lost track

of time. I mean, I'm sorry I missed the gig, man... 
"



Written by: Richie Cole and Eddie Jefferson, � 1979

Official release: "Hollywood Madness", Richie Cole, 1979

Recorded at Home Grown Fidelity Studio, Studio City, CA, April 25, 1979

Tom Waits vocals on last verse

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Richie Cole's liner notes to 'Hollywood Madness': "While driving in the van through the Pacific Northwest, Eddie and I wrote the next song, 'Waitin for Waits', for one of our favorite people, Tom Waits, who explains personally at the end (very logically) why he kept us waiting."




 




Walk Away

 



 



Dot King(1) was whittled(2) from the bone of Cain(3)

With a little drop of poison in a red, red blood

She need a way to turn around the bend(4)

She said, I wanna walk away and start all over again



There are things I've done I can't erase

I wanna look in the mirror and see another face

I said "never", but I'm doin' it again

I wanna walk away and start over again



No more rain, no more roses

On my way

Shake my thirst in a cool, cool pond



There's a widower in every place

There's a heart that's beatin' in every page

The beginning of it starts at the end

Well, it's time to walk away and start over again



Weather's murder at a hundred and three

William Ray shot Cora Belle Lee

A yellow dog(6) knows when he has sinned

You wanna walk away and start over again



No more rain, no more roses

On my way

Shake my thirst in a cool, cool pond



Cooper told Molly the whole block's gone

They're dyin' for jewelry, money, and clothes

I always get out of the trouble I'm in

I wanna walk away and start over again



I left my bible by the side of the road

Carved my initials in an old dead tree

I'm goin' away but I'm gonna be back when

It's time to walk away and start all over again



Oh, oh yeah

Yeah

It's time to walk away

You gotta walk away

Gotta walk away

Just wanna walk away, yeah

I wanna walk away and start over again

I wanna walk away

Wanna walk away

Wanna walk away

Wanna walk away

Wanna walk away



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1995

Official release: Dead Man Walking, Columbia (Sony Music Entertainment Inc.), 1995

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1995

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Re-released on: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Cross The River. Traveler. January, 2004. Self-released

God Is A Tom Waits Fan. The Box Spring Hogs. May 2004. Self-released demo

Modern Twang. Smokestack Lightnin'. March 9, 2007. EMI Music Marketing (Germany)

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music). Duet with Tom Waits



Notes:



(1) Dot King

- "One of the songs inspired by the movie 'Dead Man Walking' (it's not actually heard in the film). You get a feeling that you know what it's about, but if you take a good look at each line, it's not that straightforward. How reliable is the 'Beautiful Maladies' songbook, you think? According to that book, this song starts with "That king was whittled from the bones of Cain". What king? And it sure sounds like he's singing "Dot King", doesn't it? So who was Dot King? Well, I'll tell ya. She was a chorus girl in the Ziegfeld Follies, found dead in her bed in 1923, with a bottle of chloroform beside her. At first it was believed to be suicide, but further investigation showed signs of a struggle, so they changed it to murder one. They never found the killer though, despite an abundance of suspects (=former lovers). The story inspired one of S. S. Van Dine's thrillers starring detective Philo Vance, 'The Canary Murder Case', later filmed with Louise Brooks doing the part of "Margaret O'Dell". (But apparently it has precious little to do with the actual case.) Dot was never called the Canary though, she was called "the Butterfly", something to do with the lightness with which she moved from one bed to another (if i understand it correctly). What this has got to do with being whittled from the bones of Cain, I don't know. Maybe it's not about her at all. As a matter of fact, when this song was being written and recorded (1995-1996), there was (in the States) a woman called Dorothy King on trial for murdering two of her young sons (her eldest son tipped the cops of.) Don't know if it's her either. She did a plea bargain and will probably be out any day now. Why don't you ask her? The rest of the people in this song are nowhere to be found. By the way, Gerrit Tijink points out that you can *slake* your thirst in a pond. I think that explains a lot, but it doesn't alter the fact that Tom sings "shake my thirst", and that's what it says in the song book too." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000).



(2) Whittle: To reduce or eliminate gradually, as if by whittling with a knife (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(3) Cain:

- Genesis 4: 1-16. 'Abel and Cain' The Mahometan tradition of the death of Abel is this: Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. (Source: The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer).

- Also mentioned in Dirt In The Ground: "Now Cain slew Abel, he killed him with a stone."



(4) Bend: 1. n. [late 19C+] a drunken spree [abbr. bender] 2. [1960s] an experience created by a hallucinogenic drug [bent out of shape] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 3. Around the bend: phr. [20C] mad, insane (around the twist, harpic), [old naut. jargon round the bend, mad; the image is one who is 'not straight'] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(5) Yellow dog: An inferior or worthless person or thing (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Walking Spanish

 



He got himself a homemade special(2), you know his glass is full of sand

And it feels just like a jaybird, the way it fits into his hand

He rolled a blade up in his trick towel, they slap their hands against the

wall

You never trip, you never stumble, he's walkin' Spanish down the hall



Slip him a picture of our Jesus, or give him a spoon to dig a hole

What all he done ain't no one's business, but he'll need blankets for the

cold

They dim the lights over on Broadway, even the king has bowed his head

Every face looks right up at Mason, he's walkin' Spanish down the hall



Latella's screechin' for a blind pig, Punk Sander's carved it out of wood

He never sang when he got hoodwinked(3), they tried it all but he never would

Tomorrow mornin' there'll be laundry, but he'll be somewhere else to hear

the call

Don't say good bye, he's just leavin' early, he's walkin' Spanish down the

hall



All St. Bartholomew(4) said was whispered into the ear of Blind Jack Dawes

All the Baker told the machine was that he never broke the law

Go on and tip your hat up to the Pilate, take off your watch, your rings and

all

Even Jesus wanted just a little more time, when he was walkin' Spanish down

the hall



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985

Official release: Rain Dogs, Island Records Inc., 1985

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology 1983-2000" (Nuova Carisch s.r.l. Milan/ Italy, 2001)



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Kr�p p� finska �ver bron")

Live Au Forum. Toxic Blues Again. December, 1996. Self-released (live)

Coaltown Blues. Lex Romane & Joe Riillo. 1998. Lucky Duck Records

Whispers Of Time. Toxic Blues Again. December, 1999. Self-released

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Bluesville. Steve Johnson. 2001. New Risin' Blues/ Virgin France

Tonight at Johnny's Speakeasy. Jo Serrapere And The Willie Dunns. May, 2002. Detroit Radio Co. Recordings

Blues from the Roadhouse. Steve Johnson. February, 2003. Dixiefrog

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

Get Up Now. Toy Shop. September 7, 2006. Rockin' Camel Music (USA)



Notes:



(1) Walking (someone) Spanish

- To force someone to leave, usu. from a public place, by lifting him by his coat or shirt collar to a walking position and propelling him toward the door (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 

- Being in the act of doing something you don't want to do. So, to paraphrase the example Waits himself gave, a guy reaching for his wallet after being told to do so by a mugger would be "walking spanish" as he did so. (This example from the publicity LP release of Rain Dogs, in which Waits talks about the theme of each of the songs in turn.) In the instance of the song itself, then, the guy is on death row and is only walking to the chair because he has to: hence he's "walking spanish". (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)

To make a man walk Spanish is to give him the sack; to give him his discharge. In 1885 one of the retired captains in the Trinity House Establishment said, "If I had to deal with the fellow, I would soon make him walk Spanish, I warrant you." (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)

- Spanish Walk: n. [late 19C] (US) a constrained style of walking assumed, willy-nilly, by those who are being ejected from a bar or saloon (cf French Walk). [? the way Spanish pirates supposedly forced their prisoners to walk on tiptoes while they were held by the scruff of the neck, or tip-toeing gait of flamenco dancers] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

Tom Waits (1985): "Walking Spanish, John Lurie played on that. He's a saxophone player and actor. Walking Spanish is an expression they use when you don't want to go somewhere. It's 5:30 in the morning and the baby just woke you up screaming and you drag yourself out of bed, you're walking Spanish. Somebody says, "Listen, buddy, give me all your money." and your hand goes back around toward your wallet, you're walking Spanish, you don't want to go. Walking the plank, basically, walking Spanish is walking the plank." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985)



(2) Home-made special n.: a home-made pistol/ gun, also referred to as a Zip gun (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)



(3) Hoodwinked v. tr.: 1. To take in by deceptive means; deceive 2. To blindfold 3. To conceal (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(4) Bartholomew St.: 1st. century saint. All that is known of him with certainty is that he is mentioned in the synoptic gospels and acts as one of the twelve apostles. Scholars believe he is the same as Nathanael mentioned in John, who says he is from Cana and that Jesus called him an "Israelite...incapable of deceit." The Roman Martyrology says he preached in India and Greater Armenia, where he was flayed and beheaded by King Astyages. He has become the patron saint of butchers and tanners. He is often depicted with a knife and sometimes wearing his own skin in his hand



Warm Beer And Cold Women

 



It's warm beer and cold women, no I just don't fit in

Every joint I stumbled into tonight, that's just how it's been

All these double-knit strangers with gin and vermouth

And recycled stories, in the naugahyde(2) booths

And the platinum blondes and tobacco brunettes

I'll just be drinkin' to forget you, I light another cigarette

And the band's playin' somethin' by Tammy Wynette(3)

And the drinks are on me tonight



All my conversations now, I'll just be talkin' about you, baby

I'm borin' some sailor as I try to get through

I just want him to listen now, I say that's all you have to do

He said I'm better off without you, until I showed him my tattoo

And now the moon's risin', ain't no time to lose

Time to get down to drinkin', tell the band to play the blues

And the drink's are on me, I'll buy another round

At the last ditch attempt saloon



Warm beer and cold women, no I just don't fit in

Every joint I stumbled into tonight, that's just how it's been

All these double-knit strangers with gin and vermouth

Receding hairlines, in the naugahyde booths

And the platinum blondes and tobacco brunettes

I'll just be drinkin' to forget you, baby, I light a menthol cigarette

And the band's playin' somethin' by (4)Johnnie Barnette

At the last ditch attempt saloon



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975



Known covers:

The Piano Has Been Drinking. The Piano Has Been Drinking. April, 1990. Chlodwig/ BMG Germany (in German/ K�lsch)

Songs Of Tom Waits. Dolphin Blue. 1995. Self-released demo (Germany)



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Warm Beer And Cold Women". With: Frank Vicari: tenor saxophone. Dr. Fitz(gerald) Jenkins: upright bass. Chip White: drums. Taken from "Sange Efter Lukketid" DR2 television live music show. Copenhagen/ Denmark: June, 1976. Directed by Ole Koefoed, produced by Edmondt Jensen.



Notes:



(1) Warm Beer And Cold Women intro's

Live intro from "Nighthawks At The Diner: "Hey, how are ya? This is about a... well, I'd kinda reached the end of an emotional cul-de-sac one particular evening. It was a strange sort of evening. I ended up at a little vino place called The Three Little Pigs. Well, I was starin' at the beer nuts, and the swizzle sticks, and the three little pigs... I was gettin' a lot of visual and verbal insubordination from a double-knit character in the corner, and... One of those nights... "

Live intro from "The Agora Ballroom, Cleveland, December 3, 1976": "Well, I'm all disoriented here! We'd like to do a... The ensemble here is completely nerve-ridden Well, we're gonna do a little song here... It's about a... I started out with bad directions to a party one night. You know how that is. The guy didn't speak English. Told us to get on 32 and run it all the way out. Ended up in a small little bar. And I've been into a lot of bars and... this was one of them. This (?) little place originally was a men's room, and they decided to knock out a wall and build on. A livin', breathin' example of urban renewal, extensive renovations, under new management, please pay when served, and... well..."



(2) Naugahyde: American trademark used for vinyl-coated fabrics (Source: Merriam - Webster collegiate dictionary)



(3) Tammy Wynette: Tammy Wynette, born Virginia Wynette Pugh in Itawamba/Mpi May 5 1942. Two of her biggest hits were "Stand by Your Man" and "DIVORCE." Her 1969 album, Tammy's Greatest Hits, sold more copies than any female country recording artist ever had and crossed over to the Top 40 pop lists. Wynette married her third husband, country superstar George ("No Show") Jones, in 1968, and the couple became known as "Mr. & Mrs. Country Music." They were also frequent fodder for the tabloids, due to Jones' fondness of the bottle. Jones was a violent drunk, however, and Wynette finally left him in 1975 ( this is when Mr.Waits recorded Warm beer). Stress-related hospitalizations; the torching of her tour bus and fifteen-bathroom house; and a 1978 kidnapping, during which she was held at gunpoint, strangled, and beaten severely by her abductor. She came honestly by her nickname, "The Heroine of Heartache." The nineties witnessed one of the most unusual collaborations in musical history: Wynette teamed with British dance band K.L.F. for the strange single, "Justified and Ancient," The First Lady of Country Music died in her sleep in April of 1998. She was fifty-five.



(4) Jonnie Barnett: Jonnie Barnett, co-writer of the Clay Walker hit, "The Chain Of Love," died August 18, 2002 at Baptist Hospital in Nashville. According to information provided the Tennessean newspaper, Barnett was 56 and died of a stroke. In addition to "Chain," a 2001 BMI award-winner, Barnett also co-wrote "One Foot In The Blues," which was recorded by Johnny Adams and nominated in 1997 at the W. C. Handy Blues Awards for blues song of the year. Born Jonathan Barnett Kaye in Sumpter, SC, Barnett broke into the entertainment business as a performer, sharing the bill with such acts as Frank Zappa, Tom Waits, Cheech & Chong, Howlin' Wolf, Eric Burdon and Brownie McGhee & Sonny Terry. However, he was primarily a songwriter for the last 20 years of his life. Among those who recorded his songs were Hank Williams Jr., Etta James, the Holmes Brothers, Joe Simon, Eric Burdon, Irma Thomas and his sometimes co-writer Dan Penn. Occasionally doubling as a movie actor, Barnett had small parts in Robert Altman's Nashville (1975) and Cheech & Chong's Next Movie (1980). Barnett and his co-writer, Rory Lee, wrote a short-story version of "The Chain of Love" that appeared in the inspirational book Chicken Soup For The Country Soul before Walker released it in song form. (Source: Traditional Country Hall Of Fame, 2002 -Edward Morris, CMT)

Tom Waits (1975): "I've played audiences that hate me, that'd love to do damage to my physical person. Interviewer - what do you do? Well, you think up a lot of insults before you go on stage, I learned a lot of 'em from Jonnie Barnett." (Source: WAMU Radio Interview. Date: Washington, DC. April 18, 1975)



Watch Her Disappear

 



Last night I dreamed that I was dreaming of you...

And from a window across the lawn I watched you undress

Wearing a sunset of purple, tightly woven around your hair

that rose in strangled ebony curls

moving in a yellow bedroom light.

The air is wet with sound.

The faraway yelping of a wounded dog.

And the ground is drinking a slow faucet leak.

Your house is so soft and fading

as it soaks the black summer heat.

A light goes on and the door opens.

And a yellow cat runs out on the stream of hall light

and into the yard.



A wooden cherry scent is faintly breathing the air.

I hear your champagne laugh.

You wear two lavender orchids.

One in your hair and one on your hip.

A string of yellow carnival lights

comes on with the dusk,

circling the lake with a slowly dipping halo

and I hear a banjo tango.



And you dance into the shadow of a black poplar tree

And I watched you as you disappeared.

I watched you as you disappeared.

I watched you as you disappeared.

I watched you as you disappeared.(2)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

"Watch Her Disappear" as performed in the theatre play

Alice rehearsals at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December 17, 1992

Taken from "Visions D'Alice" (1993), French/ German TV documentary by Thierry Thomas for La SEPT/ ARTE



Notes:



(1) Watch Her Disappear: Sung by Charles Dodgson in Knee 4, "Letters 1". Directions from the play: Charles Dodgson writes letters to Alice. He looks at her photograph. The Cheshire Cat comes out of the kitchen, Dodgson crumples up his letters and throws them at the Cheshire Cat. CHARLES DODGSON writes: Dear Alice, last night I dreamed that I was dreaming of you...



(2) Directions from the play: "Dodgson leaves. The Cat plays with the crumpled letters."



Way Down In The Hole

 



(Frank's Wild Years studio version, 1987)



When you walk through the garden, you gotta watch your back

Well, I beg your pardon, walk the straight and narrow track

If you walk with Jesus, he's gonna save your soul

You gotta keep the Devil way down in the hole



He's got the fire and the fury at his command

Well, you don't have to worry if you hold on to Jesus' hand

We'll all be safe from Satan when the thunder rolls

We just got to keep the Devil way down in the hole



All the angels sing about Jesus' mighty sword

And they'll shield you with their wings, and keep you close to the Lord

Don't pay heed to temptation, for his hands are so cold

You gotta help me keep the Devil way down in the hole



Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Down in the hole

You gotta help me keep the Devil down in the hole



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1998

Official release: "Frank's Wild Years", Island Records Inc., 1987 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play





 



Way Down In The Hole



(Big Time live version, 1988)



Well, I feel as though we should move right into the religious material



When you walk through the garden, you gotta watch your back

Well, I beg your pardon, walk the straight and narrow track

When you walk with Jesus, he's gonna save your soul

You got to keep the Devil, well you gotta keep him down in the hole



He's got the fire, people he's got the fury at his command

Oh, you don't have to worry, hold on to, hold on to Jesus' hand

We'll all be safe from Satan, when the thunder, when the thunder starts to

roll

We got to keep the Devil, keep him on down, down in the hole



That red horned lousy low-life underneath our boots

Praise the Lord!

I don't know what it is, two dollar?

That demon meister, three dollar?

That Prince Devil

Just see if you can come up with a figure that matches your faith

You say how much has Jesus done for you

And we got to go in with our hydraulic system and blast him out!

People, can I get an amen!



All the angels, they start to sing all about Jesus' mighty sword

And they'll shield you with their wings, people they'll keep you close to

the Lord

Now don't pay heed to temptation, for his hands are so cold

You gotta keep the Devil, keep him on down in the hole



Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Down in the hole



Well people, I got to speak about something

Can I get an amen!

Can I get a Hallelujah!

Praise the Lord!

Have mercy

The Lord is a very, very busy man

I do what I can

But Jesus is always going for the big picture

But he's always there to help us out of the little jams too(2)



Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Down in the hole

Keep him down in the hole

We got to keep the Devil down in the hole

We got to keep the Devil, keep him on down in the hole



Down

Down, down, down, mighty Devil

I send you down below my boots

Down, down

Filling my life with anger and strife

Go down, mighty Devil

Find a place to live

Down, down, down



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Howlin' Mercy. John Campbell. 1993. Elektra

Heavy Metal Horns. Heavy Metal Horns. 1994. Self-released

Risque. Térez Montcalm. 1994. BMG Music Canada Ltd

Songs Of Tom Waits. Dolphin Blue. 1995. Self-released demo (Germany)

Gamblin' Days Are Over. Compulsive Gamblers. August, 1995. Sympathy for the Record Industry, SFTRI 372

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "En strevsom mann")

Into Temptation - Astrid Seriese sings Waits, Weill & more. Astrid Seriese. October, 1996 (September, 2003). Brigadoon

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Being Tom Waits. Billy`s Band. 2001. Self-released demo album (Russia)

Spirit Of The Century. Blind Boys Of Alabama. April 24, 2001. EMD/ Real World Records

Hooray For The Moon. Jon Dee Graham. January, 2002. New West Records

Ain't Your Train. The Tremors Bluesband. 2003. Self-released (live)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003.Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Live & Deadly: Memphis-Chicago. The Compulsive Gamblers. April 15, 2003. Sympathy for the Record Industry

Chateau Haag - Good News. Lisa Haag. November, 2004. Self-released (Austria)

Roll The Dice. Big Town Playboys. November 8, 2004. Mi5 Recordings (UK)

Levi. Phil Cunneff. 2005. Fells Point Jazz

Bump. BlueTouch. September 2005. Self-released

Enter The Mule. Blue Mule. October 22, 2005. Flat Five Press and Recording

Don't Act Right. Boss Diablo. May 19, 2006. Moondog Records

South Of Hell, France. Rev. Tom Frost. July 21, 2006. Closed For Private Party Records

The Look South. Sam Rosen. October 4, 2006. Class Act Records

Washington Square Serenade. Steve Earle. September 25, 2007. New West Records

The Wire: And All the Pieces Matter (soundtrack). Various artists. January 8, 2008. Nonesuch (three versions performed by: Blind Boys of Alabama, Neville Brothers and DoMaJe)

Live At Seaside Tavern. The Blues Busters. October 30, 2008. Self-released

No Provision. Spirit & Blues. January 16, 2009. Gracetone

American Landscape. The Nighthawks. February 3, 2009. Powerhouse Records 

Candy Store. Kristine Jackson. February 20, 2010. Self-released

Looking Glass. Zoe Gilby. September 7, 2010. JazzAction



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Way Down In The Hole" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Edited version from Warfield Theatre, San Francisco/ USA. November 5, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1987): "That's Ralph Carney on three horns simultaneously. We wrote that one real fast; it was practically written in the studio. Checkerboard Lounge gospel. Here, Frank has thrown in with a berserk evangelist. RR: That's redundant. WAITS: And for free, he pretends to be blind. One of those tent show things."(Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense" . New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)



(2) But he's always there to help us out of the little jams too: This is the clou of a story that's been deleted from the original version (Warfield Theatre. November 5, 1987).

- Original story: "Well people, I got to speak about something! Can I get an amen! Can I get a halleluiah! Praise the lord! Have mercy... People, when I was on my way to this speech tonight, we pulled down in Dallas/ Texas. The lord loooves Dallas/ Texas. Well people, I mean to tell you the lord was working his wonders with his paint brush. All the many hues of his pallet. The almond, the many violets and the vermilion. And I was seated in Clipper Class. People I love Clipper Class! But I was seated next to and elderly Indian gentleman who was having some trouble with the tiny foil top that locks in the freshness on his strawberry preserves container. A problem we've all experienced from time to time... People I want you to know that he busted that top, till I thought he would die. And you know what I did!? You know what I did!? Well I tell you what I did! People I snatched the container from his hand, I tore open the foil top and I spread his preserves out on his toast for him! (applause)."



We're All Mad Here

Hang Me In The Bottle



(Alice demo version, 1992. Also known as: We're All Mad Here)(1)



Well, you can hang me in a bottle like a cat(2)

Let the crows pick me clean but for my hat

Where the wailing of a baby meets the footsteps of the dead

We're all mad here(3)



And the devil sticks his flag into the mud

Mrs. Carol has run off with Reverend Judd

Hell is such a lonely place

And your big expensive face will never last



Have I told you all about the eyeball kid?(4)

He was born alone inside a Petri dish

He was born without a body or a brow



And you'll die with the rose still on your lips

And in time the heart-shaped bone that was your hips

And all the worms, they will climb the rugged ladder of your spine

We're all mad here



And my eyeballs roll this terrible terrain

And we're all inside a decomposing train

And your eyes will die like fish

And the shore of your face will turn to bone



Hang me in a bottle like a cat

Let the crows pick me clean but for my hat

Where the wailing of a baby meets the footsteps of the dead

We're all mad here(5)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



We're All Mad Here



(Alice studio version, 2002)(1)



You can hang me in a bottle like a cat(2)

Let the crows pick me clean but for my hat

Where the wailing of a baby

meets the footsteps of the dead

We're all mad here(3)



As the devil sticks his flag into the mud

Mrs. Carol has run off with Reverend Judd

Hell is such a lonely place

And your big expensive face

will never last



And you'll die with the rose still on your lips

And in time the heart-shaped bone that was your hips

And the worms, they will climb

the rugged ladder of your spine

We're all mad here



And my eyeballs roll this terrible terrain

And we're all inside a decomposing train

And your eyes will die like fish

And the shore of your face

will turn to bone(5)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Hang Me In The Bottle: Sung by March Hare, Mad Hatter and Dormouse in scene 5. Stage directions from the play: (Alice sees a long table laid with many places set out under a tree; behind it the White Rabbit lurks. The Mad Hatter, the March Hare, and the Dormouse are having tea. Alice tries to sit down.) MARCH HARE: No room! No room! MAD HATTER: No room! No room! Go back where you came from! ALICE: But there's plenty of room. MARCH HARE: No, there isn't. It just looks like it. MAD HATTER: There's only enough for us. MARCH HARE: Oh, let her sit down. What does it matter, hatter? MAD HATTER: Let her sit down. What do I care, hare? DORMOUSE: What's the meat of the matter? The heat of the hatter? The hate of the hatter? The hire of the hare? The lure of the pair? The cure for the care? MARCH HARE: Oh, shut up! (They change places continually. Alice tries to get a cup of tea.) Are you going to the Queen's croquet party? ALICE: I haven't been invited. MAD HATTER: Just show up. She'll never know the difference. ALICE: That didn't get me very far here. DORMOUSE: You mean hare. MAD HATTER: Douse it, mouse! DORMOUSE: Natter natter natter Natter natter natter natter, This isn't making sense And if it were it wouldn't matter. (They sing).



(2) You can hang me in a bottle like a cat: From William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" (Act 1, Scene 1). "Benedick: If I do, hang me in a bottle like a cat and shoot at me, and he that hits me, let him be clapped on the shoulder and called Adam." In olden times a cat was for sport enclosed in a bag or leather bottle, and hung to the branch of a tree, as a mark for bowmen to shoot at. Steevens tells us of another sport: "A cat was placed in a soot bag, and hung on a line; the players had to beat out the bottom of the bag without getting besmudged, and he who succeeded in so doing was allowed to hunt the cat afterwards. (Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable E. Cobham Brewer from the new and enlarged edition of 1894. Thanks to John McClegg, 2005 for pointing out this reference)



(3) We're All Mad Here: This is quoted from the original Lewis Carroll book "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland" chapter 6: "Pig And Pepper". "But I don't want to go among mad people," Alice remarked. "Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat: "we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad." (Source: "Lewis Carroll The Annotated Alice", Martin Gardner. Penguin Books, 1960)



(4) Eyeball Kid: Note Waits has removed this part from the 2002 version. Also featured in: Such A Scream, 1992 and as the 1999 track from Mule Variations. Further reading: Eyeball Kid full story



(5) Stage directions from the play: (An exhausted pause.) MARCH HARE: We need a tale to while away the time. MAD HATTER: A tale! A whale of a way to tell the time! MARCH HARE: Can't tell him anything - he won't listen, you know. ALICE: Who? MARCH HARE: Time. MAD HATTER: But time will tell. Time tells the longest tale. Always. Time's tale is longer than yours. He never ends. MARCH HARE: But whether or not the tale gets told - that's another matter, hatter. DORMOUSE: Time out! Time out! Time out! ALICE: You mean we're out of time? MARCH HARE: No, time is out. ALICE: Of what? MAD HATTER: Of joint - oh cursed spite! I swear we'll never get this right... ALICE: I haven't got all night, you know - (They continue changing places.) I wish I were out! MAD HATTER: Of what? ALICE: Of here! DORMOUSE: You mean hare. MAD HATTER: Shut the door, mouse! ALICE: How do I find the queen? MAD HATTER: Go through the forest. ALICE: How do I find the forest? MAD HATTER: Go through the tree. ALICE: How do I go through the tree? MAD HATTER: Through the door! (There is indeed a door in the tree. Alice opens it, steps through and disappears)



What Became Of Old Father Craft?

Altar Boy



(Alice demo version. Also known as: What Became Of Old Father Craft?)(1)



Now he's an altar boy, bound up in leather and chains

What became of old Father Craft

I'll never forget the Sunday he left

And gave me something special in the rectory

He's an altar boy

Corrected me in the rectory

And that's why I'm feeling so blue

Cause I'm an altar boy, what about you?



  - "Pater noster, qui es in coelis(2)

  Sanctificetur nomen tuum

  Adveniat regnum tuum..."

  - "'Pater Noster', yeah"

  - "Yeah"



I can order in Latin

Make 'em au gratin, Joe

Cause I'm an old altar boy

That's why I'm so depressed

I never got the rest of the dream

Just the ritual

Now I'm habitual

Majoring in crimes that are unspeakable

I'm an altar boy

That's what happened to me, yeah



He's just an old altar boy

Laying out there in the street

He's an altar boy (anyone he can meet)

Hoping he can meet a woman dressed like a nun

He knows there's got to be some around here

Drinking across from the church

Just a little Father Cribari wine

On a Sunday morning time

Remembering when he was busier

Now he's getting dizzier

Fill it up, Joe

You know the routine, yeah

I'm an altar boy, oh yeah



Out there in the bar, the old altar boy

[untranscribable]

Making the scena with a novena

Why is he winking at this time in his life

He never took a wife, cause he's an old altar boy

Drinking Cribari wine

An altar boy, down here in his prime

What became of him

Well, he's looking up the dress of Sister Marie

He's rather depressed, as you can see

He hasn't been to mass since nineteen forty-three

Cause he's an old altar boy

He figures he got enough religion already in him

Now he's leafing through the dirty magazines

He's an altar boy, what became of him

He's an altar boy, yeah



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Altar Boy



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



He's an ol' altar boy

Lying out there in the street

He's an ol' alter boy

Bound up in leather and chains

That's why I'm feeling so blue

I'm an old altar boy

What about you?



Now, I can order in Latin

Make 'em au gratin, Joe

I'm an old altar boy

That's why I'm so depressed

I never got the rest of the dream

Just the ritual

Now I'm habitual

Majoring in crimes that are unspeakable

Cause I'm an old altar boy

That's what happened to me.



I'm an old altar boy

He's hoping he can meet a woman dressed like a nun

He knows there's got to be some around here

Drinking across from the church

A little Father Cribari wine

On a Sunday morn' time.



I'm an old altar boy.

Why is he winking at this time in his life?

He never took a wife, cause he's an old altar boy

Oh, yeah...

What about you?



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Altar Boy.

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg/ Germany, 1992.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Duchess and Mad Hatter in knee 7. 

- Stage directions from the play: Knee 7 Letters II, "The Cheshire Cat walks slowly across the grass, dropping Dodgson's letters as he goes. Several Chessmen, the Queen's gardeners, enter. They find the letters and pick them up. Other Chessmen set up wickets for a croquet game. Meanwhile, the Duchess and the Mad Hatter, on their way to the croquet party, appear in a stage box. Duchess and Mad Hatter sing:"

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)



(2) PATER noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum: The Lord's Prayer: OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name (Submitted by Alicia Fontana, eGroups discussionlist. September, 2000)



What Else Is New?

 



Well, your skeletons in the closet are introducing themselves

The knick-knacks wisecrack(1) there on the shelf

You told him that you loved him, but he's hissin' at you

What else is new, what else is new, what else is new



Cause your old man's a counterfeit, your daughter's a lush(2)

It's you and Mickey Spillane, and the lady's in a hush(?)

Someone's stealin' your heart, someone's stealin' your car

What else is new



Well now, your creditors hate you, and so do your kids

Your footballin' sweetheart is down on the skids(3)

And now the parks are full of fugitives, the trees are on fire

What else is new, what else is new



Now you see, the cigarette machines are busted, you can't get no change

And somebody cancels everything you arrange

For every invitation gets your RSVP

What else is new, what else is new, what else is new, what else is new



Well now, the rockin' chair's busted, your ashtrays are full

Your evenings and your afternoons are usually dull

So you toast to the Toastmaster toaster and you

What else is new, what else is new, what else is new, what else is new



You gotta tell me, what else is new

What else is new

What else is new, what else is new, what else is new

What else is new



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1976 [?]

Unofficial release: "Tales From The Underground Volume 4", PMS Records, 1999

Small Change sessions. July, 1976



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of What Else Is New?.

Small Change sessions. July, 1976.



Notes:



(1) Crack wise: To speak knowingly. To speak jokingly; to make a wisecrack (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(2) Lush n.: 1a. A drunkard; a heavy drinker esp. a habitual drunkard with a job, family, and accepted place in society (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 1b. Beer and other intoxicating drinks are so called from Lushington the brewer. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(3) Skids, the n.: Fig., the decline, or being on the decline, from success, fame, honesty, good reputation, or sobriety to failure, mediocrity, a life of disappointment, or a bad reputation: the decline from being, or being known as, a successful, useful, or respected member of society to being a failure, a has-been, or a derelict. Fairly common. May be from "skid row". (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



What Keeps Mankind Alive?

 



You gentlemen who think you have a mission

To purge us of the seven deadly sins(2)

Should first sort out the basic food position

Then start your preaching, that's where it begins



You lot, who preach restraint and watch your waist as well

Should learn, for once, the way the world is run

However much you twist, or whatever lies that you tell

Food is the first thing, morals follow on(3)



So first make sure that those who are now starving

get proper helpings, when we all start carving

What keeps mankind alive?



What keeps mankind alive? The fact that millions

are daily tortured, stifled, punished, silenced and oppressed

Mankind can keep alive thanks to its brilliance

in keeping its humanity repressed

And for once you must try not to shirk the facts

Mankind is kept alive

by bestial acts!



Written by: Original words by Bertolt Brecht

Translation by Ralph Manheim and John Willett

Published by: European American Music Corporation, � 1928. Weill-Brecht-Harms Music Co., Inc. (ASCAP)

& Kurt Weill Foundation for Music Inc. (ASCAP). All rights adminsetered by WB Music Corp.

Music by: Kurt Weill (Second finale, Drei Groschenoper)

Official release: "Lost In The Stars - The Music Of Kurt Weill". Various artists, 1985.

Engineer: Bob Musso. Accordian by Guy Klucevsek.

Re-released on: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) What Keeps Mankind Alive?:

- "This is a song from Kurt Weill's and Berthold Brecht's 'Die Dreigroschenoper' ('The Threepenny Opera'). The correct title of the piece is originally 'Zweiter Dreigroschenfinale' (or 'Second Threepenny Finale), but 'What Keeps Mankind Alive?' has caught on as title after this translation. In the "opera" (it's really more of a musical cabaret) it is sung by the bandit Macheath (aka Mack the Knife) and Celia Peachum, wife of the proprietor of 'Beggar's Friend', a shop where London's beggars can acquire the correct raggedy appearance." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)

- The anti-capitalist 'Dreigroschenoper' was originally staged at Berlin's Theater on August 31, 1928. In 1931 German director G.W. Pabst (Pandora's Box, 1929) made his famous filmversion with Rudolf Forster, Lotte Lenya, ea. Brecht originally collaborated on the film, but the script was rewritten when his ideas clashed with those of Pabst. Brecht and Weill were displeased with the filmmaker's interpretation, and took out a lawsuit over the material's copyright. The film was released on the eve of Hitler's seizure of power in Germany. Pabst captured the essence of the atmosphere which allowed the existence of the Nazi state, and all original German prints were destroyed by the Third Reich. The film was shot simultaneously in both German and French, with different casts. 

Tom Waits (1999): "Well, the weird thing about Kurt Weill is that after I made a few records in the '80s, people started to tell me that I was sounding like this guy, or that I must be listening to this guy. So I figured I should probably go out and listen to him, because I'd never heard of him before. I did listen, and then I thought, 'Oh, I hear that.' " (Source: "Tom Waits, In Dreams" Exclaim: Michael Barclay. April/ May 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "That macarbe, dissonant style, yeah. See, when I hear Weill I hear a lot of anger in those songs. I remember the first time that I heard that Peggy Lee tune, Is That All There Is?, I identified with that. (Sings.) "Is that all there is? If that's all there is, then let's keep dancing". So you just find different things that you feel your voice is suited to. I didn't really know that much about Kurt Weill until people started saying, "Hey, he must be listening to a lot of Kurt Weill." I thought, I better go find out who this guy is. I started listening to The Happy End, and the Threepenny Opera and Mahagonny and all that really expressionistic music." (Source: "Mojo interview with Tom Waits". Mojo: Barney Hoskyns. April 1999)



(2) Seven deadly sins: Pride, Wrath, Envy, Lust, Gluttony, Avarice, and Sloth. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(3) Food is the first thing, morals follow on (Erst kommt das Fressen, dann kommt die Moral): This famous quote said by both Macheath and Jenny in the ballad is kind of hard to translate into English. Brecht's use of the German word "Fressen", instead of the usual word "Essen," is not accidental and alludes to his low opinion of humanity as mere animals hidden under a thin veneer of culture and manners. It differentiates between the animal-like frenzy of eating and the human concept of eating. The reader expects to read the phrase: "Erst kommt das Essen, dann kommt die Moral" using the usual German word "Essen" to mean, "First comes the meal, then comes the moral." Brecht's almost shocking use of the word "Fressen" implies we are nothing more than animals, and our first priority is to be fed.



Translation of the song from the Second Finale

of Die Dreigroschenoper (The Threepenny Opera):



MACHEATH: You gentlemen who think you have a mission

to purge us of the seven deadly sins,

should first sort out the basic food position,

then start your preaching! That's where it begins.

You lot who preach restraint and watch your waist as well,

should learn, for once, the way the world is run:

However much you twist, whatever lies you tell,

food is the first thing, morals follow on.

So first make sure that those who now are starving

get proper helpings when we all start carving.



VOICE OFF-STAGE: What keeps mankind alive?



MACHEATH: What keeps mankind alive? The fact that millions

are daily tortured, stifled, punished, silenced, oppressed.

Mankind can keep alive thanks to its brilliance

in keeping its humanity repressed.



CHORUS: For once you must try not to shirk the facts:

Mankind is kept alive by bestial acts.



MRS. PEACHUM: You say that girls may strip with your permission.

You draw the line dividing art from sin.

So first sort out the basic food position,

then start your preaching! That's where we begin.

You lot who bank on your desires and our disgust

Should learn for once the way the world is run:

Whatever lies you tell, however much you twist,

food is the first thing, morals follow on.

So first make sure that those who are now starving

get proper helpings when we all start carving.



VOICE OFF-STAGE: What keeps mankind alive?



MRS. PEACHUM: What keeps mankind alive? The fact that millions

are daily tortured, stifled, punished, silenced, oppressed.

Mankind can keep alive thanks to its brilliance

in keeping its humanity repressed.



CHORUS: For once you must try not to shirk the facts:

Mankind is kept alive by bestial acts.



Adapted from John Gay's 'The Beggar's Opera' (1728),

translated from English to German by Brecht's assistant Elisabeth Hauptmann,

This translation back into English was made by Ralph Manheim and John Willett for a later staging.

(In another translation, made by Michael Feingold in 1989,

the song would instead be called 'How Do All Humans Live?')



Original German text:

(Wovon lebt der Mensch)



Ihr Herrn, die ihr uns lehrt, wie man brav leben 

Und Sünd und Missetat vermeiden kann 

Zuerst müßt ihr uns was zu fressen geben 

Dann könnt ihr reden: damit fängt es an.



Ihr, die euren Wanst und unsre Bravheit liebt 

Das eine wisset ein für allemal: 

Wie ihr es immer dreht und wie ihr's immer schiebt 

Erst kommt das Fressen, dann kommt die Moral.



Erst muß es möglich sein auch armen Leuten 

Vom großen Brotlaib sich ihr Teil zu schneiden. 



(Jenny): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 



(Macheath): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 

Indem er stündlich Den Menschen peinigt, auszieht, anfällt, abwürgt und frißt. 

Nur dadurch lebt der Mensch, daß er so gründlich 

Vergessen kann, daß er ein Mensch doch ist.



(Choir): Ihr Herren, bildet euch nur da nichts ein: 

Der Mensch lebt nur von Missetat allein!



(Jenny): Ihr lehrt uns, wann ein Weib die Röcke heben 

Und ihre Augen einwärts drehen kann 

Zuerst müßt ihr uns was zu fressen geben 

Dann könnt ihr reden: damit fängt es an.



Ihr, die auf unsrer Scham und eurer Lust besteht 

Das eine wisset ein für allemal: 

Wie ihr es immer dreht und wie ihr's immer schiebt 

Erst kommt das Fressen, dann kommt die Moral.



Erst muß es möglich sein auch armen Leuten 

Vom großen Brotlaib sich ihr Teil zu schneiden.



(Macheath): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 

(Jenny): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 

Indem er stündlich Den Menschen peinigt, auszieht, anfällt, abwürgt und frißt. 

Nur dadurch lebt der Mensch, daß er so gründlich 

Vergessen kann, daß er ein Mensch doch ist.



(Choir): Ihr Herren, bildet euch nur da nichts ein: 

Der Mensch lebt nur von Missetat allein!



What's He Building?

 



What's he building in there?

What the hell is he building in there?

He has subscriptions to those magazines

He never waves when he goes by

He's hiding something from the rest of us

He's all to himself, I think I know why

He took down the tire-swing from the pepper tree

He has no children of his own, you see

He has no dog, he has no friends

And his lawn is dying

And what about those packages he sends?

What's he building in there?

With that hook light on the stairs

What's he building in there?

I'll tell you one thing, he's not building a playhouse for the children

What's he building in there?

Now what's that sound from underneath the door?

He's pounding nails into a hardwood floor

And I swear to God I heard someone moaning low

And I keep seeing the blue light of a TV show

He has a router(2) and a table saw

And you won't believe what Mr. Sticha(3) saw

There's poison underneath the sink of course

There's also enough formaldehyde to choke a horse

What's he building in there?

What the hell is he building in there?

I heard he has an ex-wife in some place called Mayors Income, Tennessee

And he used to have a consulting business in Indonesia

But what's he building in there?

He has no friends but he gets a lot of mail

I bet he spent a little time in jail

I heard he was up on the roof last night, signaling with a flashlight

And what's that tune he's always whistling?(4)

What's he building in there?

What's he building in there?

We have a right to know



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Mule Variations, Anti Inc., 1999

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Mule Variations" (Amsco Publications, 2000)



Known covers:

Hexnut. Hexnut. March 2007. Karnatic Lab Records (Netherlands)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "What's He Building?"

Taken from "VH-1 Storytellers" (1999)

VH-1 concert documentary at Burbank Airport, Los Angeles/ USA (broadcast May 23, 1999).

With Larry Taylor and Smokey Hormel



Notes:



(1) What's he building?

Live intro from "Stockholm July 14, 1999": "This is a story about your neighbor And my neighbor And the neighbor you are soon to become I guess what gets me is, I know two or three things about my neighbor And that's all I wanna know And from that I can build a story First of all, he told me he was from Tampa Well, then explain the Indiana plates to me My neighbor's name is Cunningham And the thing I think about, with a name like Cunningham, is If you're a ham, then you weren't very cunning, were you? That was a very private thought And unnecessary to be sharing with Cunningham But sometimes at night, when I hear things like that I think, what the hell is he building in there?..." (Live intro from "Stockholm July 14, 1999". Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)

Tom Waits (1999): "We're all, to a degree, curious about our neighbors, and we all have four or five things that we know about them. And with those things, we usually create some kind of portrait of their life. He drives that Valiant. . . Did you notice? That dog has no hair in the back. . .His wife must be sixteen. . . Look at that garage. Looks like it caught fire and he never even repainted it. . .And then you add to it, as other things unfold: I saw him last night. You ever see him wearing those lime green pants? Where's he from, St. Louis? That's the only place I've ever seen lime green pants. But he said he's from Tampa. . .And you never, ever introduce yourself. But he continues to develop like a film for you. Then you report to your wife new things every day that you've observed. His dog gets loose and comes into your yard, and has no license. We all do that, don't we? I was thinking that he's the guy. He's talking about himself. He's delusional. We've all become overly curious about our neighbors, and we all do believe, in the end, that we have a right to know what all of us are doing." (Source: A Q&A about Mule Variations. MSO: Rip Rense, early 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "We seem to be compelled to perceive our neighbors through the keyhole. There's always someone in the neighborhood the Boo Radley, the village idiot and you see that he drives this yellow station wagon without a windshield, and he has chickens in the backyard, and doesn't get home 'til 3 AM, and he says he's from Florida but the license says Indiana... so, you know, 'I don't trust him.' It's really a disturbed creative process." (Source: "Mojo Interview With Tom Waits" Mojo magazine (USA), by Barney Hoskyns. Date: Santa Rosa. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "Yeah, it's kind of tipping my hat to Ken Nordine, who was a big influence on me. And I've listened to him since I started recording. Ken lives in Chicago. He has a peculiar imagination and tells remarkable stories. This one started out as a song, and I wasn't able to get it to fly as a song, so I just took the words and started saying them. And it all just kind of came together. It's just what we all do to each other, I guess, as neighbors living in an apartment building or on a block, wherever you are. We all know two or three things about the people we live around and we put them together and create a story. He said he was from Tampa, but yet he's got Indiana plates. Gee, what's that about? He wears all his clothes inside out. He walks backwards. He shaved his head, only on one side. We all do that, I gues s; it's just wondering about those things. A song that happened pretty fast. The music in the background was spontaneous as well. We just set up a room with a lot of percussion and everyone just kind of moved around, banging on things while they talked. AC: What is he building in there? TW: He's a tweaker, I don't know. My theory is that he's talking about himself. I don't know what it is. It's just one of those strange little short stories." (Source: Mule Conversations. Austin Chronicle: Jody Denberg. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "We try to do that as a song over and over and over. It wouldn't work as a song. I just spoke the words and the whole thing came together. Kaufman: There's one song that feels like a field recording. It's almost like there are crickets in the background. Was that done outside? Waits: No, right in here, just set up a whole bunch of instruments. I work with really great engineers. They don't make value judgments. If you bring a strange ... you can bring something from a ditch that you found on the way to the studio, they'll put it in the room and circle it like it's a moonrock. They'll tap on it with a hammer. They're like scientists that way, and I like that. Everything is a potential instrument, it depends on how you use it." (Source: Tom Waits '99, Coverstory ATN. Addicted to Noise: Gil Kaufman en Michael Goldberg. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "It's about a tweaker. I don't know what it's about. Everybody is curious about their neighbors, right? Goldberg: You've seen "Rear Window" obviously? Waits: Right. What little they know about you, whoever your neighbors are, they have already designed a story about you. Wears those fatigue jackets, he's got the baseball cap with the wings on them but he's not in the service -- what the hell's going on? Drives that Valiant. Plays that crazy music all the time, sounds like Japanese stuff coming out of the window. We all do it, we all do it. You know three things about your neighbor, you can make a story, then you'll add to it as it develops. So. And we do feel as if we have the right to know what each of us is up to, right?" (Source: Tom Waits '99, Coverstory ATN. Addicted to Noise: Gil Kaufman en Michael Goldberg. April, 1999)

Waits laments the fact that America has become a country where any solitary activity appears to encourage suspicions that there's a serial killer, or a Unabomber, living next door. We seem to be compelled to perceive our neighbors through the keyhole, he says, There's always someone in the neighborhood the Boo Radley, the village idiot and you see that he drives this yellow station wagon without a windshield, and he has chickens in the backyard, and doesn't get home til 3 AM, and he says he's from Florida but the license says Indiana so, you know, I don't trust him. It's really a disturbed creative process. (Source: "Mojo interview with Tom Waits". Mojo: Barney Hoskyns. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "I got kind of a Unabomber image. We seem to be living in a time when the guy next door may be building a fertilizer bomb in his basement. Guess it's the rat theory: There's too many of us, and we're going crazy because of the proliferation of the human manifes ation. You go down the freeway, and all of a sudden there are 350,000 new homes where there used to be wilderness. They all have to go to the bathroom somewhere, they all want toys for their kids, they all want eggs and bacon and a nice little car and a place to vacation. When the rats get too plentiful, they turn on each other. Q: In the song you mention a town called Mayors Income, Tenn. TW: Came to me in a dream. Two towns. The other one, same dream, Miner's Prayer, W.V." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "It's about thinking we have a right to know. 'Y'know, he drives a blue Mazda and doesn't get home until three in the morning. He was karate-chopping his own shrubbery last night - in his underwear. So we put all those things together and we make up a story about someone that bears no resemblance to the truth, and then we make it a serial. And that's what happens with the media. We love looking at each other through keyholes. They ought to make keyhole-glasses, they'd sell a million of 'em, because that's how we prefer looking at each other, down on our knees in front of a keyhole." (Source: "Tom Waits, Hobo Sapiens" Telegraph Magazine, by Mick Brown. Date: China Lights/Santa Rosa. April 11, 1999) 



(2) The Router (A Tool That Does Woodworking Magic): Less well known than other portable tools, the router is a handful of high power that does an amazing amount of work. No other tool fully duplicates its feats, for it does a number of things no other could. The router is deceptively simple in principal -- a heavy-duty motor with a chuck in which cuttings bits can be mounted, adjustable in a flat-bottomed base so that more or less of the bit protrudes, and with two handles for guiding it over the work. The jobs it can do include putting fancy molding on edges, grooving, fluting, beading, bas relief carving, tapering furniture legs, cutting rabbets for screening glass, inlay work, making professional joints (including dovetails), and sharpening its own cutting bits! (Source: "Black & Decker Handbook: How To Choose And Use Power Tools", by Harry Walton Popular Library Edition. November, 1961. Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, as sent to Tom Waits Library. April 5, 2002)



(3) Mr. Sticha

- Tom Waits 
(1993): "I used to make skateboards out of plywood and go down to a roller rink called Skate Ranch and buy just the wheels. We used to skate down this hill called Robert Avenue and it was a great curve and you dug up a lot of speed. It went by our neighbor Mr. Stitcha. He lived in the beauty of the curve, where all the momentum culminated in a beautiful slough of cement. It took you right past his house but as close as you could get to his porch. Mr. Stitcha drank to excess. This was common knowledge in the neighborhood. He had the thick glasses and the red face and the red wine stains down the front of his t-shirt. That' s like I look now. Anyway it was the only place to get that kind of speed and thrill, so the front of his house became sort of a festival for all the skateboarders in the whole area. On Halloween he had a heart attack and died on his front porch and we were all told he died because we skated by his house and that each and everyone of us killed him in our own way. And we were all left with the memory that we all had a hand in his murder. It was like a Shakespeare thing, everybody had their hand on the knife. So I carry this with me, but I just want to say here and now, in Thrasher Magazine, that I did not kill Mr. Stitcha. It took a lot of therapy and it took a lot of liquor. Mr. Stitcha rest in peace." (Source: "Tom Waits". Thrasher Magazine: Brian Brannon. February, 1993)

Tom Waits (1999): "Mr. Sticcha was my neighbor when I was a kid. He didn't like kids and he didn't like noise. All the kids would go past his house yellin' and making noise, and you would see his fist out the window and he'd threaten to call the cops. His wife used to say, "You're gonna give him a heart attack if you keep this up." And he finally had a heart attack and he died, and his wife told us that it was our fault, that we had killed him as a group. We all had to distribute that guilt and live with it, and it was upsetting: "Sticcha died and we killed him." We might just as well have plotted his murder." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July, 1999)



(4) And what's that tune he's always whistling?: The tune Waits is whistling seems to be very similar to the one Quint (Robert Shaw) whistles in the movie Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975). This happens just after the shark attack on the Orca when he is standing out on the pulpit as the shark disappears. The dusk is coming and he is holding a harpoon gun. (Submitted by "Marky" as sent to the Tom Waits Fan forum, August 2, 2007)



When You Ain't Got Nobody

 



Well, when you ain't got nobody, anybody looks nice

Don't take much to make you stop and look twice

And it's either feast or famine, I've found out that it's true

And I'm hungry as a bulldog, baby, how about you



And when you ain't got no big mama, all the mamas look hot

And when lovin' is your weakness, you're just bound to get caught

And the story never changes, history tells it so plain

And I'll be your Dick, honey, if you'll just be my Jane



And when you ain't got nobody, anybody looks nice

It don't take much to make you stop and look twice

It's either feast or famine, I've found out that it's true

And I'm hungry as a bulldog, baby, how about you

Baby, how about you

How about you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

None



Whistle Down The Wind

 



(For Tom Jans)(2)



Well, I grew up here all of my life, and I dreamed someday I'd go

Where the blue-eyed(3) girls, and the red guitars, and the naked rivers flow

Now I'm not all I thought I'd be, I've always stayed around

I've been as far as Mercy and Grand, frozen to the ground



But I can't stay here, and I'm scared to leave

So kiss me once and then, I'll go to hell

I might as well be whistlin' down the wind



The bus is at the corner, the clock on the wall

Broken down windmill, there ain't no wind at all

And I yelled and I cursed, if I stay here I'll rust

And I'm stuck like a shipwreck out here in the dust



The sky is red, and the world is on fire, and the corn is taller than me

And the dog is tied to a wagon of rain, and the road is wet as the sea

And sometimes the music from a dance will carry across the plains

And the places that I'm dreaming of, do they dream only of me?



There are places where they never sleep, and the circus never ends

So I will take the Marleybone coach(4), and be whistlin' down the wind

So I will take the Marleybone coach, and whistlin' down the wind



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

The Way It Is. Valerie Carter. July, 1996. Ulg Records

Another Man Done Gone. Bones. December, 2000. BonesMusic

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



Notes:



(1) Whistle down the wind:

- To defame a person. The cognate phrase "blown upon" is more familiar. The idea is to whistle down the wind that the reputation of the person may be blown upon. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- "I'm convinced that, dedication to Jans aside, Tom's "Whistle Down The Wind," and possibly several other songs on Bone Machine, were partly inspired by a novel by Mary Hayley Bell, also called "Whistle Down The Wind," or maybe the 1962 film based on it, produced by Richard Attenborough. The novel and movie are about some kids in a small, rural town who find an escaped convict hiding in the family's barn. They become convinced that the man is Jesus Christ and hide him from the adults in the community, whom they distrust. It's regarded as a children's story and is heavy with allegory and New Testament symbolism. Obviously, it shares quite a few themes that recur in Waits' work. The song and the story are both about being a child in the restrictive atmosphere of small town life (in which Kathleen seems to have grown up), though it's hard to see a clear connection beyond that. However, when you place the song alongside the other songs on the album -- especially Jesus Gunna Be Here, Murder in the Red Barn, Black Wings, and I Don't Wanna Grow Up, the connections between the M. H. Bell novel, the movie, and the Bone Machine album really start to accumulate. Of course, Waits seems to free-associate and there's no need to choose in an "either-or" way between Jans and Bell as the inspiration for the song." (Submitted by Kurt Gegenhuber. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist, 2000)



(2) Jans, Tom:

Tom Waits (1992): "He's an old friend of ours who died in '83. A songwriter and friend of Kathleen's and mine. From the central coast of California, kind of a Steinbeck upbringing in a small town. We dedicated it to him. He wrote 'Lovin' Arms.' Dobie Gray recorded it, and also Elvis did it. He used to play with Mimi Farina. It was written about another friend, but it was the kind of song that Tom Jans would have written. He was there in spirit." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)



1. "Tom Jans was born on February 9, 1949 (same year as Tom Waits), and died March 25, 1984. There's a lot of confusion about how he died. Some say drug overdose, others say he died shortly after being in a serious motorcycle accident, and Joan Baez, in her autobiography, says he died in a car crash. Perhaps she should know; she once introduced Jans to her sister Mimi Farina, who became Jans' singing partner in both touring and recording in the early seventies. Tom Jans seems to have had a reputation for never getting out of the Bay Area where he was born, but apparently he and Mimi even made it to the East Coast, playing clubs in New York. That's a bit further than Mercy Street and Grand Avenue, if those are indeed the Mountain View / Palo Alto area streets referred to in the song." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



2. "About 25 years back Tom Jans was as much an artist's artist as Tom Waits. The larger part of the public knew their names only by reading. Waits' name was in a kind of hip Apache-style on the sleeve of The Eagles "On the Border" as the writer of OL'55 and Jans' name was on an Elvis record. He wrote "Loving Arms", since then covered by just about everyone (I prefer Millie Jackson to the Dixie Chicks here). By the mid-seventies both were solidly anchored on the Westcoast. Remember these are the years TW sang, voluntary or not, alongside Jackson Browne on the Bonnie Raitt-album "Homeplate" and wrote "Tijuana" with Jack "Peaceful Easy Feeling" Tempchin. Waits & Jans must have known each other from this time on. West Hollywood wasn't bigger than it is now and besides that there was ... Bette Midler who seemed to be on friendly terms with both Toms in those days.Tom Jans started as a more or less conventional folksinger. He made a record together with Mimi Farina (Joan Baez' sister) and an untitled solo-album for A&M in 1972. At this point Jans got in touch with Lowell George and he started to work with the clan around Little Feat. Two minor masterpieces came from that: "The Eyes of an Only Child" in 1975 and "Dark Blonde" in 1976. What made them special is the original perspective in the songs and their wide scope. Intense love songs are combined with songs that deal with the state of society, the Spanish Franco-regime etc. and it all seems to fit in. What keeps it together is utobiography. In fact the two records seem to be two episodes out of a larger work. This guy was trying to give shape to his life by putting it on records. So when in the Spring of 1977 Jans came to Europe and told his eager interviewers that he rented studio-time to record the next part that summer, a select group of fans couldn't wait for it's results. But then it became very silent and after years of waiting the news couldn't have been worse. In 1984 Jans died, probably in connection with depression & dope although there are also reports he was involved in a car accident shortly before. Bette Midler put up an advertisement to his memory in Billboard in which the lyrics of "My Mother's Eyes" were printed and that was it. Until "Bone Machine" came out. The beautiful thing about "Whistle Down The Wind" which is dedicated to Tom Jans is that it fits in Waits' idiom as much as in that of Jans. Those who know the work of Jans well can actually hear him sing this song. For a long time I thought it must have been written earlier than the rest of Bone Machine (Jans died 8 years before, Kathleen not co-writing, the more conventional style than the rest of the songs) but since I heard Mule Variations I'm not so sure about that anymore. So much for the history, here's the mystery: Once in a while after Jans' tragic death articles emerged in different magazines with references to a mysterious last record which nobody had actually heard. It's called "Champion" and it must have been released in the US only in 1982. What is known is who collaborated on the album (the same LA-bunch as on the earlier records, which even opens the possibility that it is in fact a late release of the planned '77 record) . Well, of course there are (sometimes funny) rumours: Once there was a guy in Tokyo who had a copy but wasn't in the possession of a recording-machine (we're talking about Japan here!). There are roadies who had a tape of it but lost it, or they just can't find it or whatever. The people who actually played on the album don't react at all or only confirm that they have known Jans and played with him. Why? Well, maybe they think the record is not worth the fuss, a lack of interest in a project that wasn't too succesful, copyright problems, or simply a story that is too sad to be reminded of. Still, it's a shame that (the) story is incomplete, so if someone ever comes across .... let it be known.... A few years ago "The Eyes of an Only Child" and "Dark Blonde" were released on CD on Sony Records in Japan. At least in Holland they're in some cheap import bins." (Submitted by Hans Nijs. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 1999)



3. "After he and Mimi split Jans came down to LA where he became a sort of an innercircle celebrity. This must have been the time when he met Mr. Waits. He lived in Malibu untill his death. > Valerie Carter did a cover of the song on the album 'Way It Is' in 1996 Valerie Carter was Tom Jans' girlfriend from 1976 onwards. She supported The Eagles on the European leg of their Hotel California-tour in 1977. During the only Dutch show in Rotterdam she called Jans on stage to do his "Back on my Feet Again" together. From then on Jans was a cult-star .... in the Netherlands only, I'm afraid. Back on my Feet Again is one of those songs which resemble Whistle down the Wind. It's from the great album Dark Blonde. Around the world to be found between so much other used vinyl. Recommended particularly to those interested in early Little Feat and Tom Waits. Jans' last album "Champion" has finally been found. It seems that no American company was willing to release it although the recordings (with Carter, the Porcaro's, most Little Feat members etc.) were finished. The tapes were bought by the Japanese label Canyon International and the record was released in Japan only. The whole thing left Jans very disappointed. He lost faith in everyone around him with only few exceptions: at the end of the liner notes on the Champion sleeve it says: thanks to Tom and Kathleen. In a way these were his last words in public." (Submitted by Hans Nijs. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000)





(3) Blue eyed:

- adj. 1. Drunk. c1850; obs. 2. Innocent, gullible; idealistic; unworldly. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

Blue: adj. 1. [late 18C-19C] confused, terrified, disappointed. 2. [late 18C+] miserable, depressed (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

Blue eyed boy/ girl: A man/ woman, not necessarily a youth, who is most favored by those in power (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "The Other Side Of The World" (There's a blue eyed girl with a red bow tie)



(4) Marleybone coach: This is probably misspelled and should read Marylebone.

- Ride by/ go in the Marrowbone/ Marylebone stage, to: phr. [early 19C] to walk. [Marylebone is simply a mispron. of Marrowbone, itself metonomyc for the legs] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000). 

- Marrow-bonesDown on your marrow-bones, i.e. knees. That marrow in this phrase is not a corruption of "Mary," meaning the Virgin, is palpable from the analogous phrase, the marrow-bone stage -- walking. The leg-bone is the marrow-bone of beef and mutton, and the play is on Marylebone (London) (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



Whistlin' Past The Graveyard

 



(Blue Valentine studio version, 1978)



I come in on a night train with an arm full of boxcars(1)

On the wings of a magpie, cross a hooligan(2) night

And I busted up a chifforobe(3) way out by the Kokomo

Cooked up a mess of mulligan(4) and got into a fight



Whistlin' past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard(5), Papa one eyed Jack(6)



You probably seen me sleepin' out by the railroad tracks

Go on and ask the Prince of darkness,

what about all that smoke come from the stack

Sometimes I kill myself a jackal, suck out all the blood

Steal myself a station wagon, drivin' through the mud



I'm gonna be whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



I know you seen my headlights, and the honkin' of my horn

I'm callin' out my bloodhounds, chase the Devil through the corn

Last night I chugged the Mississippi, now that sucker's dry as a bone

I was born in a taxi cab, I'm never goin' home



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



My eyes have seen the glory of the draining of the ditch

I only come to Baton Rouge I gotta find myself a witch

I'm gonna snatch me up a couple of 'em every time it rains

You'll see a locomotive, probably thinkin' its a train



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



What you think is the sunshine is just a twinkle in my eye

That ring around my finger's called the 4th of July

When I get a little bit lonesome and a tear falls from my cheek

There's gonna be an ocean in the middle of the week



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



I come into town on a night train, with an arm full of boxcars

On the wings of a magpie, cross a hooligan night

I'm gonna tear me off a rainbow and wear it for a tie

I never told the truth so I can never tell a lie



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

A mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1978

Official release: Blue Valentine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1978

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)





 



Whistlin' Past The Graveyard



(Bounced Checks alternate take, 1981)



I come in on a night train with an arm full of boxcars(1)

On the wings of a magpie, cross a hooligan(2) night

And I busted up a chifforobe(3) way out by the Kokomo

Cooked up a mess of mulligan(4) and got into a fight



Whistlin' past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard(5), Papa one eyed Jack(6)



You probably seen me sleepin' out by the railroad tracks

Go and ask the Prince of darkness,

what about that smoke come from the stack

Sometimes I kill myself a jackal, suck out all the blood

Steal myself a station wagon, drivin' through the mud



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



I know you seen my headlights, and the honkin' of my horn

I'm callin' out my bloodhounds, chase the Devil through the corn

Last night I chugged the Mississippi, now that sucker's dry as a bone

I was born in a taxi cab, I'm never goin' home



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



My eyes have seen the glory of the draining of the ditch

I only come to Baton Rouge to find myself a witch

I'm gonna snatch me up a couple of 'em every time it rains

You'll see a locomotive, probably thinkin' its a train



Whistlin past the graveyard. steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



What you think is the sunshine is just a twinkle in my eye

That ring around my finger called the 4th of July

I'm gonna tear me off a rainbow and wear it for a tie

I never told the truth so I can never tell a lie



Whistlin past the graveyard, steppin' on a crack

Mean motherhubbard, Papa one eyed Jack



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1978

Official release:"Bounced Checks", WEA/ Asylum Records, 1981



Known covers:

Somethin' Funny Goin' On, Screamin' Jay Hawkins. March, 1994. Bizarre/ Planet (40105). Produced by Robert Duffey (re-released in 2000 "New Coat Of Paint"/ Manifesto)

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Screamin' Jay Hawkins (same version as on: "Somethin' Funny Goin' On", 1994)

Songs From My Heart. Knucklebone Oscar. 2001. Bluelight Records

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Three For All. We Three (Liebman, Swallow, Nussbaum). June 26, 2006. Challenge Records

Drivin' Rain. Michael Nash. March 13, 2007. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Boxcar, an armful of: Grab an armful of boxcars. To Jump on a moving freight train in order to get free transportation c1915. Hobo use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(2) Hooligan n.: A hoodlum; a ruffian; a tough guy (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) Chifforobe n.: A tall piece of furniture typically having drawers on one side and space for hanging clothes on the other (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(4) Mulligan stew n.:

- A stew made of any available meat(s) or vegetable(s). Orig. hobo use, perhaps from "salmagrundi". Often used facetiously about any stewlike food, however excellent (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). 

- A hobo dish containing just about anything you have handy. How to make just like they make it at the yearly hobo convention in Britt. Iowa. "Britt Mulligan Stew" = 450 lbs. of Beef, 900 lbs. of Potatoes, 250 lbs. of carrots, 35 lbs. of green peppers, 300 lbs. of cabbage, 100 lbs. of turnips, 10 lbs. of parsnips, 150 lbs. of tomatoes, 20 lbs. of chili peppers, 25 lbs. of rice, 60 lbs. of celery, 1 lb bay leaves, 24 gallon of mixed vegetables, 10 lbs. of kitchen bouquet flavoring, about 400 loaves of bread are served, a total of 5000, 8 oz. cups ordered to serve the stew. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. eGroups Tom Waits Discussionlist. March, 2000). 

- Also mentioned in "Jitterbug Boy": "Burned hundred-dollar bills, I've eaten Mulligan stew."



(5) Mother Hubbard:

- Phrase comes from the nursery rhyme: "Old Mother Hubbard. Went to the cupboard. To get her poor dog a bone; But when she got there, The cupboard was bare, And so the poor dog had none. But when she got there, The cupboard was bare, And so the poor doggie had none." (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Mother-hubba/ -hubbard n. [20C] euph. for motherfucker (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(6) One eyed Jack: 1. adj. [1960s+] (US) in poker, used of a king or jack, esp. as wild cards. [the design of the face depicted in profile on cards] 2a. adj. [early-mid-19C] (US) crooked, dishonest. 2b. adj. [late 19C+] (orig. US) inferior, inadequate, unimportant] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).



Who Are You?

 



Well, they're lining up to mad-dog(2) your Tilt-a-Whirl(3)

Three shots for a dollar, win a real live doll

All the lies that you tell, I believed them so well

Take them back, take them back to your red house

For that fearful leap into the dark(4)

Oh well, I did my time in the jail of your arms

Now Ophelia(5) wants to know where she should turn



Tell me, what did you do, what did you do the last time?

Why don't you do that?

Well, go on ahead and take this the wrong way

Time's not your friend

Do you cry, do you pray, do you wish them away?

Are you still leaving nothing but bones in the way?

Did you bury the carnival, with the lions and all?

Excuse me while I sharpen my nails



And just who are you, who are you this time?

You look rather tired, are you pretending to love?

Well, I hear that it pays well

How do your pistol and your Bible and your sleeping pills go?

Are you still jumping out of windows in expensive clothes?

Well, I fell in love with your sailor's mouth(6) and your wounded eyes

You better get down on the floor, don't you know this is war

Tell me, who are you this time?

Tell me, who are you this time?



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Solemn Sun Setting. Human Drama. 1999. Triple X

This Is Our North Dakota. No River City. September, 2003. Six Little Shoes Records



Notes:



(1) Who Are You?:

- Barney Hoskyns 
(1999): You've said that you tend to bury directly autobiographical stuff. What about Who Are You? Should we know who that's about? Tom Waits"Gee, I dunno. I think it's better if you don't. The stories behind most songs are less interesting than the songs themselves. So you say, "Hey, this is about Jackie Kennedy." And it's, "Oh, wow." Then you say, "No, I was just kidding, it's about Nancy Reagan." It's a different song now. In fact, all my songs are about Nancy Reagan." (Source: "Mojo interview with Tom Waits". Mojo: Barney Hoskyns. April 1999)

Tom Waits (1992): "It's a cynical song; the kind of stuff you'd like to say to an old girlfriend at a party. Who are you this time? Are you still jumping out of windows in expensive clothes? A thing you'd like to say to anybody who maybe raked you over the coals." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992) 

- Waits might be paying tribute to Bob Dylan's "Sad Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands" (Blonde on Blonde, 1966). Tom Waits (1991): "All of Bob Dylan's songs are carved from the bones of ghosts and have myth and vision . . . 'Desolation Row,' 'From a Buick 6,' 'Ballad in Plain D,' 'Restless Farewell,' 'Visions of Johanna,' 'Boots of Spanish Leather ,' 'Dark Eyes.'" For me, 'Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands" is a grand song. It is like Beowulf and it 'takes me out to the meadow.' This song can make you leave home, work on the railroad or marry a Gypsy. I think of a drifter around a fire with a tin cup under a bridge remembering a woman's hair. The song is a dream, a riddle and a prayer." (Source: "The Impact Of Dylan's Music 'Widened the scope of possibilities', by Robert Hilburn. Los Angeles Times. May 19, 1991)



(2) To mad-dog: v. [1990s] (US Black/ prison) to stare at intensively and theateningly (cf. bad eye). [mad dog, such animals fix their targets with an unwavering, aggressive stare] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(3) Tilta whirl: A tilt-a-whirl is a standard American carnival ride. Riders are strapped to the inside of a cylindrical section, which spins at a high speed. The ride then is lifted up on a metal arm, and the whole thing tilts in different directions (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussion;ist. September, 2000)



(4) Leap in the dark: Thomas Hobbes is reported to have said on his death-bed, "Now am I about to take my last voyage- a great leap in the dark." Rabelais, in his last moments, said, "I am going to the Great Perhaps." Lord Derby, in 1868, applied the words, "We are about to take a leap in the dark," to the Reform Bill. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(5) Ophelia: Could be refering to Shakespeare's Hamlet: Ophelia, daughter of Polonius the chamberlain. Hamlet fell in love with her, but after his interview with the Ghost, found it incompatible with his plans to marry her. Ophelia, thinking his "strange conduct" the effect of madness, becomes herself demented, and in her attempt to gather flowers is drowned. (Shakespeare: Hamlet) (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)





This painting by Sir John Everett Millais 1851-1852. Tate Gallery London NO1506.



(6) Sailor's mouth: common expression meaning to be foul mouthed, to be vulgar



Whose Sports Coat Is That?

 



(Live version: Kansas City, 1979)



I'd like to tell you a little story about a young man

He arrived home one afternoon, to find various articles of clothing

throughout his home area, that did not belong to him

This made this particular gentleman extremely upset, and rightly so

And he called his young lady to his side, and he said, Baby



I just gotta know

I just gotta know

I just gotta know

I just gotta know



Whose sportcoat is that on my rack?

Whose sportcoat is that?

Whose sportcoat is that?

I ain't got no coat like that!



Now whose hat is on the rack?

Now whose hat is on the rack?

Now whose hat is on the rack?

I ain't got me no hat like that!



Now whose car is parked right outside?

Whose car is parked right outside?

Whose car is parked right outside?

I drive a Chevy, not a goddamn Ford!



Whose cigarettes are those?

Whose cigarettes are those?

Whose cigarettes are those?

I smoke Winstons, he smokes Kools!



Whose whiskey is by the bed?

Now whose whiskey is by the bed?

Whose whiskey is by the bed?

I drink Cutty, that's J&B, babe!



Now whose pistol is that?

Whose pistol is that?

Whose pistol is that?



Whose sportcoat is that?

Whose sportcoat is that?

Whose sportcoat is that?

I ain't got me no coat like that!



Written by: Tom Waits (?)

Published by: (?), � 1979

No official release

Recorded live at the Uptown Theatre, Kansas City, October 8, 1979

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





 



Whose Sports Coat Is That?



(Live version: New York, 1979)



We have a small tale of woe in this particular point in the program

It's an unfortunate set of circumstances that fell upon our protagonist

prior to leaving town

In a small little community

It was a normal day, it was November twenty-third

My name is Joe Friday(1), I carry a badge

Yeah, there are a thousand stories in the naked city

and this is just one of them

It's a little story about infidelity

It seems our hero arrived home early in the afternoon

unbeknownst to his spouse

He put the key in the lock, he opened the door, he walked inside

And scattered around the home area, were several mysterious articles of

clothing, that did not belong to him

Subsequently he became extremely upset, and he thought to himself



Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah(2)

Someone's in the kitchen, I know

Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah

Strumming on the old banjo



Now this particular gentleman

Well, he didn't like any flies in his soup

He didn't like dogs under the table

And he became irritated

And he called his young sweetheart to his side, and he said



Baby baby baby

We got trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble

We got trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble

Trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble

He said, Honey



He said

I just gotta know

I just gotta know

I just gotta know

I just gotta know



Whose sportcoat is that on my rack?

Now whose sportcoat is that?

Now whose sportcoat is that?

I ain't got me no coat like that!



Now whose hat is on the rack?

Now whose hat is on the rack?

Now whose hat is on the rack?

I ain't got me no hat like that!



Now whose cigarettes are those?

Now whose cigarettes are those?

Now whose cigarettes are those?

I smoke Winstons, he smokes Kools!



Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah

Someone's in the kitchen, I know

Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah

Strumming on the old banjo



Now whose car is parked right outside?

Whose car is parked right outside?

Whose car is parked right outside?

I drive a Chevy, not a goddamn Ford!



Now whose whiskey is by the bed?

Now whose whiskey is by the bed?

Now whose whiskey is by the bed?

I drink Cutty, that's J&B, baby!



Trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble

Trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble

Trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble



Now baby, whose pistol is that?

Now whose pistol is that?

Now whose pistol is that?



Written by: Tom Waits (?)

Published by: (?), � 1979

No official release

Recorded live at the Beacon Theatre, New York, November 11, 1979

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Whose Sports Coat Is That?.

Beacon Theatre, New York/ USA, November 15, 1979.



Notes:



(1) Joe Friday: "Refers to the TV series 'Dragnet', where Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday (Badge No. 714)." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000) 



(2) Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah: Quotes from the song "I've been Working On The Railroad", origins unknown: " I've been working on the railroad All the livelong day, I've been working on the railroad Just to pass the time away, Don't you hear the whistle blowing Rise up so early in the morn, Don't you hear the captain shouting Dinah, blow your horn. Dinah won't you blow, Dinah won't you blow, Dinah won't you blow your horn. Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah, Someone's in the kitchen I know-oh, oh, oh, Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah, Strumming on the old banjo, And singing... Fe fi fiddley-i-o, Fe fi fiddley-i-o-o-o-o, Fe fi fiddley-i-o, Strumming on the old banjo."



Widow's Grove

 



I met you in the saddle, rode you in the dust

Held your hand to the heavens, pulled your heart to the earth

There was something that blinded me more than the mist

And the breath of the cottonwood buds lighter yet



And you rode the maypole of dance hall legs

And galloped to another's embrace

And I bit the flowers from your wrist corsage(1)

And you waltzed too slowly, too slowly you waltzed

With that girl from Widow's Grove



Oh, I'd follow you to the river, that washes out to the sea

Through the wind, through the rain of a cold dark night

That's where I'll be(2)



Near the breath of a swallow, petals dropped as you fell(3)

And you grabbed then shyly held me, against the stone cold well

In your hand was a glass, you held the ice against the night

And it dripped and it sparkled and I laughed a wish



Before it all slipped down the dark tunneled well

I heard it melt quietly and I looked at you

Bent to the earth with just one pleading wish

Your skirts brushed to the furious pounding(4)



Oh, I'd follow you to the river, that washes out to the sea

Through the wind, through the rain of a cold dark night

That's where I'll be



I hid in the elm and raised the bough, that hung even with your neck

And I chased you and drowned you, there deep in the well(4)

And when your mouth was full and wet, I swallowed all your reckless fate

And with your last breath, you moaned too drunk to wake



Oh, I'd follow you to the river, that washes out to the sea

Through the wind, through the rain of a cold dark night

That's where I'll be

Through the wind, through the rain of a cold dark night

That's where I'll be



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Widow's Grove: the song differs considerably from its transcript, indicating that it originally might have been intended as a duet/ dialogue, with the victim speaking from an afterworld. Compare: All The World Is Green (Woyzeck theatre version, 2000) and Green Grass (Real Gone, 2004) 

And I bit the flowers from your wrist corsage: Orphans booklet has this transcribed as: "I bit the flowers from MY wrist corsage."

Through the wind, through the rain of a cold dark night, that's where I'll be: Orphans booklet has this transcribed as: "Through the wind, through the rain of a cold BLACK night, IT'S THERE Ill be."

Near the breath of a swallow, petals dropped as you fell: Orphans booklet has this transcribed as: "Near the breath of a swallow, petals dropped as I fell."

Your skirts brushed to the furious pounding: Orphans booklet has this transcribed as: "MY skirts brushed to the furious pounding."

And I chased you and drowned you, there deep in the well: Orphans booklet has this transcribed as: "And I chased you and drowned you, there deep in the LAKE."



With A Suitcase

With A Suitcase (Street Band)



(Paradise Alley session, 1978. Also known as: Suitcase I)



With a suitcase, and a couple of bucks

I'm gonna skip this rhubarb(1), slide down the boulevard

I ain't gonna take that dame with me

She's full of malarkey(2)

Just as soon as it's dark, I'll get a one-way token

On the first thing smokin' out of town



And I'm goin' out to East St. Louis, Kansas City, and Chicago

Wichita, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Miami, Florida

Downtown Tulsa, Champaigne-Urbana

Bangor, all aboard, Houston and Atlanta

Goin' to Joliet, Bernadette, maybe Philadelphia

'Picket out to Tittsburgh'(3) , any burgh, hamburger

Springfield Junction, Primrose Lane

I may get me a nose-job(4) and change my name



Cause she drinks all my liquor and she steals all the covers

And she swears like a sailor

If I ever have to bail her out of jail again, I'm gonna lose my mind

Who needs the aggravation

Charlie, take me to the station

Get a one-way token on the first thing smokin' out of town



And go out to East St. Louis, Kansas City, and Chicago

Wichita, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Miami, Florida

Downtown Tulsa, Champaigne-Urbana

Bangor, all aboard, Houston and Atlanta

Goin' to Joliet, Bernadette, maybe Philadelphia

'Picket out to Tittsburgh', any burgh, cheeseburger

Springfield Junction, Primrose Lane

I may get me a nose-job and change my name



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1978

No official release: from the Paradise Alley sessions. September 7, 1978





 



With A Suitcase (Rhythm Section)



(Paradise Alley sessions, 1978. Also known as: Suitcase II)



With a suitcase, and a couple of bucks

I'm gonna skip this rhubarb, slide down the boulevard

I ain't gonna take that dame with me

Cause she's full of malarkey

Just as soon as it's dark, I'll get a one-way token

On the first thing smokin' out of town



And I'm goin' out to East St. Louis, Kansas City, and Chicago

Wichita, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Miami, Florida

Downtown Tulsa, Champaigne-Urbana

Bangor, all aboard, Houston and Atlanta

Goin' to Joliet, Bernadette, maybe Philadelphia

'Picket out to Tittsburgh', any burgh, cheeseburger

Springfield Junction, Primrose Lane

I may get me a nose-job and change my name



Well, she drinks all my liquor and she steals all the covers

And she swears like a sailor

If I ever have to bail her out of jail again, I'm gonna lose my mind

Who needs the aggravation

Charlie, take me to the station

I'll get a one-way token on the first thing smokin' out of town



And I'm goin' out to East St. Louis, Kansas City, and Chicago

Wichita, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Miami, Florida

Downtown Tulsa, Champaigne-Urbana

Bangor, all aboard, Houston and Atlanta

Goin' to Joliet, Bernadette, maybe Philadelphia

'Picket out to Tittsburgh', any burgh, Fur Burger

Springfield Junction, Primrose Lane

I may get me a nose-job and change my name



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1978

No official release: from the Paradise Alley sessions. September 7, 1978



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of With A Suitcase.

Paradise Alley sessions. September 7, 1978.



Notes:



(1) Rhubarb: n. 1. [1940s+] (US) an argument, a noisy dispute, esp. one that takes place on the field of play at a sporting event. 2. [1960s+] nonsense, rubbish [a mix of uses, e.g. theatrical, the actors' traditional muttering of Rhubarb to provide background in crowd scenes; and sporting, baseball fans' term to describe a disturbance. The term was popularized c.1943 by the US baseball commentator 'Red' Barber, whose memoirs were entitled Rhubarb in the Catbird Seat (1968)] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 



(2) Malarkey:

 n.: Exaggerated talk; tedious talk; lies; boloney, bunk. Not common (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- "It is originally American slang, meaning humbug, foolishness or nonsense. In the early days it was variously spelt, not just in the ways you give but also as malaky or mullarkey. Nobody is sure where it comes from: it just appears out of the blue in the 1920s. Some say it derives from the Irish word mullachan for a strongly built boy, hence a ruffian. My personal theory, based on one of the early spellings, is that it comes from the Irish surname Mullarkey, presumably a person of that name, in the same way that-for example-hooligan does. But who, or when, or where, I've no idea." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004) 



(3) Picket out to Tittsburgh: Taken from this joke: "A guy goes up to the ticket window at the bus terminal where he is greeted by a beautiful, large-chested woman. "I'd like two pickets to Tittsburgh", he says.  Realizing his faux pas, he blushes and retreats to the seating area. After regaining his composure he decides to try again, in spite of his embarrassment. "Forgive me for that, miss...I'd like two pickets to Tittsburgh."  Again he blushes, and retreats. Then he sees a priest and decides to enlist his help. "Pardon me, father, but would you be kind enough to help me..." So the priest goes up to the counter and asks the woman for two tickets to Pittsburgh. She gives them to him, where upon he asks... "And can I please have two nipples for this dime?"" (Submitted by Ulf Berggren/ Tony Patricca. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. December, 2000)



(4) Nose job: n. [1950s+] a rhinoplasty, cosmetic plastic surgey on one's nose (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



World Of Adventure

World Of Adventure/ River Of Men



 



Adventure

Men of adventure

Conquering the world

Conquering the world

The world of adventure

The world of adventure

The world of adventure

Our journey begins in a world of adventure



Fishers of men(1), fishers of men

Up one side and back again

Along the river of men



Our trusty oars are in the boat

Along the river of men

(Sing with me, John!)

Along the river of men

Along the river of men

Up one side and back again

Along the river of men (of men)



He yells at the crew, they get nothing to eat

Along the river of men

And it's up one side and back again

Along the river of men (of men)

Along the river of men

Along the river of men

Along the river of men



Written by: Tom Waits, 1998

Published by: [?], � 1998

Official release: the TV series "Fishing With John", 1998(2)

Recorded in Jamaica, while fishing for red snapper

Tom Waits & John Lurie: freeform singing



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Fisher of Men: Fisher of Men (Lake Galilee) Luke 5:1-11 : "And it came to pass, that, as the people pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Gennesaret, and saw two ships standing by the lake: but the fishermen were gone out of them, and were washing their nets. And he entered into one of the ships, which was Simon's, and prayed him that he would thrust out a little from the land. And he sat down, and taught the people out of the ship. Now when he had left speaking, he said unto Simon, launch out into the deep, and let down your nets for a draught. And Simon answering said unto him, Master, we have toiled all night, and have taken nothing: nevertheless at thy word I will let down the net. And when they had this done, they inclosed a great multitude of fishes: and their net brake. And they beckoned unto their partners, which were in the other ship, that they should come and help them. And they came, and filled both ships, so that they began to sink. When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees saying, depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord. For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the draught of the fishes which they had taken: and so was also James, and John, the sons of Zebedee, which were partners with Simon. And Jesus said unto Simon, Fear not; from henceforth thou shalt catch men. And when they had brought their ships to land, they forsook all, and followed him." (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, December, 2000)



(2) Interview with John Lurie by A. D. Amorosi (from the Philadelphia Citypaper.net): "Amorosi: How and why did Waits, Dafoe and Matt Dillon get involved and how'd you connect them to each location? Lurie: Jim, I figured, owed me a favor for all the stuff I've done for him. Tom was already in Jamaica. I figured he would be good for this kinda thing. And Willem and I do fish. He picked ice fishing in Maine. I wouldn't have fucking picked there. I hate the cold. I met Dennis in Japan and got him to do Fishing by asking him where he wanted to go. I get to travel and write it off on taxes. Amorosi: Were all of the catches real? Lurie: The catches with Tom were fake. We bought them from some other fisherman because Tom was throwing up and just wanted to get it over with. But we did catch a lot of fish that we don't show; fair play to me as a sportsman. But catching fish wasn't in those scripts! Willem and I were supposed to be starving to death. Matt and I theoretically couldn't catch anything because we hadn't yet done the magical dance. And Jim and I actually caught three big sharks but I edited it down to one shark to look more dramatic. We threw 'em all back. It seemed immoral to keep 'em. Amorosi: What do you think your friends learned about you on this trip? Lurie: I think they learned to hate me and never to trust me. When you see Tom grumbling, he really was mad." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. December, 2000)





Source: still from the video: "Fishing with John - Vol 1", 1998 (1992?)

Credits: video directed by John Lurie. Photography by Michael Amsler



Woe

 



(Also known as: Woyzeck's Woe)



The ribbon round your neck

against your skin it's pale as bone

It is my favorite thing you've worn

The band is playing our song

And we won't go home, 'til morn



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000 and Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits Blood Money" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Woyzeck's Woe as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Jens J�rn Spottag (as Woyzeck).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Woyzeck in act 3, scene 3



Wrong Side Of The Road

 



Put a dead cat on the railroad tracks

when the wolf bains blooming by the tressel

And get the eyeball of a rooster

and the stones from a ditch

and wash 'em down with bilge water(1)

and say you'll never snitch(2)

Take the buttons from a yellow jacket

the feather from a buzzard

The blood from a bounty hunter's cold black heart

Catch the tears of a widow in a thimble made of glass

Tell your mama and papa they can kiss your ass



Poison all the water in the wishin' well

and hang all them scarecrows from a Sycamore tree(3)

Burn down all them honeymoons put 'em in a pillow case

Wait next to the switch blades at the amusement park for me

Strangle all the Christmas carols scratch out all the prayers

Tie 'em up with barbed wire and push 'em down the stairs

And I'll whittle you a pistol for keep the nightmares of the blinds

Them sunabitches always seem to sneak up from behind

Syphon all the gas from your daddy's pickup truck

Fill up Johnny's T-bird(4) I got a couple of bucks

Put on a little perfume and wear ribbon in your hair

Careful that you don't wake up the hounds

Tear a bolt of lightning of the side of the sky

Throw it in the cedar chest if you want to tell me why

Bring me the gear shift knob from a 49 Merc

Lay down here beside me let me hold you in the dirt

And you're gonna tremble

Tear the throat out of the night

Sink your teeth into my shoulder

Dig your nails into my back

Tell that little girl to let go of my sleeve

You'll be a woman when I catch you come baby fall in love with me

Then with my double barrel shotgun and a whole box of shells

We'll celebrate the 4 of July

We'll do 100 mph spendin' someone elses dough

We'll drive all the way to Reno(5)

on the wrong side of the road



The wrong side of the road

On the wrong side of the road

The wrong side of the road

Wrong side of the road

Wrong side of the road

Hey baby



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1978

Official release: Blue Valentine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1978





 



Known covers:

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Bilgewater:

- Filthy drainings. The bilge is the lowest part of a ship, and, as the rain or sea-water which trickles down to this part is hard to get at, it is apt to become foul and very offensive. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- n. [late 19C+] thin beer, thus any thin, tasteless drink, alcoholic or otherwise. [bilgewater, the foul water that collects in a vessel's bilges] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

- Also mentioned in Town With No Cheer, 1983: "No spirits, no bilgewater, and eighty dry locals, And the high noon sun beats a hundred and four"



(2) Snitch: 

- v.t.: To steal or take small items. v.i. To inform against, betray, squeal, esp. to another's superior or teacher (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in Red Shoes By The Drugstore, 1978: "and the cold jingle of taps in a puddle was the burglar alarm snitchin' on Caesar"



(3) Sycamore tree:

- Any of various deciduous trees of the genus Platanus, especially P. occidentalis of eastern North America, having palmately lobed leaves, ball-like, nodding, hairy fruit clusters, and bark that flakes off in large colorful patches. Also called buttonball, buttonwood (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition).

Sycamore (American Sycamore): Platanus occidentalis. In keeping with its size, Sycamores have the largest leaves of any native tree in North America. Frequently, the trunk of a Sycamore will be divided into several large, secondary trunks. The bark of the Sycamore perhaps is its most striking feature: mottled creamy white and brown with the darker bark of older trees peeling away from the lighter-colored, younger bark. Typically, the Sycamore grows on bottomlands, floodplains, and on the banks of streams. The tough, coarse-grained wood is difficult to split and work. It has various uses, including butchers' blocks. A few birds feed on the fruit, and several mammals eat twigs and bark. The related Oriental and London Planetrees are ornamental shade trees, frequently planted along streets. (Source: OPLIN: � 1997 Ohio Public Library Information Network (OPLIN) & The Ohio Historical Society (OHS)) 

- The tree which Zacchaeus climbed to get a better look at Jesus.

- Also mentioned in Gun Street Girl: "He's sittin' in a sycamore in St. John's Wood. Soakin' day old bread in kerosene."





(4) T-bird: 1. a Ford Thunderbird.

- Dave Lewis (1979): "Cars, in fact, are one of Waits' real passions. He sports an elaborate tattoo on his arm emblazoned with the word 'Nighthawk', which was the name of a 'car-club' he belonged to as a teenager and he can readily run off a list of the wheels he's owned, including his current emerald green '64 T-bird." (Source: "Tom Waits: A Sobering Experience", Sounds magazine, by Dave Lewis. Date: August 4, 1979)

- John Lamb (2002): "Tom also came to our studio (ca. 1978) in a middle class neighborhood on the outskirts of Beverly Hills/West L.A....primary residences to old silent era movie stars and the families of Hollywood entertainment personalities like Allen Carr, Yashur Heifitz, Arthur Freed and the sort. So Tom drives up in his 66' Bird with "Blue Valentine" spray-painted on the rear quarter panels [late 1978, as shown on the back cover of the album Blue Valentine]. His Bird was stuffed with newspapers, manuscripts and clothing from floor to ceiling, just like his apartment. There was only enough room for the driver behind the wheel, even the passenger seat was stuffed to the roof, his vision was completely obstructed except for his forward view out the wind shield, and all these old neighbors are peering out their windows watching this seedy looking character with a wrinkled suit and porkpie Stetson hat meander across the street ...pause and head up the stairs to our old Spanish - studio house. One of the old neighbors called after his arrival to see if everything was ok or if we wanted her to call the police." (Source: E-mail conversations Tom Waits Library/ John Lamb. April 13 - May 24, 2002)



(5) Reno: also mentioned in: Better off without a wife, 1975: "Never been no Valentino, had a girl who lived in Reno.", Hang on St. Christopher, 1987: "Hang on St. Christopher now don't let me go, get me to Reno and bring it in low.



---------- X Y Z--------



Yesterday Is Here

 



(Frank's Wild Years studio version, 1987)



If you want money in your pocket and a top hat on your head

a hot meal on your table and a blanket on your bed

Well, today is grey skies(2) tomorrow is tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



I'm going to New York City

and I'm leaving on a train

and if you want to stay behind and wait 'til I come back again

Well, today is grey skies tomorrow is tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



If you want to go where the rainbows end

you'll have to say goodbye

All our dreams come true baby up ahead

and it's out where your memories lie



Well, the road is out before me and the moon is shining bright

What I want you to remember as I disappear tonight

Well, today is grey skies tomorrow is tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



Well, today is grey skies tomorrow's tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play





 



Yesterday Is Here



(Big Time live version, 1988)



Thank you ma'm!

If you want money in your pocket, you want a top hat on your head

a hot meal on your table and a blanket on your bed

Well, today is grey skies tomorrow is tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



I'm a going to New York City

I'll be leaving on a train

and if you wanna stay behind 'til I come back again

Well, today is grey skies tomorrow is tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



Now, if you want to go where the rainbows end

you will have to say goodbye

All our dreams come true baby up ahead

and it's out where your memories lie



And the road is out before me and the moon is shining bright

What I want you to remember as I disappear tonight

That today is grey skies tomorrow is tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here



And today is grey skies tomorrow's tears

You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here

You will have to wait 'til yesterday is here

You will have to wait 'til yesterday is here

You will have to wait 'til yesterday is here



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play. Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Bümpliz Casablanca. Züri West. May 13, 1989. BlackCat/ Switserland (In Swiss: “Bis I Zrügg Bi”)

Cool in July. Bertus Borgers & The Groove. 1992. Universe-Virgin (CDSP 95729)

Good News. Bertus Borgers & The Groove. 1992. Universe-Virgin (CD-single 165 558)

Wintertour. Züri West. November 21, 1992 Label: Weltrekords/ Switserland (live version in Swiss: “Bis I Zrügg Bi”)

Jack Candy. The Walkabouts. 1993. CD-single, SubPop Germany, SPCD 81/251

New West Hotel. The Walkabouts. 1993. SubPop Germany, SP 81/252

Pinups. Human Drama. May 18, 1993. Triple X

Eclipse. Astrid Seriese. July, 1993. Bridgadoon

Bury The Bottle With Me. Jever Mountain Boys. 1994. Blue Million Miles

Dear Sir. Cat Power (Chan Marshall). 1995. Plain (re released in 2001)

Sad Eyes. Vera Coomans & Philip Hoessen. 1996. Dureco (The Netherlands)

Into Temptation - Astrid Seriese sings Waits, Weill & more. Astrid Seriese. October, 1996 (September, 2003). Brigadoon

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "Der hvor regnbuen bor")

Dance With The Skeletons In Hell. Serious Solid Swineheard Is Better Than Homecooked. November 12, 1997. Day-Glo - (SPV)

Orange Juice For One. Gabriela Tanner Jazz Quintett. May 25, 2001. Jazz Elite Special

Acoustic. Calla. 2003. Self-released promo CDR (live)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Bloomsburg to Bangladesh. Bloomsburg to Bangladesh. 2004. Blue Buddha Records (performed by Jeremy dePrisco)

The Exotic Sounds of the Alter Boys. The Alter Boys. March 8, 2005. Fractured Trans

Black Money. Cowboys On Dope. April 29, 2006. Extra Records (Germany)

Bark! The Barking Dogs. February 9, 2006. WTPL Music (France)

Comin' Home. Denvis. August 1, 2006. Rosa Records (Netherlands)

Keys to the Castle. Mare Edstrom. September 15, 2006. Spiritone Records

Live At Mississippi Studios. Amanda Richards. October 3, 2006. Self-released

The Shed. The Shed. December 1, 2007. Self-released

Falling Down (single). Scarlett Johansson. April 8, 2008. Rhino Records/ Atco (same version as on Anywhere I Lay My Head, 2008)

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records (bonus track) 

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music)

No Romeo. The Pussybats. August 12, 2008. Black Rain



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Listen to audio excerpt of Yesterday Is Here as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1987): "Kathleen changed the melody on that. It was almost like a Ray Charles number before. All of a sudden we ended up with Morricone. Wanted to get some of that spaghetti-western feel. "Today is grey skies/ tomorrow is tears/ you'll have to wait till yesterday is here. . ." The title was given to me by Fred Gwynne. He had the title, and didn't know what to do with it. He said "it's yours; see what you can make of it." RR: Umm, was he speaking to you through the TV set? TW: No. in a dream. No, on "Cotton Club." We had a lot of time to stand around in our tuxedos. Kicked the title around for a long time. Always liked the title." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense." New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)

Stephen Fried (1987): "He claims that the title of one of the most haunting tunes on Franks Wild Years, "Yesterday Is Here" - "...today is grey skies/ tomorrow is tears/ you'll have to wait till yesterday is here" - was given to him by Fred Gwynne during a break in Cotton Club's filming." (Source: "The Da Vinci of Downtown". GQ Magazine: Stephen Fried. November, 1987)



(2) Grey Skies: Notice this phrase being repeated in the play. Frank's Theme: "And dream away when everyone's gone, dream away your grey skies too". More Than Rain: "I have to say to you it's more than woe-be-gotten grey skies now."



You Can Never Hold Back Spring

 



You can never hold back spring

You can be sure, I will never stop believing

The blushing rose that will climb

Spring ahead, or fall behind

Winter dreams the same dream, every time

Baby, you can never hold back spring



And even though, you've lost your way

The world is dreaming, dreaming of spring

So close your eyes, open your heart

to the one who's dreaming of you

And, you can never hold back spring

Remember everything that spring can bring

Baby, you can never hold back spring

Baby, you can never hold back spring



Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2005/ 2006

Official release: "La Tigre E La Neve" (Roberto Benigni, 2005). "La Tigre E La Neve" soundtrack (RCA Italy, 2005)

Re-released on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Resist Temptation. Harmonious Wail. October 7, 2008. Self-released



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Waits performing "You Can Never Hold Back Spring". Real Gone/ Orphans tour 2006 (ANTI, 2006).



<object height="385" width="640"></object> La Tigre E La Neve 2005 promo (dream sequence), featuring Waits performing "You Can Never Hold Back Spring". With Roberto Benigni and Nicoletta Braschi. Movie directed by Roberto Benigni.



Notes:



(1) You Can Never Hold Back Spring:

Tom Waits (2006): "That was a song for Roberto Benigni, who did a movie called The Tiger In The Snow, about the Iraq war. And uh, the movie's kinda built around the song. It's played several times during the movie. RS: Had you actually been able to see the movie when you wrote the song, or did you read the screenplay? TW: No... No, I just had to write a good song (laughs)" (Source: "Tom Waits: The Whiskey Voice Returns", All Things Considered, episode 123. NPR radio show (USA). November 21, 2006. By Robert Siegel)





Video screenshot from "La Tigre E La Neve" (Italy). Date: released September, 2005.

Movie directed by Roberto Benigni



You Can't Unring A Bell

 



You can't unring a bell, Junior

It'll cost you to get out of this one, Junior

She's got big plans that don't include you

Take it like a man



Cause you, you can't unring a bell, sucker

You'll need an attorney for this journey, Junior



How's it feel

How do you like it in the slam

You're a little man in a great big town

Perhaps you were a little hasty

He-he-he-he-he-he-he

You can't take back the things you said, man



Cause you can't unring a bell, Junior

Ah, hurts don't it

Take it like a man

Get it through your head

Suffer

He-he-he-he-he-he-he



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by These Immortal Souls

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Perfoemed by: These Immortal Souls (same version as on Step Right Up, 1995)



Young At Heart

 



Fairy tales can come true, it can happen to you

If you're young at heart

For it's hard, you will find, to be narrow of mind

 If you're young at heart



You can go to extremes with impossible schemes

You can laugh when your dreams fall apart at the seams

And life gets more exciting with each passing day

And love is either in your heart or on its way



Don't you know that it's worth every treasure on earth

To be young at heart

And as rich as you are it's much better by far

To be young at heart



And if you should survive to 105

Think of all you've derived out of being alive

Then this is the best part

You have a head start

If you are among the very young at heart



Don't you know that it's worth every treasure on earth

To be young at heart

Or as rich as you are it's much better by far

To be young at heart



And if you should survive to 105

Think of all you've derived out of being alive

Then this is the best part

You have a head start

If you are among the very young at heart

If you are among the very young at heart



Written by (words and music):Carolyn Leight & Johnny Richards(1)

Published by: Cherio Corp. (BMI), Ocheri Publising Corp. (ASCAP), Junes Tunes (BMI)

Official release: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Young At Heart: Written by Carolyn Leight & Johnny Richards. Made famous by Frank Sinatra (1954/ 1963) as (opening) song from the movie "Young At Heart" (1954, sung by Frank Sinatra).





Ad promoting "Young At Heart" with Frank Sinatra and Doris day



WORD (2006): "You've recorded a song indelibly associated with Sinatra, Young At Heart, on this new album. It's too corny to be true. TW: [Drily] Yeah, that song always moved me. My wife just thinks it's hilarious because she says, "You sound so goddamned depressed singing it. When you say, And here's the best part/ You have a head start/ If you are among the very young at heart'.. .she says, 'I don't believe that bullshit for a minute." [Laughs] "Young at heart, my ass!" (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown)

Part of the Tom Waits Library ©1999-2020