---------- I--------
I Beg Your Pardon
I Can't Wait To Get Off Work
Ice Cream Man
I Don't Wanna Grow Up
If I Have To Go
I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know
Hope I Don't Fall In Love With You
I'll Be Gone
I'll Shoot The Moon
I'll Take New York
I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby
I'm Not Your Fool Anymore
I'm Still Here
I'm Your Late Night Evening Prostitute
In A Suit Of Your Dreams
In Between Love
I Never Talk To Strangers
Innocent When You Dream
In The Colosseum
In The Morning
In The Neighborhood
Invitation To The Blues
Is There Any Way Out Of This Dream?
It Rains On Me
It's All Right With Me
It's Just The Way We Are Boys
It's Over
I Want You
I Wish I Was In New Orleans
---------- J--------
Jack & Neal
Jayne's Blue Wish
Jersey Girl
Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet
Jesus Gonna Be Here
Jitterbug Boy
Jockey Full Of Bourbon
Johnsburg, Illinois
Just Another Dime Store Novel
Just The Right Bullets
---------- K--------
Komme Nie Zu Spät
Kentucky Avenue
King Kong
---------- L--------
Lie To Me
Little Boy Blue
Little Drop Of Poison
Little Man
Little Trip To Heaven
Lonely
Long Way Home
Look's Like I'm Up Shit Creek Again
Lord I've Been Changed
Lost In The Harbour
Louise
Lowdown
Lowside Of The Road
Lucinda
Lucky Day
Lucky Day Overture
Lullaby
---------- M--------
Make It Rain
Martha
Martin Goes And Does Where It's At
Metropolitan Glide
Midnight Lullaby
Misery River
Missing My Son
Mockin' Bird
More Than Rain
Mr. Henry
Mr. Siegal
Murder In The Red Barn
Muriel
---------- N--------
New Coat Of Paint
Never Let Go
News From The Duke
Nighthawk Postcards
Nirvana
Nobody
No One Can Forgive Me But My Baby
No One Knows I'm Gone
November
---------- O--------
Ol' '55
Ol' '55 (Story)
Old Boyfriends
Old Shoes
Old Time Feelin'
On A Foggy Night
Once More Before I Go
Once Upon A Town
One, Two And Through
On The Nickel
On The Road
Overturned Pot
---------- P Q--------
Papa's Got A Brand New Bag
Paradise Alley
Pasties And A G-String
Picking Up After You
Picture In A Frame
Playin' Hooky
Please Call Me, Baby
Please Wake Me Up
Poncho's Lament
Pony
Poor Edward
Poor Little Lamb
Potter's Field
Purple Avenue/ Empty Pockets
Putnam County
Putting On The Dog
---------- R--------
Rainbow Sleeves
Rain Dogs
Rains On Me
Red Shoes (By The Drugstore)
Reeperbahn
Road To Peace
Rockin' Chair
Romeo Is Bleeding
Rosie
Ruby's Arms
Russian Dance


---------- I--------



I Beg Your Pardon

 



I'm just a scarecrow without you

Baby, please don't disappear

I beg your pardon, dear



I got a bottle for a trumpet

And a hatbox for a drum

And I beg your pardon, dear



I got upset, I lost my head

I didn't mean the things I said

You are the landscape of my dreams

Darling, I beg your pardon



I'd give you Boardwalk and Park Place

And all of my hotels(2)

I beg your pardon, dear



Please don't go back to St. Louis(3)

Can't you tell that I'm sincere

I beg your pardon, dear



I got upset, I lost my head

I didn't mean the things I said

You are the landscape of my dreams

Darling, I beg your pardon



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

From There To Here. Kyle Eastwood. September 15, 1998. Sony/ Columbia Records

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1985): "Your musical diet determines a lot of what comes out of you, and I was listening to Ellington at the time of 'I Beg Your Pardon'. In fact there's a quote from 'Sophisticated Lady' in that song. I've always had a real fascination with Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer and those people." (Source: "The Marlowe Of The Ivories". New Musical Express magazine. Barney Hoskyns. May 25, 1985) 



(2) I'd give you Boardwalk and Park Place and all of my hotels: refers to American board game Monopoly. The object of the game is to become the wealthiest player through buying, renting and selling property. There are different international editions. The Parker Brothers standard US version (based on Atlantic City) of the game has been produced since 1935. Boardwalk and Park Palace and hotels are the most valuable pieces of property on the Monopoly board. Standard (American Edition) property names are: Mediterranean Avenue, Baltic Avenue, Oriental Avenue, Vermont Avenue, Connecticut Avenue, Boardwalk, St. Charles Place, Park Place, States Avenue, Virginia Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue, St. James Place, North Carolina Avenue, Tennessee Avenue, Pacific Avenue, New York Avenue, Marvin Gardens, Ventnor Avenue, Atlantic Avenue, Illinois Avenue, Indiana Avenue, Kentucky Avenue.



(3) St. Louis

- Also mentioned in: Time, 1985: "And you're East of East Saint Louis and the wind is making speeches.", Train Song, 1987: "Well I broke down in East St. Louis, on the Kansas City Line.", Hold On, 1999: "Well, God bless your crooked heart, St. Louis got the best of me."

Jonathan Valania (1999): Getting back to the names of places, St. Louis seems to pop up a lot, in "Hold on" from the new record and "Time" from Rain Dogs and you've mentioned it a lot in interviews. Ever live there? TW: "No, never lived there. It's a good name to stick in a song. Every song needs to be anatomically correct: You need weather, you need the name of the town, something to eat - every song needs certain ingredients to be balanced. You're writing a song and you need a town, and you look out the window and you see "St. Louis Cardinals" on some kid's T-shirt. And you say, "Oh, we'll use that." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July, 1999)



I Can't Wait To Get Off Work

 



(And See My Baby On Montgomery Avenue)(1)



I don't mind working, cause I used to be jerking off

Most of my time in the bars

I've been a cabbie and a stock clerk and a soda-fountain jock-jerk(2)

And a manic mechanic on cars

It's nice work if you can get it(3), now who the hell said it?

I got money to spend on my girl

But the work never stops, and I'll be busting my chops(4)

Working for Joe and Sal(5)



And I can't wait to get off work and see my baby

She said she'd leave the porch light on for me

I'm disheveled and I'm disdainful

And I'm distracted and it's painful

But this job sweeping up here is gainfully employing me tonight



Well, "Tom, do this" and "Tom, do that" and "Tom, don't do that"

"Count the cash, clean the oven, dump the trash"

Oh, your loving is a rare and a copacetic(6) gift

And I'm a moonlight watchmanic, it's hard to be romantic

Sweeping up over by the cigarette machine

Sweeping up over by the cigarette machine



I can't wait to get off work and see my baby

She'll be waiting up with a magazine for me

"Clean the bathrooms and clean 'em good"

Oh, your loving, I wish you would

Come down here and sweep me off my feet

This broom'll have to be my baby

If I hurry, I just might get off before the dawn's early light



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976



Known covers:

Live At The Lodge. Veronica Klaus. May, 2005. Black Diamond Music 

Innocent When You Dream. Brandon Bernstein. February 26, 2010. Jazz Collective Records



Notes:



(1) I can't wait to get off work:  

Tom Waits (introducing I Can't Wait To Get Off Work, 1999): "I worked at a Pizza place when I was a kid. It was next to a mortuary and there were a lot of jokes about the food. And eh... anyway I guess this is the... this is for all the restaurant workers out there in the world...  " (Source: "KBCO Interview With Tom Waits" KBCO-C studios Los Angeles (USA), by Bret Saunders. October 13, 1999)

And See My Baby On Montgomery Avenue: There doesn't seem to be a Montgomery Avenue in San Diego (where young Tom Waits would get off work). Closest Montgomery Avenue seems to be in Cardiff By The Sea? (near Encinitas)



(2) Soda jerker, soda jerk: One, usu. a youth who prepares and dispenses refreshments at a soda fountain (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) It's nice work if you can get it

- Referring to: "Nice Work If You Can Get It". Writers: George & Ira Gershwin. From "A Damsel in Distress", 1937: "The man who only lives for making money Lives a life that isn't necessarily sunny Likewise the man who works for fame There's no guarantee that time won't erase his name The fact is, the only work that really brings enjoyment Is the kind that is for girl and boy meant Fall in love and you won't regret it That's the best work of all, if you can get it Holding hands at midnight 'Neath a starry sky Nice work if you can get it And you can get it if you try Strolling with the one girl Sighing sigh after sigh  Nice work if you can get it And you can get it if you try Just imagine someone Waiting at the cottage door Where two hearts become one Who could ask for anything more? Loving one who loves you And then taking that vow It's nice work if you can get it And if you get it, won't you tell me how? Just imagine someone Waiting at the cottage door Where two hearts become one Who could ask for anything more? Loving one who loves you And then taking that vow Nice work if you can get it And if you get it, won't you tell me how?"

- Nice work - if you can get it phr. [1940s+] implying fairly open jealousy of the previous speaker. [often lit. referring to a job/ occupation/ activity, but not invariably so] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(4) Bust one's chops: phr. [1950s] to make a great fuss about something (cf. beat one's chops, break one's chops) (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9). 

- Chops [1960s+] synon. for arse, esp. in phr. freeze/ sweat/ work one's chops off. [16C SE. jazz musicians fig. ref. to the use of one's mouth and lips in playing a wind instrument] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(5) Joe and Sal

- Refers to Napoleone Pizza House (a pizza house in National City, San Diego). Further reading: Napoleone Pizza House

- Also mentioned in the subtitle for "The Ghosts Of Saturday Night".





Napoleone Pizza House. Summer, 2001. Photography: Dalsh



(6) Copacetic, copesetic, kopasetic, kopesetic, kopasetee, kopesetee

- adj.: Fine, excellent, all right, o.k. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- "Copacetic, fine, excellent, going just right. "It's possible that this word has created more column inches of speculation in the USA than any other apart from OK. It's rare to the point of invisibility outside North America. People mostly become aware of it in the sixties as a result of the US space program-it's very much a Right Stuff kind of word. But even in the USA it doesn't have the circulation it did thirty years ago. Dictionaries are cautious about attributing a source for it, reasonably so, as there are at least five competing explanations, with no conclusive evidence for any of them. One suggestion that's commonly put forward is that it was originally a word of the African-American community in the USA. The name of Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, a famous black tap-dancer, singer and actor of the period round the turn of the twentieth century is commonly linked to this belief about its origin. Indeed, he claimed to have invented it as a shoeshine boy in Richmond. But other blacks, especially Southerners, said later that they had heard it earlier than Mr Robinson's day. But he certainly did a lot to popularise the word. A second explanation that's given credence is that it derives from one of two Hebrew expressiona, hakol b'seder, "all is in order", or kol b'tzedek, "all with justice", which it is suggested were introduced into the USA by Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrants. Other accounts say it derives from a Chinook word copasenee, "everything is satisfactory", once used on the waterways of Washington State, or from the French coupersetique, from couper, "to strike", or, in a hugely strained derivation, from the cop is on the settee, supposedly a hoodlum term used to describe a policeman who was not actively watching out for crime, and so one who was OK." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



Ice Cream Man

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



I'm clickin' by your house about two forty-five

with the sidewalk sundae strawberry surprise

I got a cherry popsicle right on time

I got a big stick, mamma, that will blow your mind



Cause I'm your ice cream man, and I'm a one-man band

and I'm your ice cream man

baby, I'll be good to you



If you missed me in the alley, baby, don't you fret

I'll be coming back around and don't forget

When you're tired and you're hungry you want something cool

You know I got something better than a swimming pool



Cause I'm your ice cream man, and I'm a one-man band

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'll be good to you



Well, if you see me coming, you ain't got no change

Don't worry baby, it can be arranged

Show me you can smile, baby just for me

and I'll fix you with a drumstick, and I'll do it for free



Cause I'm your ice cream man, and I'm a one-man band

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'll be good to you



Cause I'm your ice cream man, and I'm a one-man band

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'll be good to you



I'm your ice cream man

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'm your ice cream man

and I'm your ice cream man



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Ice Cream Man



(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



Well I'm clickin' by your house about two forty-five

with sidewalk sundae strawberry surprise

I got a cherry popsicle right on time

A big stick, mamma, that will blow your mind



Cause I'm a ice cream man, I'm a one-man band, yeah

I'm a ice cream man, baby

Honey, I'll be good to you



If you missed me in the alley, baby, don't you fret

Come back around and don't forget

When you're tired and you're hungry and you want something cool

got something better than a swimming pool



Cause I'm a ice cream man, I'm a one-man band

I'm a ice cream man

Honey, I'll be good to you, yeah



Cause I'm a ice cream man, I'm a one-man band

I'm a ice cream man

Honey, I'll be good to you



You see me coming, you ain't got no change

Don't worry baby, it can be arranged

Show me you can smile, baby just for me

Fix you with a drumstick, I'll do it for free



Cause I'm a ice cream man, I'm a one-man band

I'm a ice cream man

Honey I'll be good to you

be good to you

I'll be good to you, yeah

I'll good to you, yeah

good to you, yeah

good to you, yeah

good to you, yeah

good to you, yeah

Good to you

I'll be good to you

Don't you know

I'll be good to you

good to you



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973



Known covers:

Black Music For White People. Screamin' Jay Hawkins. July, 1991. Rhino/ Bizarre 1991 (Manifesto re-release). Produced by Robert Duffey

Roadkill Cafe [EP]. Tribe 8. November 10, 1995. Alternative Tentacle

Take Your Time, Mr. Brown. The Sugar Kings. 2000. Arabica CF-06

Best Of The Bizarre Sessions: 1990 - 1944. Screamin' Jay Hawkins. June, 2000. Manifesto (Bizarre)

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)

Take A Butcher�s Knife. Marc Breitfelder & Ryan Donohue. 2003. JukeJoint Records (Germany)

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)

Cats Outta The Bag. Cat Shell. December 20, 2007. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Ice Cream Man:

- Song could be inspired by: "Ice Cream Man", John Brim. Cut in 1953, released in 1969: "Well, summertime is here, you need something to keep you cool. Summertime is here, you need something to keep you cool. Come over to my truck, I've got something here for you. You know I come around here every night about six o'clock. I come around here every night about six o' clock. You look so good to me, you're gonna be my favorite stop. I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passing by. I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passing by. The way you're looking to me, I've just got to catch your eye. You know I've got all flavors, chocolate and strawberry too. I've got all flavors, chocolate and strawberry too. Come over to my truck, baby, I've got something here for you. I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passing by. I'm your ice cream man, stop me when I'm passing by. The way you're looking to me, I've just got to catch your eye."




 




I Don't Wanna Grow Up

 



Well, when I'm lyin' in my bed at night, I don't wanna grow up

Nothin' ever seems to turn out right, I don't wanna grow up

How do you move in a world of fog, that's always changing things

Makes me wish that I could be a dog



Well, when I see the price that you pay, I don't wanna grow up

I don't ever wanna be that way, I don't wanna grow up

Seems like folks turn into things that they'd never want

The only thing to live for is today



I'm gonna put a hole in my TV set, I don't wanna grow up

Open up the medicine chest, and I don't wanna grow up

I don't wanna have to shout it out

I don't want my hair to fall out

I don't wanna be filled with doubt

I don't wanna be a good boy scout

I don't wanna have to learn to count

I don't wanna have the biggest amount

And I don't wanna grow up



Well, when I see my parents fight, I don't wanna grow up

They all go out and drinking all night, and I don't wanna grow up

I'd rather stay here in my room, nothin' out there but sad and gloom

I don't wanna live in a big old tomb on Grand Street, ooh!



When I see the 5 o'clock news, I don't wanna grow up

Comb their hair and shine their shoes, I don't wanna grow up

Stay around in my old hometown

I don't wanna put no money down

I don't wanna get me a big old loan

Work them fingers to the bone

I don't wanna float a broom

Fall in love and get married, then boom

How the hell did we get here so soon

Well, I don't wanna grow up



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992-1998

Official release: "Bone Machine", Island Records Inc., 1992 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Gente Comune (Non voglio crescere pi�). Fiorella Mannoia. October 20, 1994. Harpo/ Sony Music (Italy).

Adios Amigos. Ramones, 1995. RadioActive Records

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Greatest Hits Live. Ramones. 1996. RadioActive Records

Humppamaratooni. El�kel�iset. 1997 (Humppapotilas). Self-released (Finland)

Non Voglio Crescere Pi�. Luigi Schiavone. 1997. Merak Music promo for "Luigi Schiavone III"

Luigi Schiavone III (Non voglio crescere pi�). Luigi Schiavone. 1997. Merak Music (Italy)

Hey! Ho! Let's Go: The Anthology. The Ramones. July 20, 1999. Rhino Records (same version as on "Adios Amigos", 1995)

2 Idiots & A Case Of Beer. Dark Humor. 2000. Dead Puppy Records

Best Of The Chrysalis Years. The Ramones. April 23, 2002. EMI Gold (same version as on "Adios Amigos", 1995)

Ramones Forever. Various artists. May 28, 2002. Radical Records (performed by Marky Ramone Group)

Wrecking Ball. The Pavers. May, 2002. Corrupted Image Records

The Chrysalis Years. The Ramones. August 26, 2002. Emi International (same version as on "Adios Amigos", 1995)

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

Casa. Etta Scollo. September, 2003. Mongebel/ Sony MON005

Tocando Ramones. Various artists. 2003. De La Fae (Argentina) (performed by Inconciencia)

Petra Haden & Bill Frisell. Petra Haden and Bill Frisell. October 21, 2003. True North Records/ Skip Records GmbH (re-released in 2005)

Liking You Liking Me. Grace Chung. 2005. Owlsong Productions

Petra Haden And Bill Frisell. Petra Haden and Bill Frisell. January 11, 2005. Sovereign Artists (same version as on True North Records/ Skip Records GmbH, 2003)

Polarity. Fragile. February 7, 2005. Blue/ Fun (ZYX)

Later. Nederlands Blazers Ensemble. February 21, 2005. VARA/ NBE (The Netherlands)

Weird Tales Of The Ramones (box set). The Ramones. August 9, 2005. Rhino/ Wea (dvd disc # 4)

Old nr. 2. Eddie Spaghetti (Supersuckers). October 18, 2005. Mid-Fir Records

Get In The Van. Outl4w. July 10, 2006. Inl4w Wreckords

Benefit At The District. Cold War Kids. October, 2006. Self-released

Pretty Mess. Maren Coleman. October 11, 2006. Self-released (USA)

Life In A Bottle. Crash Justice. November 19, 2006. Golly Gee Records

El Cos T'ho Demana (No Em Vull Fer Gran). Pell de Serp. July 3, 2007. Self-released

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)

Trouble In Mind. Hayes Carll. April 8, 2008. Self-released

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records 

Street Corner Style. The Earth Angels. March 22, 2010. Rare Rockin’ Records (Spain)



<object height="299" width="400"><embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscxxxriptaccess="always" height="299" src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=10626238&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=747575&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="400"></embed></object> 

Music video promoting "I Don't Wanna Grow Up" (Island/ Sony, 1992)

Director: Dayton, Jonathan/ Faris, Valerie. Shot by Jim Jarmusch. 

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) I Don't Wanna Grow Up:

Rip Rense (1992): "I Don't Wanna Grow Up." This, I assume, was inspired by your kids.Tom Waits"Hey, they don't want to grow up, but hey, I don't either, you know? Jesus. How the hell did it get here so soon? That's a cold shot. I was going to throw (the song) out. I wasn't going to record it, but Kathleen said, oh no, you've got to finish that. I said no, that's cornball. Then in the studio it took on another life, because we put it through a Marshall and turned it up real loud, and then it felt better. It's like you could hear it at a carnival. Little county fair Buddy Holly kind of thing going on there. It's fast. The best ones come fast. They come out of the ground like a potato." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992) 

Tom Waits (1992): "Everybody wants to grow up until they grow up. You ever been to a party and you look around and everybody around you is real grown up and you feel like - Oh, Jesus. This happened real fast, a real fast song. Kathleen said, "Oh, that's a great one." I sad, "Gee, this is a lame song. This was written too fast. This is the kind of song you write in the car." But sometimes those are the best ones. My theory is the best songs have never really been recorded so we're all listening to like used music. We're listening to things that made it through but there's so many songs that have never made it cause they were scared of the machine and wouldn't allow themselves to be recorded. The trick is to get it in there and not bruise the gin. Don't hurt the song when you record it. This happened real fast. We only did it a couple of times and we just slammed it. We said, well, we better not do this again cause it'd just sound stupid. This was the version that we did and there was only one of them. We said okay, that'll do, you can go, you can come on the trip. I haven't played that song live. That's a good one to have. It's a sing along, it's like a hootenanny." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic" Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992 (?))



If I Have To Go

 



And if I have to go, will you remember me?

Will you find someone else, while I'm away?

There's nothing for me, in this world full of strangers

It's all someone else's idea

I don't belong here, and you can't go with me

You'll only slow me down



Until I send for you, don't wear your hair that way

If you cannot be true, I'll understand

Tell all the others, you'll hold in your arms

that I said I'd come back for you

I'll leave my jacket to keep you warm

That's all that I can do



And if I have to go, will you remember me?

Will you find someone else, while I'm away?



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986/ 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Originally from the theatre play "Franks Wild Years", 1986(1)



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Mary Black - 25 Years/ 25 Songs. Mary Black. March 14, 2008. 3ú Records (Ireland)



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Listen to audio excerpt of If I Have To Go as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape.



Notes:



(1) This song is originally from the theatre play Frank's Wild Years, 1986. Sung in act 2, by Frank (Tom Waits) as he is on a park bench in a snowstorm in East St Louis, dreaming about dancing with Willa. Further reading: Frank's Wild Years




 




I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know

 



(Live version, 1999. Also known as: Memories Of What)



You think you've found in heaven a bliss

With each caress from her fingertips

But I forgot more than you'll ever know about her



You think you know the smile on her lips

The thrill and the touch from her fingertips

But I forgot more than you'll ever know about her



You stole her from me one day

You didn't care how you hurt me

But you can never steal away

The memories of what used to be



You stole her from me one day

You didn't care how you hurt me

But you can never steal away

The memories of what used to be



You think she's yours to have and to hold

One day you'll find when the love grows cold

That I forgot more than you'll ever know about her

I forgot more than you'll ever know about her



Written by: Cecil Null, 1953. First recorded by The Davis Sisters, 1953

Unofficial release (Tom Waits version): Tales From The Underground Volume 4, 1999

With Elvis Costello and Lou Reed, Live at the Beverly Theatre, Los Angeles. October 4, 1986



Known covers:

N/A



Hope I Don't Fall In Love With You

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



Well, I hope that I don't fall in love with you

Cause falling in love just makes me blue(1)

Well, the music plays and you display your heart for me to see

I had a beer and now I hear you calling out for me

And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



Well, the room is crowded, there's people everywhere

And I wonder, should I offer you a chair

Well, if you sit down with this old clown, I'll take that frown and break it

Before the evening's gone away, I think that we can make it

And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



Well, I can see that you are lonesome just like me

And it being late, you'd like some company

Well now, I've had two, I look at you and you look back at me

The guy you're with he's up and split, the chair next to you's free

And I hope that you don't fall in love with me



And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



Well, the night does funny things inside a man

These old Tom-cat(2) feelings you don't understand

But I turn around to look at you, you light a cigarette

I wish I had the guts to bum one, but we've never met

And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



Now it's closing time, the music's fading out

Last call for drinks, I'll have another stout

I turn around to look at you, you're nowhere to be found

I search the place for your lost face, guess I'll have another round

And I think that I just fell in love with you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



I Hope That I Don't Fall In Love With You



(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



Well, I hope that I don't fall in love with you

Cause falling in love just makes me blue(1)

Well, the music plays and you display your heart for me to see

I had a beer and now I hear you calling out for me

And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



Well, the room is crowded, people everywhere

And I wonder, should I offer you a chair?

Well, if you sit down with this old clown, take that frown and break it

Before the evening's gone away, I think that we can make it

And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



Well, the night does funny things inside a man

These old Tom-cat(2) feelings you don't understand

Well, I turn around to look at you, you light a cigarette

I wish I had the guts to bum one, but we've never met

And I hope that I don't fall in love with you



I can see that you are lonesome just like me

And it being late, you'd like some company

Well, I turn around to look at you, and you look back at me

The guy you're with he's up and split, the chair next to you's free

And I hope that you don't fall in love with me



Now it's closing time, the music's fading out

Last call for drinks, I'll have another stout

Well, I turn around to look at you, you're nowhere to be found

I search the place for your lost face, guess I'll have another round

And I think that I just fell in love with you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1973

Official release: "Closing Time", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984



Known covers:

Forgotten Dreams. Priscilla Herdman. 1980/ 1993. Flying Fish FF 70230 (CD) FF 90230 (Cassette, re-released in 1993 on CD by Flying Fish)

Merman. Emiliana Torrini. 1996. Japis - ETJÓ 002 (Iceland)

Sinds De Dag. Frank Boeijen. 1999. Columbia 666741.1/ (single B-side "Val Voor Jou")

Scattered, Smothered And Covered. Hootie & The Blowfish, 2000. Atlantic Records

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Verliab di ned")

Swimming. Laurel Brauns. 2001. Self-released

The Disaster at Rays Luau. The Putrid Flowers. 2001. Self-released.

Going Home. Lisa Bassenge Trio. March 5, 2001. Minor Musi (in-akustik)

Meant To Be. Jenna Mammina. September 4, 2001. Mamma Grace Records

I Hope That I Don't Fall In Love With You. Juliet Turner. November, 2001. East West Records (Ireland). Promo CD-single, same version as on "Burn The Black Suit"

Burn the Black Suit. Juliet Turner. November, 2001. East West Records (Ireland)

Für Herzen Keine Haftung. Dirty Fingers. 2002. Magic Sound

Real Thing, Rodney Hayden. January 22, 2002. Rosetta Records

Irish Charmer. Joe Giltrap. November, 2002. Newsound 2000

Campfire Songs. Natalie Merchant & 10,000 Maniacs. January 27, 2004. Elektra/ WEA

The Prince & Me - Soundtrack. Various artists. March, 2004. Hollywood Records (performed by Marc Cohn)

Oh My Love. Sophia. April, 2004. Labels UK/ City Slang

Carnival Girls. David Roe and The Rubes. 2005. Self-released

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: The Caseworker

Clone Version 0.1. Various Artists. October, 2005. Familiar/ PMP Belgium (performed by Wim de Ridder) 

Ghost In Me. Sam Lapides. May, 2006. PMF Records

Road To Lisdoonvarna. Whistling To The Bird. January 17, 2007. Self-released

Aus Sun und aus Regn. Willi Resetarits & StubnBlues. April 21, 2007. Sattele Records (Austria)

On Your Sleeve. Jesse Malin. April 7, 2008. One Little Indian Records

La La Lost. Arrica Rose. April 10, 2008. Poprock Records



Notes:



(1) Blue:adj. 1. [late 18C-19C] confused, terrified, disappointed. [late 18C+] miserable, depressed (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(2) Tomcat, Tom cat:

- v.i., v.t.: Orig., to dress up in one's best clothes, as a dude or sport, and walk the street, visit public bars, nightclubs, and the like in search of a female; to seek a female, esp. a promiscuous one; esp., to dress in one's best clothes, visit a girl or young woman, and mix boasting and sweet talk in an attempt to persuade her to enter into sexual activity. n. A woman chaser (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- The male cat.(Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd). 

- Also mentioned in "Rosie" (And a lazy old tomcat on a midnight spree And all that you left me was a melody)



I'll Be Gone

 



Tonight I'll shave the mountain

I'll cut the hearts from pharaohs

I pull the road off of the rise

Tear the memories from my eyes

And in the morning I'll be gone



I drink a thousand shipwrecks

Tonight I'll steal your paychecks

I paint the sheets across my bed

The birds will all fly from my head

And in the morning I'll be gone



Take every dream that's breathing

Find every boot that's leaving

Shoot all the lights in the cafe

And in the morning I'll be gone



I bet a thousand dollars

I have a French companion

I tie myself below the deck

I pull the rope around my neck

And in the morning I'll be gone



It takes a life to win her

There is a drum of bourbon

Eight hundred pounds of nitro

His boots are thunder as he plays



There is a stone inside it

Tonight his bones will ride it

I'll need a tent to hide it

and in the morning I'll be gone

and in the morning I'll be gone

and in the morning I'll be gone

and in the morning I'll be gone

and in the morning I'll be gone

and in the morning I'll be gone



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play



Known covers:

Spiewomalowanie. Mariusz Lubomski. 1994. Self-released. In Polish "Nie bedzie mnie"

Songs Of Tom Waits. Dolphin Blue. 1995. Self-released demo (Germany)

Sad Eyes. Vera Coomans & Philip Hoessen. 1996. Dureco (The Netherlands)

Lubomski W Trojce. Mariusz Lubomski. July 18, 2000. EMI Records

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Tales of Misbehaviour. Katya Gorrie. September, 2006. Self-released (Canada), re-released in 2007

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1987): "Kind of a Tarus Bulba number. Almost like a tarantella. A Russian dance. The guy is speaking further of his departure --- "in the morning, I'll be gone." The images . . . nitroglycerin, the pounding of hooves, wom en in the tent. Tomorrow we ride. It's an adventure number. Halloween music . . . from Torrance. Ritual music. Part of a pagan ritual we still observe in the Los Angeles area." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)




 




I'll Shoot The Moon

 



I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll be the pennies on your eyes

For you baby

I want to take you out to the fair

Here is a red rose ribbon for your hair

I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



A vulture circles over your head

For you baby

I'll be the flowers after you're dead

For you baby

I want to build a nest in your hair

I want to kiss you and never be there

And I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



You know I love you, baby

So why don't you call me?

You know my number

392-7704

Call any time



I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll be the flowers after you're dead

For you baby

I want to build a nest in your hair

I want to kiss you and never be there

I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

From Memorial Crossing, Pinkie MacLure. June, 2000. Ghost Train/ Liqo30cdl (UK)

Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling. June 14, 2004. Buschfunk (Germany)

Exotic Bird. Jessie Kilguss. August 2, 2007. Self-released

Hairy Cornflake. Clinker. February 15, 2008. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Sung in scene 9 by K�tchen as she sits on the bed.

Mark Richard (1994): "A telephone rings in a nearby office just as Waits finishes dubbing the vocal for "I'll Shoot the Moon", singing through cupped hands. Dawes cringes when the phone rings again, it's audible in the mix. "Leave it in, leave it in," says Waits. "The songs says 'Call me!'" (Source: The Music Of Chance" Spin magazine (USA), by Mark Richard. Date: June, 1994)



I'll Take New York

 



I'll tip the newsboy, I'll get a shine

I'll ride that dream to the end of the line

I'm gonna be goin' places, I'll get a ride

Take me to the Riverside



I'm gonna take you, New York, I'll make it happen

I'm on the caboose, I'm drinkin' Manhattan(2)

I'll take a splash on the big town

That's how I will arrive

Have you got two tens for a five?



You gotta roll out the carpet, strike up the band

Break out the best champagne when I land

You gotta beat the parade drum, hit all the bars

I want the moon and stars



I'm gonna take you, New York, I'll make it happen

I'm on the caboose, I'm drinkin' Manhattans

And I know someday they're going to name a street after me

Right next door to old Franklin D.(3)



I'm gonna take you, big town

Come on, New York

Come on, move over big town

I'll take New York

Come on, big town

Come on, get happy

New York

Come on



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play

Also included in Big Time the movie (1988). Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of I'll Take New York as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape.



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "I'll Take New York" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Warfield Theatre. San Francisco/ USA November 5, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) I'll Take New York

- Rip Rense 
(1987): I heard you were worried this one might scare people. TW: "Yeah. Frightened me a little bit, especially toward the end when the ground starts to move a little bit. We just rifted on that in the studio. I described the mood of it, and everyone seemed to understand it an we got it. I think it's the closest thing on the record to a nightmare. Guy standing in Times Square with tuberculosis and no money; his last post card to New York. It's deranged. I wanted it to be Frank's nightmare experience of New York." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)

Tom Waits (1987): "...But this record goes into a lot of different musical worlds. "I'll Take New York" was a nightmare Jerry Lewis going down on the Titanic." (Source: "Tom Waits is flying upside down (on purpose)". Musician, Mark Rowland October, 1987)

Tom Waits (1987): "I'm getting to the point where I can take chances, I think. It's hard when you're a producer, and you're writing and performing. It requires, well, you have to shift a lot of gears. You need somebody you can trust standing on the outside to kind of push you into the water... Just in the sound world; creating a particular sound world or environment. Taking it song by song. Like 'I'll Take New York,' it was kind of a uh...Jerry Lewis going down on the Titanic. Little dramas. On this album I tried to take each song individually and create its own world for itself." (Source: "From The Set Of Ironweed" New York Post (USA), by Rip Rense/ Franks Wild Years tourbook, 1987. Edited version reprinted in Franks Wild Years tourbook/ press kit, 1987)

Tom Waits (1988): "Well, it's another song about New York. Those others try to make it bigger or prettier, but in this case I was trying to make it more like something from the Jerry Lewis Telethon - something the song and the singer are cancelling out as it's happening. You're singing "I'll Take New York" and someone's stealing your billfold. It's like the guy singing in the middle of Times Square, with his pants around his knees." (Source: "A Flea In His Ear" City Limits magazine (UK), by Bill Holdship. Date: Traveler's Cafe/ Los Angeles. May 12-19 , 1988)

Tom Waits (1988): "Yeah, that happened in Chicago when we recorded the Frank's Wild Years album. On "I'll Take New York" they approached the whole recording like a Strasberg kind of thing [laughs] I said. "let's go with Jerry Lewis on the deck of the Titanic, going down, trying to sing 'Swanee'" I sang the song right into a Harmon trumpet mute and just explained that I wanted the whole thing to gradually melt in the end." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)



(2) Manhattan

- A cocktail based on Canadian whisky (Canadian whisky, red Vermouth, Angostura).

- Also mentioned in I Never Talk To Strangers: "Bartender, I'd like a Manhattan please."





(3) Franklin D.: Franklin Street, New York City. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Born: Hyde Park, NY, 1882 - Died: Warm Springs, Georgia, 1945. American politician and distant cousin of Theodore Roosevelt. Was elected 32nd President of the US of A and was re-elected in 1936, 1940 and 1944



I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby

 



I'm walking on air

Oh, I've left all my blue days behind me

Oh baby, I've learned how to care

And there's real love on my mind

I'm the world's most happy creature

Tell me, what can worry me?

I'm crazy 'bout my baby and my baby's crazy 'bout me, yeah



Oh, Mister Cupid was my teacher

Oh, the reason we agree

I'm crazy 'bout my baby and my baby's crazy 'bout me, yeah

Oh, Parson, get that book out, get that book out

Hold it steady, steady in your hand

Understand, an A-one combination, the perfect he and she

I'm crazy 'bout my baby and my baby's so crazy 'bout me



Oh, Parson, get that book out

Hold it steady in your hand

Look out, you can understand

It's an A-one combination, the perfect he and she

Oh, I'm crazy 'bout my baby and my baby's crazy 'bout me, yeah



Written by: Thomas "Fats" Waller and Alex Hill(1)

Original recording by Fats Waller with Ted Lewis and his Band 1931 (Edwin H. Morris & Co.)

Official release: the film American Heart, 1992. No soundtrack album available

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1992

Also released on: "Lie To Me/ Crazy About My Baby", 2006 (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc. �2006. 45 rpm advance promo for Orphans (2-track)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of I'm Crazy 'bout My Baby.

From the movie "American Heart" (1992).

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1992.



Notes:



(1) I'm Crazy 'Bout My baby

Jim Jarmusch (1993): You did a cover of a Fats Waller song for another film. TW: 'American Heart'. JJ: Directed by the guy who did 'Streetwise', Martin Bell. What's the Fats Waller song? TW: "Crazy About My Baby". Then we wrote a closing song for the film, also, called "I'll Never Let Go of Your Hand". (Source: Straight No Chaser [Spring 1993]. Interview by Jim Jarmusch)



Original version: I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby. Thomas Waller/ Alex Hill. Original recording by Fats Waller with Ted Lewis and his Band, 1931. Transcribed from Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, recorded March 9, 1931: "I'm the world's most happy creature, Tell me, what can worry me? I'm crazy 'bout my baby, And my baby's crazy 'bout me! Mr. Cupid was our teacher, That's the reason we agree, I'm crazy 'bout my baby, And my baby's crazy 'bout me! Parson, get your book out, Get it ready in your hand, Keep a steady look-out; 'Cause I know you understand. We're an A-one combination, The perfect he and she, I'm crazy 'bout my baby, And my baby's crazy 'bout me!"



I'm Not Your Fool Anymore

 



I'm not your fool

I'm not your fool

I'm not your fool

Not anymore



There was times when you were good to me

Now you can go, go, go

Never come back no more

It's all over It's all over



I'm not your fool

Not anymore

I'm not your fool

Not anymore



I tried, you know

I tried I tried so hard

I tried so hard

I tried so hard to satisfy you



I came runnin' at your every beck and call

And there were times you wouldn't even call at all

It's all over It's all over



I'm not your fool

Not anymore

No, not anymore

No



I don't need you

I don't need you

I don't need you

Not anymore



I used to lie awake at night

Cryin' the whole night through

But now I've found somebody new

To take the place of you

It's all over

It's all over



I'm not your fool

I'm not your fool

I'm not your fool

Not anymore



I'm not your fool

I'm not your fool

I'm not your fool

Not anymore

Not anymore

Not anymore

I'm not your fool



Written by: Teddy Edwards

Published by: De Luxe Music Publ., � 1991

Official release: "Teddy Edwards - Mississippi Lad", Gitanes Jazz Productions (Polygram), 1991

Tom Waits vocals



Known covers:

N/A



I'm Still Here

 



You haven't looked at me that way in years

You dreamed me up and left me here

How long was I dreaming for

What was it you wanted me for



You haven't looked at me that way in years

Your watch has stopped and the pond is clear

Someone turn the lights back off

I'll love you til all time is gone(2)



You haven't looked at me that way in years

But I'm still here.



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

Whatever Makes You Happy (limited edition extra disc). Jeff Lang. 2004. ABC Music

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany) 

Broken Shadows. Chad Eby. February 9, 2010. Cellar Live Records



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "I'm Still Here"

at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December, 1992.

Taken from The Late Show "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice"

BBC TV documentary presented by Beatrix Campbell. Aired March 4, 1993



Notes:



(1) I'm Still Here:

- Sung by Alice at the end of the play (alternate version): Scene 14 "The Trial II". Directions from the play: ALICE Thank you. LEWIS CARROLL What for? ALICE Now that the story is over, I think perhaps I can grow again. LEWIS CARROLL Oh, but of course, the story isn't over yet. ALICE It isn't?!? LEWIS CARROLL No, first you must solve the riddle. You must tell me what Jabberwocky means. Alice whispers in his ear. He smiles She whispers again. He continues to smile She whispers again. His face falls. He leaves. She smiles and starts to leave. We suddenly see her as an old woman. ALICE I went to a circus when I was a little girl and I saw two old ladies who were joined at the hip and I asked them how they got along, and the dark haired one told me they hadn't spoken a word to each other in thirty years "but we still get together over the holidays". And Dodgson told me once when I was a very young girl on one of three long summer afternoons that he had vanished into a dream and was still inside of it and that I was in it too, for I live inside his dream. He had fallen on the ice that time and broke his watch and he said he would never get it fixed and that neither of us are real and anything can happen and we will only wake up when we die. And he gave me a song in that dream and I haven't sung this in years and now I get up everyday and put on the face I face the world with... Sings:"You haven't looked at me that way in years You dreamed me up and left me here How long was I dreaming for What was it you wanted me for You haven't looked at me that way in years Your watch has stopped and the pond is clear Someone turn the lights back off I'll love you till the wheels come off I remember you with leaves in your hair But I'm still here..."

Tom Waits (2002): "The story is eh... I guess it was Oxford University had a celebration. And they wanted Alice, the Alice of "Alice in Wonderland", they wanted her to come and speak in front of the class. Cause by then she was in her eighties. So she came all the way from, wherever she came from, and it was a long journey, and she got up on stage and she walked up to the microphone. You know eh, and banged on the microphone and said a few words to the class. And this was kind of a hypothetical song that we created to cover a situation like that. That you might imagine one would be singing or thinking about. It's just kind of an odd situation to imagine a story with a little girl who is like 9 years old, and then to see her as a grown woman walking out. "(Source: "Anti Electronic Press Kit":Anti Records promo interview as distributed through the Anti website June 13, 2002)

- Alice Liddell-Hargreaves was invited in 1932 to visit the US to receive an honorary degree from Columbia University in New York. The visit aroused intense press interest, which continued after her return to England. This event was the central theme for the excellent movie "Dreamchild" released in 1985.





(2) I'll love you til all time is gone:

- Alternative line (Alice theatre play) is: "I'll love you till the wheels come off I remember you with leaves in your hair But I'm still here." Later also mentioned in Picture In A Frame from Mule Variations (1999).

Tom Waits (1999): "I'm gonna love you 'till the wheels come off. That's prison slang. Means until the end of the world." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/ July, 1999)



I'm Your Late Night Evening Prostitute

 



Well, I got here at eight and I'll be here 'til two

I'll try my best to entertain you and

Please don't mind me if I get a bit crude

I'm your late night evening prostitute



So drink your Martini and stare at the moon

Don't mind me, I'll continue to croon and

Don't mind me if I get a bit lewd

I'm your late night evening prostitute



And dance, have a good time I'll continue to shine

Yes, dance, have a good time

Don't mind me if I slip upon a rhyme



And I got here at eight and I'll be here 'til two

I'll try my best to entertain you and

Please don't mind me if I get a bit crude

I'm your late night evening prostitute

I'm your late night evening prostitute



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

None




 



Part of the



In A Suit Of Your Dreams

 



Come on down to Zookie's 

Join our Zookie's team 

So come on down to Zookie's 

You're in a suit of your dreams 

You're in a suit of your dreams



So come on down to Zookie's 

And join our Zookie's team 

Come on down to Zookie's 

You're in a suit of your dreams



Of your dreams 

You're in a suit of your dreams 

Of your dreams 

You're in a suit of your dreams



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: no official release (Frank's Wild Years theatre play, 1986) 

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of In A Suit Of Your Dreams as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



Notes:



(1) In A Suit Of Your Dreams: wordplaying on "Innocent When You Dream" which was the theme song of the theatre play Frank's Wild Years (1986) 



In Between Love

 



In between love, trying to scheme love

Who can tell what we may find

Never thought love, that I'd get caught love

Between the magic in your eyes

Your love's like wind and it's so cool and breezy

Never thought that love could be so easy

In between love, trying to scheme love

In between love again



In between love, trying to scheme love

Who can tell what we may find

All this time love, my eyes are blind love

To the feelings in my mind

Your love's like wind, and it's so cool and breezy

Never thought that love could be so easy

In between love, trying to scheme love In between love again



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

Liebeskl�nge - Chansons d'Amour. Christoph Nahrholdt. 2004. Self-released (Germany)

Chris Harris. Chris Harris. September 28, 2004. Self-released

I Think It's Going to Rain Today. Curtis Stigers. April 19, 2005. Concord Records



I Never Talk To Strangers

 



[Bartender, I'd like a Manhattan please](1)



Stop me if you've heard this one

But I feel as though we've met before

Perhaps I am mistaken

But it's just that I remind you of

Someone you used to care about

Oh, but that was long ago

Now tell me, do you really think I'd fall for that old line

I was not born just yesterday(2)

Besides I never talk to strangers anyway



Hell, I ain't a bad guy when you get to know me

I just thought there ain't no harm

Hey, yeah, just try minding your own business, bud

Who asked you to annoy me

With your sad, sad repartee

Besides I never talk to strangers anyway



Your life's a dimestore novel

This town is full of guys like you

And you're looking for someone to take the place of her

You must be reading my mail

And you're bitter cause he left you

That's why you're drinkin' in this bar

Well, only suckers fall in love with perfect strangers



It always takes one to know one stranger

Maybe we're just wiser now

Yeah, and been around that block so many times

That we don't notice

That we're all just perfect strangers

As long as we ignore

That we all begin as strangers

Just before we find

We really aren't strangers anymore



[Aw, you don't look like such a chump]

[Aw, hey baby]



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1977 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986(4)

Official release: "Foreign Affairs", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1977 &

"Bounced Checks", WEA/ Asylum Records, 1981 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986

Tom Waits: vocals and piano. Bette Midler: vocals(3)

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

Broken Blossom. Bette Midler, 1977/ 1995. Atlantic (same cut as on "Foreign Affairs")

Live 1989-1993. The Piano Has Been Drinking (Gerd K�ster). November 15, 1993. Chlodwig/ BMG Germany (Met Fremde kein Verdr��ch)

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003.Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Perfect Strangers. Margaret Wakeley. May, 2004. Self-released

Oh Marie! (7" version). Ladyfuzz. July 13, 2006.: WEA

Levenslijn. Various artists. August 29, 2006. Universal Music Belgium (performed by Wendy Van Wanten & Roland)



Notes:



(1) Manhattan

- A cocktail based on Canadian whisky (Canadian whisky, red Vermouth, Angostura).

- Also mentioned in "I'll Take New York", 1986/ 1987: "I'm on the caboose, I'm drinkin' Manhattan"





(2) I was not born just yesterdayphr. [late 19C+] aware, sophisticated, 'on the ball'(Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(3) Bette Midler:

- Barney Hoskyns (2009): “Inevitably these veterans of heartbreak overcame their cynicism as they got to the first base of flirtation. "Bette was in the middle of making Broken Blossom," [Bones] Howe recalls. "But she came to the studio and we put two mics at the piano and she went out and sat next to Tom on the piano bench and we probably did six takes before we got it." The song was slightly below Midler's range, forcing her to sing more conversationally. "When you write for a duet," says Bob Alcivar, "you've got to kind of psych out the two singers and decide what the key's going to be. In this case it was Tom's key, so Bette had to kind of fake it and go up and down and change the registers.” Vocal jazz connoisseurs would surely have something to say about Midler as canary, but her turn here as a kind of white Betty Carter worked because of its imperfection. "She drove me crazy for three months," says Howe. "She kept saying, 'I was sharp on that note, I was flat on that one,' I said, 'It doesn't get any better than that, it could be a stage performance."' (Source: “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)

Larry Goldstein (1978) : "One of the few people with whom he can work is Bette (as in Midler.) "I met her, now let me see, a couple of years ago at the bottom Line (a nightclub) in New York," he said, "and we got along famously. I admire her a great deal. And you know...I'll kick anybody's ass who knocks her. I wrote a couple of tunes for her." ("Shiver Me Timbers" among them.) The two stayed close friends and then one day Bette dropped by the studio during the recording of Foreign Affairs just to say hello. The topic of duets arose, and she asked Waits to try and write one for them. So Tom went home and went to work and came back the next day with a brand new song, to be recorded that day, I Never Talk To Strangers, which has become the most popular song on the album. When I asked him about the possibility of more collaboration between the two, Waits was intentionally vague and mysterious. "We might work something out," he said. (Source: "Nighthawks at the Chelsea", Modern Hi-Fi and Musics SOUND TRAX: Larry Goldstein. October, 1978)



(4) One From The Heart

- In 1980 this song prompted Francis Ford Coppola to contact Waits on working together on the soundtrack for One From The Heart.

Tom Waits (1981): "When I was in New York back in April of 1980, Francis was there auditioning people he wanted to be involved with the film. Somebody had sent him my records and Francis liked the song "I Never Talk to Strangers," a duet I'd done with Bette Midler [on Waits' Foreign Affairs LP released in '77]. He liked the relationship between the singers, a conversation between a guy and a girl in a bar. That was the impetus for him contacting me and asking me if I was interested in writing music for his film." (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



Innocent When You Dream

Innocent When You Dream (78)



 



The bats are in the belfry(2)

The dew is on the moor

Where are the arms that held me

And pledged her love before

And pledged her love before



It's such a sad old feeling

The hills are soft and green

It's memories that I'm stealing(3)

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream



I made a golden promise

That we would never part

I gave my love a locket

And then I broke her heart

And then I broke her heart



And it's such a sad old feeling

The fields are soft and green

It's memories that I'm stealing

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream

Innocent when you dream



Running through the graveyard

We laughed my friends and I

We swore we'd be together

Until the day we died

Until the day we died



And it's such a sad old feeling

The fields are soft and green

It's memories that I'm stealing

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream, when you dream



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987-1998

Official release: "Frank's Wild Years", Island Records Inc., 1987 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play





 



Innocent When You Dream (Barroom)



 



The bats are in the belfry(2)

The dew is on the moor

Where are the arms that held me

And pledged her love before

And pledged her love before



And it's such a sad old feeling

All the fields are soft and green

And it's memories that I'm stealing(3)

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream



I made a golden promise

That we would never part

I gave my love a locket

And then I broke her heart

And then I broke her heart



And it's such a sad old feeling

All of the fields are soft and green

And it's memories that I'm stealing

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream



We're running through the graveyard

And we laughed my friends and I

We swore we'd be together

Until the day we died

Until the day we died



And it's such a sad old feeling

All of the fields are soft and green

And it's memories that I'm stealing

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream



And it's such a sad old feeling

All of the fields are soft and green

And it's memories that I'm stealing

But you're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream, when you dream

You're innocent when you dream



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play

Also included in Big Time the movie (1988). Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Street Of Dreams. Nancy Harrow. April, 1988. Gazell Records (re-released November, 1995)

The Piano Has Been Drinking. The Piano Has been Drinking. April, 1990. Chlodwig/ BMG Germany (in German/ K�lsch)

This Town. Liberty Horses. 1992. Rough Trade Singles Club (7" single UK)

Shine. Liberty Horses. November 17, 1992. Capitol (CD single)

No Brains No Tumors. 2227. 1995. Strip Core/ Forum (Slovenia)

Innocent When You Dream. Lisa Moscatiello. 1996 (November 30, 2004). Folk Era Records

Café Knax. Susanne Grütz & Hubertus Schmidt. September 7, 1998. iMusician Digital/ Finetunes

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Ballad Collection Special Edition. Lana Lane. November, 2000. Think Tank Media

Being Tom Waits. Billy`s Band. 2001. Self-released demo album (Russia)

A Little Yearning. Camille O'Sullivan. 2002/ 2003. cat-o-stripes records (duet with Jack L.)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Crossing Jordan (NBC television series soundtrack). Various artists. April, 2003. DMZ (Columbia Records/ Sony). Performed by Jill Hennessy

Kojak Variety. Elvis Costello. August, 2004. Rhino Records (recorded in 1990)

Live At Schubas. Great Lake Swimmers. 2005. Schubas/ eMusicLive

Love Songs Revisited. Wine. April 2005. Silberblick-Musik (Germany)

Songs. Spiers & Boden. October 17, 2005. Fellside Recordings

Innocent When You Dream. Mark Erelli. December 12, 2006. Signature Sounds

Just Before Sunrise. Nathan Gunn. August 7, 2007. Sony Classical/ BMG

Two, Kathryn Williams & Neill MacColl. March 3, 2008. Caw Records

The EP. The Sants Fe All Stars. January 12, 2008. Frogville Records 

Innocent When You Dream. Brandon Bernstein. February 26, 2010. Jazz Collective Records



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Listen to audio excerpt of Innocent When You Dream as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Innocent When You Dream" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Not recorded before a live audience.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) Innocent When You Dream

- Tom Waits 
(1987): "That's the song that got him [Frank] started; that he went out on the road with, and this is a reprise. The 78 quality is to give it an epilogue feel." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense" . New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)

Tom Waits (1987): "The '78 version' of that was originally recorded at home on a little cassette player ["the Tascam 244, the one with the clamshell holster"]. I sang into a seven-dollar microphone and saved the tape. Then I transferred that to 24-track and overdubbed Larry Taylor on upright, and then we mastered that. Texture is real important to me; it's like attaining grain or putting it a little out of focus. I don't like cleanliness. I like surface noise. It kind of becomes the glue of what you're doing sometimes."(Source: "Better Waits Than Ever" Music & Sound Output (Canada/ USA), by Bill Forman. Vol. 7, No. 11. October, 1987)

Tom Waits (1988): 'Well, it's [Franks Wild Years the play] a story about a guy who went out to be an entertainer, left a small town, went to Vegas, had this song 'Innocent When You Dream'. And a year later, he had taken the same song and turned it into "You're In A Suit Of Your Dreams" to advertise suits in an all-night clothing store. And that is the type of thing that happens."(Source: "A Flea In His Ear" City Limits magazine (UK), by Bill Holdship. Date: Traveler's Cafe/ Los Angeles. May 12-19 , 1988)



(2) Bats in the belfry/ bats on one's belfry, have:The Dictionary Of American Slang has this as "bats ON one's belfry". Other sources claim the original expression to be "bats IN the belfry". 1. Have bats on one's belfry: To be crazy, very eccentric, or odd (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). 2. Have bats in the belfry, to phr. [late 19C+] to be eccentric, to act crazily [the image is of infestation of the brain] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(3) Rip Rense (1987): I wanted to ask you about one line from "Innocent When You Dream." I think the line goes "It's memories that I'm stealing. What did you mean by that? Tom Waits: "I don't know, really. God, I don't know. . . You caught me. Let's see. ..."Running through the graveyard/ we laughed my friends and I/ we swore we'd be together/until the day we died/ it's such a sad old feeling/ the fields are soft and green/ it's memories that I'm stealing/ but you're innocent when you dream." Hmmm. It's like a kids' song, you know? I'm starting to find that songs find their own logic. And when we listen to them, we don't push them in a logical fashion. We let them go in some other place. They have their own kind of Joseph Cornell collection of images. So sometimes a lyric comes to me, I try to deliberately find things that don't particularly have a meaning at the moment. Then I write 'em down, then I think about 'em. Then I understand 'em." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense." New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)



In The Colosseum

 



The women all control their men with razors and with wrists

And the princess squeezes grape juice on a torrid bloody kiss

What will you be wearing there, the lion or the raven hair?

The flesh will all be tearing, but the tail will be my own



In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight



This one's for the balcony, and this one's for the floor

As the senators decapitate the presidential whore

The bald headed(2) senators are splashing in the blood

The dogs are having someone who is screaming in the mud(3)



In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight



Now it's raining and it's pouring on the pillaging and goring

The constable is swinging from the chains

For the dead there is no story, no memory, no blame

Their families shout blue murder(4) but tomorrow it's the same



In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum

We call 'em as we see 'em In the colosseum tonight



A slowly acting poison will be given to the favorite one

The dark horse(5) will bring glory to the jailer and his men

It's always much more sporting when there's families in the pit

And the madness of the crowd is an epileptic fit



In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum

They call 'em as they see 'em In the colosseum tonight



No justice here, no liberty, no reason and no blame

There's no cause to taint the sweetest taste of blood

And greetings from the nation as we shake the hands of time

They're taking their ovation, the vultures stay behind



In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum In the colosseum In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum tonight

In the colosseum tonight



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music Inc. (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992



Known covers:

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)



Notes:



(1) In The Colosseum:

Rip Rense (1992): "In The Colosseum." Now this seems to be a first for you. It's what you might call an issue-oriented song. Seems to concern itself with the horror of human governing habits in so-called civilization.Tom Waits: (laughing) "It's a little cynical. Yeah, I like the lines in it. You can sing them with conviction and you know what it's about. I'm just tired of playing clubs, and I want to work the bigger rooms. So if I make a song called 'In The Colosseum,' maybe it'll get me into the bigger rooms. No, I just kind of imagine this modem 'Caligula' that government has become, and that we're all kind of marooned in this place where information and ideas become very abstract, but yet the hyena is still tearing at the flesh." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)



(2) Bald headed: 1. adj. [late 19C+] (US Black) bare, hairless, shining white. 2. adj. [late 19C+] (US Black) deliberately deceptive, underhand, e.g. a bald-headed lie [one who makes no effort to mask their bald head]. 3. adj. [late 19C+] (US Black) stupid, foolish. [such a person has nothing 'on top'](Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(3) Mud, in the: Of poorest quality; nearly unintelligible; said of a telegrapher's keying technique. Radio amateur use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Blue murder, to shout: 1. n. [mid-19C] cries of terror, horror, alarm; usu. in phr. cry blue murder/ scream blue murder (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000) 2. Indicative more of terror or alarm than of real danger. It appears to be a play on the French exclamation morbleu; there may also be a distinct allusion to the common phrase "blue ruin." (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(5) Dark horse n.: 1. A racing term for a horse of good pretensions, but of which nothing is positively known by the general public. Its merits are kept dark from betters and book-makers. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 2. Specif., a surprise candidate for public office in an alection; one nominated without advance publicity (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)3. [mid 19C+] one of whom little is known esp. one's opponent in a competition. [racing jargon dark horse, a horse about whose form little is known] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



In The Morning

 



He'll wear your heart and you will wear his ring

and you'll go rolling down a mustard hill

Play a lullaby on a fishbone harp

ride away on the gray mare's tail



In the morning

In the morning

In the morning when I/you rise

In the morning

In the morning

In the morning I/you will be my/your true love's bride



Weave a rosemary wreath in your auburn hair

and you'll be the envy of all the girls

He'll wear your heart - and you will wear his ring

and you'll go rolling down a mustard hill

Play a lullaby on a fishbone harp

ride away on the gray mare's tail



In the morning

In the morning

In the morning when I/you rise

In the morning

In the morning

In the morning I/you will be my/your true love's bride



Oh the blood of the lamb(2) is in the well

and it runs from the crack along the wedding bell

Perhaps a wind has blown the barrel from its mark

I heard the bird but could not hit it in the dark

I have bought and sold my only love

and my rifle, it has let me down



In the morning

In the morning

In the morning when I/you rise

In the morning

In the morning

In the morning will I/she ever be his/my bride?



Written by: Tom Waits

Original Musical Arrangement by Greg Cohen and Tom Waits

Lyrics as published in "The Black Rider" program book. Barbican Theatre. London/ UK, 2004

No official release.

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Duet sung by Bridesmaid, K�tchen and Wilhelm (and entire cast)



(2) The blood of the lamb

- Also mentioned in "Down There By The Train" ("American Recordings", Johnny Cash, 1994/ Orphans, 2006): "There's a place I know, where the train goes slow Where the sinners can be washed in the blood of the lamb."

- "Through Moses, God told the Israelites to prepare a special meal to be eaten in haste the evening before their escape from Egypt, with a whole roasted lamb as the main dish. The blood from the lamb was to be used to mark the Israelites' houses. That night, God would send the angel of Death to kill the firstborn males of the Egyptians, but God would see the blood on the Israelites' houses, and he would command his angel to "pass over" - to kill no one there. God told Moses that the Israelites were to repeat the meal each spring on the anniversary of their departure from Egypt. The Jews keep the festival of Passover to this day." (Source: The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. 2002)

- "And one of the elders answered, saying unto me, What are these which are arrayed in white robes? and whence came they? And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me, These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. Therefore are they before the throne of God, and serve him day and night in his temple: and he that sitteth on the throne shall dwell among them. They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes." (Source: The Holy Bible: King James Version. 2000. The Revelation of St. John the Divine, 7)



In The Neighborhood

 



Well, the eggs chase the bacon round the fryin' pan

And the whinin' dog pidgeons by the steeple bell rope

And the dogs tipped the garbage pails over last night

And there's always construction work bothering you



In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood



Well, Friday's a funeral and Saturday's a bride

And Sey's got a pistol on the register side

And the goddam delivery trucks, they make too much noise

And we don't get our butter delivered no more



In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood



Well, Big Mambo's kickin' his old grey hound

And the kids can't get ice cream, cause the market burned down

And the newspaper sleeping bags blow down the lane

And that goddam flatbed's(3) got me pinned in(4) again



In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood



There's a couple Filipino girls gigglin' by the church

And the window is busted and the landlord ain't home

And Butch joined the army, yeah, that's where he's been

And the jackhammer's digging up the sidewalks again



In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood



In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood

In the neighborhood



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1983

Official release: Swordfishtrombones, Island Records Inc., 1983

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology 1983-2000" (Nuova Carisch s.r.l. Milan/ Italy, 2001)



Known covers:

Stamcaf�/ Een Lied Voor Jou. Willem Duyn. 1984. CNR (Holland) 142.074 (in Dutch: "Stamcaf�")

Viel Zu Sch�n, Manfred Maurenbrecher. 1984. CBS / LP (in German: "In der Nachbarschaft")

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "I ett hyreshus")

The Piano Has Been Drinking. The Piano Has been Drinking. April, 1990. Chlodwig/ BMG Germany (in German/ K�lsch)

Das Duo Live. Manfred Maurenbrecher and Richard Wester. 1990. Monopol / CD 35683 CH (in German: "In der Nachbarschaft")

Puoli Viisi Aamulla. Sir Elwoodin Hiljaiset V�rit. 1995. Self-released/ Finland ("Kaduilla Kallion")

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "Her i gata v�r")

I Gata V�r - Sven Henriksen Synger Tom Waits. Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet- PROMOWAITS 087 (Norwegian 1-track promo CD single for "R�d Pust", 1996)

Pflichtgef�hl Gegen Unbekannt, Manfred Maurenbrecher. 1997. Bellaphon / CD 290 05 056 (live version in German: "In der Nachbarschaft")

Negerzoen. Ton Engels. 1997. Self-released single (The Netherlands)

Varjoja, Varkaita Ja Vanhoja Valokuvia. Sir Elwoodin Hiljaiset V�rit. 1998 Self-released/ Finland ("Kaduilla Kallion")

Krams - Das Letzte Konzert. Gerhard Gundermann. November 1, 1998. Buschfunk (Germany)

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Durt bin i daham")

Hey, Du - N�! Manfred Maurenbrecher and Richard Wester. 2001. Contr�r Musik/ Indigo CD 9938-2 (in German: "In der Nachbarschaft")

20 Suosikkia-Satumaa. Arja Saijonmaa. 2001. Warner Music/ Finland (in Finnish "Tulin mikkeliin", same version as on Yhteinen Taivas Ja Maa, 1989)

Wie Weet Waar Willem Wilmink Woont? Various artists. February 18, 2001. Silvox/ Netherlands. (In Dutch: "In De Javastraat")

Immer Wieder W�chst Das Gras. Randgruppencombo. May 23, 2001. Buschfunk/ Germany (In der Nachbarschaft)

Homegrown. Nussbaumer/ Weber/ Kreil. 2003. Self-released

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

30 Suosikkia. Arja Saijonmaa. March 16, 2007. Warner Music/ Finland (in Finnish "Tulin mikkeliin", same version as on Yhteinen Taivas Ja Maa, 1989)

American Storyteller Vol 2 & 3. Chris Chandler And Davd Roe. September 4, 2007. Self-released



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Music video promoting "In The Neighborhood" (Island, 1983)

Shot and directed by Haskell Wexler (October 18th, 1983). Co-directed by Michael A. Russ. 

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) In the neighborhood

Tom Waits (1983): "It has that salvation army feel. All things signed. Have a drinking song. I was trying to bring the music outdoors with tuba, trombone, trumpets, snare, symbals, accordian. So it had that feeling of filinesque type of marching band going down the dirt road. And with glockenspiel to give it a feeling of a kind of a demented little parade band." (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)

Kristine McKenna (1983): What do you consider your best work? TW: I like the story in "Burma Shave" off Foreign Affairs, "Tom Traubert's Blues" off the new album. I like "Dave The Butcher" and "In The Neighborhood" (Source: "One From The Heart & One For The Road ". New Musical Express magazine. October 1, 1983. Interview by: Kristine McKenna)

Michael Tearson (1985): Can you imagine anyone that you'd like to hear doing some of those things, or is that not even into your thinking? TW: No, I don't think so much about it. But you like it when somebody does y'know? Eh the song is going out there and somebody's gonna hear them and it's a nice feeling. It's like eh holding pigeons y'know? But eh... I had a... "In The Neighbourhood" of that Swordfishtrombones was covered by a Dutch group. It's called "In the Stromcafe" (laughs) and it was funny. MT: Did they translated it? TW: Yeah: "Noahgsf sjniff jaegh, of fishta gettete, Ischnough...In de Str���mcafe..." and it was funny, I liked that! (Source: "Nightlines Interview" Nightlines on CBC Stereo (Canada) conducted by Michael Tearson. Date: New York. Late 1985)



(3) Flatbed n.: Referring to a truck where the back part is a trailer with no vertical sides, just like it sounds, a flat bed. With stuff strapped or chained down for the hauling (Submitted by Gary Duncan. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(4) Pinned in: Having ones car surrounded by other parked cars in such a way that it's impossible to drive off.



Invitation To The Blues

 



Well, she's up against the register with an apron and a spatula

With yesterday's deliveries, and the tickets for the bachelors

She's a movin' violation from her conk(2) down to her shoes

But it's just an invitation to the blues



And you feel just like Cagney(3), she looks like Rita Hayworth(4)

At the counter of the Schwab's Drugstore(5)

You wonder if she might be single, she's a loner, likes to mingle

Got to be patient, try and pick up a clue



She said: How you gonna like 'em, over medium or scrambled?

You say: Anyway's the only way, be careful not to gamble

on a guy with a suitcase and a ticket gettin' out of here

in a tired(6) bus station, in an old pair of shoes

cause it ain't nothin' but an invitation to the blues



But you can't take your eyes off her, get another cup of Java

It's just the way she pours it for you, jokin' with the customers

Mercy mercy, Mr. Percy, there ain't nothin' back in Jersey

but a broken down jalopy(7) of a man I left behind

and a dream that I was chasin', and a battle with the booze

and an open invitation to the blues



But she used to have a sugar daddy(8) and a candyapple Caddy

And a bank account and everything, accustomed to the finer things

He probably left her for a socialite, and he didn't love her 'cept at night

And then he's drunk and never even told her that he cared

So they took the registration, and the car keys and his shoes

and left her with an invitation to the blues



But there's a Continental Trailways leavin' Local bus tonight, good evenin'

You can have my seat, I'm stickin' round here for a while

Get me a room at the Squire, and the fillin' station's hirin'

Now I can eat here every night, what the hell have I got to lose?

Got a crazy sensation, go or stay, and I gotta choose

And I'll accept your invitation to the blues



Written by: Tom Waits(9)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

Live 1989-1993. The Piano Has Been Drinking. November 15, 1993. Chlodwig /BMG Germany (in German/ K�lsch)

Vanity. Jan Vayne. 1994. EMI (The Netherlands)

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Giant Sand

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

It Happened One Night. Holly Cole. June, 1995. Blue Note Records (Japan)

By Heart. Maggie Holland. September 14, 1995. Rhiannon (RHYD5008)

Halia. Foivos Delivorias. July, 1998. Sony Music/ BMG (in Greek)

Collection. Holly Cole Trio. September, 1998. EMI (Australia)

Strike When Your Iron Is Hot. David Basse. October, 2000. City Light Records

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)

Night Rhythms 2. Various artists. 2002. Taxim Records (performed by Claudia Bettinaglio)

The Well. Jennifer Warnes. September 4, 2001. Sin-Drome Records

Ausgelacht. Arnim T�pel. September, 2002. Self-released

It's About Time. James Naughton. October 8, 2002. Drg

Ain't Your Train. The Tremors Bluesband. 2003. Self-released (live)

Too Many Spare Parts In The Yard ("Tom Waits Tribute"). Giant Sand (Howe Gelb). 2003. Self-released

Who Is D.W. Ditty? D.W. Ditty. January, 2003. Dittydisc

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003. Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

The Fourth Stream. The Fourth Stream. 2004. J. Dog Music

Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling. June 14, 2004. Buschfunk (Germany)

Journal On A Shelf. Bill Sheffield. June, 2005. American Roots & Blues Records

Journal On A Shelf. Bill Sheffield. April 22, 2006. American Roots Records (re-issue of 2005 release)

2 Blues Shoes On 2er. 2 Blues Shoes. 2006. Self-released



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Invitation To The Blues". With: Frank Vicari (tenor saxophone), Fitz Jenkins (upright bass), Chip White (drums). Taken from Rockpalast, WDR television concert documentary. WDR Studio's/ Studio-L. Cologne/ Germany (aired April 18, 1977.   



Notes:



(1) Intro from Sala Kongresowa. Warsaw, Poland. May 26, 2000: "Okay, this is about a restaurant... where the food is lousy... consistently... But there is a beautiful girl in there. And it's worth eating there... for an opportunity to see her. ... In fact they can poison you for all you care. As long as it's her shift. She's up against the register... "



(2) Conk

- n.: The head/ the face (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) Cagney

- The epitome of rough manhood. Cagney's energetic acting style with raspy voice became synonymous with the Hollywood "tough guy" role. James Francis Cagney, Jr., born on July 17, 1899, was the child of an Irish father and Norwegian mother and was raised on New York's Lower Eastside. He was quite successful in the musical "Penny Arcade". He was signed to a contract by Warner Brothers and his role as Tom Powers in "The Public Enemy" made him a star. He went on to star in such classics as "Angels With Dirty Faces", "The Roaring Twenties", "White Heat". Cagney retired in 1961. He made a big screen comeback in 1981's "Ragtime" and starred in the small screen movie "Terrible Joe Moran" in 1984. He died of a heart attack on his farm in upstate New York on March 30, 1986. President Ronald Reagan delivered the eulogy at his funeral. Hayworth and Cagney both appeared in: "The strawberry blonde ", 1941 and the Warner Brothers musical "One Sunday Afternoon ", 1948.

- Also mentioned in Romeo Is Bleeding: "Like an angel with a bullet and Cagney on the screen."





(4) Hayworth, Rita: Margarita Carmen Cansino. Born: Brooklyn, NY, October 17 1918 - Died: New York City, NY, May 14 1987. American actress and dancer. Married to E.C. Judson, Orson Welles, Prince Ali Kahn, D.Haymes and James Hill successively. She played in films such as: Tales of Manhattan, The lady from Shanghai and The Wrath of God. Hayworth and Cagney both appeared in: "The strawberry blonde", 1941 and the Warner Brothers musical "One Sunday Afternoon", 1948.





(5) Schwab's drugstore: Los Angeles drugstore/ soda fountain (The Strip, Sunset Boulevard) where several famous stars were said to be discovered. Since Hollywood is a place of dreams, this anecdote may be inflated to dream size proportions. The place to be in the 50's and 60's. Here stars were born. It is said Lana Turner was discovered here. In the 70's Schwab's drugstore was on the downgrade and had lost all it's glory and magic. It was demolished in 1983





(6) Tired adj. Dull, boring; unimaginative; specif., out of fashion, reminiscent or repetitive of things previously seen or heard (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(7) Jalopy, jaloppy n.: An old and/ or battered automobile. 'A Jalopy is a model one step above a "junker" ... it still runs but only at great peril to life, limb and the common wealth' Any vehicle regardless of its condition or age(Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(8) Sugar daddy

- A male sweetheart well provided with money, esp., a wealthy, usu. elderly man who spends money freely on girls; specif., a worldly, sophisticated man, usu. not young and usu. wealthy, who pays the rent and other expenses of a young woman in return for her sexual favors and companionship (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "Blow, Wind Blow" (Put my Raleigh's on the dashboard, Sugar daddy caught a polocar)



(9) Invitation To The Blues: Song might be inspired by or refering to Roger Miller's "Invitation To The Blues". Released as the B-side of Ray Price's 1958 hit "City Lights", "Invitation to the Blues" rose to #3 on the US charts, giving Roger Miller his first major success in the business. "I couldn't sleep last night, just walked the floor. Don't know how i'll stand this anymore. Lonely all the time since i lost you. Received your invitation to the blues. I don't know why you cause me such pain. I just hope i'll never go through this much again. Lonely me, i don't know what to do. Received your invitation to the blues. You took the laughter from this world of mine. Thanks to you the sun will never shine. Walked the floor so much wore out my shoes. Received your invitation to the blues. I don't know why you cause me such pain. I just hope i'll never go through this much again. Lonely me, i don't know what to do. Received your invitation to the blues."



Is There Any Way Out Of This Dream?

 



I can clearly see nothing as clear

I keep falling apart every year

Let's take a hammer to it

There's no glamour in it

Is there any way out of this dream?



I'm as blue as I can possibly be

Is there someone else out there for me

Summer is dragging its feet

I feel so incomplete

Is there any way out of this dream?



Summer is dragging its feet

I feel so incomplete

Is there any way out of this dream?



Written by: Tom Waits.(1)

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Out Of This Dream. Mathilde Santing. 1987. Megadisc (Holland)

So Far So Good (The Best Of Mathilde Santing). Mathilde Santing. 1992. Megadisc (Holland)

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)



Notes:



(1) Q (1982): Did you write any songs that were specifically designed for her to sing? Tom Waits"Is there Any Way Out of This Dream?" and "Take Me Home" were written for Crystal to sing. "Old Boyfriends" was originally for me, then for her, then it turned into a duet. "Picking Up After You" and "This One's From the Heart" were written as duets. I found that it was hard writing for a woman. There are certain words they're uncomfortable with. I can get away with a certain vernacular, while a woman singing it would have trouble. I had to change things around, put everything into her words. It was tough. I felt like I was writing lines for an actress (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



It Rains On Me

Rains On Me



 



This is how the world will be

Everywhere I go it rains on me

Forty monkeys drowning in a boiling sea

Everywhere I go it rains on me

I went down into the valley to pray

Everywhere I go it rains on me

I got drunk and I stayed all day

Everywhere I go it rains on me



Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

It rains on me



All god's chilluns can't you see

Everywhere I go it rains on me

Louie Lista and Marchese(1)

Everywhere I go it rains on me

Robert Sheehan and Paul Body(1)

Everywhere I go it rains on me

I went down to Argyle, I went down to Dix

Everywhere I go it rains on me

To get my powders and to get my fix

Everywhere I go it rains on me



Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

It rains on me



Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

It rains on me



Written by: Chuck E. Weiss and Tom Waits

Published by: Chuck E. Weiss Music (ASCAP)/ Jalma Music (ASCAP), �1999.

Rykomusic, Inc. (ASCAP) a division of Evergreen Copyrights (both admin. by ICG)

Official release: Extremely Cool - Chuck E. Weiss, Slow River/ Rykodisc, 1999

Re-released on: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Pressure Island. Hack Mack Jackson. July 21, 2006. Triggerfish Music



Notes:



(1) Louie Lista and Marchese,...Robert Sheehan and Paul Body.

- Notice the subtitle for Jitterbug Boy, 1974/ 1976: "Sharing a Curbstone With Chuck E. Weiss, Robert Marchese, Paul Body And The Mug And Artie."

- Chuck E. Weis: Chicago born musician and longtime friend. Further reading: Chuck E. Weiss.

- Robert Sheehan: now deceased Blues Traveler's bassist Bobby Sheehan? (Bobby Sheehan died on August 30, 1999 at his New Orleans home due to an accidental drug overdose.)

Robert Marchese: manager of the troubadour in the 1970's

- Paul Body: doorman of the Troubadour in the 1970's. "... Paul Body, is active in the music and spoken word and literary community. He's released a solo compact disc, "Love Is Like Rasputin" for New Alliance Records, and participated in the laserdisc collection audio/visual document L.A. JOURNAL released by The Voyager Company. He's also just completed a reading in the July, '95 "Rock and Roll In Literature" series at The MET Theater in Hollywood that featured actors Ed Harris, Bill Pullman, Chloe Webb, Beverly D'Angelo and other musicians and poets. He's also a clerk at Video Journeys and a film fanatic. (Source: "From The B's Nest", Alternative Cinema issue #6 - pgs. 8-9, 1995). "... Paul Body has many claims to fame: poet, writer, accordionist, and longtime friend of Tom Waits. On his album Love Is Like Rasputin, Body lays out his humorous and sometimes-touching thoughts on 1965 Los Angeles in a series of diary entries. Thirty years after witnessing the Watts riots, his mother's death, and the rise of his beloved Rolling Stones, Body is still actively performing across the city where he came of age." (Source: "SXSW Spoken Word: 1996" by Phil West. The Austin Chronicle) 

- The Mug: Troubadour barman, blues harmonica player, actor, poet Louie Lista. Name checked in the Blue Valentine linernotes as Louis Lista. "Louie got his start in the field of blues and folk music in the early 1960's when he studied harmonica with the legendary blues musician Taj Mahal. After playing countless shows at such popular venues as the Ash Grove and Troubadour in Hollywood, he helped to found the seminal 1970's powerhouse roots rock group, The Sheiks of Shake. They recorded for Mystic Records and shared stages with such musical "national treasures" as Clifton Chenier and Muddy Waters. In the late 1970's, after David Wulff completed a year long performing stint with the Shieks, Louie and Wulff started playing as an acoustic duo covering a wide range of musical styles from folk to country to blues, jazz and even contemporary popular songs. They shared stages with a "who's who" list of then popular recording artists, including R.E.M., Black Flag, the Circle Jerks, X, and The Knitters. In the 1980's they added electric guitars, bass and drums to the mix, founded the Outer City Allstars and expanded our venues to include such unlikely performance opportunities as opening for Pro Wrestling matches. In the early 1990's, Louie signed with New Alliance Records and showcased his talent as a spoken word artist on two CDs, "To Sleep With the Lights On" and "Walkin' and Talkin'". The first CD contained several songs that David Wulff produced and the second was recorded with longtime friend David Crittendon, a talented singer, pianist and author. As the 1990's progressed, Louie's love of and training in theater (Santa Monica City College) led to a series of high profile acting jobs. He played opposite Emmy award winning Kay Lenz ("Rich Man, Poor Man", "The Big Chill") as Sir Toby Belch in Spike Stewart's modern day tribute to William Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" ("The 12th Nite"). He also was a featured actor working alongside none other than Ringo Starr in Century 21 Real Estate's television commercial "Perfect Hook-ups". (Source: "Louie Lista Benefit at La Ca�ada United Methodist Church", by David Wulff. March 8, 2003)





Art Fein, Tom Waits and Paul Body (late 1977)

Source: "Another Fein Mess/ Other Fein Messes" by Art Fein. March, 2003. Copyright Art Fein



It's All Right With Me

 



It's the wrong time and the wrong place

Though your face is charming, it's the wrong face

It's not her face, but such a charming face

That it's all right with me



It's the wrong song in the wrong style

Though your smile is lovely, it's the wrong smile

It's not her smile, but a lovely smile

And it's all right with me



You can not know how happy I am we met

I'm strangely attracted to you

There's someone I'm trying so hard to forget

Don't you want to forget someone too?



And it's the wrong game and the wrong chips

Though your lips are tempting, it's the wrong lips

They're not her lips, but such tempting lips

That it's all right with me



It's the wrong time and the wrong place

Though your face is charming, it's the wrong face

It's not her face, but a charming face

And it's all right with me



It's the wrong song in the wrong style

Though your smile is lovely, it's the wrong smile

It's not her smile, but a lovely smile

And it's all right with me



You can not know how happy I am we met

I'm strangely attracted to you

There's someone I'm trying so hard to forget

Don't you want to forget someone too?



It's the wrong game and the wrong chips

Though your lips are tempting, it's the wrong lips

They're not her lips, but they're tempting lips

And it's all right with me



And it's all right, it's all right

It's all right with me

It's all right with me



It's the wrong time and the wrong place

Though your lips are charming, it's the wrong face

It's not her face, but a charming face

And it's all right with me



It's the wrong...



Written by: Cole Porter (C. Albert P.), 1953(1)

Published by: Chappell & Co (Renewed)

Originally performed by Peter Cookson in the musical "Can-Can", 1953

The most popular recording made by Frank Sinatra

Official release: "Red, Hot + Blue, a tribute to Cole Porter", 1990

Tom Waits vocals, Chamberlin and percussion



Known covers:

N/A



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Music video promoting "It's Alright With Me" (1990)

Released in 1990. Directed by Jim Jarmusch



Notes:



(1) Original version: "It's All Right With Me". Written by: Cole Porter (C. Albert P.). Original version by: Peter Cookson ("Can-Can", 1953): "It's the wrong time, and the wrong place Though your face is charming, it's the wrong face It's not her face, but such a charming face That it's all right with me It's the wrong song, in the wrong style Though your smile is lovely, it's the wrong smile It's not her smile, but such a lovely smile That it's all right with me You can't know how happy I am that we met I'm strangely attracted to you There's someone I'm trying so hard to forget Don't you want to forget someone, too? It's the wrong game, with the wrong chips Though your lips are tempting, they're the wrong lips They're not her lips, but they're such tempting lips That, if some night, you are free Then it's all right, yes, it's."





Source: stills from video for: "It's All Right With Me"



It's Just The Way We Are Boys

 



(Woyzeck theatre version only)(1)



Because it's just the way we are boys

Just the way we are

Don't try to change us

Because it's just the way we are



There was a young soldier named Dice

Who remarked, they say, bigamy's nice

Even two are a bore

I prefer three of four

For the plural of spouse it is spice(2)



Because it's just the way we are boys

Just the way we are

Don't try to change us

Because it's just the way we are



A damsel seductive and handsome

Got wedged in a sleeping room transom

When she offered much gold

For release she was told

That the view was worth more than the ransom



Because it's just the way we are boys

Just the way we are

Don't try to change us

Because it's just the way we are



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of It's Just The Way We Are

as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck by Morten L�tzh�ft (as Andres). 

Betty Nansen Theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Andres and Woyzeck in act 2, scene 4.

- An early version of "Just The Way We Are" was previously used in the theatre version of "Frank's Wild Years" (Act 1: scene 1, 1986).



(2) When the play went on tour in 2001, this song was performed with various alternate (and more risky) limericks, not published in the theatre programs or songbooks. Apparently they changed limericks every show.



There was a young fellow named Cas

Whose bullocks were made out of brass

When they tinkled together

They played 'Stormy Weather'

And lightning shot out of his ass


(Woyzeck 2001 tour)



There was a young fellow named Kent

His dick was so big that it bent

So to save him the trouble

He put it in double

And instead of coming he went


(Woyzeck 2001 tour)



There was a young man from Florida

who liked a friends wife so he borrowed her

once in the bed

he cried God strike me dead

this ain't a cunt it's a corridor


(Woyzeck 2002 tour. Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, December, 2002)



There was a young fellow named Rummy

who delighted in whipping his dummy

he'd play pocket pool

with his happy old tool

'til his pants and his shorts were all cummy


(Woyzeck 2002 tour. Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, December, 2002)



There was a young man from Darjeeling

who's tool reached up to the ceiling

in the electric light socket

he put it and rocked it

my God what a wonderful feeling


(Woyzeck 2002 tour.Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, December, 2002)



It's Over

 



(Liberty Heights studio version, 1999)



You must have brought the bad weather with you

The sky's the colour of lead

All you've left me is a feather

on an unmade bed



It's always me whenever there's trouble

The world does nothing but turn

And the ring it fell off my finger

I guess I'll never learn



But it's over, it's over, it's over

I'm getting dressed in the dark

Our story ends before it begins

I always confess to everyone's sins

The nail gets hammered down

And it's over, let it go



So don't go and make a big deal out of nothing

Well it's just a storm on a dime

And I've always found there's nothing

that money can't buy

I've already gone to the place I'm going

There's no place left to fall

And there's something to be said

for saying nothing at all



And it's over, it's over, it's over

It's done forgotten and through

No one cares what it's all for

You'll be buried in the clothes

that you've never wore

So keep your suitcase by the door

It's over, let it go



No one cares what it's all for

You'll be buried in the clothes

that you never wore

So keep your suitcase by the door

It's over, let it go

You gotta let it go

Let it go, let it go



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1998

Official release: Liberty Heights soundtrack album, 1999





 



It's Over



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



I must have brought the bad weather with me

The sky's the colour of lead

All you've left me was a feather

on an unmade bed



It's always me whenever there's trouble

The world does nothing but turn

And the ring it fell off my finger

I guess I'll never learn



And it's over, it's over, it's over

I'm getting dressed in the dark

Our story ends before it begins

I always confess to everyone's sins

The nail gets hammered down

And it's over, let it go



So don't go and make a big deal out of nothing

It's just a storm on a dime

And I've always found there's nothing

that money can not buy

I've already gone to the place that I'm going

There's no place left to fall

And there's something to be said

about saying nothing at all(2)



Cause baby then it's over, and it's over

It's done forgotten and through

Story ends before it begins

I always confess to everyone's sins

The nail gets hammered down

And it's over, let it go



You got to let me go

I wanna let it go

I wanna let it go

I wanna let you go

I want to let you go



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999/ 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of It's Over as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Ulla Henningsen (as Margret).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) It's Over: Also included in the play Woyzeck (sung by Margret in act 2, scene 5). Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



(2) Extra verse as transcribed in Orphans booklet (from original Woyzeck version, 2000): "And it's over, it's over, it's over. It's done forgotten and through. No one cares what it's all for. You'll be buried in the clothes that you never wore. So keep your suitcase by the door. It's over, let it go."



I Want You

 



I want you, you, you

All I want is you, you, you

All I want is you



Give you the stars above

Sun on the brightest day

Give you all my love

If only you would see



That I want you, you, you

All I want is you, you, you

All I want is you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Collection. Holly Cole Trio. September, 1998. EMI (Australia)

The Best Of Holly Cole. Holly Cole. November, 2000. Blue Note Records

Les Feuilles Mortes. Shade Of Blue/ Effi Geffken. 2004. Self-released (Bremen, Germany)

I Want You. The Wantones. April 7, 2008. Tôt ou Tard (France)



I Wish I Was In New Orleans

 



(In the Ninth Ward)(2)



Well, I wish I was in New Orleans

I can see it in my dreams

Arm in arm down Burgundy(3)

A bottle and my friends and me



Hoist up a few tall cool ones

Play some pool and listen

To that tenor saxophone

Calling me home



And I can hear the band begin

"When the Saints Go Marching In"

And by the whiskers on my chin

New Orleans, I'll be there



I'll drink you under the table

Be a red nose, go for walks

The old haunts, what I wants

Is red beans and rice



And wear the dress I like so well

Meet me at the old saloon

Make sure that there's a Dixie moon

New Orleans, I'll be there



And deal the cards, roll the dice

If it ain't that old Chuck E. Weiss(4)

And Clayborn Avenue(5), me and you

Sam Jones(6) and all



And I wish I was in New Orleans

Cause I can see it in my dreams

Arm in arm down Burgundy

A bottle and my friends and me

New Orleans, I'll be there



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976



Known covers:

Angel Of New Orleans. David Roe and The Royal Rounders. March, 2000. The Orchard

Big Easy Classics. Tom Hook. 2005. Self-released

Now Or Never. Dave Holt Band. August 17, 2006. Lucky Lobster (USA)

American Storyteller Vol 2 & 3. Chris Chandler And Davd Roe. September 4, 2007. Self-released

I Wish I Was In New Orleans. Tipitina. November 6, 2007. Big Bear Records

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records



Notes:



(1) Live intro from 'Cold Beer'/ Sydney, 1979: "I used to know this girl named Suzy Montelongo. And her brother's name was Joe Montelongo. Joe always wanted to kill me. He sang in a band called the Rodbenders. Suzy Montelongo used to wear these angora sweaters. I'm crazy about angora sweaters. I guess it's kind of a hang-up of mine. She had angora socks, and angora shoes. I believe she was originally *from* Angora. I don't know where she is anymore, but every time I see an angora sweater, I think maybe inside will be Suzy Montelongo. Eh-he-he... Maybe she's in New Orleans. Well, I'll be there... " (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)

Live intro from 'Paris at Midnight': "This is about a guy who lived at a place called the Taft Hotel, which is in St Louis. He spent most of the afternoon starring at the wallpaper. And it was a water stain there. He thought it was a map of South America. Heck, it was good enough for him. This was his... the way he was traveling was just from going inside the water stains on the wallpaper in the hotels. It's just a concept... And he saved most of his time in a little bag, with a string on it." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)

Francis Thumm (1988): "When did you first see yourself as a songwriter?" Tom Waits: "Actually, even after I had made records. I didn't feel completely confident in the craft until maybe Small Change. When I first put a story to music. I fell I was learning and getting the confidence to keep doing it. "Tom Traubert's Blues" "Small Change" and "I Wish I Was in New Orleans" gave me some confidence." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)

In the late 1970s Waits often used to perform this song as a medley with "I Dream Of Jeannie", "Since I Fell For You", "When The Saints Go Marching In"

I Dream Of Jeannie With The Light Brown Hair (Written by Stephen Foster, 1854): "I dream of Jeannie with the light brown hair. Borne like a vapor on the summer air. I see her tripping where the bright streams play. Happy as the daisies that dance on her way. Many were the wild notes her merry voice would pour, Many were the blithe birds that warbled them o'er. I dream of Jeannie with the light brown hair. Floating like a vapor on the soft, summer air. I sigh for Jeannie, but her light form strayed. Far from the fond parts round her native glade; Her smiles have vanished and her sweet songs flown. Flitting like the dreams that have cheered us and gone."

Since I Fell For You (Lenny Welch. Words and music by: Buddy Johnson, 1948): "When you just give love, and never get love, you'd better let love depart. I know it's so, and yet I know, I can't get you out of my heart. You made me leave my happy home. You took my love, and now you've gone, since I fell for you. Love brings such misery and pain. I guess I'll never be the same, since I fell for you. Well it's too bad, and it's too sad, but I'm in love with you. You love me, then you snub me. But what can I do, I'm still in love with you. Well, I guess I'll never see the light. I get the blues most every night, since I fell for you. Since I fell for you."

When The Saints Go Marching In (Wrritten in 1896 by James M Black (music) and Katherine E Purvis (words) (Emma Cotton[?]). Copyright: unknown): "We are trav'ling in the footsteps. Of those who've gone before, And we'll all be reunited, On a new and sunlit shore. Oh, when the saints go marching in. Oh, when the saints go marching in. Lord how I want to be in that number. When the saints go marching in. And when the sun begins to shine. And when the sun begins to shine. Lord, how I want to be in that number. When the sun begins to shine. Oh, when the trumpet sounds its call. Oh, when the trumpet sounds its call. Lord, how I want to be in that number. When the trumpet sounds its call. Some say this world of trouble, Is the only one we need, But I'm waiting for that morning, When the new world is revealed."



(2) In the Ninth Ward

- Ward: A division of a city or town, especially an electoral district, for administrative and representative purposes (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company).

- Apparently when in New Orleans, one will hear people give directions, or talking about the city in terms of wards. The term comes from the city's voting districts, which are called wards. There are 17 wards in New Orleans and one will hear the natives and the news media refer to this or that ward. Boundaries of Ward 9 are: Almonaster, Lake Pontchartrain, St. Bernard Parish Line, & the Mississippi River. (North) Claiborne Avenue and Burgundy Street are indeed in the 9th Ward.

- Bunny Matthews: "The Ninth Ward has always been the part of New Orleans that was mired in last place. Its residents, the poorest of the poor-black and white, had no political clout, no drainage, no sewerage, and in some places, no sidewalks. The Ninth Ward was the only place in city limits where hunting game was a viable nutritional option. In 1914, the Board of Commissioners of the Port of New Orleans, also known as the Dock Board, decided to create an artificial waterway connecting the river and Lake Pontchartrain. The Ninth Ward was considered the perfect site because it was "a virtually uninhabited area" or at least, uninhabited by anyone capable of stopping the captains of industry. Between 1918 and 1923, the Industrial Canal was built through the heart of the Ninth Ward, resulting in the divisions known as the Ninth Ward and the Lower Ninth Ward... (Today the Ninth Ward) is a neighborhood where 99-year-old ladies wearing housecoats and hairnets sit on their stoops, making sure that everyone else's business is their business. They own Chihuahuas because, pound for pound, they're the meanest of all canines. The last time these ladies visited Canal Street, it was the site of department stores named D.H. Holmes, Maison Blanche, Gus Mayer, Krauss and Godchaux's. To them, Metairie might as well be the moon. There is no Uptown seersucker suit pretension around here, no ponytailed joggers with glistening tans and personal CD players, nobody eating free range chickens or Light 'n Fit yogurt... The staff of life in the Ninth Ward is the po-boy, limp with gravy, hot sauce and Blue Plate mayonnaise, washed down with a draft beer-no particular brand, as long as it's cheap. Dessert is a Hubig's Pie (388 calories), baked across the border in the Eighth Ward. Half the people are drunk by noon, a quarter suffer from vague but incapacitating diseases causing crusty skin inflammations and dementia, a third would rather endure root canals instead of missing their daily soap operas. Everybody is Catholic or a voodoo variant thereof. As the saying goes, people from the Ninth Ward don't mind dying, either because they've already had so much fun or because they'll try anything once. Fats Domino, residing in the Lower Ninth Ward, is the area's most famous musician. His home on Caffin Avenue is a monument to Fats' status as a pop artist second only to Elvis Presley, as well as a testament to Mr. Domino's devotion to his home turf. He could've easily deserted the Ninth Ward for a gated community or country estate, but chose to live in New Orleans' funkiest zone-a place where murders are as common as mirlitons." (Source: "WISH YOU WERE HERE, DAWL!" By Bunny Matthews. OffBeat magazine: July 2003. Copyright �2002, OffBeat, Inc.)



(3) Burgundy: Burgundy Street, New Orleans (Ninth Ward, Holy Cross Neighborhood)



(4) Weiss, Chuck E.: Chicago born and old time friend Chuck E. Weiss. Further reading: Chuck E. Weiss



(5) Clayborn Avenue: misspelled and should read "Claiborne Avenue", New Orleans (Lower Ninth Ward). Bart Bull (2005): "Claiborne runs through the Ninth Ward (prounounced Nint') and the Sevent and Sixt and all through Uptown and Downtown....It was the great street of black New Orleans, the High Street, Main Street, which is why when Urban Redevelopment came along in the 1960s, they yanked out its looming, shady oak trees and plunked the freeway right over top of it, killing all the thriving black business. Yet, in a miracle of how Afrocentric culture can respond to such as that, folks still congregate beneath along Claiborne, using the freeway for shade in the absence of the oak trees, and every second line parade makes sure that it travels under the freeway (usually called "the bridge" because the brass band booms all more reverberatingly underneath all that concrete." (Source: email conversations Bart Bull/ Tom Waits Library, October 2005)



(6) Jones, Sam: Jones is mentioned in the linernotes of the album "Nighthawks at the diner": "Special thanks to Sam (I'll pay you if I can and when I get it) Jones." In Waits' 1974 press release for The Heart Of Saturday Night a Sam Jones is listed as one of his favourite writers.

Tom Waits: "I hitchhiked to Arizona with Sam Jones while I was still a high school student. And on New Year's Eve, when it was about 10 degrees out, we got pulled into a Pentecostal church by a woman named Mrs. Anderson. We heard a full service, with talking in tongues. And there was a little band in there - guitar, drums, and bass along with the choir." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)

Tom Waits"I have slept in a graveyard and I have rode the rails. When I was a kid, I used to hitchhike all the time from California to Arizona with a buddy named Sam Jones. We would just see how far we could go in three days, on a weekend, see if we could get back by Monday. I remember one night in a fog, we got lost On this side road and didn't know where we were exactly. And the fog came in and we were really lost then and it was very cold. We dug a big ditch in a dry riverbed and we both laid in there and pulled all this dirt and leaves over us Iike a blanket. We're shivering in this ditch all night, and we woke up in the morning and the fog had cleared and right across from us was a diner; we couldn't see it through the fog. We went in and had a great breakfast, still my high-water mark for a great breakfast. The phantom diner." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July 1999)

Tom Waits: "Well actually I had some good things that happened to me hitchhiking, because I did wind up on a New Year's Eve in front of a Pentecostal church and an old woman named Mrs. Anderson came out. We were stuck in a town, with like 7 people in this town and trying to get out you know? And my buddy and I were out there for hours and hours and hours getting colder and colder and it was getting darker and darker. Finally she came over and she says: "Come on in the church here. It's warm and there's music and you can sit in the back row." And then we did and eh... They were singing and you know they had a tambourine an electric guitar and a drummer. They were talking in tongues and then they kept gesturing to me and my friend Sam: "These are our wayfaring strangers here." So we felt kinda important. And they took op a collection, they gave us some money, bought us a hotel room and a meal. We got up the next morning, then we hit the first ride at 7 in the morning and then we were gone. It was really nice, I still remember all that and it gave me a good feeling about traveling." (Source: "Fresh Air interview with Tom Waits", Fresh Air with Terry Gross, produced in Philadelphia by WHYY. Radio show as archived on Fresh Air website. May 21, 2002)



---------- J--------



Jack & Neal

 



 



Jack(1) was sittin' poker faced(2) with bullets backed with bitches(3)

Neal(4) hunched at the wheel, puttin' everyone in stitches(5)

Braggin' 'bout some nurse he screwed while drivin' through Nebraska

And when she came she honked the horn

and Neal just barely missed a truck

And then he asked her if she'd like to come like that to Californy

You see, a red head in a uniform will always get you horny

Yeah, and with her hairnet and those white shoes and a name tag and a hat

She drove like Andy Granatelli(6)and knew how to fix a flat(7)

And Jack was almost at the bottom of his MD 2020(8)

Neal was yellin' out the window, tryin' to buy some bennies(9)

From a Lincoln full of Mexicans, and the left rear tire blowed

And the sons of bitches pretty near almost ran us off the road

And while the nurse had spilled the Maneshewitz(10 all up and down her dress

And then she lit the map on fire, Neal just had to guess

Should we try and find a bootleg route or a fillin' station open

The nurse was dumpin' out her purse and lookin' for an envelope

And Jack was out of cigarettes, and as we crossed the yellow line

The gas pumps looked like tombstones from here

And it felt lonelier than a parkin' lot when the last car pulls away

And the moonlight dressed the double breasted foothills in the mirror

Weaving out a negligee and a black brassiere

And the Mercury(11) was runnin' hot and we were almost out of gas

Just then Florence Nightingale(12) she dropped her drawers and

Stuck her fat ass half way out of the window to a Wilson Pickett(13) tune

And shouted 'Get a load of this' and gave the finger to the moon



Countin' one eyed Jacks(14) and whistlin' Dixie in the car

Neal was doin' least a hundred when we saw a fallin' star

And Florence wished that Neal would hold her 'stead of chewin' on his cigar

Jack was noddin' out and wishin' he was in a bar

With Charlie Parker(15) on the bandstand, and not a worry in the world

And a glass of beer in one hand and his arms around a girl

Neal was singin' to the nurse, 'Underneath the Harlem Moon'(16)

And somehow you could just tell we'd be in California soon...



Open up your golden gates(17)

California, here I come

I said: California, here I come

Look out: California, here I come



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1977

Official release: Foreign Affairs, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1977



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Jack & Neal: Refers to beat authors Jack Kerouac and beat epitome Neal Cassady.

- Jack Kerouac: Born: March 12, 1922: Lowell, Massachusetts. Died: October 21, 1969: St. Petersburg, Florida. At a young age Kerouac had written a novel, stylistically reminiscent of Thomas Wolfe, about the torments he was suffering as he tried to balance his wild city life with his old-world family values, 'The Town and the City' which earned him respect and some recognition as a writer, although it did not make him famous. Later he decided to write about his cross-country trips with Neal Cassady exactly as they had happened, without pausing to edit, fictionalize or even think. "On The Road" was finally published in 1957, and when it became a tremendous popular success Kerouac did not know how to react. Embittered by years of rejection, he was suddenly expected to snap to and play the part of Young Beat Icon for the public. Trying to live up to the wild image he'd presented in 'On The Road,' he developed a severe drinking habit that aged him prematurely. He kept busy, appearing on TV shows, writing magazine articles and recording three spoken-word albums, but his momentum as a serious writer had been completely disrupted. Defeated and lonesome, he left California to live with his mother in Long Island, and would not stray from his mother for the rest of his life. Despite the 'beatnik' stereotype, Kerouac was a political conservative, especially when under the influence of his Catholic mother. As the beatniks of the 1950's began to yield their spotlight to the hippies of the 1960's, Jack took pleasure in standing against everything the hippies stood for. He supported the Vietnam War and became friendly with William F. Buckley. His health destroyed by drinking, he died at home in 1969.

- Barney Hoskyns (2009): “It's interesting to consider here how the Kerouac Cassady dynamic was paralleled by the friendship between Waits and Chuck E. Weiss. For Waits, Weiss embodied the same recklessness Cassady did for Kerouac. "[He] had become ... the great Idiot of us all," Kerouac wrote in Visions of Cody, his almost homoerotic paean to Cassady, " [ ... ] entirely, irresponsible to the point of wild example and purgation for us to learn and not to have to go through." While Weiss and Cassady harboured aspirations to being artists themselves, really they functioned as Ids to the Egos of the men who observed them and had the discipline to make art of their observations. For Waits to note that Kerouac wasn't "nearly as mad and impetuous" as the damaged Cassady may have been an interesting admission of his own relative cautiousness.” (Source: “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)





(2) Poker face: A face lacking in expression. Used in poker, where one tries not to reveal his hand by his facial expression (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) Bullets backed with bitches n.: Among American poker players, a bullet is an ace (Source: The dictionary of the teenage revolution and its aftermath, Hudson) Bullets = a pair of aces in the hole (Source: Dan's poker dictionary, Dan Kimberg). Bitch n. In playing cards, a queen of any suit. Fairly common by c1900 (Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Neal Cassady. Born: February 8, 1926: Salt Lake City, Utah. Died: February 4, 1968: San Miguel De Allende, Mexico. Neal Cassady was raised by an alcoholic father in the skid row hotels of Denver's Larimer Street. In December 1946 Cassady moved to New York. It was here that he met Kerouac and Ginsberg. Soon he and Kerouac began the series of cross-country adventures that would later become 'On The Road'. Cassady married several women and fathered many children (much of this activity is discussed in 'On The Road'). After a night of hard partying in Mexico in 1968, Cassady wandered onto a deserted railroad, intending to walk fifteen miles to the next town. He fell asleep on the way, wearing only a t-shirt and jeans. It was a cold rainy night, and Cassady was found beside the tracks the next morning. He was in a coma, and died in a hospital later that day. Kerouac would die a year later. The real genius behind the Beat movement in literature never published a book during his life. He appeared as a main character in many books, though, from "Go" by John Clellon Holmes to "On The Road" by Jack Kerouac to "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" by Tom Wolfe. His free-flowing letter writing style inspired the young Kerouac to break his ties to the sentimental style he'd picked up from Thomas Wolfe and invent his notion of "spontaneous prose." Without Neal Cassady, the Beat Generation would never have happened.





(5) Puttin' everyone in stitches: In stitches (Informal) Laughing uncontrollably (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)



(7) Flat n.: A punctured or "flat" automobile tire. Stand. since c1930. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(8) MD 20/20: (Mad Dog)Mogen David Wineries developed this product several decades ago, and it has been a favorite of high school and college students ever since. College students recognize its above average potency and use it as a "quick drunk." It is produced in several flavors that resemble soda pop, including: "pink grapefruit," "wild berry," "Hawaiian blue," and "lightning creek," which make it more palatable to the tastes of "new drinkers." (Source: Indiana Prevention Resource Center," Factline on high potency alcoholic beverages")



(9) Bennies n.: Any amphetamine pill, esp. Benzedrine. Addict and student use since c1945 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). Benny/ Bennie/ Bennies n. [1940s] (orig. US drugs) Benzedrine; thus benny-head. (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(10) Manischewitz: Kosher wine from New York/ New Jersey based producer of kosher foods and wines. Foreign Affairs lyrics spell this as 'Manoshevitz". All Manischewitz wines are made and bottled under the Rabbinical supervision of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (Source: Manischewtz official site)



(12) Nightingale, Florence: British nurse, hospital reformer, and humanitarian. Born in Florence, Italy, on May 12, 1820. After the Crimean War broke out in 1854, Nightingale, stirred by reports of the primitive sanitation methods and grossly inadequate nursing facilities at the large British barracks-hospital at �sk�dar (now part of Istanbul, Turkey), volunteered her services in the Crimea. Under Nightingale's supervision, efficient nursing departments were established. Through her tireless efforts the mortality rate among the sick and the wounded was greatly reduced. Nightingale founded the Nightingale School and Home for Nurses at Saint Thomas's Hospital in London. The opening of this school marked the beginning of professional education in nursing. Her contributions to the evolution of nursing as a profession were invaluable. Before she undertook her reforms, nurses were largely untrained personnel who considered their job a menial chore; through her efforts the stature of nursing was raised to a medical profession with high standards of education and important responsibilities. She died in London on August 13, 1910



(13) Picket, Wilson: Born: March 18, 1941, Prattville, AL. Of the major '60s soul stars, Wilson Pickett was one of the roughest and sweatiest, working up some of the decade's hottest dancefloor grooves on hits like "In the Midnight Hour," "Land of 1000 Dances," "Mustang Sally," and "Funky Broadway." He tends to be held in somewhat lower esteem than more versatile talents like Otis Redding and Aretha Franklin. One early hit was: "In the Midnight Hour," whose chugging horn line, loping funky beats, and impassioned vocals combined into a key transitional performance. Picket's biggest pop hit was "Land of 1000 Dances ", a soul anthem of sorts with its roll call of popular dances



(14) One eyed jack:

Tom Waits (1979): "You know, a one eyed Jack is like a... You got one headlight burned out on your car. It's called a one eyed Jack." (Live version of "Burma Shave". Sydney, Australia. March, 1979)



(15) Parker, Charlie: Charles Christopher Parker, Jr. was born on August 29, 1920 in Kansas City, Kansas.Parker was an amazing saxophonist who gained wide recognition for his solos and innovative improvisations. He was, without a doubt, one of the most influential and talented musicians in jazz history. He could play remarkably fast lines, if slowed down to half speed, would reveal that every note made sense. He could play amazingly fast and complex solos or sweet, slow ballads. He was given the nicknames "Bird" and "Yardbird". Since a chicken is a "yard bird" and Parker was quite fond of chicken, Parker was given the nickname Charlie "Yardbird" Parker. He was also nicknamed "Bird" for his tendency to "live free as a bird". Round 1950 drugs started to consume his daily life, his cabaret license was revoked in New York, making it much more difficult for him to play in clubs. March 5, 1955 was Parker's last public engagement at Birdland. He died a week later at a friends apartment



(16) Underneath the Harlem Moon: Referring to: "Underneath The Harlem Moon" (Gordon-Revel). Transcribed from Don Redman and His Orchestra, vocals by Harlan Lattimore. Recorded October 6, 1932: "Creole ladies walk along with rhythm in their thighs Rhythm in their feet and in their lips and in their eyes, Where do highbrows find the kind of love that satisfies? Underneath the Harlem moon! There's no fields of cotton; picking cotton is taboo; They don't live in cabins like the old folks used to do. Their cabin is a penthouse up on Lennox Avenue, Underneath that Harlem moon! Why, they just live on dancing, They're never blue or forlorn, 'Cause it ain't no sin to laugh and grin; That's why darkies were born Oh, they shout, "Hallelujah!" every time they're feeling low; Every sheik is dressed up like a Georgia gigolo, You may call it madness but they call it hi-de-ho, Underneath the Harlem moon!"



(17) Open up your golden gates: Quoting: "California, Here I Come"Written by: Al Jolson, B. DeSylva, Joe Meyer, 1924: "When the wintry winds are blowing, And the snow is starting in to fall, Then my eyes turn westward, knowing that's the place I love the best of all. California, I've been blue, Since I've been away from you, I can't wait 'til I get going, Even now I'm starting in to call Chorus: California here I come, Right back where I started from, Where bowers of flowers bloom in the sun, Each morning at dawning birdies sing an' ev'rything: A sunkist Miss said, don't be late, That's why I can hardly wait, Open up that Golden Gate, California here I come! Anyone who likes to wander, Ought to keep this saying in his mind Absence makes the heart grow fonder Of the good old place you leave behind. When you've hit the trail awhile Seems you rarely see a smile; That's why I must fly out yonder, Where a frown is mighty hard to find! Chorus:"




 




Jayne's Blue Wish

 



The sky holds all our wishes

The dish ran away with the spoon(2)

Chimney smoke ties the roofs to the sky

There's a hole over head

but it's only the moon



Will there ever be a tree

Grown from the seeds I've sown

Life is a path lit only by the light of those I've loved(3)

By the light of those I love



Life's a path lit only by

the light of those I've loved

By the light of those I love



Written and produced by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2002 /2006

Tom Waits vocals, guitar. Recorded and mixed March 2001 at Prairie Sun Recording, Cotati, CA/ USA

Engineer: Oz Fritz Second Engineer and Production Assistant: Jeff Sloan Assistant Engineer: Gene Cornelius.

Official release: "Big Bad Love" (original movie soundtrack): Various artists. February 19/ March 12, 2002

Label: Nonesuch Records, a Warner Music Group Company.

Re-released on Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Soundtrack song notes by Arliss Howard: "I have sung lullabies to my children as I imagined they were intended. But lately I find myself singing them under my breath when I'm alone. It's quite a thing to sing this little amazement when you're walking on an old logging track and break out into a meadow lit by a quarter moon. My gratitude to the Brennan/ Waits family is that mysterious and immense."... "Tom and Kathleen look good together. I don't know how they work, the mechanics of it, but sitting in the restaurant asking me what kind of song I had in mind, they just looked good. When we heard the demos, there were highway sounds on the track and then I remembered Kathleen saying that Tom would work in a moving car with a tape recorder. And a tuba."



(2) The dish ran away with the spoon

- Quoting from "Hey, diddle, diddle" (nursery rhyme, copyright unknown): "Hey, diddle, diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed To see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon."

- Also quoted in Little Boy Blue (One From The Heart, 1982): "Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn, The dish ran away with the spoon" and Everything You Can Think Of Is True (Alice, 1999): "Everything you can think of is true The dish ran away with the spoon."



(3) Life's a path lit only by the light of those I've loved:

- Tom Waits (2003) on Johhny Cash passing: "Johnny Cash said, 'Life is a path lit only by the light of those we love.' Wherever he is now he's traveling on a well lit path. He is the patron saint of every kid with a guitar. Songwriters learn how to write songs from listening to each other. He's like a wise old tree full of songs. I spent many days under his branches." (Source: "Man in Black Johnny Cash dies", by John Gerome (Associated Press). September 14, 2003)



Jersey Girl

 



(Heartattack And Vine studio version, 1980)



Got no time for the corner boys(2)

Down in the street makin' all that noise

Don't want no whores on Eighth Avenue

Cause tonight I'm gonna be with you



Cause tonight I'm gonna take that ride

Across the river to the Jersey side

Take my baby to the carnival

And I'll take you on all the rides



Down the shore everything's all right

You with your baby on a Saturday night, yeah

Don't you know all my dreams come true

When I'm walkin' down the street with you



Sing sha la la la la la sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la, sha la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la, sha la la la

Sha la la la la la



You know she thrills me with all her charms

When I'm wrapped up in my baby's arms

My little angel gives me everything

I know someday that she'll wear my ring



So don't bother me cause I got no time

I'm on my way to see that girl of mine, yeah

Nothin' else matters in this whole wide world

When you're in love with a Jersey girl



Sing sha la la la la la sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la, sha la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la, sha la la la

Sha la la la la la



And I call your name

I can't sleep at night



Sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la la yeah

Sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la, sha la la la

Oh I'm in love, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la la yeah

Sha la la la la la la la la



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: "Heartattack And Vine", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980 & "Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)





 



Jersey Girl



(Bounced Checks alternate take, 1980)



Got no time for the corner boys(2)

Down in the street makin' all that noise

Don't want no whores on Eighth Avenue

Cause tonight I'm gonna be with you



Cause tonight I'm gonna take that ride

Across the river to the Jersey side

Take my baby to the carnival

And I'll take you on all the rides



Down the shore everything's all right

You with your baby on a Saturday night, yeah

Don't you know all my dreams come true

When I'm walkin' down the street with you



Sing sha la la la la la, sha la la la la la la la la

Sha la la, la la la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la, yeah yeah yeah

Sha la la, la la la la la

Sha la la la la la



You know she thrills me with all her charms

When I'm wrapped up in my baby's arms

My little angel gives me everything

I know someday that she'll wear my ring



So don't bother me cause I got no time

On my way to see that girl of mine, yeah

Nothin' else matters in this whole wide world

When you're in love with a Jersey girl



Sing sha la la la la la sha la la la la la la, yeah yeah yeah

Sha la la, la la la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la la la yeah yeah yeah

Sha la la, sha la la la

Sha la la la la la



And I call your name

I can't sleep at night



Sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la yeah yeah yeah

Sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la yeah

Don't bother ne cause I ain't got no time

Sha la la la la la la

Oh I'm in love, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: "Bounced Checks", WEA/ Asylum Records, 1981





 



Jersey Girl



(Live version with Bruce Springsteen, 1981)



Got no time for the corner boys(2)

Down in the street makin' all that noise

Don't want no girls on Eighth Avenue

Cause tonight I'm gonna be with you



Cause tonight I'm gonna take that ride

Across the river to the Jersey side

Take my baby to the carnival

And I'll take you on all the rides



Down the shore everything's all right

You with your baby on a Saturday night

Don't you know that my dreams come true

when I'm walkin' down the street with you



Sing sha la la la la la sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la la



You know she thrills me with all her charms

When I'm wrapped up in my baby's arms

My little angel gives me everything

I know someday she's gonna wear my ring



So don't bother me man I got no time

I'm on my way to see that girl of mine

Nothin' else matters in this whole wide world

when you're in love with a Jersey girl



Sha la la la la la sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la



And I call your name

I can't sleep at night



Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la



I see you on the street and you look so tired

I know that job you've got leaves you so uninspired

When I come by to take you out to eat

I find you dressed upon the bed and baby, fast asleep(3)



Go in the bathroom, put that make-up on

We're gonna take that little brat of yours, and drop her off at your mom's

Oh, I know a place where the dancin's free

Come on girl, won't you go with me?(3)



Sha la la la la la sha la la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la

Sha la la la, I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la

I'm in love with a Jersey girl

Sha la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la la

Sha la la la la la



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

No official release. Live duet with Bruce Springsteen. L.A. Sports Arena. August 24, 1981



Known covers:

Suspicion, Lisa Bade. 1982. Elektra SP 6-4897

Live 1975-1985. Bruce Springsteen, 1987. Sony Music/ Legacy Records

Hessel Live Ahoy '91, Hessel. 1991. Self-released

Fat Cats. Johnny Hooper. December, 1992. Self-released CDJRH2

To All My Friends In Far Flung Places. Dave Van Ronk. December, 1994. Gazell

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Pale Saints

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Blue York, Blue York. Various artists. November 20, 1996. Blue Note Records

Live 1975-1985. Bruce Springsteen, 1997. Legacy Records (re-release of 1987 version, 3 box set)

Ugly. Jon Bon Jovi. 1998. Mercury Records (single)

Live From The Mountain Stage Lounge. Various artists. April, 1998. Blue Plate (live version performed by Holly Cole)

Live At The World Cafe (Vol. 7). Moxy Fruvous. April, 1998. The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, WC9807/ PRI (live version)

Collection. Holly Cole Trio. September, 1998. EMI (Australia)

Country Lover. Ben Olander. 1998. Leco Music

Don't Ask Me. Brian Fraser. 1999. Black Market Music

Getting There. The Bacon Brothers. August, 1999. Bluxo Records

Santa Baby: Live In Toronto. Holly Cole. January 25, 2000. EMI International

The Best Of Holly Cole. Holly Cole. November, 2000. Blue Note Records

Tropical Soul. Dennis McCaughey & Tropical Soul. November, 2000. Migration Music

Taivas Sinivalkoinen. Bablo. February 12, 2001. Self- released

10:30 Thursdays. Andy Cowan. May, 2001. Self-released BMM 245.2

Live At The Kammerspiele. Me And Cassity. 2002. Tapete Records

Jersey�s Talkin. Various artists. September, 2002. BluesKid (performed by The Mango Brothers)

Homegrown. Nussbaumer/ Weber/ Kreil. 2003. Self-released

Sometimes. Claudia Bettinaglio. September, 2003. CrossCut Records

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

Swingin� it. 8 To The Bar. 2004. Self-released (Germany) 

Songman V. Mike Sinatra. 2004. Monophonic

Sometimes... Claudia Bettinaglio. August, 2004. CrossCut Records

The Holly Cole Collection - Vol. 1. Holly Cole. October 12, 2004. Magada International (same version as on Temptation, 1995)

Twenty Fifth Anniversary Collection. Bagatelle. November 29, 2004. Self-released

Crosseyed Cat. Turnip Greens. March 21, 2006. Cope Records (Denmark)

Ameri-mf-cana. Ameri-mf-cana (Sue Burkhart and Ed Vadas). September 1, 2007. Self-released

Absolutely Live. The Bluesbreakers. July 2008. Extraplatte (Austria)

Misfits. The Hot Java Band. August 22, 2008. Cool Vision Records

Father Time. Hal Ketchum. September 9, 2008. Curb Records

Fragile. Joni Keen Jazz. February 5, 2009. Skylark Records

Under Cover #1. Peter Viskinde. March 2, 2009. Poplick Records



Notes:



(1) Jersey Girl:



Tom Waits (1980): "I never thought I would catch myself saying "sha la la" in a song. This is my first experiment with "sha la la." It has one of them kinda Drifters feels. I didn't wanna say "muscular dystrophy" in it or anything, 'cause I didn't think it fit in with the feel of the number. So lyrically I tried to do it straight ahead, a guy walking down the street to see his girl." (Source: "Heartattack and Vine". Us promo pack: Stephen Peeples. September 4, 1980)



(1998): When you wrote "Jersey Girl," [TW "mmm"] did you have Bruce Springsteen in the back of your mind? I know you've been asked this. [TW] No, well I wrote it for my wife, she's from Jersey, well she's originally from Illinois, she moved to New Jersey, and she grew up there, Morristown, New Jersey, and so I wrote it for her when we met, and eh, so.. eh. [DJ] Were you flattered by Bruce Springsteen doing it? [TW] Yeah! I like it, I like that version. I got up on stage and sang it with him one night in Los Angeles in front of about ten million people, and it scared the hell outa me. Um, Yeah I do like it. With the little glockenspiel in there, an a... [DJ] It's seems somehow very natural for him to do it, seemed like it sort of fit into his style well. [TW] Well, I've done all I can to help him, you know. He's been in such a jam, financially so uh, y'know... [DJ] I'm sure he appreciated that a lot.. [TW] No, iss.... I really liked that version. (Source: "Mixed Bag, WNEW New York ". Interview on WNEW FM. October, 1998)



Jay S. Jacobs (2000): "Waits had invited Jerry Yester to arrange and conduct "Jersey Girl" and "Ruby's Arms," and he later remarked that Yester's arrangement for the latter just blew him away - he loved the fact that the brass choir sounded so much like a Salvation Army band." It would be the last time Yester and Waits ever worked together. "Right after Heartattack and Vine - or like a year after - I moved to Hawaii," Yester recalls. "And he moved up North. And I haven't seen him since. I've talked to him on the phone, but I haven't seen him since then - except in the movies . . ." (Source: Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. Jay S. Jacobs, 2000)



(2) Cornerboy

- n. [late 19C+] (orig. US) an idler who whiles away the time hanging around on street corners (corner cove, corner cowboy, corner man, drugstore cowboy, lounge lizzard, saloon-bar cowboy) (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

- Also mentioned in "Annie's back In Town": "And all the corner boys are trouble-makers."



(3) The best known cover is of course that made by Bruce Springsteen. He first performed the song at Meadowlands Arena in New Jersey, July 2, 1981. There is a bootleg (audience) tape available from that show. He performed it again a week later, on July 9, 1981, and this time he recorded it himself and released it as B-side of the 7" single 'Cover Me' in 1981. It's also available in the box-set 'Bruce Springsteen Live 1975-1985' released in 1986. ...Bruce added a verse of his own: "I see you on the street and you look so tired I know that job you've got leaves you so uninspired When I come by to take you out to eat I find you dressed upon the bed and baby, fast asleep Go in the bathroom, put that make-up on We're gonna take that little brat of yours, and drop her off at your mom's Oh, I know a place where the dancin's free Come on girl, won't you go with me?" There is also a version with Tom and Bruce doing the song together. It was recorded at a Springsteen concert at LA Sports Arena, Los Angeles, August 24, 1981'. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. March, 2000)



Michael Tearson (1985): "I have to ask you about the Springsteen cover of "Jersey Girls". How did you first hear that and how did you first react when you heard it?" Tom Waits: "I don't know when I first heard that. Oh I got a tape... yeah. I heard it on the eh... I don't know, I guess I heard it on the radio. Yeah, I heard it on the radio. I said: "Yeah, that's a pretty good song there." (laughs) Yeah, I did what I could to help him out. As far as I'm concerned he's on his own now. Eh, I've done what I can for his career and eh... y'know? Well, I liked it, I really liked it. And I heard it a lot, it was on some jukeboxes and that's kinda nice too, y'know? Yeah, it was a good feeling. And I liked the way he did it. Yeah, I liked it a lot. Yeah, he's a real nice guy." (Source: "Nightlines Interview" Nightlines on CBC Stereo (Canada) conducted by Michael Tearson. Date: New York. Late 1985)



(1998): Were you flattered by Bruce Springsteen doing it? Tom Waits: Yeah! I like it, I like that version. I got up on stage and sang it with him one night in Los Angeles in front of about ten million people, and it scared the hell outa me. Um, Yeah I do like it. With the little glockenspiel in there, an a... DJ: It's seems somehow very natural for him to do it, seemed like it sort of fit into his style well. TW: Well, I've done all I can to help him, you know. He's been in such a jam, financially so uh, y'know... DJ: I'm sure he appreciated that a lot.. TW: No, iss.... I really liked that version. (Source: "Mixed Bag, WNEW New York". Interview on WNEW FM. October, 1998)



Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet

 



Jesus' blood never failed me yet

Never failed me yet

Jesus' blood never failed me yet

There's one thing I know

For he loves me so



Jesus' blood never failed me

Never failed me yet

Never failed me yet

One thing I know

For he loves me so



Jesus' blood never failed me yet

Never failed me yet

Never failed me yet

There's one thing I know

Loves me so



Jesus' blood never failed me

Never failed me yet

Never failed me yet

One thing I know

For he loves me so



Original version published by: Gavin Bryars, � 1971/ 1975

This version published by: Mnemonic/ (MCPS/ PRS), � 1993

Official release (version with Waits): Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet - Gavin Bryars, POINT Music, 1993

Tom Waits: Vocals. London tramp: Vocals

Tom Waits vocals recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1993



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet:

Gavin Bryars (1993): "In 1971 I came across a tape of an old tramp singing a fragment of a religious song. I made a long orchestral piece out of it and this was recorded in 1975. --- Some years ago Tom contacted me because he had lost his recording of the original version, which he said was his "favourite recording". Accordingly, when I developed the new piece, I decided to ask Tom if he would like to join in." (Source: Liner notes from "Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet", Gavin Bryars, POINT Music, 1993)

Gavin Bryars (1993): "I came across the original tape that I used for this piece when a friend [Alan Power] was making a film about tramps and people living rough near railway stations in London and he gave me the tapes to help him make the film and one of these was this old man singing a religious song, Jesus Blood Never Failed Me. He wasn't drunk, he simply just burst into song."

Tom Waits (1999): "Well this was the eh... Gavin Bryars and eh this was a song that was discovered through eh ehm.. they did a documentary on songs that people remembered from their childhood. And they interviewed a lot of homeless people in England. And they went under to the bridges and out to the beach and downtown and ehm& and they found people that ehm& asked them what are the songs they carry with them, what are the songs that mean something to them. And there's a lot of people (who) have lost everything and maybe all they've got is you know these memories and these songs and this was one that they found and ehm... So Gavin Bryars orchestrated it and it was called "Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet" and eh he made a record with that title..." (Source: "KBCO Interview With Tom Waits" KBCO-C studios Los Angeles (USA), by Bret Saunders. October 13, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999) on Gavin Bryars' "The Sinking Of The Titanic": "This is difficult to find, have you heard this? It's a musical impression of the sinking of the Titanic. You hear a small chamber orchestra playing in the background, and then slowly it starts to go under water, while they play. It also has "Jesus Blood" on it. I did a version of that with him. I heard this on my wife's birthday, at about 2:00 in the morning in the kitchen, and I taped it. For a long time I just had a little crummy cassette of this song, didn't know where it came from, it was on one of those Pacifica radio stations where you can play anything you want. This is really an interesting evening's music." (Source: "Tom Waits, Artist Choice" Hear Music Artist's Choice. Date: October, 1999)

Gavin Bryars (2006): "I understand those who don't like Tom Waits' voice in the context and there are many people who prefer the original recording from 1975 - the 'purists' - and it was for that reason that I made the first track listing follow exactly the structure of the old version so that it would be possible to drop out at that point. In fact because of the investment of Frankfurt Ballet in the recording process (they wanted to have the rights for the first ballet use) we did also make a mix without Tom, though it probably goes without saying that I prefer Tom in there - after all it was my idea to include him. His specific inclusion was to have something other than an accompaniment to the old man's voice, and also to have something which evolves rather than repeats." (Source: "Jesus Blood Never Failed Me yet". E-mail from Gavin Bryars to Brian Alegant as published on Prof. Alegant's Blog. November 7, 2006)

Gavin Bryars (2006): "The original Obscure Records release from 1975 was re-released by Virgin in 1998, initially in UK only to capitalise on the first night of my second opera Doctor Ox's Experiment at English National Opera. Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet was originally the 'B' side of the LP, with The Sinking of the Titanic as the 'A' side. It was also released in Japan, but I'm not sure about the rest of the world." (Source: "Jesus Blood Never Failed Me yet". E-mail from Gavin Bryars to Brian Alegant as published on Prof. Alegant's Blog. November 5, 2006)

Further reading: "BBC Radio: Johnnie Walker Interview"



Tom Waits, Jesus and Me

Beautiful intonation, impeccable timing and diction as clear as Frank Sinatra's. It's all in a day's work when you record with a legend.


By Gavin Bryars.



I spent one afternoon over 10 years ago working with Tom Waits in a studio in northern California. It was probably one of the most sublime musical experiences of my life. We were recording my piece, Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet, an orchestral arrangement based on a 1971 field recording of a tramp singing in London. Tom and I were first in touch at the time of his last tour of the UK - in the 1980s. He had lost his copy of the original vinyl LP released on Brian Eno's Obscure Records in 1975, an album that had quietly disappeared. This, he said, was his "favourite record", which seemed to me to be the highest praise. As it happened, there were a couple of pristine copies in my manager's office so I had one sent to him. I was given a couple of tickets for his London concert but in the event was unable to go. I still feel guilty at the thought of those two empty seats.



We didn't meet at that time, but I subsequently got in touch with Tom when he was working with stage director Robert Wilson on the opera The Black Rider, which I went to see in Paris. Tom and I had a good deal in common as I too had worked with Bob (in the early 1980s, on my first opera Medea and on Bob's monumental project The CIVIL WarS). Although I saw Tom in Paris, we did not speak. But we did begin to correspond regularly and discussed his possible involvement in my second opera, Doctor Ox's Experiment - in fact the idea of Tom taking the central part of Ox - which interested him a lot.



During this period, Philip Glass asked me if I would be interested in doing a CD recording of Jesus' Blood. He assumed I would do something similar to the old version and was somewhat fazed when I wanted to use the entire 74 minutes then available. The CD falls into three parts: the first 25 minutes are as the old version (to satisfy purists who, if they wanted, need listen no further). Then the music goes on another journey, with a series of darker orchestrations in the second part;and for the third I decided to add Tom.



It was in the middle of a telephone conversation with the record company in New York that I found myself saying, almost involuntarily, that I would introduce the voice of Tom Waits late in the piece. I reasoned that, throughout the piece, everything serves to accompany and support the loop of the old man's voice. But in the context of a much larger structure, something else might emerge alongside, like two fragile old friends singing a duet. And Tom agreed to do it.



I recorded all the orchestral and choral tracks in New York in late 1992 (working towards a May 1993 release) and, as Tom had been working with Bob Wilson again in Europe (on Alice In Wonderland), we left it that we would be in touch after he had spent the Christmas holidays with his family.



However, when I tried to contact him in January he couldn't be found. Nobody knew where he was and all messages went unanswered. Eventually it came to a point where I had to go to New York to make the final mix and I called Tom again to say that if he really was not able to do it I would understand, but that I had 24 hours to make the arrangements and if I didn't hear I would have to proceed without him.



I left this message on his machine and tried again the next morning before going to the university to teach. To my surprise, although there had been no reply, his outgoing message had been changed, which I took as a clue to encourage me to try again. When I came back in the afternoon there was a lengthy message from him apologising, and eventually we spoke.



The upshot was that he wanted to do it, but under certain conditions. These were that he would not come to New York but that his part in the recording should be done in his studio in northern California with me, his engineer and nobody else. I picked up a multi-track of the piece, with a preliminary mix and three vacant tracks, and flew to San Francisco.



After staying overnight at a hotel in the airport, I rented a car and drove north. I followed the studio's directions and found my way by lunchtime, to what is basically a converted chicken farm, with various rooms built inside unlikely exteriors. One of these rooms was a guesthouse where I was to stay the next night, and so I installed myself and Tom arrived mid-afternoon. He came with his wife Kathleen and two children (his wife was expecting their third child, Sullivan, born later that year) in an old American car. They had all been to a comic-book convention on the coast. His family left and we set about recording.



As the studio machines could not handle the large reels I had brought with me, we cut the tape on to three separate reels. For the first take Tom was in a booth next to the control room and simply sang along to the tape in a variety of ways. After we listened to this take, Tom suggested that he sing in a different space, in the "Waiting Room", where he recorded his own albums and where he has all his own instruments.



Here he sang to headphone playback, head close to the microphone, with just me in the room. It was like being in the company of a great blues singer from the past. He sang, eyes closed, constructing sequences of the phrase, maybe five or six repetitions, until he moved immediately to a new idea. Some were subtle and tender, some very powerful and even angry. Occasionally he sang through a battery-operated voice gun. Later we tried a few takes on which he sang through this megaphone and I accompanied him on his harmonium, which had only one working pedal.



Throughout the recording I could witness at close quarters his musical strengths: impeccable timing, beautifully focused intonation, an instinctive musical intelligence and diction as clear as Frank Sinatra's (which would have been fantastic to hear in opera).



When we finished we spent the early evening chatting about music and many other things, and his range of musical knowledge was extraordinary. He also talked eloquently about my piece and about his first hearing the music by chance over the radio at the end of a birthday party for Kathleen. He spoke about the place being littered with empty bottles, balloons and confetti while they just sat quietly holding hands, listening to the whole piece. The music, he said, "settled like a dust on the evening". To save Kathleen having to pick him up later that evening, I drove him back in my rented car.



When I got back to New York I sorted the individual repetitions into groups and constructed a sequence to follow the contours of the orchestration. In fact, in all the repetitions he never once sang the phrase "correctly" - ie exactly as the old man (!) - and I had to classify his versions. One I called Ruby's Arms as he often made the second phrase of the tramp's song into the same as one in his own song, "[I will say goodbye] to Ruby's arms [though my heart is breaking]".



I still have somewhere all the takes - the album contains about a third of them - and when we parted we agreed two things. One was that we would never do the piece "live" together. And the other was to do with its exploitation. He said: "If ever some bastard comes up with a wine called Jesus' Blood, don't let them use the piece for a commercial".



Nobody has. But I wouldn't.



(Source: Sunday Herald Online. October 3, 2004. � newsquest (Sunday Herald) limited. all rights reserved)





 



Notes on the recording of Jesus' Blood Never Failed Me Yet - written for John Potter

By Gavin Bryars.



When Philip Glass asked me if I would be interested in doing a new recording of Jesus' Blood he assumed that I would do something similar to the first version and wanted to know what other pieces would be on the same CD. He was somewhat fazed when I said that I would do a version lasting the whole 74 minutes available.



I pointed out to him that I had no intention of simply multiplying by three the number of times each of the old repetitions would be done (an approach that would, perhaps of been his solution!). The original version had lasted for one side of a vinyl album - about 25 minutes - as I merely wanted to avoid a side-break. I decided rather to make the first 25 minutes exactly the same in terms of structure as the old version (to satisfy purists who, if they wanted, could listen no further) but then to take the music on another journey.



Effectively this makes the CD fall into three parts. The first is as the old version (which was subsequently re-released on CD by Virgin, and I knew of their intention). The second part moves into a series of darker orchestrations, some without strings at all. And for the third I decided to add Tom.



This decision came in the middle of a telephone conversation with the record company in New York when I was explaining how the orchestration might involve. I found myself saying, almost involuntarily, that I would introduce the voice of Tom Waits at some point later in the piece.



My thinking in this was as follows: in all the versions I had made everything that is played serves to accompany and support the old man's voice. I felt that perhaps at this point, in the context of a much larger structure, another element might join, and even provide a form of duet with the old man.



I had begun discussions with Tom by this time of his being involved in my second opera Doctor Ox's Experiment - in fact I had spoken with him about taking the part of Ox himself. I knew of his feelings about Jesus' Blood as he had contacted me in the 1980's when he was on tour in England. He had lost his copy of the LP which he said was his "favourite record". As it happened there were a couple of copies in my manager's office and I had a copy sent to him. I later got in touch with him when he was working with Bob Wilson on The Black Rider, which I went to see in Paris. WE had a good deal in common as I had worked with Bob in the early 1980's (Medea, CIVIL WarS, The Golden Windows).



Although I saw him in Paris, we did not speak. So we had not met, nor spoken directly, but we did correspond regularly for a time.



I faxed him to ask if he would do the Jesus' Blood recording and explained my thinking on the whole shape of the piece (I worked out a 'road-map' of the whole duration so that I could see exactly what was happening in each repetition). He agreed to do it.



The plan was that I would record all the orchestral and choral tracks in New York during November and December 1992 as we were working towards a May 1993 release. Tom had been working with Bob Wilson again in Europe (on Alice in Wonderland) and we left it that we would be in touch after he had spent the Christmas and New Year holidays with his family.



However, when I tried to contact him in January he couldn't be found. His manager didn't know where he was and all messages were unanswered no matter who sent them. Eventually it came to a point where I had to go to New York to make the final mix and I called Tom again to say that if he really was not able to do it I would understand but that I had 24 hours to make the arrangements and if I didn't hear I would have to proceed without him. (In fact there is a mix without him, as Frankfurt Ballet co-produced the recording and wanted to have the option of having a version without Tom. Frankfurt's artistic director, William Forsythe visited me at the studio in New York as I was finishing the mix)).



I remember leaving the message on his machine and trying again before leaving my house to go to the university to teach in the morning. To my surprise, although there had been no reply, his outgoing message had been changed and I took this as a clue to encourage me and that I might try again. When I came back from teaching in the afternoon there was a lengthy message from him (which I still have on tape!) apologising and eventually we spoke.



The upshot was that he wanted to do it but under certain conditions. These were that he would not come to New York but that his part in the recording should be done in his studio in Northern California with just me and his engineer and emphatically no-one from New York. Consequently when I arrived in New York I picked up a multi-track of the piece with a preliminary mix and with 3 vacant tracks and flew to San Francisco. I stayed overnight at a hotel in the airport, rented a car and then drove north (I remember crossing the Golden Gate Bridge in the early morning with the Beach Boys on the radio....). I followed the studio's directions and found my way there by lunchtime - it is basically a converted chicken farm, with all the various rooms built inside an unlikely exterior. One of these rooms was a guest house where I was to stay the next night and so I installed myself and Tom arrived mid-afternoon. He came with his wife and two children (his wife was expecting their third child, born later that year and called "Sullivan") in an old American car - a Chevrolet or Cadillac - and they had been to a comic book convention on the coast. His family left and we set about recording.



As the studio machine's could not handle the large reels which I had brought we had to cut the tape onto three separate reels which gave us, effectively, 15 minutes per tape. For the first take Tom was in a booth next to the control room and simply sang along to the tape in a variety of ways. We listened to this take and then Tom suggested that he sing in a different building, in a room called the "Waiting Room", where he records his own albums. All the rooms are linked to the central control room and there is one for listening called the "Listening Room"....



In this space he has all his own instruments and he sang to headphone playback with just me in the room. It was like being in the company of a great blues singer from the past as he sang, eyes closed, constructing sequences of the phrase until he moved on to a new idea. Each sequence would last maybe 5 or 6 repetitions and then he would immediately be into a new idea. Some were quite tender, some were emotionally very powerful and even angry, occasionally he did some through a battery operated voice gun. At the end we tried a few where he sang through this megaphone and I accompanied him on his harmonium, which only had one working pedal. (Some of these repetitions were used on the "B" version of the single which was issued later).



By the end of a couple of hours we had recorded on all the available tracks which I was to take back to New York.



We spent the early evening chatting and, to avoid his wife having to pick him up later in the evening, I drove him to an address in Santa Rosa in my rented car.



I would say that spending the afternoon in that studio with Tom was as beautiful a musical experience as I can remember. I have a video with Tom and myself talking about the piece (a film crew arrived, in spite of my clear instructions to the contrary, from the record company later that evening - I look quite uncomfortable) and he is very eloquent about the piece and about his first hearing the music over the radio at the end of a birthday party for his wife. He talks about the place being littered with balloons and confetti and they were just sitting quietly. He describes the music as settling like a dust on the evening and they just listened to the whole piece, holding hands....



When I got back to New York I sorted the individual repetitions into groups (the groups of repetitions which he had sung) and constructed a sequence which would follow the contours of the orchestration. I wanted the peak to be round about the hour mark which coincided with the centre of the only accompanying phrase which lasts two whole repetitions, that for the piccolo trumpet.



In fact, in all the repetitions that he sang he never once sang the phrase 'correctly' (!) i.e. exactly as the old man, and I devised a series of mnemonics for classifying his versions. One of these was "Ruby's Arms" as he often made the second phrase of the tramp's song into the phrase which occurs when he sings, in his own song, "(I will say goodbye) to Ruby's arms (though my heart is breaking)".



I still have somewhere all the takes that we did - the album contains about a third. I did later re-use some of the material that isn't on the CD when I did a B version for the single release. This starts with Tom and myself, and then the old man is gradually added, rather than the obverse which is what we do on the A version, and which is the way all other versions were made. Apparently this single got to number 8 in the Dutch pop charts in 1993.....



(Source: Gavin Bryars official site. Copyright � Gavin Bryars. All rights reserved)



Jesus Gonna Be Here

 



Well, Jesus gonna be here

He gonna be here soon, yeah

He gonna cover us up with leaves

With a blanket from the moon, yeah

With a promise and a vow

And a lullaby for my brow

Jesus gonna be here

He gonna be here soon, yeah



And I'm not gonna do nothin' but wait here

I don't have to shout, yeah

I got me no reason, yeah

And I got no doubt, yeah

I'm gonna get myself unfurled

From this mortal coiled up world

Jesus gonna be here

Gonna be here soon, yeah



I got to keep my eyes, keep 'em wide open, yeah

So I can see my Lord, yeah

I'm gonna watch that old horizon

For my brand new Ford, yeah

Well, I can hear him rolling on down the lane

I said Hollywood be thy name

Cause Jesus gonna be here

He gonna be here soon, yeah



Well, I got to keep myself, I must keep myself faithful

And you know that I've been so good, yeah

Except for drinking

But he knew that I would, yeah

And then I'm gonna leave this place better

Than the way I found that it was

And Jesus gonna be here

He gonna be here soon, yeah



I know my Jesus gonna be here

He gonna be here soon, yeah

I know my Jesus gonna be here

Gonna be here soon, yeah



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992-1998

Official release: "Bone Machine", Island Records Inc., 1992 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

The Silverbacks. Jeff Lang and Hat Fitz. 1998. Self-released JL9801CD

Start The Engine and Drive Away. Faraway Brothers. May 21, 1999. NMX Records

Wits End Sessions. Big Skin and Gary Knowlton. 2000. Self-released

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Spirit Of The Century. Blind Boys Of Alabama. April 24, 2001. EMD/ Real World Records

Second Skin. Ashley Cleveland. April, 2002. 204 Records

A Postcard From... Billy's Band. 2003. Self-released (Russia)

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

Paul Weller: Under the Influence Various Artists. November 25, 2003 Label: Under the Influence (performed by The Blind Boys Of Alabama)

I Don't Believe. Ash Grunwald. 2004. Self-released (Australia)

Pat The White. Pat The White. March, 2004. Bros

10 Ans De Blues Au Québec. Various Artists. 2004. Bros. Performed by Pat the White (same version as on "Pat The White" March, 2004)

Live At The Corner. Ash Grunwald. 2005. Self-released (Australia)

When I was Everything. Christopher Williams. January 11, 2005. Big Red Van Music

Kings of Candleburg Road. Ken Tucker and The Back Porch Pilgrims. June, 2005. Self-released

100 Fields. Drongomala. 2006. Flyin Mountain

Rivington Hotel. Tina Mancusi. November 17, 2006. Self-released

V.I.H. V. The Victory In Heaven Band. March 9, 2007. Victory In Heaven Music

Crazy Coyote. Lewi Longmire Band. April 7, 2007. Self-released

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Solo Accoustic. Paul Zunno. June 13, 2007. Self-released

Passion, Prayer, Poison. Karen Vieno Paurus. March 15, 2008. Self-released

HooDoo You Do. Abbe May & The Rockin' Pneumonia. January 30, 2009. Self-released (Australia)

Something As Simple. Christopher Williams. March 24, 2009. BiG ReD VaN Music

Things That Go Bump In the Night. We Ghosts. July 17, 2009. Self-released (Sweden) 

Christian Blues vol. 2. Eddie Matthews and Larry Maz. May 8, 2010. Gracetone



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Jesus Gonna Be Here". With: Larry Taylor: upright bass, guitar. Smokey Hormel: guitar, banjo, mandolin. Danny McGough: keyboards. Andrew Borger: drums, marimba, percussion. Sala Kongresowa. Warsaw/ Poland May 26, 2000 (Mule Variations tour).  



Notes:



(1) Jesus Gonna Be Here:

- Tom Waits 
(1992): "Probably would have been better if we'd gotten a Baptist choir, but I kind of like it by itself, just bass and guitar. I don't know, I was trying to sing, making my voice real big. It's a gospel song. So I guess I was thinking about different things to sing about. Because one tends to cover the same ground, you know. There are things you are drawn to, and will always be drawn to, and they'll keep happening and you'll keep writing about them, as if this time I'll solve it, you know, but I think the best songs are riddles that you try to discover what you think about them while you're writing them. And then the deeper the riddle, the longer you'll sing the song. And then, some songs, like Bob Dylan said, are best written in a very peaceful place and sung in turmoil, and then other songs are the other way, they're written in turmoil, and sung in a peaceful place. They really do have a lot of power and they really do help you sometimes." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)

Tom Waits (1992): "I used to hear them [preachers] in downtown LA all the time, the guys on the corner with their own sound systems in the briefcases and the microphones. Heavy traffic. They always picked like 5 o'clock when it's really busy downtown. It usually seemed like the most important thing that was going on but it was also disregarded by everyone. It used to make me really - I would always stop and listen cause when you have something to say and it's important to you and no one's listening it's a lonely place and it takes a lot of courage and it takes a lot of conviction. Sometimes it just elevates you. Knowing that nobody's listening - there's a freedom in that. You can say anything you want when no one's listening. If you're raging in a room where nobody cares what you say you can say anything you want. I love those guys. Plus the sound systems were really - I love the sound of the little broken speakers." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic" Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992 (?))

Tom Waits (1992): "This was done real simply, it's just guitar and bass and that's it - in a small room. I never played upright bass before. It was one of those trades, Larry took the guitar and I took the bass. You can hear the helicopter on that." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic" Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992 (?))



Jitterbug Boy

 



(Sharing a Curbstone With Chuck E. Weiss, Robert Marchese, Paul Body And The Mug And Artie)(16)



Well, I'm a jitterbug boy(2), by the shoe-shine

Resting on my laurels and my hardys(3) too

Life of Riley(4) on a swing shift(5), girls follow my drift

Once upon a time I was in show biz too



I've seen the Brooklyn Dodgers(6) playing at Ebbets Field(7)

Seen the Kentucky Derby(8) too

It's fast women, slower horses, I'm reliable sources

And I'm holding up a lamp post if you want to know



I've seen the Wabash Cannonball(9), buddy, I've done it all

Because I slept with the lions, and Marilyn Monroe(10)

Had breakfast in the eye of a hurricane

Fought Rocky Marciano(11), played Minnesota Fats(12)

Burned hundred-dollar bills, I've eaten Mulligan stew(13)

Got drunk with Louis Armstrong(14), what's that old song?

I taught Mickey Mantle(15) everything that he knows



So you'll ask me what I'm doing here, holding up a lamp-post

Flipping this quarter, trying to make up my mind

And if it's heads I'll go to Tennessee, and tails I'll buy a drink

If it lands on the edge I'll keep talking to you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976(17)



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Live intro's:



- Westchester Jazz Festival, 1976: "You know, I was just thinking about my first Senior Prom, just before I came out here. I tried to perish the thought. I don't know... I took a girl named Margaret Terentino to the Senior Prom. And she wasn't that good looking really... I've seen better legs on a table, but eh... Better teeth on a comb. Better hair on my ass, as a matter of fact. Well, I wasn't... I wasn't any great catch myself! I had hemorrhoids, dandruff, and terminal acne. They used to use me for third base. I took a girl named Margaret Terentino and... Her brother was a big sumo wrestler, and her parents owned an Italian restaurant. And I had to borrow a car. And I was working... It was a dish washing job and a paper route at the same time. Doing a little social climbing. So I drove her all the way to Tijuana, and parked illawstrous right in front of a big sign that said, "Toe-away! No parking! We're not responsible for articles lost or stolen". Well, to make a long story shorter, the car got towed away, I got all juiced and shit, and threw up all over her dress. That was right after she threw up all over my slacks. So I ended up hitch-hiking and I got picked up by a guy named Joe Montelongo, and Joe was a big guy who used to sing in a band, and they did one song, it was 'Walking the Dog'. But they did it for about a half hour or so. So he let us in the car, and we got into a big fight and I dropped her off at a Sanders station, to go in and fix herself up. And I went home. And just about that time was when I ran into Chuck E. Weiss, a partner of mine. And he told me a long story 'bout when he was thirteen years old and he went into a telephone booth, and he found the key in the coinbox. If you think about that it's fascinating, because not only did that key fit in that particular coinbox, but it also fit about seven hundred and fifty other telephone booths. Eh-he... Well, push came to shove, he called up 'bout ten friends in there, and they had to drag him all over the city, and a week later Chuck E was thirteen years old, ridin' a limousine and smokin' Cuban cigars. Eh-he-he... And the headlines in the newspapers said, 'Ma Belle (?) Raided by Mafia'. A real caper. This is 'bout a jitterbug cat I met in the Pennsylvania station at three o'clock in the morning, named Rocky. One of those guys who's been everywhere, knows everything, done everything, you know... I mean, he definitely would sell you a rat's asshole for a wedding ring, and I'll say that without fear of contradiction. He told me he was wearing Hank Williams' boots. And they were loafers, you know... He said, 'Well, I had the tops cut off, cause you know... ' 

- The Shaboo Inn, Willimantic. November 9, 1976: "Well... I'd like to do eh... Well, this is a new song about an evening I spent in the Pennsylvania station In the wee small hours of the morning in New York City one night I was just trying to get to Philadelphia Cause every now and then you just have to go to Philadelphia That's all there is to it Regardless of whether you know anybody there or not, you just have to go to Philadelphia I woke up in the middle of the night and [?] to get to Philadelphia so I called on the phone to the Pennsylvania station There weren't no trains, there weren't anybody answering the phone I just had to get to Philadelphia, so I ran all the way up to 34th Street Walked inside and the place was just loaded with a veritable convoluted evening compendium And one straggler of a cat named Rocky leaning up outside of the information booth I took one look at him and I knew that he'd probably been involved at some point with an academic institution of higher learning And he was all over me like a cheap suit, eh-he-he-he Couldn't shake him, eh-he-he So we went to a place called Blarney Stone Yeah, so I went to Blarney Stone and drank cheap shots and beer in the memory of a guy named Charlie Denton that died in 1937 And sang songs aaaaall night long I said, I want a girl just like the girl that married dear old Dad [cheers from the audience] You too, huh? When I fall in love it will be forever Or I'll never fall in love [scat sings] Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think Destroy yourself, it's later than you think The girl that I marry will have to be Soft as a kitten and have a whole lot of money Well, at least a Bank Americard and Master Charge As we walked up 8th Avenue he was telling me all about when he used to hang out with... it was him and Mickey Mantle and Igor Stravinski and John F. Kennedy, and... Those were back in the old days... Said, me and Sly was like this... eh-he-he-he Don Drysdale, and I knew him when he was nothing and he hasn't changed a bit So I was sitting around with the Pope one night And who dropped in but Hank Williams, let me tell ya! And Hank was eh... cause those were the days when Hank was hanging out with Louis Armstrong, so they all came in together So we got Charlie Parker on the phone and said, 'You gotta get over here, man' And he looked me right in the eyes ...?... and said I'm the jitterbug boy..."

- One Night Stand, 1976. Version 1:"Somewhere across the sea My love, she waits for me [scat sings] Well, when I fall in love Y'know, it will be forever Or I'll never fall in love Heeey, baby! I wanna know if you'll be my girl Cause wise men say, only fools rush in Well, won't you take me out to the ball game And take me out to the crowd Friendship, friendship Just a perfect friendship When other friendships have been forgotten Ours will still be hot Cause there's a place for us A time and place for us I got plenty of nuttin' And nuttin' is plenty for me I got the sun in the morning And the moon at night Cause I'm a jitterbug boy..."

- One Night Stand, 1976. Version 2"And I dream of Jeannie with the light brown hair Cause when I fall in love, it will be forever Or I'll never fall in love Because the girl that I marry will have to be Soft as a kitten and have a whole lot of money And then you can take me out to the ball game Take me out to the crowd You know, one of these days I'm gonna get me a little place down there on Primrose Lane Life's a holiday on Primrose Lane Such a holiday on Primrose Lane And I got the sun in the morning And the moon at night Cause I'm a jitterbug boy..."

- WNEW radio. December 14, 1976: "This is a song about eh... a cat I met at eh Pennsylvania station eh real late one night and eh... his name's Rocky... It seems there's always a guy named Rocky at Pennsylvania station... or any station for that matter. If there isn't you know eh, they usually have a (...?...) and rent one. And eh... The guy'd been everywhere, done everything. I was going to Philadelphia. He said: "Man, I'm going to Philadelphia." He said: "I'm gonna take a train." I said: "Well you know eh, don't take a train, let the train take you.". Huh, huh... "

- Roslyn, Long Island, New York, October 10, 1977"Somewhere across the sea my love, she waits for me... There's a place for us. A time and place for us. On a bicycle built for two. Well, you can take me out to the ball game. Take me out to the crowd. Well, the girl that I marry will have to be soft as a kitten and have a whole lot of money. Because when I fall in love it will be forever or I'll never fall in love. Friendship, friendship just a perfect friendship. When other friendships have been forgotten ours will still be hot. Cause I'm a jitterbug boy..."

- Sydney. March, 1979: "Well, this is a little song about a buddy-wuddy of mine. His name is Chuck E. Weiss. Chuck E. Weiss is the kind of guy that would steal his own car. Eh-he-he-he... And I'm a jitterbug boy..."

- Kansas City, 1979"Well... thank you. It's really nice to be here. The only time I ever had any honest affiliation with Kansas City was when a friend of mine named Montclair de Havilland drove here over the weekend in a powder blue Lincoln Continental, just to get himself a can of Falstaff and some orange pants. Eh-he-he-he-he-he. Eh-he-he. He said, 'Man, this is the only city in the United States where you can get orange pants!' Eh-he-he-he... Eh-he-he... [With a voice from hell:] All right, calm down back there! Well, I dream of Jeanie with the light brown hair Flowing like a river Oh, but Jeanie won't talk to me anymore And I've got plenty of nuttin' And nuttin's plenty for me And I've got the sun in the morning And the moon at night Cause I'm a jitterbug boy..."

- Storming Heaven Benefit, Healdsburg. August 11, 1996"Good evening. Thank you! I know: what have I been doing? Well, I've gone back to school... traffic school. I don't have to pick a major right away, that's what I loved about it. I'm gonna go with something really light at first, just like "seven units", and "failure to yield", something like that. Actually, I ran into somebody just the other day that I went to traffic school with, and I said 'Jeff! How are you?' And we exchanged greetings. And he was the guy that first told me that there are only two things that you can throw out the window of a moving vehicle on the freeway without getting arrested. And I know what those two things are. The first one is easy. [someone in the audience yells 'Water'] Water, exactly! The second one's a little tougher. Are you ready for this? Feathers! Think about that for a while. Now that's without the bird. That's why I got arrested. I assume. I argued... I'm a jitterbug boy..."

- Draken Theatre. Stockholm, Sweden. November, 1987"This is about when I lived in a hotel. I lived in a hotel for a long time and... Long beyond the time necessary for me to stay in a hotel. I had an analyst who insisted that I'd stay in a hotel under all circumstances. And under no circumstances was I to move out of this hotel. And I was paying him a lot of money, so I thought I'd better take his advice. So I stayed in this hotel, forever! And there was a nice little cigarette machine in the lobby, and a swimming pool that was painted black. It matched my mood in the water most of the time. It was a thrilling place. And my analyst is now living in that hotel. And he pays ME three hundred dollars, so it all balances out. Actually, I get asked a lot of questions. I guess that the question I get asked the most... well, I mean I get asked often enough that I would remark on it to you tonight. In fact, somebody just today came up to me and asked me... [somebody in the audience yells 'How's the wife and kids?'] That's the one! Thank you very much, Sir! Everybody wants to get in the act! How long have you been out of prison now, Sir? See, that's what happens when cousins marry. Anyway, you're still working out at the airport, right? Okay, we'll be seeing you bright and early! Actually, the question I get asked the most is... and somebody today, just... I mean, out of the clear blue sky, somebody came up to me and said 'Tom, is it possible for a girl to get pregnant without intercourse?' I get that all the time. I mean, I get asked that all the time! Anyway... I said, for the answer to this we're gonna have to go all the way back to the civil war. Apparently a stray bullet... This is the truth! A stray bullet actually pierced the testicle of a Union soldier, and then it went on to lodge itself in the ovaries of an eighteen year old girl who was standing two hundred, maybe three hundred feet from him at the time. They'd never even met! How's that for luck! Anyway, you know, she was very happy of course, cause there was something kind of immaculate about the conception, and she did a lot of interviews and that type of thing, and people flew in, and she was on the cover of a lot of magazines at the time. The baby was healthy. Of course, the soldier was pissed off, wouldn't you be? It's actually a FORM of intercourse, but I don't think it's for everybody. Unless you like action. I like action! This is a little song about eh... I got it right out of the encyclopedia..."



(2) Jitterbug

- n.: adj. One who, though not a musician, enthusiastically likes or understands swing music; a swing fan.. A devotee of jitterbug music and dancing; one who follows the fashions and fads of the Jitterbug devotee (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- [1960s] (US Black) a youth who lives a street life but is not invariably a criminal [app. coined 1934 by US band leader Cab Calloway (1907-44)] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(3) Resting on my Laurels and my Hardys: To rest on ones laurels, referring to the comical Hall Roach duo: Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy.



(4) Life Of Riley: The good life. William and Mary Morris, in "Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins", conclude that this phrase arose when the vaudevillian Pat Rooney sang a song called "Are You the O'Reilly" during the late 19th century. The audience would sing along with this song, which dealt with what it would be like to be wealthy. The lyrics included such lines as `A hundred a day will be small pay' and `on the railroads you'll pay no fare.' However, H. L. Mencken attributes the origin of the phrase to "The Best in the House is None Too Good for Reilly," popular at the turn of the century. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. eGroups Tom Waits Discussionlist. March, 2000)



(5) Swing shift n.: A work period or shift between the standard day and night shifts, usu. beginning in the afternoon and ending in the evening, but sometimes beginning in the early morning and ending in the afternoon; a work crew or group of workers who work during these hours (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(6) Brooklyn Dodgers: The Brooklyn Dodgers was a New York baseball team that much to the dismay of the Brooklyn people moved to LA and became the LA Dodgers. When still in New York they played their home games at Ebbets Field. In the movie 'Blue in the Face' you can hear talk about how nothing was ever the same in Brooklyn after they left.(Submitted by Ulf Berggren. eGroups Tom Waits Discussionlist. March, 2000)



(7) Ebbets Field: Once the home arena for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Not to be confused with the Ebbets Field Nightclub in Denver where Waits has played in the seventies



(8) Kentucky Derby: The Kentucky Derby stands as the oldest, consecutively held Thoroughbred race in America. The first Kentucky Derby was held May 17, 1875. Further reading: http://www.kentuckyderby.com/kderby/history/index.html (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. eGroups Tom Waits Discussionlist. March, 2000)



(9) Wabash Cannonball

- A train. It ran for years along the Wabash River between St. Louis and Detroit. It was a steam engine that carried people, supplies, and food. The last run was in March of 1971 (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. September, 2000)

- Train, made famous by Roy Acuff's hit country song in the 40's. Wabash,a river flowing from W Ohio through Indiana, along part of the boundary between Indiana and Illinois, into the Ohio River (Submitted by Gary Duncan. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(10) Monroe, Marilyn

- Norma Jean Mortenson. Born Los Angeles/ Cal. 01-06-1926. Died Brentwood/ Cal. 05-08-1962. American actress and sex-symbol. Was married to Joe Dimaggio for a while.

- Also mentioned in A Sweet Little Bullet, 1978: "I'd rather die before I wake like Marilyn Monroe" and Hold On, 1999: "With charcoal eyes and Monroe hips she went and took that California trip"



(11) Marciano, Rocky: American actor and undefeated heavyweight champion of the world. Real name Rocco Marchegiano. Born: Brockton, Ma, September 1 1924 - Died: near Des Moines, Lo, August 31 1964.





(12) Minnesota Fats: Born Rudolf Wanderone Jr., Minnesota Fats was known as New York Fats early in his career, and adopted the nickname Minnesota Fats after the 1961 movie "The Hustler". Known to fans as "the sultan of stroke", "dean of the green", and the "bank shot bandit", Minnesota Fats was probably the most famous player ever to play the game of billiards. Fats could shoot pool with either hand, but more importantly, he could entertain while doing it. Minnesota Fats had his own television show called "Celebrity Billiards Show", on which he played. Fats shot pool competitively well into the 1980's. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. eGroups Tom Waits Discussionlist. March, 2000)





(13) Mulligan stew

n.: A stew made of any available meat(s) or vegetable(s). Orig. hobo use, perhaps from "salmagrundi". Often used facetiously about any stewlike food, however excellent (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- A hobo dish containing just about anything you have handy. How to make just like they make it at the yearly hobo convention in Britt. Iowa. "Britt Mulligan Stew" = 450 lbs. of Beef, 900 lbs. of Potatoes, 250 lbs. of carrots, 35 lbs. of green peppers, 300 lbs. of cabbage, 100 lbs. of turnips, 10 lbs. of parsnips, 150 lbs. of tomatoes, 20 lbs. of chili peppers, 25 lbs. of rice, 60 lbs. of celery, 1 lb bay leaves, 24 gallon of mixed vegetables, 10 lbs. of kitchen bouquet flavoring, about 400 loaves of bread are served, a total of 5000, 8 oz. cups ordered to serve the stew. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. eGroups Tom Waits Discussionlist. March, 2000).

- Might also refer to the famous verse from "Babes In Arms" (Rodgers and Hart, 1937): "I've wined and dined on Mulligan stew, and never wished for turkey."

- Also mentioned in "Whistin' Past The Graveyard": "Cooked up a mess of Mulligan and got into a fight."



(14) Armstrong, Louis

- Born in New Orleans on Aug. 4, 1901, Louis grew up in the poorest part of the city. Armstrong began to play with jazz groups and brass bands in New Orleans, developing quickly. In 1925 he began his remarkable series of Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings. In 1928 Armstrong led the Savoy Ballroom Five. "West End Blues", was considered by many (including Louis himself)to be his greatest recording. During the next decade he became a household name, making two acclaimed visits to Europe during 1932-34, appearing in small but memorable roles in movies and leading a swing-oriented big band. By the mid-'40s Louis Armstrong was considered out of style. His orchestra had declined and his own solos and clowning sounded at odds with his younger more bop-oriented sidemen. But after appearing with a variety of veteran players in the Hollywood film "New Orleans "and having success playing at an acclaimed Town Hall concert in 1947, Armstrong broke up his big band and formed the All-Stars. His sextet was an immediate success, and Armstrong began a schedule of nearly non-stop travelling.After a few years the routines became fairly predictable and critics tired of them while some in the Civil Rights community thought of Armstrong as an Uncle Tom. However when he died on July 6 1971, there was no jazz musician who could approach him in popularity.

- Tom Waits (1998): "...You always hear him smiling in his songs. I heard that the biggest disappointment for him was that he was never asked to sing the National Anthem at the opening game of the World Series. It was his big dream, and they never asked him." (Source: "Mixed Bag, WNEW New York". Interview on WNEW FM. October 1998)



(15) Mantle, Mickey

- Mickey Charles Mantle. Born: Spavinaw, Ok, October 20 1931 - Died: Dallas, Tx, August 13 1995. A famous American baseball player in the 1950's (successor of Joe DiMaggio with the New York Yankees). He was a friend of Whitey Ford. In 1969 he resigned from professional baseball.

- Also mentioned in A Sight For Sore Eyes, 1977: "That we toast to the old days and Dimagio too and old Drysdale and Mantle, Whitey Ford and to you."





(16) Sharing a curbstone with Chuck E. Weiss, Robert Marchese, Paul Body and The Mug and Artie:

- Notice this excerpt from It Rains On Me (Chuck E. Weiss, Extremely Cool, 1999): "Louie Lista and Marchese, Everywhere I go it rains on me, Robert Sheehan and Paul Body, Everywhere I go it rains on me."

Chuck E. Weis: Chicago born musician and longtime friend. Further reading: Chuck E. Weiss.

Robert Marchese: manager of the Troubadour in the 1970's

Paul Body: doorman of the Troubadour in the 1970's. "... Paul Body, is active in the music and spoken word and literary community. He's released a solo compact disc, "Love Is Like Rasputin" for New Alliance Records, and participated in the laserdisc collection audio/visual document L.A. JOURNAL released by The Voyager Company. He's also just completed a reading in the July, '95 "Rock and Roll In Literature" series at The MET Theater in Hollywood that featured actors Ed Harris, Bill Pullman, Chloe Webb, Beverly D'Angelo and other musicians and poets. He's also a clerk at Video Journeys and a film fanatic. (Source: "From The B's Nest", Alternative Cinema issue #6 - pgs. 8-9, 1995). "... Paul Body has many claims to fame: poet, writer, accordionist, and longtime friend of Tom Waits. On his album Love Is Like Rasputin, Body lays out his humorous and sometimes-touching thoughts on 1965 Los Angeles in a series of diary entries. Thirty years after witnessing the Watts riots, his mother's death, and the rise of his beloved Rolling Stones, Body is still actively performing across the city where he came of age." (Source: "SXSW Spoken Word: 1996" by Phil West. The Austin Chronicle) 

The Mug: Troubadour barman, blues harmonica player, actor, poet Louie Lista. Name checked in the Blue Valentine linernotes as Louis Lista. "Louie got his start in the field of blues and folk music in the early 1960's when he studied harmonica with the legendary blues musician Taj Mahal. After playing countless shows at such popular venues as the Ash Grove and Troubadour in Hollywood, he helped to found the seminal 1970's powerhouse roots rock group, The Sheiks of Shake. They recorded for Mystic Records and shared stages with such musical "national treasures" as Clifton Chenier and Muddy Waters. In the late 1970's, after David Wulff completed a year long performing stint with the Shieks, Louie and Wulff started playing as an acoustic duo covering a wide range of musical styles from folk to country to blues, jazz and even contemporary popular songs. They shared stages with a "who's who" list of then popular recording artists, including R.E.M., Black Flag, the Circle Jerks, X, and The Knitters. In the 1980's they added electric guitars, bass and drums to the mix, founded the Outer City Allstars and expanded our venues to include such unlikely performance opportunities as opening for Pro Wrestling matches. In the early 1990's, Louie signed with New Alliance Records and showcased his talent as a spoken word artist on two CDs, "To Sleep With the Lights On" and "Walkin' and Talkin'". The first CD contained several songs that David Wulff produced and the second was recorded with longtime friend David Crittendon, a talented singer, pianist and author. As the 1990's progressed, Louie's love of and training in theater (Santa Monica City College) led to a series of high profile acting jobs. He played opposite Emmy award winning Kay Lenz ("Rich Man, Poor Man", "The Big Chill") as Sir Toby Belch in Spike Stewart's modern day tribute to William Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" ("The 12th Nite"). He also was a featured actor working alongside none other than Ringo Starr in Century 21 Real Estate's television commercial "Perfect Hook-ups". (Source: "Louie Lista Benefit at La Ca�ada United Methodist Church", by David Wulff. March 8, 2003)

Artie: It seems this doesn't refer to Art Fein (The L.A. Musical History TourArt's Poker Party) but to one Artie Leichter, as pointed out by Barney Hoskyns in his 2009 Waits biography “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" (Faber/ Broadway, 2009). Artie Leichter was songwriter and lighting man at the Troubadour in the 1970's.



(17) In the late 1970s Waits often used to open this song with a medley quoting from: "Can't Help Falling In Love","Enjoy Yourself","Friendship, friendship","Hey Baby!","I Got Plenty Of Nuttin'","I Got The Sun In The Morning","Primrose lane","Take Me Out To The Ball Game","The Girl That I Marry", "When I Fall In Love" 

Dan Forte (1977): "Of his approach to composing, Tom comments, "I start with a couple of changes, you know. Maybe a single-note melody sometimes. I usually have the lyrics all written; I just have to find something to hang them on. On 'Jitterbug Boy' [from Small Change), I was thinking about George Gershwin's 'I Got Plenty O' Nuthin', Nuthin's Plenty For Me.'" (Source: "Tom Waits - Offbeat Poet And Pianist" Contemporary Keyboard magazine, by Dan Forte. April, 1977)



Quoted at: "Wise men say only fools rush in..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (Agora Ballroom, Cleveland USA. August 25, 1976)Quoting: Can't Help Falling In Love. Words & music by George Weiss - Hugo Peretti - Luigi Creatore, 1961



Can't Help Falling In Love



Wise men say only fools rush in

but I can't help falling in love with you

Shall I stay would it be a sin

If I can't help falling in love with you



Like a river flows surely to the sea

Darling so it goes some things are meant to be, take my hand,

take my whole life too for I can't help falling in love with you



Like a river flows surely to the sea

Darling so it goes some things are meant to be, take my hand,

take my whole life too for I can't help falling in love with you

for I can't help falling in love with you



Quoted at: "Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (Willimantic or New York. May, 1976 - Shaboo version)Quoting: Enjoy Yourself (It's Later Than You Think). Written by Carl Sigman and Herb Magidson. Transcribed, as recorded in New York November 28, 1949 by Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians



Enjoy Yourself (It's Later Than You Think)



You work and work for years and years, you're always on the go

You never take a minute off, too busy makin' dough

Someday, you say, you'll have your fun when you're a millionaire

Imagine all the fun you'll have in your old rockin' chair



Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think

Enjoy yourself, while you're still in the pink

The years go by as quickly as a wink

Enjoy yourself, enjoy yourself, it's later than you think



You're gonna take that ocean trip, no matter, come what may

You've got your reservations made but you just can't get away

Next year, for sure, you'll see the world, you'll really get around

But how far can you travel when you're six-feet under ground?



Your heart of hearts, your dream of dreams, your ravishing brunette

She's left you and she's now become somebody else's pet

Lay down that gun, don't try my friend to reach the great beyond

You'll have more fun by reachin' for a redhead or a blonde



Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think

Enjoy yourself, while you're still in the pink

The years go by as quickly as a wink

Enjoy yourself, enjoy yourself, it's later than you think



You never go to nightclubs and you just don't care to dance

You don't have time for silly things like moonlight and romance

You only think of dollar bills tied neatly in a stack

But when you kiss a dollar bill, it doesn't kiss you back



Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think

Enjoy yourself, while you're still in the pink

The years go by as quickly as a wink

Enjoy yourself, enjoy yourself, it's later than you think



Quoted at: "Friendship, friendship, just a perfect friendship..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (Agora Ballroom, Cleveland USA. August 25, 1976)Quoting: Friendship. Words and music by Cole Porter. Introduced by Ethel Merman and Bert Lahr in the Broadway musical "DuBarry was a Lady", 1939. Words and music by Cole Porter. Popularized by Kay Kyser and His Orchestra. Also recorded by: Al Jolson, Judy Garland and Johnny Mercer (1940), Ann Hampton Callaway and Liz Callaway (1996)



Friendship



If you're ever in a jam, here I am

If you're ever in a mess, S-O-S

If you ever feel so happy, you land in jail; I'm your bail.

It's friendship, friendship, just a perfect blendship



When other friendships have been forgot, Ours will still be hot.

Lah-dle-ah-dle-ah-dle dig, dig, dig.

If you're ever up a tree, phone to me.

If you're ever down a well, ring my bell.

If you ever lose your teeth, and you're out to dine; borrow mine.

It's friendship, friendship, just a perfect blendship



When other friendships have been forgate, Ours will still be great.

Lah-dle-ah-dle-ah-dle, chuck, chuck, chuck.

If they ever black your eyes, put me wise.

If they ever cook your goose, turn me loose.

If they ever put a bullet through your brain; I'll complain.

It's friendship, friendship, just a perfect blendship



When other friendships have been forgit, Ours will still be it.

Lah-dle-ah-dle-ah-dle, hep, hep, hep



Quoted at: "Hey baby, I wanna know if you'll be my girl..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (Agora Ballroom, Cleveland USA. August 25, 1976) Quoting: Hey Baby!Margaret Cobb And Bruce Channel, 1962



Hey Baby!



Hey, hey, baby, I wanna know

if you'll be my girl;

Hey, hey, baby, I wanna know

if you'll be my girl



When I saw you walking down the street,

I said, "that's the kind of girl I just like to meet."

She's so pretty, lord, she's so fine,

I'm gonna make her mine, mine



I said, "hey, hey, baby, I wanna know

if you'll be my girl."



When you turned and walked away,

that's when I wanna say,

"come on, baby, give me a whirl,

I wanna know if you'll be my girl."



I said, "hey, hey, baby, I wanna know

if you'll be my girl."



When you turned and walked away,

that's when I wanna say,

"come on, baby, give me a whirl,

I wanna know if you'll be my girl."



I said, "hey, hey, baby, - hey, baby!

I wanna know if you'll be my girl."

All right, be my girl



Quoting at: "I got plenty of nuttin' and nuttin's plenty for me..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (Sydney, Kansas City, Austin, 1979) Quoting: I Got Plenty Of Nuttin'. Lyrics by: Du Bose Heyward/ Ira Gershwin. Music by: George Gershwin (b. Jacob Gershwin). Originally performed by Todd Duncan in the jazz opera "Porgy and Bess" in 1935. Early recording by Leo Reisman and his Orchestra. Transcribed from: Ella Fitzgerald / Louis Armstrong



I Got Plenty Of Nuttin'



I got plenty of nothing

And nothing's plenty for me

I got no car - got no mule I got no misery



Folks with plenty of plenty

They've got a lock on the door

Afraid somebody's gonna rob 'em

While there out (a) making more

- what for I got no lock on the door

- that's no way to be

They can steal the rug from the floor - that's OK with me

'Cause the things that I prize - like the stars in the skies - are all free



I got plenty of nothing

And nothing's plenty for me

I got my gal - got my song

(I) Got heaven the whole day long -

Got my gal - got my love - got my song



Quoted at: "I got the sun in the morning and the moon at night..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (several shows in mid/ late 70's). Quoting: I Got The Sun In The Morning. Words and music by Irving Berlin. Introduced by Ethel Merman in the musical "Annie Get Your Gun". Sung by Betty Hutton in the 1950 film version



I Got The Sun In The Morning



Taking stock of what I have and what I haven't,

What do I find?

The things I've got will keep me satisfied.

Checking up on what I have and what I haven't

What do I find?

A healthy balance on the credit side



(chorus)

Got no mansion, got no yacht, Still I'm happy with what I've got;

I've got the sun in the morning and the moon at night.

(I've got the sun in the morning and the moon at night.)

Got no silver, got no gold,

What I've got can't be bought or sold;

I've got the sun in the morning and the moon at night.

(I've got the sun in the morning and the moon at night.)



Sunshine gives me a lovely day

Moonlight gives me the Milky Way

Got no checkbooks, got no banks,

Still I'd like to express my thanks;

I've got the sun in the morning and the moon at night.

(I've got the sun in the morning and the moon at night.)

And with the sun in the morning and the moon in the evening,

Why I'm all right!



Quoted at: "A little place down there on Primrose Lane..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy-2 (Agora Ballroom, Cleveland, USA. August 25, 1976) Quoting: Primrose Lane. Writers: George Callender and Wayne Shanklin, 1959. Top chart position reached: # 8 in 1959. Re-made by O. C. Smith at # 86 in 1970



Primrose Lane



Primrose Lane, life's a holiday on Primrose Lane

Just a holiday on Primrose Lane with you

Can't explain when we're walkin' down the Primrose Lane

Even roses bloomin' in the rain with you

Sweet perfume

Those little old roses bloom



And I want to walk with you my whole life through Primrose Lane,

life's a holiday on Primrose Lane

Just a holiday on Primrose Lane with you

Sweet perfume

Those little old roses bloom



And I want to walk with you my whole life through Primrose Lane,

life's a holiday on Primrose Lane

Just a holiday on Primrose Lane with you

With you

With you

With you



Quoted at: "Won't you take me out to the ball game..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (several shows in mid/ late 70's). Jack Norworth, who wrote the lyrics to baseball's anthem in 1908, knew the game but never saw a major league game until 34 years later. His composer was Albert Von Tilzer, who himself never saw a major league game until 1928. The song is now in the public domain



Take Me Out To The Ball Game



Katie Casey was baseball mad

Had the fever and had it bad

Just to root for the home town crew

Every soul Katie blew

On a Saturday her young beau

Called to see if she'd like to go

To see a show, but Miss Kate said ... No,

I'll tell you what you can do



(Chorus:)

Take me out to the ball game

Take me out with the crowd

Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack

I don't care if I ever get back

Let me root, root, root for the home team

If they don't win it's a shame

For it's one, two, three strikes you're out

At the old ball game



Katie Casey saw all the games

Knew the players by their first names

Told the umpire he was wrong

All along, good and strong

When the score was just two to two

Katie Casey knew what to do

Just to cheer up the boys she knew

She made the gang sing this song



Chorus.



Quoted at: "The girl that I marry will have to be soft as a kitten..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (Willimantic or New York, May, 1976 - Shaboo version). Quoting: The Girl That I Marry (Annie Get Your Gun, 1946). Irving Berlin



The Girl That I Marry



The girl that I marry will have to be

As soft and as pink as a nursery



The girl I call my own

Will wear wear satins and laces and smell of cologne



Her nails will be polished and in her hair

She'll wear a gardenia and I'll be there

'Stead of flittin', I'll be sittin'

Next to her and she'll purr like a kitten



A doll I can carry

The girl that I marry must be



Quoted at: "When I fall in love, it will be forever..." Performed as part of: Jitterbug Boy (several shows in mid/ late 70's). Quoting:When I Fall In Love. Words by Edward Heyman, music by Victor Young. Prime artist: Nat King Cole (whose recording, released as a single, did not chart) - Doris Day's version hit #20 in 1952 and the Lettermen's went to # 7 in 1962



When I Fall In Love



When I fall in love it will be forever

Or I'll never fall in love

In a restless world like this is

Love is ended before it's begun

And too many moonlight kisses

Seem to cool in the warmth of the sun



When I give my heart it will be completely

Or I'll never give my heart

And the moment I can feel that you feel that way too

Is when I fall in love with you.

And the moment I can feel that you feel that way too

Is when I fall in love with you



Jockey Full Of Bourbon

 



Edna Million in a drop dead(2) suit

Dutch Pink(3) on a downtown(4) train

Two dollar pistol but the gun won't shoot

I'm in the corner on the pouring rain



Sixteen men on a dead man's chest(5)

And I've been drinking from a broken cup

Two pairs of pants and a mohair vest

I'm full of bourbon, I can't stand up



Hey little bird(6), fly away home

Your house is on fire, children are alone

Hey little bird, fly away home

Your house is on fire, your children are alone



Schiffer broke a bottle on Morgan's head

And I'm stepping on the devil's tail

Across the stripes of a full moon's head

And through the bars of a Cuban jail



Bloody fingers on a purple knife

Flamingo drinking from a cocktail glass

I'm on the lawn with someone else's wife

Admire the view from up on top of the mast



Hey little bird, fly away home

House is on fire, children are alone

Hey little bird, fly away home

House is on fire, your children are alone, hey



I said, hey little bird, fly away home

Your house is on fire, your children are alone

Hey little bird, fly away home

House is on fire, your children are alone



Yellow sheets on a Hong Kong bed

Stazybo horn and a Slingerland ride(7)

"To the carnival" is what she said

A hundred dollars makes it dark inside



Edna Million in a drop dead suit

Dutch Pink on a downtown train

Two dollar pistol but the gun won't shoot

I'm in the corner on the pouring rain



Hey little bird, fly away home

Your house is on fire, your children are alone

Hey little bird, fly away home

Your house is on fire, your children are alone



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985-1998

Official release: "Rain Dogs", Island Records Inc., 1985 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Jockey full av Bourbon")

Vain Nopeat Elävät. Miljoonasade. November 22, 1989. Warner Music Finland (in finnish as "Rokkibändi Wounded Knee")

The Piano Has Been Drinking. The Piano Has been Drinking. April, 1990. Chlodwig/ BMG Germany (in German/ K�lsch)

Meret Becker und Ars Vitalis 1993-1995, Meret Becker and Ars Vitalis. 1996. Self-released (limited German live edition of 1000 pcs)

Zw�lf Kostbarkeiten. Zaftig. 1997. Self-released (Germany)

Mr. Happy. Mambo Combo. 1997. Blue Heron Records

Goatfoxes. Tightrope. 1997. Rockwerk Records

Live At The Lava Lounge. Blue Hawaiians. August 4, 1997. Pascal Records

Live Noise. Moxy Fruvous. May 19, 1998. Bottom Line/ Koch

Gerd K�ster und... Gerd K�ster. March 22, 1999. Chlodwig (Pavement Records)

Savage Night. Blue Hawaiians. August, 1999. Interscope (Universal)

Sheriff of Bottletone County. Bottletones. February 15, 2000. Hepcat Records

The Difference, Adam Dorfman. April, 2000. BMI

Being Tom Waits. Billy`s Band. 2001. Self-released demo album (Russia)

A Different Kind Of Blues. Fat Vinny & The Wiseguys. 2001. Self-released

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)

Stray. Christine Graves. February 17, 2001. Brave Music

Wicked Grin. John Hammond. March 13, 2001. Emd/ Virgin

Sweet Sixty. Jerry Williams (Sven Erik Fernström). 2002. Stockholm (Sweden) 

Storming The Castle. Full Front Folk. 2002. Self-released

Bar Jeder Vernunft. Various artists. June 5, 2002. Duo-Phon (Pool Music und Media). Performed by Meret Becker and Ars Vitalis. Same version as on "Meret Becker und Ars Vitalis: 1993-1995", 1996

Impedance Tube. Deadpan Alley. June 18, 2002. Self-released

Abenteuer des Alltags. Ralf & Feinton Huwendieck. September 30, 2002. Tonstudio (SPV Germany)

Rooms. Tightrope. 2003. Self-released

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production/ Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Call It What You Wanna! Vince Lee And The Big Combo. May, 2003. Self-released.

The Usual Bandidos. Carlos And The Bandidos. December, 2003. Part (UK)

Cirkus. Souvenirs. 2004. Hosdal. Bonnier Amigo Music Group (in Danish "Whiskeyt�s")

God Is A Tom Waits Fan. The Box Spring Hogs. May 2004. Self-released demo

Radio Tijuana. G. Rag & Los Hermanos Patchekos. July 12, 2004. Gutfeeling (Broken Silence)

Ride This: The Covers EP. Los Lobos. August, 2004. Hollywood Records

Le Drame du Pastis. Puts Marie. May, 2005. Self-released

Live at Kung Fu Bakery. Stephanie Schneiderman Band. May 10, 2005 Label. Papa J. Records

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

Griff Steel & The Duck and Dive Five. Griff Steel & The Duck and Dive Five. December 7, 2005. Self-released

Song Of Jealousy. Pulp Dogs. April 30, 2006. Self-released (Italy)

Misplaced. Moshav. August 8, 2006. JMG

Steve Evans Quartet, 2 Sets. Steve Evans. December 4, 2006. Self-released

Catch the Squirrel. Jeremy dePrisco. May 19, 2007. Self-released

The Ballad Of John Henry. Joe Bonamassa. February 24, 2009. Premier Artists 

Hold Fast. G. Rag Y Los Hermanos Patchekos. April 24, 2009. Gutfeeling Records

Voyage. Youn Sun Nah. April 24, 2009. ACT Records

Shadows. The Lazy Boys. May 12, 2010. Part Records



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Music video promoting "Jockey Full Of Bourbon" (1986)

Island/ MCA records, 1986 (footage from "Down By Law" Jim Jarmusch 1986).

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) Jockey

- n.: A driver. A cab, bus or truck driver (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- [mid-19C-1940s] an accomplice or assistant usu. of a driver of a cab or utility vehicle (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 



(2) Drop deadadv. [1970s+] (orig. US) extremely, esp. as in drop-dead beautiful. [so beautiful, striking etc. as to cause the onlooker to drop dead] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



 (3) Dutch Pink

- n. [19C] blood [Dutch Pink, a yellow pigment] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

- Notice the same phrase being used in Temptation, 1987: "I can't resist Dutch pink and Italian blue, she is waiting there for you."



 (4) Down townI am going down town, i.e. to the business part of the town. Down the country properly means down the slope of the land, or as the rivers run. We say "I am going up to town" when we mean out of the country into the chief city. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



 (5) Sixteen men on a dead man's chest

"Dead Man's Chest" (also known as Fifteen Men On A Dead Man's Chest or Derelict) is a fictional sailor's work song or "sea shanty" from Robert Louis Stevenson's novel Treasure Island (1883), and a later expanded poem by Young E. Allison (1891). It has since been used in many later works of art in various forms. Most famous being the "Yo Ho Ho" sailor song from a 1901 Broadway musical; Seq. by: Almut Koerting: "Fifteen men on a dead man's chest Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum Drink and the devil had done for the rest Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum. The mate was fixed by the bosun's pike The bosun brained with a marlinspike And cookey's throat was marked belike It had been gripped by fingers ten; And there they lay, all good dead men Like break o'day in a boozing ken Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum Fifteen men of the whole ship's list Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum! Dead and be damned and the rest gone whist! Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum! The skipper lay with his nob in gore Where the scullion's axe his cheek had shore And the scullion he was stabbed times four And there they lay, and the soggy skies Dripped down in up-staring eyes In murk sunset and foul sunrise Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum. Fifteen men of 'em stiff and stark Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum! Ten of the crew had the murder mark! Ho ho ho and a bottle of rum! Twas a cutlass swipe or an ounce of lead Or a yawing hole in a battered head And the scuppers' glut with a rotting red And there they lay, aye, damn my eyes Looking up at paradise All souls bound just contra wise Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum Fifteen men of 'em good and true - 'Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum! Ev'ry man jack could ha' sailed with Old Pew, Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum! There was chest on chest of Spanish gold With a ton of plate in the middle hold And the cabins riot of stuff untold, And they lay there that took the plum With sightless glare and their lips struck dumb While we shared all by the rule of thumb, Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum! More was seen through a sternlight screen... Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum Chartings undoubt where a woman had been Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum. 'Twas a flimsy shift on a bunker cot With a dirk slit sheer through the bosom spot And the lace stiff dry in a purplish blot Oh was she wench or some shudderin' maid That dared the knife and took the blade By God! she had stuff for a plucky jade Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum Fifteen men on a dead man's chest Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum Drink and the devil had done for the rest Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum. We wrapped 'em all in a mains' tight With twice ten turns of a hawser's bight And we heaved 'em over and out of sight, With a Yo-Heave-Ho! and a fare-you-well And a sudden plunge in the sullen swell Ten fathoms deep on the road to hell, Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!"



(6) Hey little bird: quoting "Ladybug! Ladybug!" (Nursery rhyme, unknown copyright): "Ladybug! Ladybug! Fly away home Your house is on fire And your children all gone All except one, And that's Ann, For she has crept under The frying pan" (Source: Zelo Nursery Rhymes ( (c) 1996-2000 C. Thomas Wright III)



(7) Slingerland ride: On a drum kit you will find one or two (in severe cases more) ride toms above the snare drum. The ride cymbal is usually placed to the right, by the floor tom (assuming the drummer is right handed). And Slingerland is of course a brand of drums. A "Slingerland ride" can mean either the tom or the cymbal (Submitted by Ulf Berggren, Raindogs Listserv Discussionlist. August, 2000)



Johnsburg, Illinois

 



(Swordfishtrombones studio version, 1983)



She's my only true love

She's all that I think of

Look here: in my wallet that's her



She grew up on a farm there

There's a place on my arm

where I've written her name next to mine



You see: I just can't live without her

and I'm her only boy

And she grew up outside McHenry

in Johnsburg, Illinois



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1983-1998

Official release: "Swordfishtrombones", Island Records Inc., 1983 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)





 



Johnsburg, Illinois



(Big Time live version, 1988)



She's my only true love

She's all that I think of

Look here: in my wallet that's her



She grew up on a farm there

There's a place on my arm

where I've written her name next to mine



You see: I just can't live without her

and I'm her only boy

And she grew up outside McHenry

in Johnsburg, Illinois



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1983-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Fat Cats. Johnny Hooper. December, 1992. Self-released CDJRH2

Overdressed Late Guy. Park Stickney. 1995. Self-released (instrumental)

The Sweetheart Break-in. The Supreme Music Program/ Megan Mullally. 2000. Unknown label

Everyone Says It's On. Jason Falkner. 2001. Air Mail Recordings

5000 Days. The Bad Examples. January, 2002. Waterdog Music

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003. Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Sometime Ago. Anke Jochmaring. January 15, 2006. Phonector

Still Time. Matthias Bergmann. February 1, 2008. Jazz4ever Records (instrumental) 

Wies Merge. Ton Engels. December 12, 2007. Vulcano Records PlatCD7210

Stomp Glide Wobble. The Northside Southpaws. January 25, 2008. Self-released

Jenny Scheinman, Jenny Scheinman. May 27, 2008 Koch Records

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music)

Flutter And Wow. Charlie Wood. May 18, 2009. Archer Records

American Dream. Taylor Haskins. June 8, 2010. Sunnyside Records



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Johnsburg Illinois" taken from the Big Time concert video

Recorded live at the Warfield Theatre. San Francisco/ USA November 5, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum. 

May not be visible everywhere (MPRCS).



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1983): "My wife is from Johnsburg, Illinois. It's right outside McHenry and up by the ching-a-lings. She grew up on a farm up there. So it's dedicated to her. It's real short. Somehow I wanted just to get it all said in one verse. There are times when you work on a song and end up repeating in the second verse what you already said in the first. So I thought I would be more appropriate if it's just like a feeling of a sailor somewhere in a cafe, who opens his wallet and turns to the guy next to him and shows him the picture while he's talking a bout something else and says: "Oh, here. That's her." and then closes his wallet and puts it back in his pants. It relates in some way to "Shore Leave" in the sense that it talks about Illinois. So thematically I was trying to tie it into "Shore Leave" (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)

Live from Stockholm 1987: "She's my only true love She's all that I think of. Look here in my wallet, that's her. She grew up on a farm there. There's a place on my arm. Where I've written her name next to mine. You see, I just... [tries the high note but fails, talks]... This is where it all falls apart for me! It's kind of an unfinished thing, we're still working on it. I'm just checking to see if you're still with me! You see, the best songs are the ones that aren't finished yet. Cause there's still places in them where you can put things, you know. We just got to a little shelf and there was nothing on it. We're gonna have to come up with something to put in there. So you're part of this little process now. Oh yeah, there's this thing: [sings] You see, I just can't live without her. And I'm her only boy. And she grew up outside McHenry. In Johnsburg, Illinois. You see, I just can't live without her. And I'm her only boy. And she grew up outside McHenry. In Johnsburg, Illinois" (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. March, 2000)

- Some 40 miles west of Johnsburg, Illinois is the city of Waukegan (as mentioned in Gun Street Girl, 1985: "He left Waukegan at the slammin' of the door."





Just Another Dime Store Novel

 



Stop me if you've heard this one. Well, I said, looky here, baby, I'm here for the same reason you are. I've been married to the same woman for twenty-five years, and not once has she asked me what I do for a living. She tells me that she loves me but I know that she's a gyppy.(1) I find matchbooks in her purse from every goddam bar in town. Her mother's a transvestite and her father was always a Fuller Brush man(2), but he was bald as a doorknob and hell, I was afraid to try.



I had a vasectomy when I was thirteen years old, when I knocked up this thirteen hundred pound Mexican woman. I didn't have a green card and I worked for her father for seven years, at the Hermasillo(3) Chamber of Commerce. Hell, I had minimum wage and shit, and I finally told him hey, he could have his job for crying out loud. And I told her I was going out for a pack of cigarettes one night. I got into a taxi cab and told him to take me to East St Louis, I'll pay whatever's on the meter.



Now that's when I hooked up with this pharmacist, you see? Yeah, this pharmacist, crazy pharmacist, you see? Let me sweep up in the apothecary for a hot meal and some Neosenephrin(4) while I studied hotel management at night. Well, I finally got ready for the exam and I rented a room above a barber shop, when Jimmy the Lock one night broke in, stole some Lucky Tiger(5), a half pint of Bay Rum, and a 'Field & Stream' magazine. I caught a cross-town bus. Well you see, I told the guy to let me off at the nearest bar and I walked inside and what do you know? That's right! A girl I hadn't seen in fifteen years recognized me after a shave and told me that she thought we could make beautiful music together. And I said, 'Baby, I have a tin ear' and she said, 'Shit, I have a glass eye and a bum leg'.



So we went to her place and I found she was running guns to Africa and selling Avon products without a license, so I borrowed a car to go to the beach and meet new friends. Damn! Eh-he-he... Well, that ain't the half of it, man, you know... boy, have I got troubles, man... Well, I was pulled over for driving without sunglasses and Bermudas, and I was harassed and intimidated until we got to talking about Pete Kelly's blues(6), and I know a guy named Webb(7), and they gave me a free color brochure booklet on how to avoid child molesting, and I drove away with a new lease on life and ten dollars in my pocket, which I spent on an out-of-print Cozy Cole album at Music Man Murray's(8), which I considered an investment in the future. Along with a hi-fi recording of the 1959 Grand Prix at Sebring, which was in the wrong jacket and turned out to be a Rudy Ray Moore album(9).



Well anyhow, I'd been trying to lay my hands on that sucker for years, and needless to say I was beside myself, so I turned to myself and I said 'Hey Earl! You gonna be a bum all your life?' You know. I said, 'Are you talking to ME?' Eh-he... Earl was one of my aliases at the time, you see. I was traveling under the name of Earl Scheib(10), maybe you've heard of me? Well anyhow, to make a long story short, I threw in with these Italian guys in Montebello(11). Well, they talked me into opening up a used-food restaurant, and hell you know, you got used cars, used clothes, used furniture, why not used food, well? For the less fortunate people who don't get out much, you know what I mean.



Anyhow, on opening night this one-armed bass-player goes berserk right in front of the goddam place. With search lights and all, well that attracted the authorities over there.. eh-he... They were tipped off, you see. I always maintained that it was a real inside job, and they discovered it was a front for a prosthetics supermarket and a pet hospital. Anyhow... I was at a loss for words, and I was sent to two years in prison, but they suspended the sentence, and had me listen to a band called Mondray for six months and no parole.



Anyhow, I got out and I swore I was going straight. I got the first flight to Vegas where I enrolled in a major university and spent two years studying to be a typing teacher. My analyst said it was the healthiest thing he ever heard of. Anyhow, before the end of the fiscal year I was living on chicken and wine, I'm not talking about bullshit here! No record. Clean. Every night I'd put on a tie and hit the after hours bars with my old beat-up Underwood typewriter. I'd only read about these places in 'Tally's Corner'(13), mind you.



Anyhow, here I was with shades on hanging out in the bar. Well, this trombone player named Marcel Tupee asked me if I wanted to sit in one night, and of course I was nervous and scared and shit. Well, 'he who hesitates is lost', and when I got on the bandstand they hit me with the spotlight, and I knew that something was happening, and they kicked off a blues in B-flat and I just typed, man! Like a crazy man! Typed like a crazy man, all that woodsheddin' had paid off, and oh hell, baby, 'You Scheeeeeib man!' You've heard the story a thousand times, I know. I don't wanna bore you. It's a dime store novel, and hell, you know the rest.



I got strung out and then I got my own group, and started playing the MYF meetings(14), like three shows a night, four on the weekends, and I couldn't pay the band, they left me flat one night in Montgomery Wards(15). I was there, you know, bartering for some band uniforms, and hell, I ain't seen high nor hell of 'em since. So I got out of the racket. Went back to my first wife and begged her to take me back, told her I'd changed, there'd be no more of them bondage scenes, and I'm a new man. She slapped me with a fifteen dollar bill for an orthodontist who claimed I walked the check on some braces. Are you sure you wanna hear this, man?



Anyhow, she gave me the bums rush(16), Jack, and I got a job sweeping up at Yonkers' race track. And one afternoon right in the middle of the daily double, I got inspiration. I remembered Hitler's phone number. That's right, thirteen thirteen, lucky number! And I put everything I had, sixty-eight bucks, on number thirteen, 'Big Blitz', and it paid ten to one. I got twelve hundred and sixty bucks. Quit my job, drove all night to New Orleans where I met the girl of my dreams, woke her up and played the long version of 'Harlem Nocturne'(17) on my trumpet. She called the paramedics and they shot me full of thorozine, and said take a long walk off a short pier, well I ain't no fool! No siree! I got me three hots and a flop(18) and the first thing smokin' out of town, if you understand what I mean.



And baby, I saw you in nineteen fifty-seven. Nineteen fifty-seven in a Lincoln Continental with Rhode Island plates, passing me on Route 66 doing seventy-five miles an hour, with a blue scarf around your neck, smoking a Lucky Strike, and wearing Chanel No. 5, with a Rosemary Clooney ringer(19) on the radio, and I knew you didn't see me. But I saw you! And I told myself that night, that I gotta get next to that girl.



So what do you say you slide down a stool, and we could get acquainted?



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1977 [?]

Unofficial release: Tales From The Underground Volume 4. PMS Records, 1999

Recorded at Filmways/ Heider Recording, Hollywood, July or August, 1977

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren: Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000

and Dorene LaLonde as sent to Tom Waits Library: November, 2002)



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Just Another Dime Store Novel.

Foreign Affairs sessions: July 28, 1977 - August 15, 1977.

Recorded at Filmways/ Heider Recording, Hollywood/ USA.



Notes:



(1) Gyppy: (gypo/ gyppo/ gyppy/ gippo/ jippo) n. 1. [20C] gypsy, usu. derog. 2. [1920s - 60s] (US) contract work. [abbr. The implication is that like a gypsy the worker fulfils the contract then moves on. Note UK services sl. gyppo, gravy, grease, stew: S. Afr. milit. gyppo, to shirk duty] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 



(2) Fuller brush man: In 1906 Alfred C. Fuller began an American home care products enterprise which became known as The Fuller Brush Company. From brushes, brooms and mops, to disinfectants, cleansers and air fresheners Fuller used to market its products through door-to-door salesmen. This "Fuller Brush Man" would go door to door with a suitcase full of home care cleaning products. Further reading: Fuller Brush Home Page



(3) Hermasillo: Hermasillo, Sonora, Mexico. Located ca. 60 miles into Mexico from the Arizona border



(4) Neosenephrin: product for relief from nasal congestion. Work by causing a jolt of adrenaline



(5) Some Lucky Tiger: Lucky Tiger (hair-care product).

Also mentioned in Barbershop (Foreign Affairs, 1977) "Bay rum, Lucky Tiger, Butch Wax, Crackerjacks..." Swordfishtrombone (Swordfishtrombones, 1983) "With Lucky Tiger in his angel hair, and Benzedrine for getting there..."



(6) Pete Kelly's blues: A 1955 musical melodrama about jazz age musicians and their run-ins with some prohibition-era mobsters. Set in Kansas City. Ella Fitzgerald sings the title tune. Academy Award Nomination for "Best Supporting Actress--Peggy Lee". Directed and produced by Jack Webb. Starring: Jack Webb (as Pete Kelly), Edmond O'Brien, Peggy Lee, Janet Leigh, Lee Marvin, Jayne Mansfield, Andy Devine and Ella Fitzgerald. Jack Webb's second film as director (he had made Dragnet the previous year)





(7) I know a guy named Webb: Jack Webb? Closing Time bass player Bob Webb?



(8) Cozy Cole album at Music Man Murray's

- Cozy Cole album
: Born October 17, 1909, East Orange, New Jersey. Died January 31, 1981, Columbus, Ohio. Cozy Cole had a long and successful career as a percussion sideman, working with many of the greats in jazz: Louis Armstrong, Benny Carter, Cab Calloway, and Lionel Hampton. In 1943, he joined Raymond Scott's CBS radio orchestra. Scott later called him, "The most professional musician I've ever worked with." William Randolph "Cozy" Cole was the definitive example of a drummer who directly applied the rudimental approach to jazz, and among the very few whose style evolved and spanned a number of eras





 



- Music Man Murray's: Rare record dealer Music Man Murray. 5055 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, California 90016/ USA. Further reading: Music man Murray official site



(9) Rudy Ray Moore album: Rudy Ray Moore born March 17, 1937 in Fort Smith, Arkansas recorded some songs for Federal Records in the early 1950s. The most famous of these recording sessions is "Step it up and go." Although Moore's singing career didn't hit the big time, he did deliver some truly great soulful rock n' roll songs in a similar vein of Richard Berry. Moore moved to Los Angeles, California in 1959. Several more singles were released by various labels, including his own Vermont Records, with Moore performing either as a solo artist or with other vocal groups like The Seniors. At this time his first comedy albums were recorded, "Below the belt" and "Let's all come together" (both 1961), which was later followed by "The Beatnik scene" (1962). Realizing he needed to carve out his own niche from other black comedians of that period (namely, Redd Foxx), Moore took a much more shocking approach to his comedy by filling his material with profanity, sex, and several traditional toasts (Shine and the Great Titanic, The Signifying Monkey, and of course Dolemite), making him the world's first X-rated comedian. His toasts (black tradition of story telling) were formatted as rhyming stories ("Some folks say that Willie Green, was the baddest motherfucker the world had ever seen," etc.) and often backed by music which has made him a great influence on rap artists of today, many of which have sampled Moore's material or even went so far as to have him appear in songs or videos. Things finally took off in 1970 with the release of the comedy LP "Eat out more often" featuring the "Dolemite" toast as well as other material. Sixteen more comedy albums were released within a few years, selling well over a million copies combined, though none achieved the massive acclaim of his first two ground breaking albums. With titles like "I can't believe I ate the whole thing," "The Streaker," "Dolemite for President," and "Dolemite is another crazy nigger" his releases were always held under the counters at record stores. But what really took the public by surprise were his outlandish and incredibly daring record covers which always featured Moore and several women seminude in hilarious and suggestive poses. This by far helped his releases gain the status they achieved since these records were not teasing you and gave you "more than you came for!" Further reading: Official Rudy Ray Moore Website



 



(10) Earl Scheib

- Also mentioned in Nighthawk Postcards (Nighthawks At The Diner, 1975) "Pacing in front of rainbow Earl Scheib $ 39,95 merchandise."

- Earl Scheib, founded in 1937, is USA leader in low-cost auto-painting. They call themselves: "The world's largest company-owned and operated production auto-painting and body repair shop." In the 60's their slogan was: "I'll paint any car any color for $ 29.95 ". The "any"color was not literal (mostly very simple primary colors). Their logo was decorated with a colourful rainbow





(11) Montebello: The city of Montebello (meaning beautiful hills in Italian) is in California near Los Angeles (35th of the present cities in Los Angeles County)



(13) Tally's Corner: "Tally's Corner: A Study of Negro Streetcorner Men" (Little, Brown & Co. 1967) by Elliot Liebow. Since its original publication in 1967, Tally's Corner has old more than 700,000 copies and has become one of the books most frequently invoked in discussions of public policy regarding America's poor. For eighteen months in 1962-1963 Elliot Liebow lived among a group of seemingly anchorless black men in a blighted inner-city neighborhood of Washington, D.C. What he recorded, in a narrative distinguished by its elegance and clarity, opened America's eyes to the circumstances faced by black men in American society and remains vitally relevant to the continuing American debate over education and welfare reform. It doesn't look like Waits ever quoted directly from this book





(14) MYF meetings: The American "Methodist Youth Fellowship" is the Senior High School Ministry of the United Methodist Church. Also "Mennonite Youth Fellowship"



(15) Montgomery Wards: In 1872 Aaron Montgomery Ward established the first mail-order business at Clark and Kinzie Streets in Chicago. The company remained exclusively a mail-order business until 1926, when the first Montgomery Ward retail store opened in Plymouth, Indiana. By 1929, the total number of stores was 531. Wards had been bought and sold several times when it announced in December, 2000 that the company was closing and its 37,000 employees would be terminated



(16) Get the bums rush, tophr. [late 19C+] (orig. US) to be thrown out, esp. of a saloon or place of entertainment. [the origin of the phr. came to the saloons of late 19C New York where vagrants and other hungry people attempted to take advantage of the sometimes sumptious free lunch counters, which were meant for drinkers only] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9) 



(17) Harlem Nocturne

- Earle Hagen wrote "Harlem Nocturne" in 1940 for a radio series as a conscious imitation of the Duke Ellington sound. Randy Brooks, a white big band leader, picked it up as his theme song in 1941. About ten years later, saxophonist Herbie Fields, released it as a single, soon after, virtually every sax player in the R & B business had his own version of it out. Sax-heavy honky-tonk R & B was beginning to fade at the time, but the smooth, sultry sound of "Harlem Nocturne" made it a good transition into the more sophisticated jump bands. In 1959, a New Jersey band, the Viscounts, had a minor hit with it, introducing an eerie guitar effect that's been retained in most of the subsequent covers. It has been used in many motion pictures and television series. A few years ago, it was the theme song of the television series Mickey Spillane's "Mike Hammer" starring Stacy Keach.

- Also mentioned in Spare Parts II (Nighthawks At The Diner, 1975) "Band is kickin' into some long version of 'Harlem Nocturne' or somethin'..."

- Further reading: Harlem Nocturne sheetmusicThe Worlds Of Earle Hagen



(18) Three hots and a flop: Three hots and a cot: n. [1970s+] (US) three meals a day plus a bed for the night, often used as a rate of payment. Flop n. [1910s+] (US) a cheap room or bed (cf Flophouse) (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(19) Rosemary Clooney ringer: Rosemary Clooney, born May 23, 1928, in Maysville, Kentucky, may best be recognized for her starring role with Bing Crosby in "White Christmas." In the early 1950s radio made a strong bid to issue a challenge to the growing magnetism of television. Star-studded variety programs were created, and week after week Hollywood studios offered musical programs by big names. Clooney was signed to co-host, with beloved vocalist Bing Crosby, a songfest radio show, which aired every weekday morning on CBS radio. Clooney became the star of her own television series in 1956. The Rosemary Clooney Show, which ran through 1957, was syndicated to more than one hundred television stations. But by that time, Clooney had begun to feel the strain of stardom and her relentlessly hectic schedule. Rosemary saw her mission in life to "simply be singing." In January of 2002, Rosemary underwent lung cancer surgery. She died on June 29, 2002. Further reading: The Rosemary Clooney Palladium



Just The Right Bullets

 



There is a light in the forest

There's a face in the tree

I'll pull you out of the chorus

And the first one's always free



You can never go a-hunting

With just a flintlock(2) and a hound

You won't go home with a bunting(3)

If you blow a hundred rounds



It takes much more than wild courage

Or you'll hit the tattered clouds(4)

You must have just the right bullets

And the first one's always free(5)



You must be careful in the forest

Broken glass and rusty nails

If you're to bring back something for us

I have bullets for sale



Two, three, four



Why be a fool when you can chase away

Your blind and your gloom(6)

I have blessed each one of these bullets

And they shine just like a spoon



To have sixty silver wishes(7)

Is a small price to pay

They'll be your private little fishes

And they'll never swim away



I just want you to be happy

That's my only little wish

I'll fix your wagon and your musket

And the spoon will have its dish



And I shudder at the thought

Of your poor empty hunter's pouch

So I'll keep the wind from your barrel

And bless the roof of your house



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

"Just The Right Bullets" 1990 theatre version

The Black Rider rehearsals. Thalia Theatre in Hamburg/ Germany.

Taken from German WDR television documentary "The Black Rider - Der Schwarze Reiter", 1990 (Theo Janssen and Ralph Quinke)



Notes:



(1) Just The Right Bullets: Sung by Pegleg in scene 4 as he offers Wilhelm the magic bullets



(2) Flintlock n.: A hand firearm fitted with a flintlock (A lock for a gun or pistol, having a flint fixed in the hammer, which on striking the steel ignites the priming); esp., the old-fashioned musket of European and other armies. (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



(3) Bunting: Any of various birds of the family Fringillidae, having short, cone-shaped bills and brownish or grayish plumage (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)



(4) Tattered clouds: 

- Marianne Faithfull (2004): "The Black Rider is the last thing Burroughs wrote certainly the last thing he wrote after The Western Lands, the novel about Egypt, which I love. I know Burroughs's work very well, and he threw a lot from it into The Black Rider: there is a lot of The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, and some of The Black Rider's imagery is from Naked Lunch. Tattered clouds is one of his images, and there are a lot of tattered clouds in The Black Rider." (Source: "The Devil? That Was His Own Dark Side", interview with Marianne Faithfull, by Tim Cumming. The Guardian (London). May 12, 2004. Copyright @ 2004 Guardian Newspapers Limited).

- Tom Waits (2006): "He (William Burroughs) wrote most of his words at his place in Lawrence (Kansas), and he'd send piles of material. Our dramaturge (would) edit and paste and cut and find the right spot for everything. Burroughs was just coughing up all this stuff, not writing in any linear way. Sometimes I would take something he wrote and turn it into a lyric. Sometimes we'd collaborate, like in "Just the Right Bullet." "To hit the tattered clouds you have to have the right bullets" - that's all Burroughs. "The first bullet is free" - that's me." (Source: "Theater: Strange 'Magic'". The Orange County Register (USA), by Paul Hodgins. April 26, 2006) 

- Also mentioned in The Last Rose Of Summer (1993): "I love the way the tattered clouds, blow wind across the sky."



(5) And the first one's always free: might be referring to being tempted to use heroin. Also: "I have bullets for sale" and "And the spoon will have its dish".

- Robert Palmer (1993): "Mr. Waits grew up reading Jack Kerouac and the other Beat writers, including Mr. Burroughs, the Beat godfather, but they hadn't met until they sat down in the novelist's home in Lawrence, Kan., to begin work on "The Black Rider." Mr. Burroughs still sounds enthusiastic about the collaboration. "When Tom was here in Lawrence," he said recently by telephone, "and we were sketching out the basic structure of 'The Black Rider,' he had some very good ideas. I had the idea of comparing the magic bullet in the original German story to heroin. Once you use one, you'll use another. Tom said, 'Yeah, and the first one's always free,' and of course that went right in." (Source: "Tom Waits, All-Purpose Troubadour" The New York Times (USA) by Robert Palmer. Date: Limbo/ San Francisco, November 14, 1993)



(6) Your blind and your gloom

- Tom Waits (1993): "These are our champagne glasses from the night we got married. She's carrying me in hers because mine broke and fell over. So the bride is carrying the groom. And I broke a piece out of hers. She didn't want me to get 'em. She thought we'd be wasting our money, to get a bride and groom champagne thing. It was the night we got married, she said, "What, are you nuts, you're gonna spend that kind of money?" We were gonna spend like $30. JJ: Where were you? TW: In Watts, in L.A., about 1am. She said don't do it, and I did. JJ: Did it say "groom" in black, or in white? TW: "Groom", just like this in white. You know, bride, groom. Kathleen calls it "blind gloom." (Source: "Straight No Chaser" Jim Jarmusch. October 1993)



(7) Silver wishes/ silver bullets: "Americans frequently use it to refer to some simple and seemingly magical solution to a complicated problem. In that sense, it seems to be a conflation of, or perhaps a confusion between, an older sense of silver bullet and the very similar magic bullet. We have to look into European folklore to find out where silver bullet comes from. There are lots of stories in which they are the only way to kill some supernatural enemy. Werewolves were believed to have been given the power to change form by the Devil in return for acting as his servants. Nothing ordinary could kill one - only a silver bullet would do it. Basically, what a stake through the heart was to a vampire, a silver bullet was to a werewolf. Later, the same idea was applied to other supernatural entities. Some of the legends say that a hare, who was either a witch in disguise or the familiar of a witch, could only be killed in this way. Others refer to any man who had sold himself to the Devil, or sometimes to the Devil himself, who could be scared off by such means. Another legend says that a silver bullet would never miss its target. Obviously, these legends couldn't appear before guns were invented, but the first examples are actually rather late even so: the first I know of is dated about 1700 and the stories didn't become common until the early nineteenth century. The legends are common to many European countries, but the figurative sense is characteristically American. Magic bullet is rather more recent. It's a direct translation of the German word Zauberkugel, which is said to have been created by the medical scientist Dr Paul Ehrlich in reference to his search, much opposed by the medical establishment of the time, for a cure for syphilis. The term is recorded in English from about 1938 to mean some drug, usually as yet undiscovered, that will be the perfect cure for a specific disease. It suddenly became common in American newspapers in 1940, presumably as the result of a film of that year, Dr Ehrlich's Magic Bullet, which had Edward G Robinson in the title role. It's notable that silver bullet also became more widely known in the US as the result of a famous series, the Lone Ranger Show (on radio from 1933 and later on television). The Lone Ranger typically arrived out of nowhere to perform miraculous feats and would leave a silver bullet as a mark that he had been there. It looks very much as though these media influences caused the traditional supernatural sense of silver bullet to shift towards that of the upstart magic bullet. You can see the sense evolving in this quotation from a Pennsylvania paper, the Bedford Gazette, of 19 September 1951: 'There are those who warn against viewing the atom as a magic weapon,- he continued. - I agree. This is not a silver bullet which can deliver itself or otherwise work military miracles." The earliest example I can find in a clearly figurative sense is in the Chronicle Telegram of Elyria, Ohio, for 18 March 1971: "Drug abuse, as virtually other major problem, is ... not given to simplistic silver bullet solutions." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



---------- K--------



Komme Nie Zu Spät

 



(Alice demo version, 1992. Also known as: Kommienezuspädt)(1)



Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

Komme nie zu spät!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!



And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!



Komme nie zu spät!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

Can't be late!

Can't be late!

Can't be late!

Can't be late!



Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!



Komme nie zu spät!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Kommienezuspädt



(Alice studio version, 2002)



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!



Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

And we can't be late!

Komme nie, komme nie,

komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!



Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!



Komme nie zu spät!

Komme nie zu spät!



Ha, ha, ha, ha!

Ha, ha, ha, ha!

Ha, ha, ha, ha!

Komme nie zu spät!



... [untranscribable fantasy German]...

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

And we can't be late!

Sei punktlich!

Sei punktlich!

Komme nie zu spät!



Komme nie, komme nie, komme nie zu spät!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

"Komme Nie Zu Spät" as performed in the theatre play

Alice rehearsals at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December 14, 1992

Taken from "Visions D'Alice" (1993), French/ German TV documentary by Thierry Thomas for La SEPT/ ARTE



Notes:



(1) Komme Nie Zu Spät: Played in scene 3.

Tom Waits (2002): "One of the songs on there, that's on Alice, the "Kommeniezuspät". Which is eh. Actually there are a few words in there that have real meaning but the rest of it is just pure gibberish. But a lot of people when they hear it the say: "Ghee I didn't know you spoke Rumanian." or "I didn't know you spoke, the odd dialect of Finland." I have been known to tell them that I DO speak those languages, but truthfully I don't." (Source: "Anti Electronic Press Kit" Anti Records promo interview as distributed through the Anti website. June 13, 2002)



Kentucky Avenue

 



 



Well, Eddie Grace's Buick got four bullet holes in the side(2)

And Charlie DeLisle is sittin' at the top of an avocado tree(3)

Mrs. Storm(4) will stab you with a steak knife if you step on her lawn

I got a half a pack of Lucky Strikes, man, so come along with me

And let's fill our pockets with macadamia nuts

And go over to Bobby Goodmanson's and jump off the roof



Well, Hilda plays strip poker when her mama's cross the street

Joey Navinski says she put her tongue in his mouth

And Dicky Faulkner's got a switchblade and some gooseneck risers

That eucalyptus is a hunchback, there's a wind down from the south

So let me tie you up with kite string and I'll show you the scabs on my knee

Watch out for the broken glass, put your shoes and socks on

And come along with me



Let's follow that fire truck, I think your house is burnin' down

And go down to the hobo jungle(5) and kill some rattlesnakes with a trowel

And we'll break all the windows in the old Anderson(6) place

And we'll steal a bunch of boysenberries and I'll smear 'em on your face

I'll get a dollar from my mama's purse and buy that scull and crossbones ring

And you can wear it 'round your neck on an old piece of string



Then we'll spit on Ronnie Arnold and flip him the bird(7)

And slash the tires on the school bus, now don't say a word

I'll take a rusty nail and scratch your initials in my arm

And I'll show you how to sneak up on the roof of the drugstore

I'll take the spokes from your wheelchair(8) and a magpie's wings

And I'll tie 'em to your shoulders and your feet

I'll steal a hacksaw from my dad and cut the braces off your legs

And we'll bury them tonight out in the cornfield

Just put a church key(9) in your pocket, we'll hop that freight train(10) in the hall

We'll slide all the way down the drain to New Orleans in the fall



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1978 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "Blue Valentine", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1978 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)





 



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Kvarteret Stormen")



Notes:



(1) Kentucky Avenue: 

Tom Waits (introducing Kentucky Avenue, 1976): "I grew up on a street called Kentucky Avenue in Whittier, California. My dad was teaching night school at Montebello. I had a little tree fort and everything. I had my first cigarette when I was about seven years old. It was such a thrill. I used to pick 'em up right out of the gutter after it was raining. My dad smoked Kents. Now, I never liked Kents - I tried to get him to change brands. I used to repair everybody's bicycles in the neighborhood. I was the little neighborhood mechanic. There was a guy called Joey Navinski who played the trombone, and a guy called Dickie Faulkner whose nose was always running. And there was a woman called Mrs. Storm. She lived with her sister. She used to sit in her kitchen with her window open and a twelve-gauge shotgun [sticking] out of it ... so we took the long way around." (Source: Live at the Apollo Theatre, London, UK. March 23, 1976)

Tom Waits (introducing Kentucky Avenue, 1979): "Here's a song about growing up. I grew up at a street called Kentucky Avenue. Well, I was born at a very young age, and eh when I was about 5 years old I used to... I used to walk down Kentucky Avenue collecting cigarette buts. And I finally got me a paper route. I used to get up at 1 o' clock in the morning so I could deliver my papers and still have time to break the law..." (Source: BBC's "Tonight In Person" TV show. July 26, 1979)

Tom Waits (1981): "My best friend, when I was a kid, had polio. I didn't understand what polio was. I just knew it took him longer to get to the bus stop than me. I dunno. Sometimes I think kids know more than anybody. I rode a train once to Santa Barbara with this kid and it almost seemed like he lived a life somewhere before he was born and he brought what he knew with him into this world and so..." His voice fades off for a moment, then, "...It's what you don't know that's usually more interesting. Things you wonder about, things you have yet to make up your mind about. There's more to deal with than just your fundamental street wisdom. Dreams. Nightmares." (Source: "Tom Waits: Waits And Double Measures" Smash Hits magazine by Johnny Black. March 18, 1981)

Tom Waits (1985): "Childhood is very important to me as a writer, I think the things that happen then, the way you perceive them and remember them in later life, have a very big effect on what you do later on." "That one came over a little dramatic, a little puffed up, but when I was 10 my best friend was called Kipper, he had polio and was in a wheelchair - we used to race each other to the bus stop." (Source: "Hard Rain" New Musical Express (UK), by Gavin Martin. Date: New York. October 19, 1985)



(2) Eddie Grace's Buick got four bullet holes in the side: Might refer to Buick trademark portholes, reminiscent of large bulletholes. The post-war Buick Roadmaster (as sung about in Ol' '55), had the famous Buick Ventiports, better known as portholes (created by Buick designer Ned Nickles). While lesser Buicks had only three on each fender, the Roadmaster sported four, making it instantly recognizable.





(3) And Charlie DeLisle is sittin' at the top of an avocado tree: In 1978 Waits was interviewed for The Santa Barbara News And Review, by Charley Delisle Waits's childhood friend.



(4) Mrs. Storm:

- Also mentioned in Spidey's Wild Ride (Orphans - bastards, 2006): "And big John Jizom from downtown Chizom flew away with old mrs. Storm."

Tom Waits (1999): "When I was a kid, I had a friend whose dad was a truck driver. His name was Gale Storm. We had moved to National City, and his dad was coming through town, and he picked me up and he took me back up to L.A., to Whittier, to stay for a weekend. And I rode in the truck all the way up there. I was just like, "I'm gonna -- I don't know what I'm gonna do, but I'm changed." (Source: "Gone North, Tom Waits, upcountry" L.A. Weekly. Robert Lloyd. April 23-29, 1999)

Tom Waits (1976): "And there was a woman called Mrs. Storm. She lived with her sister. She used to sit in her kitchen with her window open and a twelve-gauge shotgun [sticking] out of it ... so we took the long way around." (Source: Live at the Apollo Theatre, London, UK. March 23, 1976)



(5) Hobo jungle n.: 1. A hobo camp and rendezvous, usu. a clear space in a thicket (for fuel) near a railroad (for transportation), and ideally also near water and on the outskirts of a city 2. A gathering place for the unemployed of a city, often near the dumping ground and usu. equipped with homemade shacks or huts for those with no other place to live. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(6) Anderson: Tom Waits (1983): "I was stranded in Arizona on the route 66. It was freezing cold and I slept at a ditch. I pulled all these leaves all over on top of me and dug a hole and shoved my feet in this hole. It was about 20 below and no cars going by. Everything was closed. When I woke up in the morning there was a pentecostal church right over the road. I walked over there with leaves in my hair and sand on the side of my face. This woman named Mrs. Anderson came. It was like New Years' Eve... Yeah, it was New Years' Eve. She said: "We're having services here and you are welcome to join us." So I sat at the back pew in this tiny little church...." (Source: "Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones". Island Promo interview, 1983)



(7) Flip the bird, flip a bird v.i.: To gesture (to someone) by raising a clenched fist with the second finger extended; to give the finger to (Source: American - Australian slang dictionary, O'Shea)



(8) Wheelchair:

Gavin Martin (1985): "Blue Valentine' has the Waits song I keep coming back to. 'Kentucky Avenue' starts as fanciful childhood reminiscence and builds to a climax that is at once absurd and heartbreaking, TW: "Childhood is very important to me as a writer, I think the things that happen then, the way you perceive them and remember them in later life, have a very big effect on what you do later on." "That one came over a little dramatic. a little puffed up, but when I was 10 my best friend was called Kipper, he had polio and was in a wheelchair - we used to race each other to the bus stop." (Source: "Hard Rain". New Musical Express: Gavin Martin. October 19, 1985)



(9) Church key n.:

- A bottle or can opener, esp. as used to open a container of beer (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang - Supplement, Wentworth/ Flexner). 

- Also mentioned in "Mr. Henry": "Tuggin' at his shirttail, jinglin' his church key."

- "The shape of the business end of the tool reminded people of the often ornate handles to big, old-fashioned door keys. The link with churches in particular was surely because in the experience of most people such big keys opened church doors. It's also more than probable that an irreverent joke was attached as well, in that drinking beer was an unchurchly thing to do. Before the messages start to be written, let me rapidly move on to a further stage in the development of the term. As you say, the phrase church key is only recorded in print from 1951, though there is much anecdotal evidence to suggest it is rather older in the spoken language, perhaps from the late 1930s. This was around the time at which beer began to be sold in cans rather than bottles. These early cans also needed a tool to open them, since the pull tabs of today were not to be introduced until about 1962. The tool was a stout flat strip of metal with a sharp point, which you pressed into the top of the can to puncture a triangular hole (two were needed on opposite sides, I recall, to let air in so the beer would flow easily). By an obvious analogy, these also came to be called church keys, even though they were a completely different shape. The cap on these beer bottles, by the way, is a crown cork, named after a fanciful view of the ring of crinkled points around the edge of the metal closure before it was clamped on the neck of the bottle. It was invented in 1898 by William Painter, and his firm, the Crown Cork and Seal Company of Baltimore, is still very much around, though these days it spends most of its time making aluminium cans and other packaging products. (Please forgive an enthusiast's digression: I used to run a museum of cidermaking and would demonstrate a hand crown corker to visiting parties. A good operator could do 15 a minute but I never managed so many)" (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004. All rights reserved)



(10) Freight train in the hall:

Kristine McKenna (1983): What's the earliest memory fixed in your mind? Tom Waits: "I have a very early memory of getting up in the middle of the night and standing at my doorway by the hall in the house and having to stand there and wait while a train went by. And after the train passed I could cross the hall into my parent's room." (Source: "One From The Heart & One For The Road ". New Musical Express magazine. Interview by: Kristine McKenna. October 1, 1983)

Tom Waits (1987): "When I was a kid there used to be a train in the hall. Every night a train went through the hall. To get into the bathroom I used to have to wait into my doorway. The freight train used to run right through the center of the house." (Source: "MTV's The Cutting Edge 'Limo Interview"The Best of the Cutting Edge, Volume II. 1987)



King Kong

 



They shot him down

They shot him down

They thought he was a monster

But he was the King



They came to his island

And they brought her with them

They wanted to get his picture

But they were surprised by his enormous size



And when he saw the woman

He took her without question

Because after all

He was the King



And he loved the woman

He loved the way she looked

And she wouldn't stop screaming



But he loved the woman

And he fought a Tyrannosaurus Rex

And it was a bloody battle

But he fought it for his woman



And he climbed up a mountain

And he looked around

Some kind of forest

With all these dinosaurs



And he stripped his woman

He stripped her bare

But there was a pterodactyl

There!



And then a hero

Came and took his woman

And they fell off the mountain

Into some water



And then later

He came looking for his woman

But they were waiting

And they threw a bomb



And they tied him

And took him across the ocean

And they chained him

And put him in the show



And when he saw his woman

He broke loose

And everyone fled in terror

And he was looking for her



And he overtook a train

And he was looking in the street

And then he found her in her apartment



And he climbed up the Empire State building

It was like a phallic symbol

And he took his woman

To the top of that towering temple



And he climbed up and looked around

Some kind of city

With all those skyscrapers

And all the cars



Just him and his screaming woman

And they were finally alone

He loved his woman

You could see it in his eyes

His great big eyes



He loved his woman

From the moment that he saw her

He was all choked up inside



But when the airplanes came

He was soon to die

But he hung on long enough to set his woman down

And make sure that she was safe



And as the bullets pierced

He looked at her so sincere

Before he fell

Because he loved his woman



And they shot him down

They thought he was a monster

But he was the King



Who killed the monkey

'Twas beauty that killed the beast



And Willis O'Brien died

A tragic death

There wasn't much

That he had left



And Ray Harryhousen said

That when Willis died

That's when the King was really dead



They shot him down

They shot him down

They thought he was a monster

But he was the King



Written by: Daniel Johnston (Yip/ Jump Music, 1983)(1)

Published by: �2004 Eternal Yip Eye Music (BMI). Administered by BUG.

Official release (Waits version): "The Late Great Daniel Johnston - Discovered, Covered". Various artists (Gammon. September, 2004)

Re-released on Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) King Kong:

Tom Waits (1992): "Lately I like Daniel Johnston, he's got a lot of records out.. Most of the records sound like they were done in his basement and his mom is at the top of the stairs telling him to come up to dinner. The Replacements have done some of his songs. One called King Kong I really love so much. We don't have that one here. He sounds like a kid and he records on inferior equipment and I always think that's brave. Technology has gotten to the point where I think both in sound and in video - we've seen what it can be when it's well produced and expensive. I think that our ears and our eyes go to that which is - it's just the old pendulum - and when things are produced in a more low rent way you'll listen more carefully. Daniel Johnston's part of that world." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic", Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well, Jim Jarmusch played me his version of "King Kong," and I tried to stay as true to that as I could. If you hear the original, you'll see what I mean. I got all his records. I thought I'd really discovered this: it's real outsider art. The interesting thing about outsider art is that it's such big business. These outsider artists are creating false biographies for themselves, saying they're victims of mental illness and child abuse, and they grew up poor in the South and they're creating these false backgrounds. You aren't really qualified as an outsider unless you've had no formal art education, so you have to prove that you have no art education at all. It's an interesting turn of the tables." (Source: "Tom Waits Call And Response", Stop Smiling magazine No. 28 (USA). October 27, 2006)

- Further reading: Rejected - UnknownOfficial Daniel Johnston Site



---------- L--------



Lie To Me

 



Lie to me baby

Uh huh, lie to me baby

Lie to me baby

Lie to me baby - move on



I know you got another jockey at home

Let me be your rider till your real man comes

Whip me baby, lie like a dog

I really don't care if you do



Lie to me baby

Uh huh, lie to me baby

Lie to me baby

Lie to me baby - move on



I know you got yourself a skinny ol' man

Let me be your baby, I know that I can

Slap me baby, give me all of your grief

I have no use for the truth

Lie to me baby - move on



I know you got another jockey at home

Let me be your rider till your real man comes

Whip me baby, lie like a dog

I really don't care if you do

Never stop telling me lies



Lie to me baby

Lie to me baby

Lie to me baby

Move on



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



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Music video promoting "Lie To Me" directed by Danny Clinch (Anti/ Epitaph, 2006).(2)



Notes:



(1) Lie To Me:

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)



(2) Danny Clinch (2006): "I shot the stills with a motor drive on handheld. I just shot a bunch of frames consecutively and had him kind of running around and he was really giving it up which was really kind of cool. I shot it several times over and over again and then said, "Let's do a few close ups of your face, feet and things like that so that we would have some things to cut away to... let's do a couple that are really wide." Basically I was thinking like an editor, I was coming in close then backing up wide, having him doing some motion. I had never done anything like that before. When I got back and loaded it into the computer I talked to a friend of mine that knows the process and she was very excited and she said, "You shot this on a tripod, right?" I said, "No," and she said, "Ooo." And I said, "What do you mean?" She said, "Well, if you shoot it on a tripod, the background stays steady and the subject moves throughout the background, and that's how you get it animated to make sense." I said, "You (know) what, it doesn't have to make sense - it's Tom Waits." I used color film for the most part. I drained all the color out of it in the edit and added a lot of contrast to it... (and) edited on Final Cut Pro. [Editing process was done by] another friend of mine, Tosh, he is really an animator and we started to work on it. As I said, we were putting animation in with the stills. He started it and loaded it into the computer and just started to align the cut together. Once he did that, he put the images in some sort of order. I came in came up with the idea of stopping at certain points and having areas where you could actually freeze on the photo. I did belabor over it; it is Tom Waits and I wanted to give it my best." (Source: "Tom Waits' Video Highlights Rock Photographer's Talent", Freeze Frame/ Music Video Wire. December 2, 2006. © 2006 MVWire and contributors)




 




Little Boy Blue

 



Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn(2)

The dish ran away with the spoon(3)

Home again, home again Saturday morn

He never gets up before noon



Well, she used to render you legal and tender

When you used to send her your promises, boy

A diller, a dollar(4), unbutton your collar

And come out and holler out all of your noise



So Little Boy Blue, come blow your top

And cut it right down to the quick

Don't sit home and cry on the Fourth of July

Around now you're hittin' the bricks(5)



So abracadabra, now she disappeared

Everything's Canada Dry

So watch your behavior and rattle your cage

With a bottle of Bourbon, goodbye



So Little Boy Blue lost little Bo Peep

She fell through a hole in the nest

Now ain't it peculiar that she's finally cooled



Your big wheel's(6) just like all of the rest



Whenever it rains, the umbrellas complain

They always get played for a chump



So mark it and strike it, she's history now

And you're hangin' out at the pump



Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn

The dish ran away with the spoon

Home again, home again Saturday morn

He never gets up before noon



Well, she used to render you legal and tender

When you used to send her your promises boy

A diller, a dollar, unbutton your collar

And come out and holler out all of your noise



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Eclipse. Astrid Seriese. July, 1993. Bridgadoon

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Into Temptation - Astrid Seriese sings Waits, Weill & more. Astrid Seriese. October, 1996 (September, 2003). Brigadoon

Bachelorette. Melissa Stylianou. November, 2001. SBM

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)



Notes:



(1) Little Boy Blue:

- Tom Waits (1982): "That was originally a song I was singing. Just another song in the movie. Then they cut it, sliced it up and adapted it for her to sing." (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



(2) Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn: quoting "Little Boy Blue" (nursery rhyme, unknown copyright): " Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn,

The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn Where is the boy who looks after the sheep? He's under a haycock, fast asleep Will you wake him? No, not I, For if I do, he's sure to cry
."



(3) The dish ran away with the spoon: Quoting from "Hey, diddle, diddle" (nursery rhyme, copyright unknown). "Hey, Diddle, Diddle: "Hey, diddle, diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed To see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon."

- Also quoted in Jayne's Blue Wish (Big Bad Love, 2002/ Orphans, 2006): "The sky holds all our wishes The dish ran away with the spoon" and Everything You Can Think Of Is True (Alice, 1999): "Everything you can think of is true The dish ran away with the spoon."



(4) A Diller A Dollar: Quoting from "A Diller A Dollar" (nursery rhyme, copyright unknown): "A diller, a dollar A ten o'clock scholar What makes you come so soon? You used to come at ten o'clock But now you don't come until noon."



(5) Bricks:

n.: 1. The pavement or sidewalk; the street 2. The world outside prison walls. Prison use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "9th & Hennepin" (And the bricks are all scarred with jailhouse tattoos)



(6) Big wheel n.: - An important influential person; a person in authority; a big shot. One who has a little authority; a loyal, diligent subordinate (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Little Drop Of Poison

 



(End Of Violence version, 1997)



I like my town with a little drop of poison

Nobody knows, they're lining up to go insane

I'm all alone, I smoke my friends down to the filter

But I feel much cleaner after it rains



She left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison

She left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison



Did the devil make the world while god was sleeping

Someone said you'll never get a wish from a bone

Another long goodbye and a hundred sailors

That deep blue sky is my home



She left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison

She left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison



A rat always knows when he's in with weasels

Here you loose a little every day

I remember when a million was a million

They all have ways to make you pay

They all have ways to make you pay



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1997/ 2006

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1997

Official release: "Spain Every Time I try/ End Of Violence soundtrack", Outpost Recordings, 1997





 



Little Drop Of Poison



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



I like my town with a little drop of poison

Nobody knows, they're lining up to go insane

I'm all alone, I smoke my friends down to the filter

But I feel much cleaner after it rains



And she left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison



Did the devil make the world while god was sleeping?

You'll never get a wish from a bone

Another long goodbye and a hundred sailors

That deep blue sky is my home



And she left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison



Well, the rat always knows when he's in with weasels

Here you loose a little every day

Well, I remember when a million was a million

They all have ways to make you pay



And she left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison

And she left in the fall, that's her picture on the wall

She always had that little drop of poison



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1997/ 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany) 

The Shape Of You. Nina Vox. January 6, 2009. Scarab Music (Australia) 

Despite Your Destination. Shay Estes & Trio ALL. December 5, 2009. Self-released



Little Man

 



As sure as fire will burn

there's one thing you will learn

Is things you have cherished

are things that you have earned

Luck is when opportunity

meets with preparation(1)

And the same is true for ev'ry generation



Little man

As you climb on my knee

the whole future lies in thee

Little man



Little man

Never hurry, take it slow

Things worth-while need time to grow

Little man



Don't look back

there are things that might distract

Move ahead towards your goal

and the answers will unfold



Little man

Love is always in the air

It is there for those who care

Little man



Don't look back

there are things that might distract

Move ahead towards your goal

and the answers will unfold



Little man

Love is always in the air

It is there for those who care

Little man



Little man

Little man

Little man



Written by: Teddy Edwards

Published by: De Luxe Music Publ., � 1991 (Copyright Control)

Official release: Teddy Edwards - Mississippi Lad, Gitanes Jazz Productions (Polygram), 1991.

Teddy Edwards: tenor saxophone. Tom Waits: vocal & guitar. Art Hillery: piano. Leroy Vinnegar: bass. Billy Higgins: drums.

Re-released on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Luck is when opportunity meets with preparation: "Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity", ascribed to Seneca (Roman dramatist, philosopher & politician: 5 BC - 65 AD)





Waits and Edwards in the studio, 1991

Source: booklet for: "Mississippi lad" (Antilles) by Teddy Edwards.

Date: March 15/ 16, 1991 at Sunset Sound, Hollywood CA.

Credits: photography by Howard Morehead



Teddy Edwards (1995) on working with Waits on Mississippi Lad, 1991 ''Tom Waits is the one who got me my contract with PolyGram. He's wonderful, he's America's best lyricist since Johnny Mercer. He came down to the studio on the ''Mississippi Lad'' album, that's the first one I did for PolyGram, and he sang two of my songs, wouldn't accept any money, just trying to give me the best boost that he could.'' (Source: "Teddy Edwards: 'You ain't done nothing but play great'", Tony Gieske. Remembrance Of Swing Past)



Little Trip To Heaven

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



Little trip to heaven on the wings of your love

Banana moon is shining in the sky

I feel like I'm in heaven when you're with me

I know that I'm in heaven when you smile

Though we're stuck here on the ground

I got something I've found

And it's you



I don't need to take no trip to outer space

All I have to do is look at your face

And before I know it, I'm in orbit around you

I thank my lucky stars that I found you

When I see your constellation

You're my inspiration

And it's you



[whistled solo]



You're my North star when I'm lost and feeling blue

You're my sun that's breaking through, it's true

And all the other stars seem dim around you I thank my lucky stars that I found you

When I see your smiling face I know nothing's gonna take your place

And it's you



And it's you

And it's you

And it's you

And it's you

And it's you

Ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh

Ooh



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Little Trip To Heaven



(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



Little trip to heaven on the wings of your love

Banana moon is shining in the sky

Feel like I'm in heaven when you're with me

Know that I'm in heaven when you smile

Though we're stuck here on the ground I got something that I've found

And it's you



I don't have to take no trip to outer space

All I have to do is look at your face

And before I know it, I'm in orbit around you

Thanking my lucky stars that I've found you

When I see your constellation

Honey, you're my inspiration

And it's you



You're my North star when I'm lost and feeling blue

The sun is breaking through the clouds, don't you, don't you know it's true?

Honey, all the other stars seem dim around you

Thanking my lucky stars that I've found you

When I see your smiling face

Honey, I know nothing ever gonna take your place

And it's you



And it's you, and it's you

And it's you, and it's you

And it's you

And it's you

And it's you

Shoo-be-doo, ba-ba-da



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973



Known covers:

Swingin' Standard Time. Jive At Five. 1995. Self-released

Into Temptation - Astrid Seriese sings Waits, Weill & more. Astrid Seriese. October, 1996 (September, 2003). Brigadoon

Beautiful One. Holly Robinson. July, 1999. Cameron

Little Trip (soundtrack). Mugison. April 18, 2006. Ipecac Recordings

Fall Of The House Of Even. Even In Blackouts. October 31, 2006. FDO Records

Almost Home EP. Courtney Fortune. November 16, 2006. Self-released

Meet The Sun Halfway. Mae Robertson. February 26, 2008. Lyric Partners

Thunder’s Mouth. Scott Ainslie. May 7, 2008. Cattail Music



Lonely

 



Lonely, lonely, lonely,

Lonely eyes, lonely face

Lonely, lonely in your place



Lonely, lonely

Lonely eyes, lonely face

Lonely, lonely in your place



I thought that I knew all that there was to

Lonely, lonely, lonely



Melanie Jane, won't feel the pain

Lonely, lonely

Lonely eyes, lonely face

Lonely, lonely in your place



And I thought that I knew all that there was to

Lonely, lonely,

lonely eyes, lonely face

Lonely, lonely in your place



And I still love you, I still love you

Lonely, lonely



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973



Known covers:

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: The Caseworker



Long Way Home

 



Well I stumbled in the darkness

I'm lost and alone

Though I said I'd go before us

and show the way back home

Is there a light up ahead

I can't hold on very long

Forgive me pretty baby but I always take the long way home



Money's just something you throw

off the back of a train(2)

I got a head full of lightning

And a hat full of rain

And I know that I said

I'd never do it again

And I love you pretty baby but I always take the long way home



I put food on the table

and a roof over our head

But I'd trade it all tomorrow

for the highway instead

Watch your back, keep your eyes shut tight

Your love's the only thing I've ever known

But one thing's for sure pretty baby, I always take the long way home



You know I love you baby

More than the whole wide world

You are my woman

You know you are my pearl

Let's go out past the party lights

Where we can finally be alone

Come with me and we can take the long way home

Come with me, together we can take the long way home

Come with me, together we can take the long way home



Written and produced by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2002/ 2006

Tom Waits vocals, guitar Larry Taylor upright bass Nic Phelps French horn

 Recorded and mixed March 2001 at Prairie Sun Recording, Cotati, CA/ USA

Engineer: Oz Fritz. Second Engineer and Production Assistant: Jeff Sloan. Assistant Engineer: Gene Cornelius.

Official release: "Big Bad Love" (original movie soundtrack): Various artists. February 19/ March 12, 2002

Label: Nonesuch Records, a Warner Music Group Company.

Re-released on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Feels Like Home. Norah Jones. February, 2004. Blue Note Records

Min & Meer. De Mol & De Roovere. September, 2005. Self-released ("Blokje Om")

Long Way Home. Mainesqueeze. October, 2005. Self-released

Roots & Fruits. Natural Blues. April 16, 2007. Self-released

The Honeymoon Agenda/ Northeast. The Mammals. December 2007. Humble Abode Music

Wishful Thinking. Hot Club Of Cowtown. May 4, 2009. Shout!Factory

Crushes. Mates of State. June 15, 2010. Self-released 

Innocent When You Dream. Brandon Bernstein. February 26, 2010. Jazz Collective Records



Notes:



(1) Soundtrack song notes by Arliss Howard: "I have sung lullabies to my children as I imagined they were intended. But lately I find myself singing them under my breath when I'm alone. It's quite a thing to sing this little amazement when you're walking on an old logging track and break out into a meadow lit by a quarter moon. My gratitude to the Brennan/ Waits family is that mysterious and immense."... "Tom and Kathleen look good together. I don't know how they work, the mechanics of it, but sitting in the restaurant asking me what kind of song I had in mind, they just looked good. When we heard the demos, there were highway sounds on the track and then I remembered Kathleen saying that Tom would work in a moving car with a tape recorder. And a tuba."



(2) Money's just something you throw off the back of a train: same phrase mentioned in Diamond In Your Mind (Solomon Burke version, Don't Give Up On Me 2002): "They said everything was sacred, nothing was profane. And money was something that you throw off the back of trains."



Look's Like I'm Up Shit Creek Again

 



Well, the sun came in my window

Wednesday morning

And your love was like the golden rays again

Now I'm lying here on a Thursday, and you're lovin' someone new

And it looks like I'm up shit creek again



And I can't help but thinking of your lovin' ways

And I've cried a quart of tears since you've been gone

And I can't face the morning by myself, love

And it looks like I'm up shit creek again



Since you've been gone I cry all the time

And I cannot stand leavin' you behind



So I'll pull myself together and I'll dry away the tears

But the morning light has brought back memories

And I can't face the morning by myself, love

And it looks like I'm up shit creek again



So I'm out a-walkin' on this dusty highway

Cause you've given me no reason for to stay

And I'll walk until I've found someone who'll love me not in vain

And it looks like I'm up shit creek again

And it looks like I'm up shit creek again



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

Down To The Promised Land. Various Artists. 2000. Bloodshot Records (performed by Nora O'Connor)

Stranger To Someone. Jason Walker. May, 2002. Laughing Outlaw

Daltry Calhoun - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 20, 2005. Lakeshore Records (performed by Nora O’Connor)

Over Moons And Heavy Arms. Vago. June 16, 2007. Label: Self-released



Notes:



(1) Up shit creek (without a paddle): Taboo. Out of luck; in a hopeless predicament. Although the shortened form "up the creek" is common, the full orig. term is seldom heard now. Orig. from homosexual usage, meaning that one has encountered difficulties or has been discovered while engaged in anal intercourse (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Lord I've Been Changed

 



Woah I, know I've been changed

And I know I've been changed

I know I've been changed

Angels in heaven done sign my name

Angels in heaven done sign my name



Well, I know I got religion,

Lord knows I'm not ashamed

Well, a holy ghost is my witness

and the angels done sign my name



Oh, I said: I know I've been changed

And I know I've been changed, yeah

Know I've been changed

Angels in heaven done sign my name

Angels in heaven done sign my name



Lord knows I've been converted

Lord knows I've been redeemed

Well, you can wake me up in the midnight hour

I'm gonna tell ya just a what I seen



I said: I know I've been changed

And I know I've been changed, yeah

Know I've been changed

Angels in heaven done sign my name

Angels in heaven done sign my name

Angels in heaven done sign my name

Angels in heaven done sign my name



Written by: Traditional arranged by Waits/ Brennan

Published by: Traditional/ Public Domain(1)

Official release (John Hammond version): Wicked Grin, John Hammond. 2001. Emd/Virgin

John Hammond: Guitar, Vocals. Stephen Hodges: Percussion. Larry Taylor Tom Waits

Vocal Handclaps: Tom Waits, John Hammond, Stephen Hodges, Augie Meyers, Gene Cornelious, Oz Fritz, and Ralph Patlan

Waits live versions performed during Mule Variations tour, 2000.

Official release (Tom Waits version): Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.(2)



Known covers:

Wicked Grin. John Hammond. March 13, 2001. Emd/ Virgin

Where We Live - Stand For What You Stand On, Various artists. September 30, 2003. Performed by John Hammond



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Lord I've Been Changed"

Video outtake from the Irish documentary "Freedom Highway" (directed by Philip King).

Date: Prairie Sun studios. Cotati Ca, 2001.

Credits: Hummingbird productions



Notes:



(1) I Know I've Been Changed:

- John Hammond (2001): "It's a traditional gospel song that [Waits] had heard from the Staple(s) Singers that they'd recorded for VeeJay in the Fifties. He wanted to do this song and I said hey no problem. I remember my first major gig was at the Ash Grove in Los Angeles opening for the Staples Singers. It was the purest sound and the most spiritual thing I'd ever heard. Pops was my friend for years and years and he gave me such encouragement. Tom knew I was into that sound, so it's just me playing guitar, Tom, Larry on bass and a lot of handclapping. Did he sing his ass off or what?" (Source: "Hammond Gets Waits' Blues" by Andrew Dansby. Rollingstone.com. April 12, 2001). Could be: "Great Day - The Staple Singers" (Milestone MCD-47028-2. Recorded 1962 & 1964)

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)

Lord, I Know I've Been Changed: "Intro: (Choir) The angels in the heavens done signed my name, Chorus: (Men/Choir) Lord, I know I've been changed, (Lord, Lord) Lord, I know I-I-I I-I-I been changed, Lord, I know I've been changed, The angels in the heavens done signed my name Verse: (Soloist/Choir) One of these mornings, it won't be long, (The angels in the heavens done signed my name), You're gonna look for me, and I'll be gone, (The angels in the heavens done signed my name), Bridge: (Choir/Ladies) I've been changed, I've been changed, (He's changed my walk, he's changed my talk), I've been changed, I've been been changed, The angels in the heavens done signed my name Outro 1: (Altos) He picked me up and he turned me around, (Sopranos: Change x 8) He place my feet on solid ground, I once was blind but now I see, I thank the Lord for CHANGE! etc. (Men: I'm so glad that the Lord changed me, I'm so glad that the Lord, that the Lord, CHANGE!) Outro 2: (Choir) Change (x 8)" (Source: "Spirit And The Sky", Warwick Revelation Rock-Gospel Choir. Warwick Revelation's Piazza Concert 2003)

- I Know I've Been Changed: "I know I've been changed; Yes my Lord; Cause de angels in Heaven done signed my name I prayed all night and I prayed all day too; I'll keep on praying till I come through I stepped in da water and da water was cold It chilled my body but not my soul If you don't believe dat I've been redeemed; Den follow me down to dat Jordan stream." (As performed by: "The School Of Music/ East Carolina University", 2002)

- Lord I know I've been changed (Unidentified choir version): "Lord I know I've been changed Lord I know I've been changed Lord I know I've been changed. The angels in the heaven done sign my name. Went down to the river of Jordan Went down to the river of Jordan The water was chilly and cold The water chilled my body But the water didn't chill my soul."



(2) Original tape (vocals, guitar and tambourine) from "Freedom Highway - Songs That Shaped a Century/ Songs of Resistance and liberation" (2001). Irish documentary on pop and politics, made for RTE, the BBC, the Irish Film Board and ARTE. Directed by Philip King (Hummingbird Productions, 2001). Interview and performs "I Know I've Been Changed" and "I Ain't Goin' Down To The Well No More") 

Philip King (2004): "Tom Waits walked into the room with the barn door and he threw it onto the ground and he threw a chair on it and he sat up on it. And the door creaked and the chair creaked and he threw that tambourine into the door and he put his foot on it and a banjo in his hand and he said: 'I'm ready'. I knew he was ready, but I wasn't ready. Because his voice was like a whirlwind that just blew me across the room when he started to sing. He was consumed by the act of doing what he was doing... It's at those times that you feel the five-year wait is worth it. The 117 phone calls were worth it. The cajoling, the knocking on the door, the inevitable rejection, which is a constant part of this work, is worth it." (Source: "Philip King tells Shane Hegarty about recording Tom Waits" The Irish Times, October 29, 2004)



Lost In The Harbour

But There's Never A Rose



(Alice demo version, 1992. Also known as: Lost In The Harbour)(1)



Over here the ladies all want sweet perfume

But there's never a rose

And over there the roses are frightened to bloom

So they never can grow



And over here they need wool

For weaving their baby's new clothes

But nobody has any wool

And the sheep are all lost in the harbour

Lost in the harbour



And over here they want diamonds to wear

But there aren't any here

And over there everyone's hiding their tears

But they're crying inside



And the wall won't come down

Till they're no longer afraid of themselves

And if you don't believe me, ask the elves

And then I can come down to the harbour

Down to the harbour



And then I will fill the ocean back up with my tears

I still have a couple more years

And then I can come back to the harbour

Down to the harbour(2)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Lost In The Harbour



(Alice studio version, 2002)(1)



Over here the ladies all want sweet perfume

But there's never a rose

And over there roses are frightened to bloom

So they never can grow



And over here they need wool

For weaving their baby's new clothes

But nobody has any wool

And the sheep are all lost in the harbour

Lost in the harbour...



And over here they want diamonds to wear

But there aren't any here

And over there everyone's hiding their tears

But they're crying inside



And the wall won't come down

Till they're no longer afraid of themselves

And if you don't believe me, ask yourselves

And then I can come down to the harbour

Down to the harbour



And then I will fill the ocean back up with my tears

I still have a couple more years

And then I can come back to the harbour

Down to the harbour(2)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

"Lost In The Harbour" as performed in the theatre play (excerpt)

Alice rehearsals at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December 14, 1992

Taken from "Visions D'Alice" (1993), French/ German TV documentary by Thierry Thomas for La SEPT/ ARTE



Notes:



(1) Lost In The Harbour: Sung by Humpty Dumpty in scene 10.

Stage directions from the play (Scene 10, Humpty Dumpty): " (A large egg-like creature, Humpty Dumpty, sits on top of a wall. Alice approaches.) ALICE: If you please, Sir - what's on the other side of the wall? HUMPTY DUMPTY: Who wants to know? A: I do. HD: And who are you? A: I'm a little girl named... named... I'm afraid I don't know my name any more. But I thought perhaps there might be a door in the wall - HD: A door!! You cannot have a door in a wall. You'd lose the wallness of it. If you could get through to the other side of a wall, what's the point of having it? A: What is on the other side, then? HD: Nothing, when you can't see what's there - or everything, since you can imagine whatever you please. On the other side of a wall, everything is possible, but nothing really exists. A: But you can see the other side, can't you? HD: Of course I can, child. Someone always has to see both sides. I am the all-inclusive dialectic between here and there. If you want to know what's on the other side, you have to ask me. A: Wouldn't it be simpler just to tear down the wall? HD: Don't even think that, child! Tear down the wall, what would become of me? A: An omelet, perhaps. HD: What a nasty thing to say! A: But I didn't mean - HD: Precisely. You don't mean. You're like everybody else, you say, but you don't mean. Now I, on the other hand, mean - even when I don't say. Take this for instance. (sings)"

Tom Waits: "That's the Humpty Dumpty situation, looking over one side of the wall and the other -- 'over here,' 'over there,' " Waits says. "It's East Berlin-West Berlin, Palestine and Israel, Northern Ireland. That [enemies] are really kind of neighbours as well." The harbour is the meeting point. "It's about conflict resolution." (Source: "A double shot of Waits" Globe and Mail (Canada) May 7, 2002 by Carl Wilson. Copyright C 2002 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc.)



(2) Stage directions from the play (Scene 10, Humpty Dumpty): "(talks) "There! And that's only a beginning. Always rely on the letter M. A: Why M? HD: Why not? A: Oh, you are the person I've been looking for! I'm trying to find out what "Jabberwocky" means. HD: Jabberwocky again! They all want to know what Jabberwocky means. It's a wall of words, child, a wall of words. My advice to you is, see if it has any meaning without the words. A: But how can I do that? HD: By holding still, child. Stand stock-still, and watch."



Louise

 



(Friends Of Mine version, 1998. Also known as "Tell It To Me")



They say you're seeing someone, you're wearing his ring

They say you laughed when you heard my name

They say he takes you dancing, he holds you so near

They say he'll buy you anything

Tell me am I foolish, I don't believe these stories

Darling, I'll be coming home soon



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me



Well, I know you will not see me, but I hear you have a daughter

I hear she has my eyes

They say she calls him "father", and that he's proud of her

And that he believes all of your lies

But for all your faithless beauty, I give all my tomorrows

And if you're still thinking of me



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me



Took a job in Tennessee

To build a life for us

Give a kiss to win a heart

Take a kiss to break apart



They say you're seeing someone, you're wearing his ring

They say you laughed when you heard my name

They say he takes you dancing, he holds you so near

They say he'll buy you anything

Well, tell me am I foolish, I don't believe these stories

Darling, I'll be coming home soon



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me

Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me

Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it, tell it to me



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1998/ 2006

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording Studios, Cotati, CA, on May 28, 1998

Official release (as "Louise"): Friends Of Mine - Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998





 



Tell It To Me



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



They say you're seeing someone, you're wearing his ring

They say you laughed when you heard my name

They say he takes you dancing, he holds you so near

They say he'll buy you anything

Tell me am I foolish, I don't believe these stories

And I'll be coming home soon



Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me



I know, you will not see me, but I know you have a daughter

And I hear she has my eyes

They say she calls him "father", and he's proud of her

And even believes all of your lies

But for all your faithless beauty, I'd give all my tomorrows

And if you're still thinking of me

Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me



Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me

Oh Louise, Louise, if it's true

Tell it to me



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1998/ 2006

Official release (as "Louise"): Friends Of Mine - Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998

Re-released (as "Tell It To Me") on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Steel guitar by Bobby Black



Known covers:

Friends Of Mine. Ramblin' Jack Elliott. 1998. HighTone Records

Monsters Of Folk. Various artists. 1998. HighTone Records promo CD (performed by Ramblin' Jack Elliott, same version as on "Friends Of Mine", 1998)

15 Years Of American Music. Various artists. 1998. HighTone Records (performed by Ramblin' Jack Elliott, same version as on "Friends Of Mine", 1998)



Notes:



(1) Tell It To Me: (Bone Machine outtake)

- Jim Jarmusch (1993): Man, you have so many songs. There are other songs you played for me that aren't on 'Bone Machine', like "Filipino Box Spring Hog". TW: Yeah, and "Tell It to Me", and "Mexican Song", "In the Reeperbahn", one called "Shall We Die Tonight", a suicide pact ballad, and then a couple for John Hammond at the same time, one called "Down There By the Train". JJ: Did he record it? TW: No, nobody did. And we couldn't find a way to do it either that felt good, so we just left it, and it's just sitting there. (Source: "Straight No Chaser" Straight No Chaser magazine (UK), by Jim Jarmusch. Date: October, 1992 (published early 1993)



(2) Ramblin' Jack Elliott version:

- Ramblin' Jack Elliott (on: Louise): "I've known Tom for over 20 years. He sent me a letter with a tape of this song. I didn't know how our voices would sound together, but we got a good take." (Source: Ramblin' Jack Elliott official site, 2006)

Edvins Beitiks (1996): "Waits will be on Elliot's next album [Friends Of Mine" Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998], along with Arlo Guthrie, Jerry Jeff Walker, Guy Clark and Bob Weir. It was a labor of love, says Waits. "We did one song with Guy Clark - 'That Old Time Feeling' - that came off pretty good, I thought. Jack brings it with him when he comes, and that's rare these days. "You could say Jack wears in his songs - they're well used and well sung," says Waits, adding with a characteristically raspy chuckle, "Some people would say he wears 'em in and wears 'em out, but he wears 'em, that's for sure. "When he's learning a song he kind of tries it on like a pair of gloves. I got a chance to watch him do that when he recorded a song my wife and I wrote. He's got a way of doing things that's uniquely his own. He makes a song his own. That's the beauty of it." Waits has been itching to record with Elliott ever since he first heard his music getting good play, in the days when he was working as a doorman at the Heritage Club in San Diego's Mission Beach. "I was about 19, and his record was one of the most-played at this little coffee house. Jack's record was on the turntable all the time the one where he's on the cover with his horse and he's roping something [Ramblin' Jack Elliott: Young Brigham", Reprise R/RS 6284, 1968]. "It had '912 Greens' on there, spoken out, the song that so moved me. It had his version of "Tennessee Stud' and some Woody Guthrie songs," says Waits. He paused, then added that Elliott "was a real hero of mine - the idea of meeting him one day and recording with him is pretty fantastic." Waits, caught up in American music, did a lot of listening to Elliott, to Blind Lemon Jefferson, to Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, before stepping onstage at the Heritage Club to give the music a try himself. "I think I made more as a doorman than I did playing," he said. "Eight dollars a night on the door, $6 a night on stage. A little strange." Waits laughed at the memory of it, and the laughter was contagious. He called back easy-going roams with Elliott when both men were moving through Los Angeles in the high-water years of California folk. "We bumped into each other a couple of times," said Waits, making it matter-of-fact. "Hung with him in clubs in L.A., him and his dogs and his motorhome." After listening to the long-sleeve best of Elliott's stories, Waits is convinced "Jack should sit down somewhere with a tape recorder and talk all day and they should put it in the Library of Congress. "He's got one of those stories that is a novel unto itself, and I'd like to read it," says Waits. "Because his story is also the story of the country." (Source: "On The Road Tom Waits Talkin' About Hanging And Recording With Ramblin' Jack Elliott...". San Francisco Examiner, by Edvins Beitiks. August 4, 1996(?))





Source: Official Guy Clark website. W. Guy Clark and Ramblin' Jack Elliot.

Date: Prairie Sun Studios, Cotati. During the recording sessions for Ramblin' Jack Elliot's "Friends Of Mine".

Recorded between February 26, 1996 to October 14, 1997



Lowdown

 



She's a crooked sheriff in a real straight town

She openend the door, shake shake shake the lights go down

Clover honey and the Jimson Weed

Red leather skirt way up above her knees

Oh yeah, my baby's lowdown



She's a gone lost dirt road

There ain't no way back I been told

Well she's a story they all tell

She's a rebel, she's a yell

Oh yeah, my baby's lowdown



White heat in a cold rain

I'm a mergin here in your mergin lane

Jockey La Fayette, Big Eyed Al



The second hand moon's shining for my gal

She's a big red flag in a mean bullpen

She'll steal it from you, sell it right back to you again

Well, she's a wild rose, she's not settled

Cold gun of ice blue metal,

Oh, my baby's lowdown



White heat in a cold rain

I'm a mergin here in your mergin lane

Jockey La Fayette, Big Eyed Al



She's a cheap motel with a burned out sign

She'll take care of you definitely every time

She got a stolen check book and legs up to there

Singing into a hairbrush, right in front of the mirror

Oh yeah, my baby's lowdown



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Low-down

- adj. Unfair; unetchical; degraded; vile; low. 1850: Thornton. 1869: DAE. Colloq. (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner, 1975)

- adj. [US] [mid-19C+] mean, contemptible, unpleasant. (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



Lowside Of The Road

 



I'm on a black elevator goin' down

Little Joe from Kokomo(2), it rattles to the ground

The dice is laughin' at the man that it throwed

I'm rollin' over to the lowside of the road



The moon is red and you're dancin' real slow

Twentynine miles left to go

The chain monkeys(3) help you with your load

I'm rollin' over to the lowside of the road



Jezebel(4) is naked with an axe

The prosecution tells you to relax

Your head feels like it's ready to explode

And you're rollin' over, you're rollin' over



Well, the clapper(5) has been ripped out of the bell

The flapper has been kicked right out of hell

When the horse whips the man that he rode

You're rollin' over to the lowside of the road



The dog won't bite if you beat him with a bone

And she's so shy when she's talkin' on the phone

And then the ground rises up and starts to groan

And rollin' over to the lowside of the road

Unto the lowside of the road

Unto the lowside of the road



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Mule Variations, Anti Inc., 1999

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Mule Variations" (Amsco Publications, 2000)



Known covers:

Ready For Love. John Hammond. February, 2003. Back Porch Records

Begin The Biguine. Viktor Lazlo. May 29, 2007. Universal Music (duet w. Belgian singer Arno Hintjens)

Duke Robillard’s World Full Of Blues. Duke Robillard. June 26, 2007. Stony Plain Records



Notes:



(1) Lowside Of The Road

- Rip Rense
 (1999): Tell me about "Lowside of the Road." Tom Waits: "Leadbelly was involved in a skirmish after a dance one night on a dirt road, late. Someone pulled out a knife, someone got stabbed, and he went to jail for it. He was rolling over to the low side of the road. I seem to identify with that. I think we all know where the low side of the road is." (Source: A Q&A about Mule Variations. MSO: Rip Rense, early 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "It's all about the black plague and the 14th century. Wrong side of the road, low side of the road, everybody knows where the low side of the road is. You make that U-turn and you come back and your tires get stuck, and you keep spinning and spinning and spinning, and you wish you'd just kept going instead of stopping and trying to turn around. I don't know. It's one of those images. It can be about anything you want it to be about. Wherever the low side of the road is for you, whatever road you're on, whatever the low side of that road there is for you, that's what it's about, I guess." (Source: "Tom Waits '99 Q&A" ATN (Addicted To Noise) Coverstory, by Gil Kaufman and Michael Goldberg. Date: Petaluma. April, 1999) 



(2) Little Joe from Kokomo

- Kokomo: A city of central Indiana north of Indianapolis. Founded in the 1840's, it is a manufacturing center (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)

n. [late 19C+] (gambling) the point of 4 in craps dice (little britches, little Joe) (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(3) Chain monkeys: An American niche industry becoming obsolete. "Chain monkeys", mostly construction workers and loggers, would spend hours along the sides of icy mountain roads to help travelers wrap their tires with chains to help gain traction. The job came with hazards like frostbite and the tendency for drivers to run over chainers. These days, SUVs and 4-wheel drive cars don't require chains, and states have begun to plow more mountain roads. So "Chain monkeys" are a dying breed (Source: American Western Magazine, 2003. Copyright � 2003 High Country News)



(4) Jezebel: Biblical reference. Book of Kings, story of Ahab and Jezebel. Jezebel was given authority to decree the manner in which the people would be permitted to worship. Then she persecuted to death those who would disagree



(5) Clapper n.: The tongue of a bell (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



Lucinda

 



Well, they call me William the Pleaser

I sold opium, fireworks and lead

Now I'm telling my troubles to strangers

when the shadows get long I'll be dead



Now, her hair was as black as a bucket of tar

her skin as white as a cuttlefish bone(1)

I left Texas to follow Lucinda

Now I'll never see heaven or home



I made a wish on a sliver of moonlight

A sly grin and a bowl full of stars

Like a kid who captures a firefly

and leaves it only to die in the jar



As I kick at the clouds at my hanging

As I swing out over the crowd

I will search every face for Lucinda's

And she will go off with me down to hell



I thought I'd broke loose of Lucinda

The rain returned and so did the wind

I cast this burden on the god that's within me

and I'll leave this old world and go free



The devil dances inside empty pockets(2)

but she didn't want money or pearls

No, that wasn't enough for Lucinda

She wasn't that kind of girl



Now I've fallen from grace for Lucinda

Whoever thought that hell be'd so low

I did well for an old tin can sailor

but she wanted the bell in my soul



I've spoken the god on the mountain

And I've swam in the Irish sea

I ate fire and drank from the Ganges(3)

and I'll beg there for mercy for me



I thought I'd broke loose from Lucinda

the rain returned and so did the wind

I was standing outside the Whitehorse

Oh but I was afraid to go in



I heard someone pull the trigger

her breasts heaved in the moonlight again

There was a smear of gold in the window

and then I was the jewel of her sin



They call me William the Pleaser

I sold opium, fireworks and lead

Now I'm telling my troubles to strangers

when the shadows get long I'll be dead



Now her hair was a black as a bucket of tar

skin as white as a cuttlefish bone

I left Texas to follow Lucinda

I know I'll never see heaven or home

I know I'll never see heaven or home

I know I'll never see heaven or home



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(4)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Cuttlefish bone: A cuttlefish bone (the white calcareous internal shell of a cuttlefish, a cephalopod) is used as a dietary supplement for birds and reptiles (especially turtles), as it is usually very soft and dry. Often found washed ashore on beaches.



(2) The devil dances inside empty pockets: The devil dances in an empty pocket. 18th Century proverb of German origin: poverty tempts one to do evil.



(3) Drank from the Ganges: Devout Hindus begin to give their offerings of flowers or food, throwing handfulls of grain or garlands of marigolds or pink lotuses into the Ganges river India. Others will float small oil lamps on its surface. Or as stated in "Banaras City of Light" by Diana L. Eck, "they may take up her water and put it back into the river as an offering to the ancestors and the gods" (Eck 212). In cupped hands they will also take the ritual drink of the Ganges and then fill a container to take with them to the temple.



(4) Lucinda:

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)



Lucky Day

 



The prettiest girl in all the world

Is in a little Spanish town

But I left her for a Bonnie lass(2)

And I told her I'd see her around

But that Bonnie lass and her heart of glass

Could not hold a candle to bummin' around(3)



So don't cry for me, cause I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



Well, tell the boys back home

that I'm doin' just fine

I've left all my troubles and woe

So sing about me, for I can't come home

I've many, many many more miles to go



Why, there's Miss Kelsey

She taught dance in our school

And old Johnny O'Toole

I'll still beat you at pool



So don't cry for me, for I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



Well, when I was a boy, my daddy sat me on his knee

And he told me, he told me many things

And he said son, there's a lot of things in this world

That you're gonna have no use for

And when you get blue(4) and you've lost all your dreams

There's nothin' like a campfire and a can of beans



Why, there's Miss Kelsey

She taught dance in our school

And old Johnny O'Toole

I'll still beat you at pool



So don't cry for me, for I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



So don't cry for me, for I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

Long Honeymoon. Mary Coughlan. June 12, 2001. Evangeline



Notes:



(1) Sung by Wilhelm in scene 11 as he goes mad after having shot K�tchen.



(2) Lass(ie) n.: A girl or young woman (who is unmarried); A sweetheart (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(3) Bum around: To loaf; to wander idly; to do nothing (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Blue: adj. 1. [late 18C-19C] confused, terrified, disappointed. 2. [late 18C+] miserable, depressed (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



Lucky Day Overture

 



Ladies and gentlemen Harry's Harbor Bizarre(2) is proud to present

Under the Big Top(3) tonight

Human Oddities!

That's right, you'll see the Three Headed Baby

You'll see Hitler's(4) brain

See Lea Graff, the German midget who sat in J.P. Morgan's(5) lap

You'll see Priscilla Bajano(6), the monkey woman

Jo Jo(7), the dog faced boy

Jim Milton Malone, the human skeleton(8)

That's right, ladies and gentlemen

See Grace McDaniels(9), the mule faced woman

And she's the homeliest woman in the world

Under the Big Top tonight

Never before seen

And if you have a heart condition, please be warned

Don't forget to visit our snack bar at Charleston Grotto

All sales are final, void where prohibited by law

You'll see Sealo(10) the seal boy who has flippers for arms

You'll see Johnny Eck(11), the man born without a body

He walks on his hands

He has his own orchestra and is an excellent pianist

See Gerd Bessler(12), the human pincushion

And don't forget, it's Ladies' Night here at Harry's Harbor Bizarre

You'll see Ko Ko(13) the bird girl

Mortando(14), the human fountain

Step a little closer, ladies and gentlemen, and don't be shy

Dig deep in your pockets

You'll see Radion(15), the human torso(16)

Deep from the jungles of Africa

Ladies and gentlemen Harry's Harbor Bizarre

Ladies and gentlemen Harry's Harbor Bizarre



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) In the original play a Tom Waits tape is played to open the show, then the Old Uncle starts singing the song.

- Mark Richard (1994): "We are listening to "Lucky Day Overture", the opening of The Black Rider. Waits is adding maniacal laughter from a Japanese movie dubbed in German he sampled from late-night Hamburg television. Waits says he has always been fascinated with human oddities, collecting books like Ripley's Believe It or Not, books of strange and incredible facts."Some people might consider it sick or demeaning, but these people had careers and were very well-respected in show business," says Waits. "Everybody I know in show business has something about them mentally, spiritually, or physically that makes them an oddity." (Source: "The music of chance". Spin Magazine: June 1, 1994. Mark Richard) 



(2) Harry's Harbor Bizarre: "Harrys Hamburger Hafen Basar" formerly known as "Harry's Hafen Basar": An existing shop and meeting point in the Hamburg harbour area (Balduinstra�e 18, nowadays Erichstrasse 56). This is a 5-minute walk from the St. Pauli district (Reeperbahn).

- Further reading (in German): Harry's Harbour Basar

Tom Waits (1993): "It's a crude little junk shop. Sailors from all over the world, when they land in Hamburg, that's where they sell their $2 guitars, stuffed snakes, zebra jackets. It's a real swampy place. You can buy insects from everywhere, under glass, in little boxes; elephant beetles the size of a child's shoe. It's all mildewed in there, full of weird musical instruments, half-decomposed baby giraffes stuffed with straw. They even had a shrunken head you could look at for, like, two marks. They advertise the shrunken head in the window; that's what brings 'em in. Harry's rarely there; if he is, all the prices are doubled." (Source: "Tom Waits, All-Purpose Troubadour" The New York Times (USA) by Robert Palmer. Date: Limbo/ San Francisco, November 14, 1993) 





(3) Big top n.: Specif., the main tent of a circus; generally, the circus, circusses, or circus life (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(4Hitler: Adolf Hitler. Born: Braunau, Austria, 1889 - Died: Berlin, Germany, 1945. According to the official statements Hitler committed suicide on April 30 1945, after which his body was burned. Rumours are still circulating speaking of a conspiracy and a possible disappearance of the remains



(5) J.P. Morgan: Nowadays J.P. Morgan is a huge American bank holding company with headquarters in New York City. It's named after American financier, J. Pierpont Morgan, who until his death in 1913 was managing partner of the firm. J. Pierpont Morgan inherited his father's business in 1890 and consolidated the firm's European and American interests. Under Pierpont's guidance, the firm was instrumental in financing many of the enterprises -- railroads, steel, mining, and utilities. In the years around the turn of the century, he was the "mightiest personal force in American business life." It could very well be true, that some midget sat on J.P. Morgans lap. Round the turn of the centuries "freaks" or so-called "Human oddities" travelled European courts and visited people of high standing (f.i.: P.T. Barnum and Thomas Thumb)



 (6) Priscilla Bajano: Known as "The Monkey Woman". Spelled "Percilla Bejano". Percilla "The Monkey Girl" Bejano died on February 5, 2001. She was 89 years old. "Percilla and her late husband Emmitt "The Alligator Skin Man" Bejano were billed as the "World's Strangest Married Couple" on sideshow midways around the world. After her retirement, Percilla became very protective of her privacy. She often stated that since she had spent so much of her life being stared at, she was going to shave her beard and live a quiet life. "Show's over," was her exact quote. But since she began working on carnival midways when she was three years old, Percilla had one million and a half stories about her time on the road. She knew, or worked with, almost anyone you could imagine and loved to tell stories about her time on the road. But I will always remember Percilla dancing. That was her all-time favorite. In her backyard to the radio, or at the IISA club in Gibsonton, she always wanted to dance." (Source: "Final Curtain" ON THE SAWDUST TRAIL, Shocked and Amazed. June 2001 by Kathleen Kotcher) 





(7) Jo Jo: The 16-year-old Russian Fedor Jeftichew was contracted in 1884 by P.T. Barnum and quickly renamed Jo-Jo the dog-faced-boy. According to Barnum's flyers he was found in the woods of Kostrama (Central Russia), where he and his father lived in a cave. In reality JoJo had been travelling through Russia for years, showing himself to paying audiences. To further enhance his doglike appearance he was told to growl and bark at the audience





(8) Human skeleton: An act where the the performer was extremely emaciated from a disease or muscular disorder in which they could not gain weight.One example was "The Shadow Man",whose height was 5'7", weighing only 71 lbs.(Worked with Ringling Circus when well enough) (Source: Carny Lingo, Joe Bates). This title was usually given to Peter Robinson. Robinson starred in Tod Browning's "Freaks" (1932) 



(9) Grace Mc Daniels

- Starred in Tod Browning's "Freaks", 1932.

- "Grace McDaniels was born to normal parents on a farm near Numa, Iowa in 1888, and joined F.W. Miller's freak show in 1935 after winning an "ugly woman" contest. She suffered from a genetic condition known as Sturge-Weber syndrome, which causes a large, purple birthmark on the head and face that thickens and distorts the flesh. Her condition was degenerative, her face becoming more and more misshapen with age until she she could barely speak. When she first entered showbusiness Grace disliked being called a freak and particularly objected to the "World's Ugliest Woman" title. She covered her birthmark with makeup when she wasn't onstage and covered her ears so she wouldn't hear the talker's lecture when she was. But she remained with the freak show because the pay was excellent, and in time grew to enjoy the attention she received, though she still objected to the word "ugly" and chose to be called the Mule-Faced Woman instead. Those who knew Grace say she was a wonderful friend, a loving mother toward her son, and an all-around loveable person. Dolly Reagan, the Ossified Lady, remaked that "Grace was the kindliest person in the world." Though Grace enjoyed performing, she preferred being a homemaker and loved to cook, clean and sew. Contrary to popular belief, Grace was never married (the rumor of her marriage can be traced back to Harry Lewiston's book, Freak Show Man). Rather, she was taken advantage of by an intoxicated carnival worker, and her son, Elmer, resulted from this union. Elmer inherited his father's vile temperament and passion for drink and was abusive of his poor mother, whose act he managed, stealing money from her and generally being so disagreeable that showmen refused to hire Grace just so they wouldn't have to deal with Elmer. Both Grace and Elmer passed away in 1958, though there is some confusion over which died first." (Source: "Phreequeshow", Elizabeth Anderson, 2006)

- Text with left picture: "Grace McDaniels, the so-called mule-faced woman, in 1947. While she is perhaps the homeliest woman in the world she is happily married and the mother of a fine son."





(10) Sealo

- Starred in Tod Browning's "Freaks".

Seal Boy: Human oddity afflicted with phocomelia, or foreshortened 'seal,' limbs, usually with hands and feet attached directly to the torso without arms or legs (Source: Carny Lingo, Joe Bates).

- Stanislaus "Stanley" Berent was born to a Polish Catholic family in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on November 24, 1899. The exact cause of his peculiar deformity remains unknown, as phocomelia (literally "seal arms") is usually linked to exposure to thalidomide, which did not appear on the market until half a century after Berent was born. Sealo is said to have been discovered on a streetcorner selling newspapers, thus beginning an illustrious 35-year career. Sealo would appear with every major sideshow in the United States. He spent the longest time with Pete Cortes, who shared Sealo's passion for playing cards and was said to spend hours backstage playing rummy with him. He was beloved by his colleagues, who remember him as a smiling and congenial man. Sealo appears to have had some orthopedic problems in addition to having deformed arms. He had a hard time getting on and off the stage and would therefore spend hours at a time onstage, selling pitch cards. He also preferred to sleep in hotels, instead of on the fairgrounds, and took a taxi to and from work every day. His act consisted of everyday tasks such as sawing a board, shaving, and autographing his publicity photo. When he was unable to reach something with his hands - such as the zipper on his pants - he used a stick with a hook attached.Perhaps the most memorable moment in Sealo's long career came in 1972, when a group of freaks with Ward Hall's show came under attack from politically correct reformers who cited a 1921 Florida law that banned the exhibition of the handicapped. Sealo, along with Pete Terhurne and others, sued the state to have the law overturned. A few years later, in 1976, Sealo retired to the International Independent Showmen's Association retirement center in Gibsonton. When his health began to decline, he returned to his native Pittsburgh and checked in to the local Catholic hospital. He died in 1980 and is buried in a Catholic cemetary. (Source: "Phreequeshow", Elizabeth Anderson, 2006)





(11) Johnny Eck: Johnny Eck was born John Echkardt (twenty minutes after his twin brother Robert) August 27, 1911, Baltimore, Maryland. The boys entered the sideshow circuit at the age of 12, where John was billed as "Johnny Eck, The Half-boy." Johnny went on to play a role in Tod Browning's "Freaks" before returning with his brother to Baltimore, where he became a screen painter. The only time Johnny and Rob were ever apart from each other was the time Johnny spent in Hollywood filming "Freaks". He climbed the stairs to the top of the Washington Monument, on his hands in 1938. In the late 1930's he was displayed in several Ripley's Believe It Or Not Odditoriums, where he was billed as "The Most Remarkable Man Alive!". Height 1' 6". Johnny died January 5, 1991, at the age of 79, in the house where he was born. Personal quote: "I met hundreds and thousands of people, and none finer than the midgets and the Siamese twins and the caterpillar man and the bearded woman and the human seal with the little flippers for hands. I never asked them any embarrassing questions and they never asked me, and God, it was a great adventure."

Tom Waits (1999): "... The Ringling Brothers at one point were exhibiting Einstein's eyes, Napoleon's penis and Galileo's finger bones, all on the same bill. Different tents. 'Course I missed that. You ever hear of Johnny Eck? He was a Ringling act. The Man Born Without a Body. Johnny Eck had his own orchestra and was an excellent pianist and he'd stand on his hands and wear a tuxedo." (Source: "Gone North, Tom Waits, upcountry " L.A. Weekly: Robert Lloyd. April 23-29, 1999)





(12) Gerd Bessler: Musican and sound technician. The recordings for the Black Rider were made in his "Music Factory" in Hamburg. He took care of recording and sound and was one of the driving forces behind the production. Played violin on the song "Crossroads". 

- Human pincusion: An act in which the performer sticks sharp objects such as pins, needles,meat-skewers,etc, into their flesh (also known as "Fakirs"...from the Indian term...or "Pain-proof men") (Source: Carny Lingo, Joe Bates) 



(13) Ko Ko: "Minnie Woolsey, born in Georgia in 1880, was afflicted with a unique form of "bird-headed" dwarfism or nanocephaly. In addition to her unusual facial features, she was blind, mentally handicapped, toothless, and had only fine wisps of hair on her odd-shaped head. The story goes that she was rescued from a dismal life in a Georgia insane asylum by an enterprising showman, and began her showbiz career as "Minnie Ha-Ha", a play on North Carolina's Minnihaha Falls. "Minnie Ha-Ha" dressed in a phony American Indian costume and spoke jibberish to sideshow audiences. By the time Minnie landed a role in Freaks in 1932, the sideshow world already had a "Koo Koo, the Bird Girl" - Betty Green - but this didn't stop Minnie's managers from dressing her in a feathery costume, too. Though she has no lines in Freaks, she made a lasting impression on moviegoers when she shimmied on the table during the wedding feast of Cleopatra the aerialist and Hans the dwarf. Thus it was Minnie who was best remembered as "Koo Koo", not Betty Green, although the two are frequently confused. Later, Minnie worked at Coney Island as "Koo Koo, the Blind Girl from Mars", where she confounded spectators by failing to respond to visual stimuli. Her blindness is just one of a host of symptoms that characterize some types of primordial dwarfism. It's unknown exactly how long Minnie was with the circus or when she died, but some accounts claim she was still living (and was nearly run over by a car) in 1960, making her at least 80 years old." (Source: "Phreequeshow", Elizabeth Anderson, 2006)





(14) Mortando: Should be spelled Mortado. "Mortado the crucified man". He had holes in his hands and feet, and also appeared as "The Human Fountain," with water shooting out of him. In the holes he concealed capsules of "blood" that spouted forth when spikes were pounded through them. Later, utilizing a specially designed chair with plumbing fixtures, he became Coney Island's "Mortado the Human Fountain" (Source: Barta 1996) 



(15) Radion: Should be spelled Randian (the Caterpillar Man). "Prince Randian, a Hindu, was said to possess a quiet sense of humour and was able to speak Hindu, English, German and French. His personal philosophy was that no physical handicap need matter if the mind is dominant. He was able to write, paint, shave and roll his own cigarettes using only his mouth, the latter feat is demonstrated in the film Freaks. Prince Randian's only dialogue in the film is almost indecipherable, but he apparently remarks to one of the Rollo brothers, "Can you do anything with your eyebrows?" During the carnival's off-season, Prince Randian resided in Patterson, New Jersey with his devoted wife and several children. His last public appearance was an evening show at Sam Wagner's 14th. Street Museum on December 19th. 1934. He collapsed and died shortly after at the age of 63."





(16) Human torso: Human oddity born without arms or legs.There were many of these 'human oddities", but perhaps the most famous was Prince Randian, a star attraction at Coney Island & also starred in the movie "Freaks".He was introduced as the 'human caterpillar who crawls on his belly like a reptile'. Randian could roll a cigarette and light it just using his lips (Source: Carny Lingo, Joe Bates)



Lullaby

 



(Also known as: Overturned Pot)



Sun is red; moon is cracked

Daddy's never coming back

Nothing's ever yours to keep

Close your eyes, go to sleep

If I die before you wake

Don't you cry don't you weep



Nothing's ever as it seems

Climb the ladder to your dreams

If I die before you wake

Don't you cry; don't you weep

Nothing's ever yours to keep

close your eyes; go to sleep



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits Blood Money" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Also published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

Mano Que Mece La Luna. Various artists. October 17, 2007. Sello Autor/ Spain (performed by La Chicana) 

The Love List. Kaya Brüel. April 21, 2008. Stunt Records

Come On Up. Dieter Weslowski. March 1, 2010. Self-released



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Listen to audio excerpt of Lullaby as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Kaya Br�el (as Marie).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by: Marie in act 1, scene 3 and by Karl the Fool in act 3, scene 2



---------- M--------



Make It Rain

 



 



She took all my money

and my best friend

You know the story

Here it comes again

I have no pride

I have no shame

You gotta make it rain

Make it rain!



Since you're gone

deep inside it hurts

I'm just another sad guest

on this dark earth(1)



I want to believe

in the mercy of the world again(2)

Make it rain, make it rain!



The nite's too quiet

Stretched out alone

I need the whip of thunder

and the wind's dark moan



I'm not Able, I'm just Cain(3)

Open up the heavens

Make it rain!



I'm close to heaven

Crushed at the gate

They sharpen their knives

on my mistakes



What she done, you can't give it a name

You gotta make it rain

Make it rain, yeah!



Without her love

Withour your kiss

Hell can't burn me

more than this

I'm burning up all this pain

Put out the fire

Make it rain!



I'm born to trouble

I'm born to fate

Inside a promise

I can't escape

It's the same old world

But nothing looks the same

Make it rain!

Make it rain!



Got to make it rain

Make it rain

You got to make it rain

Got to make it rain

You got to...



I stand alone here!

I stand alone here!

Sing it:

Make it rain!

Make it rain!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Passport To The Blues. Duke Robillard. August 17, 2010. Stony Plain Music



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Make It Rain" on the Late Show With David Letterman (2004)

CBS TV television talkshow with David Letterman. 

Ed Sullivan Theater. New York/ USA (broadcast September 28, 2004)



Notes:



(1) I'm just another sad guest on this dark earth:

- Notice same phrase being used in Baby Gonna Leave Me (Real Gone, 2004) ("Well I'm just another sad guest on this dark earth").

- Could be quoted from Goethe: "Und so lang du das nicht hast, Dieses: Stirb und werde! Bist du nur ein tr�ber Gast, Auf der dunklen Erde." (Trans: And as long as you haven't experienced this, to die and so to grow. You are only a troubled guest, on this dark earth) From: "Selige Sehnsucht", 1814.



(2) I want to believe in the mercy of the world again

Jonathan Valania (2004): Well, that's why I think if you had to distill the essence of Real Gone down to one line, it's where you say, "1 want to believe in the mercy of the world again." I think so many people feel that way right now. TW: "Do you know who said that? Bob Dylan. He didn't say it in a song; he said it in an interview. He was just talking about the state of the world, so I threw that in there." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. October, 2004)



(3) I'm not Able, I'm just Cain

- Refering to Abel and Cain: According to Genesis 4: 1-16. 'The Mahometan tradition of the death of Abel is this: Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. (Source: The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer).

- Notice earlier references to Cain and Abel: Dirt In The Ground, 1992 ("Now Cain slew Abel, he killed him with a stone"), Walk Away, 1995 ("Dot King was whittled from the bone of Cain") and Sins Of The Father, 2004 ("Written in the book of tubold Cain, A long black overcoat will show no stain")



Martha

 



Operator, number please, it's been so many years

Will she remember my old voice while I fight the tears

Hello, hello there, is this Martha, this is old Tom Frost

And I am calling long distance, don't worry 'bout the cost

Cause it's been forty years or more, now Martha please recall

Meet me out for coffee, where we'll talk about it all



And those were the days of roses, of poetry and prose

And Martha all I had was you and all you had was me

There was no tomorrows, we packed away our sorrows

And we saved them for a rainy day



And I feel so much older now, and you're much older too

How's your husband, and how's your kids, you know that I got married too

Lucky that you found someone to make you feel secure

Cause we were all so young and foolish, now we are mature



And those were the days of roses, of poetry and prose

And Martha all I had was you and all you had was me

There was no tomorrows, we packed away our sorrows

And we saved them for a rainy day



And I was always so impulsive, I guess that I still am

And all that really mattered then was that I was a man

I guess that our being together was never meant to be

And Martha, Martha, I love you, can't you see



And those were the days of roses, of poetry and prose

And Martha all I had was you and all you had was me

There was no tomorrows, we packed away our sorrows

And we saved them for a rainy day



And I remember quiet evenings, trembling close to you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

Sefronia. Tim Buckley, 1973. Third Story/ Fifth Floor. DiscReet MS-2157(first cover of a Waits song ever, mid 1973 - re-released on "Step Right Up", 1995)

Poet, Fool, Bum. Lee Hazlewood, 1973. Capitol ST-11177 UK- Stateside (EMI) SSL-10315

Do You Do. Freddie White. 1981. Mulligan Records (re-released on "Lost And Found", 2002)

Street Of Dreams. Nancy Harrow. April, 1988. Gazell Records (re-released November, 1995)

Vanity. Jan Vayne. 1994. EMI (The Netherlands)

Welcome To The Neighbourhood. Meat Loaf. November, 1995. Mca Special Products

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Tim Buckley (same version as on "Sefronia", 1973)

La Femme En Rouge. Loes Snijders. 1999. Comoedia Mundi

Everybody Has A Dream. Mitchell Howard. 2000. Cling Peaches Music

Willis Moore. So Far. March 22, 2000. Self-released

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German)

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Piano Face. John Autin. 2002. Rabadash Records

Lost And Found. Freddie White. 2002. Little Don Records (same version as on "Do You Do", 1981)

Unplugged. Anne B�renz & Frank Wolff. 2003. B�chergilde (Germany)

Homegrown. Nussbaumer/ Weber/ Kreil. 2003. Self-released

Greetings From Hell - The Tom Waits Songbook, Hell Blues Choir. September, 2003. Tylden & Co (Norway)

One For The Ages. Andy Cooney. March 2, 2004. Rego Irish

Bye-Bye. Anne B�renz. October, 2006. Stalburg Theater (Germany)

Timbre. Yukiko Hayashi. May 24, 2007. EWE Records (Japan)

A Thousand Nights. Melanie Doane. July 1, 2008. Prairie Ocean Recordings 

Covers. Manu Codjia. November 17, 2010. BeeJazz (France)



Notes:



Timothy White (1979): "As Bette and I order dinner, I think aloud about her appearance last May on Saturday Night Live. Poured into a sleek white dress covered with jagged black spots, she had treated the studio audience to a disco-driven rendition of "Married Men," the single from her latest LP, Thighs and Whispers. She resembled some manic she-devil -- half woman, half jungle cat -- as she slithered and snarled to the torrid dance tempo. Ruffling her unruly blond tresses, Midler carried on with vintage vigor, supported by a phalanx of backup singers whose garish costumes (satin wedding gowns, black tails) and cocky grins were of a piece with the Divine Miss M's trademarks of hot flash and sassy trash. But when she stepped from the shadows for her second song, her racy attire had been replaced by a simple black smock and tights, and there was a vulnerability in her humble demeanor. She stated she wanted to do a song written by her friend Tom Waits, and in a strained, doleful voice she began to sing "Martha."

Operator, number please, it's been so many years / Will she remember my old voice while I fight the tear's

Although rather bleak, the ballad is not terribly different from many of her more somber torch songs. But there was an underlying grittiness to her tone that had less to do with performing than with simple grief.

I feel so much older row, you're much older too / How's your husband, how's the kids, you know I got married too / Lucky that you found someone to make you feel secure / We were all so young and foolish, now we are mature

Creeping into the second chorus, her voice faltered, and the camera caught a tiny sparkle in her eye, a glimmering pinpoint that grew steadily into a tear.

I was always so impulsive, guess that I still am . . . / I guess that our being together was never meant to be

As the plaintive music subsided, Bette clutched the microphone, mascara running down her cheek. The dark eyes glazed over and her face fell into a pained expression so distant that I wondered if she remembered where she was. It was an altogether curious vignette, profoundly moving yet equally perplexing.

"That song calls up a lot of deep things for me," Bette sadly admits as she picks at her Caesar salad. "That night on the show, I was thinking about my mom. I lost my mother this year; she had leukemia for a long time, cancer of the liver -- and of the breast, incidentally, when I was a kid. She suffered most of her life. "She just thought I was it," Midler says, brightening for an instant.
" (Source: Rolling Stone: December 13, 1979: "The Rose: Bette Midler Conquers Hollywood, Bette Midler Outgrows Her Hollywood Dreams in 'The Rose'" Timothy White)



Martin Goes And Does Where It's At

 



MM: Hey buddy, excuse me!

TW: Yeah yeah...

MM: Can I get you over here for a second? I have...

TW: Hold your horses, man. I'm busier than a set of jumper cables at a Puerto Rican wedding, man.

WAITRESS: I need a Mai Tai, a Brandy Alexander and a draught, light.

TW: Yeah yeah yeah...

MM: I could use another one though. I don't usually do this. It's just that... I'm in the music business. You ever get anybody in here from...

TW: Yeah well. Things are tough all over, man. What else is new?

MM: Yeah... Today my company made me do a disco record. I mean, it's just... As I said, I don't usually do this. I'd really like another one, if that's all right. You don't mind pennies, do you?

TW: Oh, we can always use pennies.

MM: Oh, fantastic. Wait... (the sound of a shitload of pennies being thrown on the counter)

MM: I think I eh... I think I got enough there for a double.

TW: I think you got enough there for a funeral.



Written by: Martin Mull and Tom Waits � 1977

Published by: [?], � 1977

Official release: "I'm Everyone I Ever Loved" (ABC/MCA AB-997) - Martin Mull, 1977

Spoken word: Tom Waits, Martin Mull



Known covers:

N/A



Metropolitan Glide

 



Are you ready!?

Are you ready!?

Are you ready!?



Knocky Parker told Bowlegged Sal(2)

They all know how to kick it in Cal

They're playing this dope and this-a money tune

Dancing baby with a 7 mile broom

Things are bulging out the rafters like hell

Down there at the Hush Hotel

They're jumping right out of their seats,

dancing to the bran' new beat



Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide

Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide



The floor is polished and your momma's gone

You can quake and roll and moan

29 gypsies in a Cadillac stoned

Turn off the ringer on your cellular phone

Whip the air like a Rainbow Trout

Drag your tail pipe till you bottom out



Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide

Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide



Hey! Hey!



Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide



The low bottom of the China moon

The black swan and the way too soon

Ace pocket and the dog bone gone

The peacock and the mean black swan

The rain shower and high heeled shoe

Bombay money and I know I can do it

The sink hole and the victory dance

It's in the pocket in the real tight pants



Do.... the Metropolitan Glide

Do.... the Metropolitan Glide



Hey!



The Metropolitan!

The Metropolitan!



Show your teeth, bray(3) like a calf

You kill me with your machine gun laugh

You make me trouble with the floor that's creaking

I've been ready to ka-boom for a week

Put on your stockings and your powder and blush

Keep it all on the hush, hush, hush



Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

The Metropolitan!



Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Metropolitan Glide:

- Tom Waits
 (2004): "Instructional dance songs are a rarity these days," he says. "When I was a kid, it seemed that every single that came out was an instructional dance song. Like "The Locomotion," "The Jerk," "The Peppermint Twist," "The Grind," "The Mess Around" - there were a million of them." (Source: "Songs Of Decay From Waits." Toronto Star (Canada). October 5, 2004. By Vit Wagner)

Tom Moon (2004): Undisguised glee creeps into Tom Waits' voice when he talks about the instructional dance song he heard on the radio the other day. He can't quite believe he stumbled onto such a thing, a hip-hop station in 2004 playing what amounts to the bling generations Mashed Potato. It's Terror Squad, featuring Fat Joe, doing 'Lean Back', but in his telling, the song becomes a pearl in the order of "The Twist." "It was so wild, they're telling you how to do it. The only phrase I caught was "lean back," but you couldn't mistake it. I mean, I haven't had anybody tell me how to do a dance in a long, long time." (Source: "Tom Waits: Dancing In The Dark". By Tom Moon. Harp Magazine (USA). December, 2004)



(2) Knocky Parker told Bowlegged Sal

Jonathan Valania (2004): Who is Knocky Parker? TW: Old Delta-blues guy. JV: Bowlegged Sal? TW: Singer. I think from St. Louis. Sorry, Bo. [Laughs]" (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits by Jonathan Valania. Magnet magazine (UK). October 2004)



(3) Bray like a calf

- To bray: 1. To utter a loud, harsh cry, as an ass. Laugh, and they Return it louder than an ass can bray. --Dryden. 2. To make a harsh, grating, or discordant noise. Heard ye the din of battle bray? --Gray. (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



Midnight Lullaby

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of rye(1)

Hush-a-bye my baby, no need to be crying

You can burn the midnight oil(2) with me as long as you will

Stare out at the moon upon the windowsill And dream



Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye

I'll tell you another story, tell you no lies

There's dew drops on the windowsill, and gumdrops in your head

You're slipping into dream land, you're nodding your head

So dream



Dream of West Virginia, or of the British Isles

Cause when you are dreaming, you see for miles and miles

When you are much older, remember when we sat

At midnight on the windowsill, and had this little chat

And dream



Come on and dream

Come on and dream

And dream

And dream

Come on and dream



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Midnight Lullaby



(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



(One, two, three, four)



Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of rye(1)

Hush-a-bye my baby, no need to be crying

You can burn the midnight oil(2) with me as long as you will

Stare out at the moon upon the windowsill And dream



Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye

Hush-a-bye my baby, no need to be crying

There's dew drops on the windowsill, and gumdrops in your head

You're slipping into dream land, you're nodding your head

So dream



Dream of West Virginia, or of the British Isles

Cause when you are dreaming, you see for miles and miles

When you are much older, remember when we sat

At midnight on the windowsill, and had this little chat

And dream



Come on and dream

Come on and dream

And dream

And dream

Come on and dream



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973



Known covers:

Beautiful One. Holly Robinson. July, 1999. Cameron

Hush. Dawn Clement. 2003. Conduit Records

Teach Me Tonight. Lisa Fuller. April 4, 2006. Bizarre Planet

Dream. Mae Robertson. March 6, 2007. Lyric Partners

Down At The Sea Hotel. Various artists. October 16, 2007. The Secret Mountain ( performed by Guy Davis)



Notes:



(1) Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of rye.

- Quoting: Sing A Song Of Sixpence. Children's song. Written by: Unknown. Adapted by: Terry Kluytmans: "Sing a song of sixpence, A pocket full of rye; Four and twenty blackbirds Baked in a pie! When the pie was opened, The birds began to sing; Wasn't that a dainty dish To set before the king? The king was in his counting house, Counting all the money; The queen was in the parlor, Eating bread with honey The maid was in the garden, Hanging out the clothes; When down came a blackbird Who snapped off her nose!"

- Notice the same phrase being used in Bronx Lullaby/ Smuggler's Waltz: "So sing a song of ten grand, with a pocket full of dough"



(2) Midnight oil, burning the: Sitting up late, especially when engaged on literary work. Midnight Oil: Late hours. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



Misery River

 



(Woyzeck theatre version, 2000: Carnival Announcer with entire cast in prologue)(1)



Carnival Announcer: "Ladies and gentlemen here you see the astronomical horse and the two little canary birds - favorites of all potentates and of all crowned heads, tell the people everything, how old, how many children, what illnesses."



Gentlemen! Gentlemen! Look at this creature, as God made it: nothing, nothing at all. 



Misery's the River of the World

Misery's the River of the World

Misery's the River of the World



The higher that the monkey can climb(2)

The more he shows his tail

Call no man happy 'til he dies(3)

There's no milk at the bottom of the pail

God builds a church

The devil builds a chapel(4)

Like the thistles that are growing

'round the trunk of a tree

All the good in the world

You can put inside a thimble

And still have room for you and me



If there's one thing you can say

About Mankind

There's nothing kind about man

You can drive out nature with a pitchfork

But it always comes roaring back again




Carnival Announcer: "Gentlemen, now see the effect of art. The monkey is already a soldier - that is not much, it is the lowest level of the human race! The little dummy is musical. Gentlemen this animal that you see here, with a tail on his body, with his four hooves, is a member of all learned societies, professor of our university, with whom the students learn to ride and fight. Man - you are created of dust, sand and dirt. Do you want to be more than dust, sand and dirt? Observe the progress of civilization. Everything progresses: a horse, a monkey, a canary bird. The commencement of the commencement is starting now!"




The higher that the monkey can climb

The more he shows his tail

Call no man happy 'til he dies

There's no milk at the bottom of the pail



God tempers all the winds

for the new shorn lambs(5)

the devil knows the bible

like the back of his hand



All the good in the world

You can put inside a thimble

And still have room for you and me



If there's one thing you can say

About Mankind

There's nothing kind about man

You can drive out nature with a pitchfork

But it always comes roaring back again



For want of a bird

The sky was lost

For want of a nail

A shoe was lost

For want of a life

A knife was lost

For want of a toy

A child was lost(6)



Misery's the River of the World

Everybody Row! Everybody Row!

Misery's the River of the World

Misery's the River of the World

Misery's the River of the World

Everybody Row! Everybody Row!

Everybody Row



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Spoken word as published in 2002 tour Woyzeck songbook (English translation by Betty Nansen Teatret)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story





 



Misery River



(Woyzeck theatre version, 2000: Margret closing scene)(1)



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world



The higher that the monkey can climb(2)

The more he shows his tail

Call no man happy 'till he dies(3)

There's no milk at the bottom of the pail



God builds a church

The devil builds a chapel(4)

Like the thistles that are growing

'round the trunk of a tree



All the good in the world

You can put inside a thimble

And still have room for you and me



If there's one thing you can say

About mankind

There's nothing kind about man

You can drive out nature with a pitch fork

But it always comes roaring back again



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world



For want of a bird

The sky was lost

For want of a nail

A shoe was lost

For want of a life

A knife was lost

For want of a toy

A child was lost(6)



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Everybody row! Everybody row!



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Everybody row! Everybody row!



Everybody row! Everybody row!

Everybody row!



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story





 



Misery River



(Blood Money studio version, 2002)



The higher that the monkey can climb(2)

The more he shows his tail

Call no man happy 'till he dies(3)

There's no milk at the bottom of the pail



God builds a church

The devil builds a chapel(4)

Like the thistles that are growing

'round the trunk of a tree



All the good in the world

You can put inside a thimble

And still have room for you and me



If there's one thing you can say

About mankind

There's nothing kind about man

You can drive out nature with a pitch fork

But it always comes roaring back again



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world



The higher that the monkey can climb

The more he shows his tail

Call no man happy 'till he dies

There's no milk at the bottom of the pail



God tempers all the ruins for the new shorn lands(5)

The devil knows the bible like the back of his hand

All the good in the world

You can put inside a thimble

And still have room for you and me



If there's one thing you can say

About mankind

There's nothing kind about man

You can drive out nature with a pitch fork

But it always comes roaring back again



For want of a bird

The sky was lost

For want of a nail

A shoe was lost

For want of a life

A knife was lost

For want of a toy

A child was lost(6)



And misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Everybody row! Everybody row!

Misery's the river of the world



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Everybody row! Everybody row!

Everybody row! Everybody row!



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Everybody row! Everybody row!

Everybody row! Everybody row!

Everybody row!



Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Misery's the river of the world

Everybody row! Everybody row!

Everybody row!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits Blood Money" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story





 



Known covers:

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)



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Listen to audio excerpt of Woyzeck intro as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Lars Knutzon (as carnival announcer).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Low-res video of "Misery River" as featured in the opening scene of "Woyzeck"

Woyzeck/ Betty Nansen theatre promo, 2000

Monkey puppet with Tom Waits' voice from tape



Notes:



(1) Misery River (Early theatre version)

- Sung by Carnival Announcer (and entire cast) in prologue. Sung by Margret in closing scene

- Spoken intro by Margret (in 2006 released as Children's Story on Orphans (Bastards)): "Once upon a time there was a poor child, with no father and no mother. Everything was dead... And no one was left in the whole world. Everything was dead... And it went on search, day and night. And since nobody was left on earth, it wanted to go up to the heavens. And the moon was looking at it so friendly. And when it finally got to the moon, the moon was a piece of rotten wood! And then it went to the sun. And when it got there, the sun was a wilted sunflower. And when it got to the stars, they were little golden flies. Stuck up there! And the shrike(1a) sticks 'em on a blackthorn(1b). And when it wanted to go back, down to earth, the earth was an overturned piss pot. It was all alone, and it sat down and cried. And there it sits till this day. All alone... Misery's the river of the world... ." (Transcription by "Pieter from Holland" as published on the Tom Waits Library, 2000) 

Shrike or butcher bird, predatory songbird found in most parts of the world except Australia and South America. The plumage of the European and North American species is mostly gray, black, and white; the tail is long and rounded, and the wings are rather short. Some African species are brilliantly colored. The name butcher bird reflects its habit of impaling its prey-small birds and mammals and large insects-on a thorn or sharp twig before tearing it apart with its strong, tip-hooked beak. North American shrikes include the loggerhead, great gray or northern, and California shrikes. (Source: The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001)

Blackthorn: A spreading thorny shrub or small tree (Prunus spinosa), with blackish bark, and bearing little black plums, which are called sloes. Despite their succulent appearance the fruits are far too bitter for human consumption, except as a flavouring in home-made liqueurs



(2) The higher that the monkey can climb: might be inspired by or referring to the classic first-wave ska hit "The Higher the Monkey Climb" (aka "Higher the Monkey Climbs") by Justin Hinds & the Dominoes (1966-1967, produced by Duke Reid). Also mentioned in "Tear Down These Walls" by Scottish Gaele band Runrig (Searchlight: Chrysalis, 1989): "The higher the monkey climbs the more he reveals. Tear down these walls. All men were born the same. You came here with nothing. But naked and a name. A name. Tear down these walls. They keep raising for you."



(3) Call no man happy 'till he dies

Thomas Sj�sv�rd (2006): "Ascribed to Solon (ancient Athenian statesman) by Herodotus (the 'father of history'). Herodotus (who probably just relates an older tradition) tells us how Solon, when asked by Croisus who is the happiest man, does not give the answer that Croisus wants. Finally C. asks why he himself doesn't qualify gives a long lecture in which the famous quote. From Herodotus Histories, book 1. chapter XXXII, translated by A. D. Godley: "So, Croesus, man is entirely chance. To me you seem to be very rich and to be king of many people, but I cannot answer your question before I learn that you ended your life well. The very rich man is not more fortunate than the man who has only his daily needs, unless he chances to end his life with all well. Many very rich men are unfortunate, many of moderate means are lucky. The man who is very rich but unfortunate surpasses the lucky man in only two ways, while the lucky surpasses the rich but unfortunate in many. The rich man is more capable of fulfilling his appetites and of bearing a great disaster that falls upon him, and it is in these ways that he surpasses the other. The lucky man is not so able to support disaster or appetite as is the rich man, but his luck keeps these things away from him, and he is free from deformity and disease, has no experience of evils, and has fine children and good looks. If besides all this he ends his life well, then he is the one whom you seek, the one worthy to be called fortunate. But refrain from calling him fortunate before he dies; call him lucky." The part "But refrain from calling him fortunate before he dies" is in the (Ionic (hence k� instead of p�)) Greek: "prin d' an teleut�s�i, epischein, m�de kaleein k� olbion". Even if this phrase could be translated exactly to what Waits sings through the monkey, he does leave the context out, including the part about being lucky (eutuchea). This context is interesting however, as it reminds us of All the world's green: "You turn kings into beggars and beggars into kings", which by the way sounds like another reference (Shakepeare... ?). Sophocles, who is either inspired by Herodotus, or draws from the same sources, has a simpler meaning (closer to Waits') in his play Oedipus Tyrannus (translated by Sir Richard Jebb, 1528-30: "Therefore, while our eyes wait to see the final destined day, we must call no mortal happy until he has crossed life's border free from pain." In the original: "h�ste thn�ton onta kein�n t�n teleutaian idein h�meran episkopounta m�den' olbizein, prin an terma tou biou peras�i m�den algeinon path�n." (Source: message as posted on Tom Waits Library messageboard. December 1, 2006)



(4) God builds a church The devil builds a chapel

- Where God hath a temple, the Devil will have a chapel. Robert Burton. (1577-1640), Anatomy of Melancholy. Part iii. Sect. 4, Memb. 1, Subsect. 1.

- For where God built a church, there the Devil would also build a chapel.-Martin Luther: Table Talk, lxvii.

- God never had a church but there, men say, The Devil a chapel hath raised by some wyles. William Drummond: Posthumous Poems.

- No sooner is a temple built to God but the Devil builds a chapel hard by.-George Herbert: Jacula Prudentum

- Wherever God erects a house of prayer, The Devil always builds a chapel there. Daniel Defoe: The True-born Englishman, part i. line 1. (Source: John Bartlett (1820-1905). Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. 1919.)



(5) God tempers all the ruins for the new shorn lands

Notice these two different transcripts

A: "God tempers all the winds for the new shorn lambs" as transcribed in Woyzeck 2002 tour songbook (translation by Betty Nansen Teatret)

B: "God tempers all the ruins for the new shorn lands" as transcribed in "Tom Waits - Blood Money" 2002 songbook (Amsco Publications)

God tempers the wind to the shorn lamb: Not a biblical quotation, but attributed to Lawrence Sterne (1713-1768). "Laurence Sterne (Maria, in the Sentimental Journey). In French, "A brebis tondue Dieu lui mesure le vent; " "Dieu mesure le froid � la brebis tondue. " "Dieu donne le froid selon la robbe." Sheep are shorn when the cold north-east winds have given way to milder weather (Source: The Dictionary Of Phrase And Fable By E. Cobham Brewer from The New And Enlarged Edition of 1894)



(6) For want of a bird, the sky was lost: This verse is based on the nursery rhyme entitled "For Want Of A Nail" (The Real Mother Goose, 1926) :"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost; For want of the shoe, the horse was lost; For want of the horse, the rider was lost; For want of the rider, the battle was lost; For want of the battle, the kingdom was lost, And all for the want of a horseshoe nail."



Missing My Son

 



I was in a line at the supermarket the other day, and uhm... y'know, I had all my things on the little conveyor belt there. And uh... there's a gal in front of me that is uh.. well, she's staring at me and I'm getting a little nervous and uh, she continues to stare at me. And I uh, I keep looking the other way. And then, finally she comes over closer to me and she says: "I apologise for staring, that must have been annoying. I, I... You look so much like my son, who died. I just can't take my eyes off you." And she precedes to go into her purse and she pulls out a photograph of her son who'd died. And uh, he looks absolutely nothing like me. In fact he's... Chinese. Uh... anyway, we chatted a little bit. And uh, she says: "I'm sorry, I have to ask you. Would you mind, as I leave the supermarket here, would you mind saying "Goodbye mom" to me? I, I know it's a strange request but I haven't heard my son saying "Goodbye mom" to me, and "So long" and it would mean so much to me to hear it. And uh, if you don't mind I... " And I said: "Well, you know, okay, yeah, sure. Eh.. uh... I can say that." And, and so, she uh gets her groceries all checked out. And uh, as she's going out the door she waves at me and she hollers across the store: "Goodbye son!" And I look up and I wave and I say: "Goodbye mom!" And then she goes, and uh... So I get my few things there, on the conveyor belt and the checker checks out my things. And uh, and he gives me the total and he says: "That'll be four hundred and seventy nine dollars." Uh... and I said: "Well, how is that possible! I've only got a little tuna fish, and uh some skimmed milk, and uh mustard and a loaf of bread..." He goes: "Well, well you're also paying for the groceries for your mother. She uh, told me you'd take care of the bill for her." And I said: "Well, wait a minute! That's not my mother!" And he says: "Well I distinctly heard her say as she left the store "Bye son!" and you said "Bye mom!" and so what are you trying to say here, uh..." I said: "Well, JESUS!" And I looked out into the parking lot and she was just getting into her car. And I ran out there. And she was just closing the door, and she had a little bit of her leg sticking out of the door and she was pulling away and I grabbed her leg and I started PULLING it! Just the way... I'm pulling yours...



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & �2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) The entire story (and the way it is told) reminds of the Christmas story from the movie Smoke (Wayne Wang, 1995) as told by Harvey Keitel.



Mockin' Bird

 



Mockingbird high in a tree

Looks like you got the best of me

Mockingbird singin' this song

Well, the mockingbird is mockin' me now that you're gone



Mockingbird high and aloof

Well, he's blowin' notes on top of my roof

Well, the mockingbird singin' this song

Well, the mockingbird is mockin' me now that you're gone



Well, the mockingbird high in a tree

Lookin' up at you, you're lookin' down at me

And the mockingbird high and aloof

Blowin' notes on top of my roof



Mockingbird high in a tree

Well, lookin' up at you, you're lookin' down at me

The mockingbird singin' this song

Well, the mockingbird is mockin' me now that you're gone



Throwed some papers, tried to scare him away

Just a-looked down at me and this is what he said



And the mockingbird high in a tree

Looks like you got the best of me

Mockingbird singin' this song

Well, the mockingbird is mockin' me now that you're gone



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Tindersticks



More Than Rain

 



It's more than rain that falls on our parade tonight(2)

It's more than thunder

It's more than thunder



And it's more than a bad dream, now that I'm sober

Nothing but sad times

Nothing but sad times



None of our pockets, are lined with gold(3)

Nobody's caught the bouquet

And no dead presidents(4) we can fold

Nothing is going our way



And it's more than trouble, I've got myself into

It's more than woe-begotten gray skies now(5)



And it's more than a bad dream, now that I'm sober

There's no more dancing

There's no more dancing



And it's more than trouble, I've got myself into

Nothing but sad times

Nothing but sad times



None of our pockets, are lined with gold

Nobody's caught the bouquet

And no dead presidents we can fold

Nothing is going our way



And it's more than goodbye, I have to say to you

It's more than woe-begotten gray skies now



And it's more than goodbye, I have to say to you

It's more than woe-begotten gray skies now



And it's more than woe-begotten gray skies now



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology 1983-2000" (Nuova Carisch s.r.l. Milan/ Italy, 2001)

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play

Also included in Big Time the movie (1988). Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Live At New York Town Hall. Elvis Costello & Brodsky Quartet. September, 1993. Warner PRO-CD-6480 (US promo, recorded: March 18, 1983)

Plugging The Gaps, Vol 2. Elvis Costello and the Brodsky Quartet, 1995. Tone Records 2CD003 (same version as on "Live At New York Town Hall", 1993)

Being Tom Waits. Billy`s Band. 2001. Self-released demo (Russia)

Black As A Raven. The Jim-Jams. 2004. Flotainment

The Juliet Letters (Expanded & Remastered). Elvis Costello & Brodsky Quartet. March 21, 2006. Rhino

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



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Listen to audio excerpt of More Than Rain as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "More Than Rain" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Warfield Theatre. San Francisco/ USA. November 5, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) More Than Rain:

- Tom Waits (1987): "Oh, yeah, a little Edith Piaf attempt. There's prepared piano on it." RR: How was it prepared? TW: "Lightly sauteed. Francis Thumm plays the strings with a nickel. Almost like you'd play a mandolin. It's in there somewhere." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)

Big Time intro (Wiltern Theatre. November 9, 1987): "Uh this is about all the bad days in the world. I used to have some really bad days. And I kept them in a little box. And one day I threw them out into the yard. Oh, it's just a couple of innocent bad days. Well, we had a big rain... I don't know what it was growing in, but I think we used to put egg shells out there and coffeegrounds too. Don't plant your bad days! They grow into weeks, the weeks grow into months, and before you know it you got yourself a bad year. Take it from me: CHOKE those little bad days! CHOKE 'em down to nothing! There are your days, CHOKE 'em! You choke my days, I'll choke yours!... All right... It's more than rain..."

Bill Schimmel (2007): "He plugged me into a Leslie Twin-Cat, which is not an easy thing to do. We worked half a day to get that sound, and he wouldn't stop untill we got it. We had to wire me up. I had wires between my knees. It looked like an execution." (Source: Bill Schimmel interview December 12, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



(2) Tom Waits (1983, on the instrumental "Just Another Sucker In The Vine" from Swordfishtrombones) "Actually I originally planned to write a lyric called: "It's more than rain that falls on our parade tonight". But I thought it was more effective as an instrumental and it also sets up "Frank's Wild Years". (Source: A Conversation with Tom Waits (Swordfishtrombones) Island Records music industry white label 12" promo. Date: September, 1983)



(3) Pockets lined with gold: original theatre version has this as: "None of our pockets are filled with gold."



(4) Dead presidents

- n. [20C] (US) a $1 bill [the pictures of US presidents that are printed on the various denominations] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).



(5) Gray skies/ Grey Skies: Notice this phrase being repeated during the play. Yesterday Is Here: "Well today is grey skies, tomorrow is tears. You'll have to wait 'til yesterday is here." Frank's Theme: "And dream away when everyone's gone, dream away your grey skies too."



Mr. Henry

 



(Early demo version, 1977. Also known as: Tie Undone)



In the evening he staggers home with his tie undone(1)

He's as poor as a church mouse(2), and he's whistlin' at the night

And he's tuggin' at his shirttail, and jinglin' a church key(3)

And chewin' on a toothpick, on another binge(4)

And tramplin' the rosebush, whistlin' to himself

Now don't wake up the neighbors, spittin' on the hinge

And rattlin' the milk bottles, trippin' on a skate

And hidin' from the paper boy before it's too late



Well, the screen door's open, don't make no noise in the kitchen

He got no excuse for a cold, gray wife that starts bitchin'

That the no good bum(5) is at it again

After she's given him all the best years of her life

(you must be kidding me!)



He'll tell her he was celebrating Savage's divorce

And he played a hunch(6) out at Yonkers(7), you never can trust a horse

And thrown in jail, swore he'd never do these things again

He's got an alibi, but never tells her

where he's been



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc., � 1977

No official release. Foreign Affairs sessions, July to August, 1977





 



Mr. Henry



(Studio version, 1981. Also known as: Tie Undone)



Mr. Henry staggers home when the evening's done

He's as poor as a church mouse(2), high on the Meyer's rum

Tuggin' at his shirttail, jinglin' his church key(3)

Chewin' on a toothpick, on another binge(4)

Tramplin' the rosebush, whistlin' to himself

Now don't wake up the neighbors, spittin' on the hinge

Rattlin' the milk bottles and trippin' on a skate

Hidin' from the newsboy

before it's too late



The screen door's open, don't make no noise in the kitchen

Got no excuse for a cold gray wife that starts bitchin'

That the no good bum(5) is at it again

After she's given him all the best years of her life

He'll tell her he was celebrating Savage's divorce

Played a hunch(6) out at Yonkers(7), you can never trust a horse

And thrown in jail, and swore he'd never do these things again

He's got an alibi,

but never tells her

where he's been



"Henry!"

"Henry!"



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc., � 1977

Official release: "Bounced Checks", WEA/ Asylum Records, 1981



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) In the evening he staggers home with his tie undone: Notice the same opening being used for Annie's Back In Town ("Paradise Alley" soundtrack, 1978)



(2) Church mouse, poor as a:

In a church there is no cupboard or pantry, where mice most do congregate. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd). 

- Also mentioned in "Blow Wind Blow": "I got quiet as a church mouse."



(3) Church key 

- n.: A bottle or can opener, esp. as used to open a container of beer (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang - Supplement, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in Kentucky Avenue: "Just put a church key in your pocket, we'll hop that freight train in the hall."



(4) Binge n.: 1. A drunken spree 2. A spree of any kind; a period of self-indulgence (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) Bum

- n.: 1. Generally, a beggar, tramp, hobo, vagrant, or loafer; also, any jobless man or youth having little or no income; a poor, poorly dressed, and unkempt frequenter of saloons; a down-and-outer; sometimes , a hoodlum 2. A drifter; a grifter 3. Any male without a professional occupation, goal in life, or social prestige; any disreputable or disliked youth (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "Better Off Without A Wife" (Here's to the bachelors and the Bowery bums), "Barber Shop" (Well, if I had a million dollars, what would I do? I'd probably be a barber, not a bum like you)



(6) Hunch: n. A strong, intuitive impression that something will happen; -- said to be from the gambler's superstition that it brings luck to touch the hump of a hunchback. [Colloq. or Slang] (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



(7) Yonkers: Famous horse racetrack at the city of Yonkers, north of New York City



Mr. Siegal

 



I spent all my money in a Mexican whorehouse baby

across the street from a Catholic church

And then I wiped off my revolver

and I buttoned up my Burgundy shirt



I shot the morning in the back, with my red wings on

old the sun he'd better go back down

And if I can find a book of matches

I'm goin' to burn this hotel down



You got to tell me brave captain

why are the wicked so strong

How do the angels(2) get to sleep

when the Devil leaves his porchlight on



Well I dropped thirty Grand on the nugget slots

I had to sell my ass on Fremont Street

and the drummer said there's sanctuary

over at the Bagdad Room



Oh, and now that's one for the money, two for the show

three to get ready, and go man go

I said tell me mister Siegel

how do I get out of here



Willard's knocked out on a bottle of heat

drivin' dangerous curves across the dirty sheets

He said: man you ought to see her when her parents are gone

Man you ought to hear her when the siren's on



I said: tell me brave captain

why are the wicked so strong

How do the angels get to sleep

when the Devil leaves the porchlight on



Don't you know that ain't no broken bottle, that I picked up in my headlights

on the other side of the Nevada line

Where they live hard die young

and have a good lookin' corpse every time



Well you know, the pit-boss said: I should keep movin'

This is where you go when you die

So I shot a black beauty(3)

and I kissed her right between the eyes



Oh, well Willard's knocked out(4) on a bottle of heat

drivin' dangerous curves across the dirty sheets

He said: when the bitch is wound up, and her parents are gone

Man you ought to hear her with the siren on



I said: tell me brave captain

why are the wicked so strong

How do the angels get to sleep

when the Devil leaves his porchlight on



I spent all my money now, in a Mexican whorehouse

across the street from a Catholic church

And then I wiped off my revolver

and I buttoned up my Burgundy shirt



I shot the morning in the back, with my red wings on

I told the sun he'd better go back down

and if I can find a book of matches

I'm goin' to burn this hotel down



Well it's one for the money, two for the show(5)

I said: three to get ready, and go man go

I said: tell me mister Siegel

how do I get out of here



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: Heartattack And Vine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980



Known covers:

Shopping In Bed. Jim Preen. 1997 (re-released in 2007). Self-released

Gonna Burn. Pete Cornelius & The De Villes. 2005. Only Blues Music

The Great Pretender. Seth Kibel. July 31, 2007. Azalea City Recordings



Notes:



(1) Siegal: Spelled as: Siegal, Siegel, Siegle, Seigle. Refers to: Benjamin (Bugsy) Siegel. Jewish gangster and dandy in the 30's and 40's. Earned fortunes during the Prohibition with bootlegging. Founded the Screen Actors Guild. was killed by the mafia in 1947. Hit ordered by Lucky Luciano and carried out by Frankie Carbo.

Stephen Peeples (1980): "Is the subject of the next tune titled "Mr. Siegal," anyone in particular? TW: "I'm trying to kind of refer to Bugsy Siegal." SP: Several people who've heard this tune already think the line "how do the angels get to sleep/when the devil leaves his porch light on" was pretty good. TW: "I like it too." ("Heartattack and Vine". Us promo pack: Stephen Peeples. September 4, 1980)





(2) Angels: n. [19C] 1. a prostitute. 2. a young woman, esp. a pretty one (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(3) Black Beauty

- Street name for amphetamine. Amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methamphetamine are collectively referred to as amphetamines. Their chemical properties and actions are so similar that even experienced users have difficulty knowing which drug they have taken. The effects of amphetamines, especially methamphetamine, are similar to cocaine, but their onset is slower and their duration is longer (Source: Drug Free Workplace, Daniel C. Drew, M.D.). 

- Biphetamine. This is really a kind of amphetimine, as is dexedrine. Black Beauty is the street name for biphetamine because the pharmaceutical drug came in a black capsule (Submitted by Richard Beckwith, Raindogs Listserv Discussionlist. August, 2000) 



(4) Knocked out v.: 1. Drunk 2. Tired exhausted 3. Emotionally exhausted (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) Well it's one for the money, two for the show: Quoting: "Blue Suede Shoes" by Carl Lee Perkins (1955): "Well it's one for the money, two for the show. Three to get ready now go cat go. But don't you, step on my blue suede shoes. You Can do anything but lay off of my blue suede shoes. You can knock me down, step on my face. Slander my name all over the place. Do anything that you wanna do. But uh uh honey lay off of my shoes. You can do anything but lay off of my blue suede shoes. You can burn my house, you can steal my car. Drink my liquor from an old fruit jar. Do anything that you wanna do But uh uh honey lay off of my shoes. But don't you, step on my blue suede shoes. Well you can do anything but lay off of my blue suede shoes. Well it's one for the money, two for the show. Three to get ready, Now go cat go. But don't you, step on my blue suede shoes. You can do anything but lay off of my blue suede shoes. Well it's blue, blue, blue suede shoes. Blue, blue, blue suede shoes yeh! Well blue, blue, blue suede shoes. Blue, blue, blue suede shoes. Well you can do anything but lay off of my blue suede shoes."



Murder In The Red Barn

 



There was a murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn



The trees are bending over and the cows are lying down

The autumn's taking over, you can hear the buckshot hounds(2)

The watchman said to Reba the Loon

Was that Pale at Manzanita(3), was it Blind Bob the Coon?(4)

Pin it on(5) a drifter(6), they sleep beneath the bridge

One plays the violin and sleeps inside a fridge



There was a murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn



Someone's crying in the woods, someone's burying all his clothes

Now Slam the Crank(7) from Wheezer slept outside last night and froze

Roadkill(8) has its seasons just like anything

There's possums in the autumn and it's farm cats in the spring



There was a murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn



Now thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house or covet thy neighbor's wife

But for some murder is the only door through which they enter life



Well they surrounded the house, they smoked him out, they took him off in chains

The sky turned black and bruised and we had months of heavy rains

Now the raven's nest in the rotted roof of Chenoweth's old place

And no one's asking Cal about that scar upon his face

'Cause there's nothin' strange about an axe with bloodstains in the barn

There's always some killin' you got to do around the farm(9)



A murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn



Now the woods will never tell what sleeps beneath the trees

Or what's buried 'neath a rock or hiding in the leaves

'Cause roadkill has it's seasons just like anything

It's possums in the autumn and it's farm cats in the spring



A murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn



Now a lady can't do nothin' without folks' tongues waggin'

Is that blood on the tree or is it autumn's red blaze

When the ground's soft for diggin' and the rain will bring all this gloom

There's nothing wrong with a lady drinking alone in a room



But there was a murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn

There was a murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn

There was a murder in the red barn, a murder in the red barn



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Cures for St. Valentine's Blues. David Belmont. 1999. WindWater Productions

Wicked Grin. John Hammond. March 13, 2001. Emd/ Virgin

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Murder In The Red Barn:

Tom Waits (1992): "It is said, for some, murder is the only door through which they enter life. I guess that's true. It's just a story about a small town murder. How everything gets covered up. And the weather changes everything. Pretty soon you stop talking about it, and you don't even remember it anymore, and you move on. I don't know what else to say about it. I like it. It's like that Bobbie Gentry song... ["Ode To Billy Joe."]" (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)

Brian Brannon (1993): So I heard that you moved to the country and there's a lot of roadkill out there? Tom Waits"Yeah, roadkill, gun racks, collapsing chicken coops and organized vultures. Q: And there's always some killing? TW: "There's always some killing you've got to do around the farm. Barns are painted red because that's where all the slaughtering is done. Originally barns were painted with the blood of dead animals. Before they had paint, there was blood." (Source: "Tom Waits". Thrasher Magazine: Brian Brannon. February, 1993) 

- A 1921 book of newspaper clippings mentions a famous murder that occured 93 years before in Polsted, Suffolk. It's about a girl called Maria Marten. Her mother dreamed that Maria had been murdered and buried in a red barn. And sure enough they found her there. In her dream the mother saw one William Corder as the killer and that was enough to convict him. He was executed in 1828. (Submitted by Ozcar/ Kicki at Angora shoes. "Man Bites Man: The Scrapbook of an English Eccentric,George Ives. Edited by Paul Sieveking Penguin Books 1980-81 160 p., paperback ISBN 0 14 00 5960 1)



(2) Buckshot n. 1. A large lead shot for shotgun shells, used especially in hunting big game(Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition) 2. One variation of the little metal pellets that fill a shotgun shell. An individual piece of buckshot is larger and more damaging than some other types, like birdshot. Larger pellets for larger animals (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000).

Buckshot hounds: Referring to hunting dogs. I don't know if he's talking about the baying of the hounds leading the hunt, or if he's referring to the hunting dogs crying as they're accidentally shot (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(3) Manzanita:

n.: Any of various western North American evergreen shrubs (genus Arctostaphylos) of the heath family;

- Also mentioned in Pony, 1999: "I run my race with Burnt Face Jake gave him a Manzanita cross"





(4) Coon: n. 1. [mid-19C] (US) a person, esp. a rustic, a peasant 2. [mid-19C] (US) a sly person, a cunning fellow 3. [mid-19C+] (orig. US) a derog. term for a black person 4. [late 19C-1930s] (US) a petty thief. (fig. uses of racoon, typified as a cunning creature. Unlike many other overtly racist terms coon had a non-racial meaning before its derog. one. Slightly earlier (c.1832) it described any man, especially a sly and shrewd one) (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(5) Pin it on:To attribute (a wrongdoing or crime) (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(6) Drifter n.: A vagabond; a wanderer; a person without a steady job, occupation or permanent address; a grifter (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(7) Crank: n. 1. [early 19C+] an eccentric. 2. [early 19C+] an obsessive, a monomaniac. 3. [early 19C+] a bad-tempered person, a 'grouch'. (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(8) Roadkill:

- n. [1970s+] (orig. US) any form of creature 9usu. small animals or birds) killed by a vehicle on the roads and used for food (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

Rip Rense (1992): "...this is the first album done since Waits left Los Angeles and moved to a small town. The significance of this last point appears to be subliminal, at best. Asked about the impact of differences between country and city life, Waits said, "There's a lot of roadkill out here. Lot of dead animals on the road. First thing you notice. I'm pullin' deer off the road all the time. So, I don't know --- that's the most dramatic change for me, the amount of roadkill out here. Fewer bottle caps, too." (Source: "Bone Machine Press Kit" by Rip Rense. Late 1992)



(9) There's always some killin': Barney Hoskyns (1999): Could you have written songs like Bone Machine's Murder in the Red Barn if you hadn't moved to the country? TW: "I buy the local papers every day, and they are full of car wrecks and I guess it all depends on what it is in the paper that attracts you. I'm always drawn to these terrible stories. I don't know why. Black Irish? You know, my wife is the same way, she comes from an Irish family and she's drawn to the shadows and the darkness. Murder in the Red Barn is just one of those stories, like an old Flannery O'Connor story. My favorite line is, "There's always some killin' you gotta do around the farm" and it's true." (Source: "Mojo interview with Tom Waits". Mojo: Barney Hoskyns. April 1999)



Muriel

 



Muriel since you left town

the clubs closed down

and there's one more burned out lamppost

on Main Street

down where we used to stroll



And Muriel

I still hit all the same old haunts(2)

and you follow me wherever I go



And Muriel I see you

on a Saturday night

in a penny arcade

with your hair tied back

And the diamond twinkle

is in your eye

is the only wedding ring that I'll buy you

Muriel



And Muriel how many times

I've left this town

to hide from your memory

and it haunts me



But I only get as far

as the next Whiskey bar

I buy another cheap cigar

and I'll see you every night



Hey Muriel

Muriel

Hey buddy

got a light?



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1977

Official release: Foreign Affairs, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1977



Known covers:

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Eleni Mandell



Notes:



(1) Muriel:

Tom Waits (ntroducing "Muriel" London, 1981): "This is a song about an American television personality named Ernie Kovacs who was very popular in the late 50's. He had his own show and he had a beautiful wife, Edie Adams, (here in a high pitched goofy voice he sings): "And you may ask yourself, how did you get that beautiful wife? How did you get that beautiful car?" Ernie was very fond of Edie, they were very close for many years. They went to a party in Beverley Hills one night. Edie took the Rolls and Ernie took the Corvair. That's just the way they had things worked out, and on Ernie's way home, he'd had a few cocktails, and he wrapped himself around a telephone pole there on Santa Monica and La Cienega, he's history now. Edie used to do advertisements for Muriel Cigars, it's a real cheap 10 cent cigar in the States and so this is about a guy in the lounge who's smoking a cigar and remembering - remember with me now." (Source: London, 1981. Transcription from tape by Gary Tausch as sent to Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. July 19, 2000)

Muriel/ Edie Adams: "Edie Adams, spokesperson in the 1960s for the Muriel Cigar Company where she provocatively coaxed the male viewers with her seductive sales pitch: "Hey big spender, spend a little dime on me" and "Pick me up and smoke me sometime." Edie's husband (at the time) was comedian Ernie Kovacs who did competing ad spots for Dutch Master Cigars. In a number of the Muriel commercials singer/comedienne Edie Adams appeared in different ethnic settings―German, French, Spanish, Chinese―to sing the Muriel song in many accents. Edie also did her own series of singing commercials for the "Muriel" brand of cigarillo "It's the light cigar that keeps a cool head," she crooned in a sultry voice. Edie Adams was the first of the sexy commercial females on television. Susan Anton later took over her role in the late seventies... Muriel Cigar sponsored a series of "Here's Edie" specials on the ABC Network in the late 1960s. One 1968 promotional ad for the show came in the form of a Decca LP album ($3.98 value) called "Behind Those Swingin' Doors" where the "Fabulous Edie Adams" interpreted twelve top all-time classics. To get it you had to "Simply send $1 (Case, check or money order), five bands from any size Muriel and your name and address to: Muriel Record offer P.O. Box 150, Pinckneyville, Illinois. Like Now!" In the 1950s, before Edie Adams, Muriel Cigar commercials featured a cartoon female who sang the lyrics "I'm today's new Muriel, the fine cigars..." (the animated ads also included a husband and $5 child cigar)." (Source: "Tobacco & Smoking", Copyright © TV Acres)





Edie Adams as featured in a Muriel cigars commercial from 1964



(2) Haunt n.: A place much frequented (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



---------- N--------



New Coat Of Paint

 



Let's put a new coat of paint

on this lonesome old town

Set em' up, we'll be knockin' 'em down

You wear a dress

Baby I'll wear a tie

We'll laugh at that old bloodshot moon

in that Burgundy sky



All our scribbled love dreams

are lost or thrown away

Here amidst the shuffle

of an overflowin' day

Love needs a transfusion

let's shoot it full of wine

Fishin' for a good time

starts with throwin' in your line



So let's put a new coat of paint

on this lonesome old town

Set em' up, set em' up, we'll be knockin' 'em down

You wear a dress baby

I'll wear a tie(1)

We'll laugh at that old bloodshot moon

in that burgundy sky



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974

Official release: The Heart Of Saturday Night, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

In The Heat. Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes. 1984. Mirage

Piano Madness. "Hurricane" Sam Rudin. 1989. Blue Rock'it Records

The Fire Inside. Bob Seger, 1991. Capitol

A New Coat Of Paint. John Slaughter Blues Band. 1992. Timeless Records CD SJP 313

Blues Package Live. Blues Package. 1992. Aschfrecords (Germany)

Jazzaphrenia. Lenny Marcus & Trio. January 11, 2000. Lmt Records

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Lee Rocker

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

Bob Seger: Greatest Hits - Vol. 2. Bob Seger. November 4, 2003. Capitol

Live At The Narrows. Tom Hunter And The Blue Frenzy. 2004. Self-released 

Cool Classics. Wixom Slim. 2005. MKN Productions

Mother. Carol Grimes. March 28, 2005. Irregular Records

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: Lee Rocker (same version as on New Coat Of Paint, 2000)

Here I Go Again. Tom Hunter. January 2006. Fs Music

Teach Me Tonight. Lisa Fuller. April 4, 2006. Bizarre Planet

My Romance. Dina Blade. September 23, 2006. Self-released

Paradigm. Scot Lee. February 1, 2007. Valley Street Music

Dangerous Mood. Suede. May 31, 2008. Easily Suede Music

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music)

Real Time. Kinzel And Hyde. December 8, 2008. Self-released



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "New Coat Of Paint". With: Frank Vicari (tenor saxophone), Fitz Jenkins (upright bass), Chip White (drums). Taken from Rockpalast, WDR television concert documentary. WDR Studio's/ Studio-L. Cologne/ Germany (aired April 18, 1977.   



Notes:



(1) You wear a dress baby, I'll wear a tie: Notice the cover illustration for The Heart Of Saturday Night being about this line





The Heart Of Saturday Night, 1974

(P) & � 1974 Elektra/ Asylum Records 7E-1015

Cover illustration: Napoleon



Never Let Go

 



 



Well, ring the bell backwards and bury the axe

Fall down on your knees in the dirt

I'm tied to the mast between water and wind

Believe me, you'll never get hurt

Now the ring's in the pawnshop, the rain's in the hole

Down at the Five Points(1) I stand

I'll loose everything

But I won't let go of your hand



Now, Peter denied and Judas betrayed

I'll pay with the roll of the drum(2)

And the wind will tell the turn from the wheel

And the watchman's making his rounds

Well, you leave me hanging by the skin of my teeth(3)

I've only got one leg to stand

You can send me to hell

But I'll never let go of your hand



Swing from a rope on a cross-legged tree

Signed with the one-eyed Jack's blood

From Temple and Union, to Weyley and Grand

Walking back home in the mud



Now, I must make my best of the only way home

Marley deals only in stones

I'm lost on the midway, I'm reckless in your eyes

Just give me a couple more throws

I'll dare you to dine with the cross-legged knights(4)

Dare me to jump and I will

I'll fall from your grace

But I'll never let go of your hand

I'll never let go of your hand

I'll never let go of your hand



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music Inc. [?], � 1992

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1992

First release: American Heart (movie), 1993 (played during the end credits)(5)

Re-released on: Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)



Notes:



(1) Five points

- An intersection of three streets, leaving five street corners. Kinda like Times Square in NYC on a smaller scale (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)

- In the town that I grew up in there was an intersection where 5 different streets came together and it was referred to as the 5 Points - there was a store there called the 5 Points Variety Store - so I think this is probably something similar (Submitted by Gary Tausch. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)

- There is a famous Five Points on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at the edge of present day Chinatown, which used to be a center for all kinds of illegal activities (Submitted by Mikael Borg. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. September, 2000)



(2) I'll pay with the roll of the drum: Pay with the Roll of the Drum (To). Not to pay at all. No soldier can be arrested for debt when on the march. "How happy the soldier who lives on his pay, And spends half-a-crown out of sixpence a day; He cares not for justices, beadles, or bum, But pays all his debts with the roll of the drum.- O'Keefe." (Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894)



(3) Hanging by the skin of my teeth: "The expression by (or with) the skin of one's teeth, which means 'by an extremely narrow margin; just barely; scarcely' is an example of a literal translation of a phrase in another language. It's also another example of a Biblical expression gaining currency in mainstream usage. The Biblical source of this phrase is the following passage, where Job is complaining about how illness has ravaged his body: "My bone cleaveth to my skin and to my flesh, and I am escaped with the skin of my teeth" (Job xix.20, in the King James Version). The point here is that Job is so sick that there's nothing left to his body. The passage is rendered differently in other translations; the Douay Bible, for example, which is an English translation of the Vulgate (St. Jerome's fourth-century Latin translation), gives: "My bone hath cleaved to my skin, and nothing but lips are left about my teeth." The phrase, which first appears in English in a mid-sixteenth-century translation of the Bible, does not appear to become common until the nineteenth century." (Source: "The Mavens' Word of the Day" April, 1997. �1995-2005 Random House, Inc.)



(4) Cross-legged knights: Cross-legged Knights indicate that the person so represented died in the Christian faith. As crusaders were supposed so to do, they were generally represented on their tombs with crossed legs. "Sometimes the figure on the tomb of a knight has his legs crossed at the ankles, this meant that the knight went one crusade. If the legs are crossed at the knees, he went twice; if at the thighs he went three times." - Ditchfield: Our Villages, 1889. (Source: E. Cobham Brewer 1810-1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898)



(5) Jim Jarmusch (1993): You did a cover of a Fats Waller song for another film. TW: 'American Heart'. JJ: Directed by the guy who did 'Streetwise', Martin Bell. What's the Fats Waller song? TW: "Crazy About My Baby". Then we wrote a closing song for the film, also, called "I'll Never Let Go of Your Hand". (Source: Straight No Chaser [Spring 1993]. Interview by Jim Jarmusch)



News From The Duke

 



I have news from the Duke

On the feast of St. George

all his guests wish to gorge on fresh meat

This rasher of wind

and the beast he has skinned

he must still try to win for the Duke



To hit is the key

a wooden bird from a tree

it is then we will know if you're true



A score of wild boar

and a partridge or four

fifteen pheasants, a goose and a hare



Ten cornish game hens

and plenty of venison

peacocks and lamb



In the morning

in the morning

in the morning when I rise



When you hear sweet syncopation(1)

And the music softly moans

T'aint no sin to take off your skin

T'aint no sin to take off your skin

and dance around in your bones



Just like those bamboo babies

down in the South Sea tropic zone

T'aint no sin to take off your skin

and dance around in your bones



Written by: Tom Waits

Original Musical Arrangement by Greg Cohen and Tom Waits

Lyrics as published in "The Black Rider" program book. Barbican Theatre. London/ UK, 2004

No official release.

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) When you hear sweet syncopation: Verse from: T'aint No Sin: Words by Edgar Leslie. Music by Walter Donaldson. Published by: Edgar Leslie, Lawrence Wright Music Co. Ltd/ EMI Music Publishing Ltd., � 1992. Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993.



Nighthawk Postcards

 



(From Easy Street)(2)



Yeah, you check out the street and it looks like there's kind of a...

Kind of a blur drizzle down the plate glass

And as a neon swizzle stick(3) is stirrin' up the sultry night air

Looks like a yellow biscuit of a buttery cue ball moon

Rollin' maverick across an obsidian sky

And as the buses go groanin' and wheezin'

Down on the corner I'm freezin'

On a restless boulevard at a midnight road

I'm across town from Easy Street(2)

With the tight knots of moviegoers and out-of-towners(4) on the stroll(5)

The buildings towerin' high above lit like dominoes or black dice

Used car salesmen dressed up in Purina checkerboard slacks(6)

and FosterGrant(7) wrap-arounds

Pacing in front of Rainbow, Earl Scheib(8), $39.95 merchandise.



Like barkers at a shootin' gallery

They throw out a Texas Guinan(9) routine:

'Hello sucker, we like your money, just as well as anybody else's here

Come on over here now...

Let me put the cut back in your strut and the glide back in your stride

Now climb aboard a customs Oldsmobile, let me take you for a ride'

Or they give you that P. T. Barnum(10) bit:

'There's a sucker born every minute!'

'You just happened to be comin' along at the right time, you know

Come over here now'



And you know, all the harlequin sailors are on the stroll

In search of: "LIKE NEW", "NEW PAINT"

and decent factory air and AM-FM dreams.

Yeah, and all the piss yellow gypsy cabs(11)

They're stacked up in the taxi zones

And they're waitin' like pinball machines

to be ticking off a joy ride to a magical place

Like "Truckers Welcome" diners

with dirt lots full of Peterbilts and Kenworths and Jimmy's(12) and the like

They're hi-ballin'(13) with bankrupt brakes

Man, they're overdriven and they're underpaid

They're overfed, and they're a day late and a dollar short

But Christ, I got my lips around a bottle

and I got my foot on the throttle and I'm standin' on the corner

Standin' on the corner like a just got in town jasper(14)

I'm on a street corner with a gasper(15)

Lookin' for some kind of a Cheshire billboard grin(16)

Stroking a goateed chin

Using parking meters as walking sticks

Yeah, on the inebriated stroll

With my eyelids propped open at half mast



But you know, over at "Chubb's Pool and Snooker"

Well, it was a nickel after two, yeah, it was a nickel after two(17)

And in the cobalt steel blue dream smoke

Why, it was the radio that groaned out the hit parade

And the chalk squeaked and the floorboards creaked

And an Olympia sign(18) winked through a torn yellow shade

Old Jack Chance himself leanin' up against a Wurlitzer

Man, he was eyeballin'(19) out a five ball combination shot

Impossible you say? Hard to believe?

Perhaps out of the realm of possibility?

Naaaah!



Cause he be stretchin' out long tawny fingers

out across a cool green felt in a provocative golden gate

He got a full table railshot that's no sweat

And I leaned up against my bannister

I wandered over to the Wurlitzer and I punched A2

I was lookin' for maybe 'Wine Wine Wine' by the Night Caps

starring Chuck E. Weiss(20

Or maybe... maybe a little somethin' called "High Blood Pressure"

by George "Cryin in the Streets" Perkins(21), no dice(22)

Cause that's Life, that's what all the people say

You're ridin' high in April, you're seriously shot down in May(23)

I know I'm gonna change that tune(24)

When I'm standing underneath a buttery moon

that's all melted off to one side

Parkay(25)...



It was just about that time that the sun came crawlin' yellow

out of a manhole(26) at the foot of 23rd Street(27)

And a Dracula moon in a black disguise

was making its way back to its pre-paid room at the St. Moritz Hotel(28)



And the El train(29) tumbled across the trestles

And it sounded like the ghost of Gene Krupa(30)

With an overhead cam and glasspacks(31)

And the whispering brushes of wet radials on wet pavement

Shhhhhhhhhhhhsh....

With a traffic jam session(32) on Belmont tonight

And the rhapsody of the pending evening

I leaned up against my bannister

And I've been looking for some kind of an emotional investment

With romantic dividends

Yeah, kind of a physical negotiation is underway

As I attempt to consolidate all my missed weekly rendezvous

into one low monthly payment, through the nose(33)

With romantic residuals and legs akimbo(34)

But the chances are that more than likely

Standin' underneath a moon holdin' water

I'll probably be held over for another

smashed weekend!

Thank you...



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975(35)

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975



Known covers:

None



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Nighthawk Postcards" (a-capella)

taken from Soundstage Show #208 (1975).

PBS television show on Tom Waits and Mose Allison. Chicago/ USA.

Aired December 22, 1975, recorded November 3, 1975 or earlier.



Notes:



(1) This song is most likely inspired by (or paying hommage to) "Poetry for the Beat Generation - Jack Kerouac and Steve Allen" (Hanover Records HML 5000, 1959). Fourteen poems read by the author to original piano accompaniment by Steve Allen. Waits has often expressed his appreciation for this album.



- Intro from "Nighthawks At The Diner""[upright bass solo] Goodness gracious, my bass player should be chained up somewhere. Mongrel... canine... growl. I wanna take you on kind of an inebriational travelogue here Yeah, ain't got no spare, you ain't got no jack You don't give a shit, you ain't never comin' back. Maybe you're standin' on the corner of 17th and Wazee Streets. Out in front of the Terminal Bar There's a Thunderbird movin' in a muscatel sky... He-he. You've been drinkin' cleanin' products all night... Open for suggestions... Eh-he-he-he. It's kinda 'bout... well it's kinda 'bout goin' down to the corner. Say, 'Well, I'm just goin' down to the corner to get a pack of cigarettes, I'll be back in a minute' " (Transcription by Ulf Berggren, 2000)

Terminal Bar: A sleezly little bar 2 blocks straight up from the train station in Denver, Colorado where Waits hung out long ago. It is at 17th and Wazee streets - or it was. Back when Waits hung out their it was a very sleezy part of Denver. Now however, with the baseball stadium (Coors Field) being built 3 blocks away, the area has been revitialized into the hippest part of Denver (called 'LODO'). Alas the terminal bar just succombed to property value pressures and sold out in the Fall of 1996 (it is being severely remodeled into a yuppie resturant). (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen) 

Tom Waits (WAMU Radio, 1975): "I'll tell you a story, I did this last night at the Cellar Door, a friend of mine, John Heard (Hurt?), accompanied me on piano, a great piano player, he sounds like George Shearing or early Dave Brubeck, Steve Allen, he's a great piano player - it's called Nighthawk Postcards From Easy Street which is going to be the title of my next forthcoming album and it'll be out in October some time, a little narrative piece, I started writing it on the corner of 12th & Wazee St in downtown Denver, Colorado, out in front of a place called the Terminal Bar, now that's about a half a block from the Santa Fe Freight Depot there and originally the name they gave to the bar had to do with the fact that it was so close to the Santa Fe Freight but now 20 years later every terminal case in town beats the pavement to get there. I started writing it in Denver, I finished it up on 23rd St in New York City - so this is kind of an improvisational adventure into the bowels of the metropolitan region, kind of a travelogue piece - when the highway is a wet slick anaconda of a 2 lane and you're motivating and negotiating a hairpin turn behind the wheel of a serious powder blue Ford Fairlane, with the whispering brushes of wet radials on wet pavement .." (Source: WAMU Radio Interview Source: audio tape. Date: Washington, DC. April 18, 1975)

Tom Waits (Coffee Break radio show, 1975): "Let's see eh... Well I could do you a kind of a [snaps fingers] Vroooooooom... vroooooomm... vrooooooom... You know eh, it's kind of a little inebriational travelogue here eh.. about eh... It was kinda like say: Well, hey look baby, I'll be right back, I'm just going down the corner and get myself a pack of cigarettes see... And you know, you get down and you hit the bricks and you notice there's kind of a Thunderbird move rolling across a muscatel sky... You see... You're standing there down there on the corner of 5th and Vermouth, it's a block away from the corner of Baby Why Did You Leave Me and Why Don't You Please Come Back Home..." (Source: Coffee Break Concert Interview: The Coffee Break Concert radio show on WMMS-FM (Cleveland/ USA). Conducted by Kid Leo (Lawrence James Travagliante). December 3, 1975)



(2) Easy street:1. Financial independence 2. A way of life characterized by wealth and luxury; a pleasant and successful life; successful business dealings (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) Swizzle stick

- n.: A stick used to stir mixed drinks (Source: Merriam - Webster collegiate dictionary).

- Also mentioned in "Putnam County" (And swizzle stick legs jackknifed over naugahyde stools)



(4) Out-of-towner n.: A visitor or transient from out of town (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) Stroll

- n.: A road, highway, or street. c1935 jive use; some Negro use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in "Drunk On The Moon" (Tight-slack clad girls on the graveyard shift, 'Neath the cement stroll, catch the midnight drift), "Shore Leave" (Well, with buck shot eyes and a purple heart I rolled down the national stroll)



(6) Purina Checkerboard Slacks: The small, red and white checkered square used as the logo for the Purina corporation (specializes in dog and cat food). So in this case: red checkered slacks (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis. August, 2000).

Slacks: Trousers for casual wear. The word was used in the early 19th century as a coloquialism to describe trousers in general and, later, trousers worn by soldiers (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).  Ralston Purina's famous "checkerboard" logo was a marketing decision by Danforth (company's founder), based on his childhood memories of a family in which the mother dressed all of her children in clothing made from the same bolt of cloth. One year, her choice of material was the checkerboard design, and Danforth never forgot the distinctive red-and-white pattern. Today, more than a century after its founding, Ralston Purina is the world's largest producer of dry dog and dry and soft-moist cat foods, which are marketed under the Purina� brand name (Source: Ralston Purina Company official website) 



(7) Foster Grant: At the time a very famous brand of sunglasses in the US. Promoting their brand with the slogan: "Who's that behind those Foster Grants?". You can buy your own pair at: The Foster Grant Homepage.





L) Louis Jordan M) Peter Sellers R) Terence Stamp



(8) Earl Scheib: Earl Scheib, founded in 1937, is USA leader in low-cost auto-painting. They call themselves: "The world's largest company-owned and operated production auto-painting and body repair shop ". In the 60's their slogan was: "I'll paint any car any color for $ 29.95 ". The "any "color was not literal (mostly very simple primary colors). Their logo was decorated with a colourful rainbow.



 

1999 Internet advertising



(9) Guinan, Texas: In the 20's Guinan owned several gin mills in New York City. Her trademark welcome was "Hello, Suckers!" She began her career as an actress, and was one of the original silent movie cowgirls. Legend has it that the joint was raided one night when the Prince of Wales was there. She popped an apron on him and hid him in the kitchen, washing dishes.

Marv Hohman (1976): "How much of your audience do you think is hip to all the slang terminology you use? It seems you've made an exhaustive study of American pop culture, especially the underside of it. There are terms I know that I'm sure most people don't, things like Thunderbird, Stacy Adams, names like Texas Guinan.... Tom Waits: Yeah. Kerouac made a record back in '59 on Hanover Records with Steve Allen and he talked about her. Her famous line was, "Hello sucker." (Source: "Bitin' The Green Shiboda With Tom Waits" Down Beat magazine (USA), by Marv Hohman. Date: Victoria restaurant/ Chicago. June 17, 1976)





(10) Barnum, P.T.: Flamboyant 19th century American entrepreneur Phineas Taylor Barnum. Born: 1810 - died: 1891. The first and perhaps greatest showman of the US. In 1842 he opened his "American Museum of Curiosities" in NY city, in which he displayed all kinds of real but also fake curiosities and freaks. In 1871 he opened his circus "The greatest show on earth" in Brooklyn. The original circus was called simply the P. T. Barnum Circus. He then merged with his competitor and formed the Barnum & Bailey Circus. When Barnum died, Bailey ran the circus. When Bailey died, the Ringling Brothers bought them out. That's how we get the incredibly long Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus. He obtained a considerable wealth through his malafide, commercial approach. Notorious swindler. The quote: "There's a sucker born every minute" typifies his cynical view of life. Check out this article by R.J. Brown claiming he never said it...

Tom Waits (1999): "... Yeah, right. Barnum & Bailey had Sarah Bernhardt's leg on display for a couple of years. They had it in formaldehyde. There was a certain point where Sarah Bernhardt's leg was making more money than she was 'cause she was doing Shakespeare in bars. I don't know how that ties in, but help me." (Source: "Tom Waits '99, Coverstory ATN". Addicted to Noise: Gil Kaufman and Michael Goldberg. April, 1999).

Tom Waits (1999): "... But I was trying to imagine what it would be like for a person [Eyeball kid ]with an enormous eyeball for a head to be in show business. If Barnum & Bailey were still around, I imagine he would have thrown in with them." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July, 1999)





(11) Gypsy n.: A taxicab operating without a taxi license (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(12) Jimmy, Jimmie n.: A car or engine built by GMC (General Motors Corp.). From pronouncing the initials GMC rapidly. Hot-rod use since c1955 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



 (13) Highball, Hiball v.: To move ahead at full speed (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(14) Jasper n.: An exceptionally pious or meek person. A rube. A fellow; a guy (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(15) Gasper n.: A cigarette, esp. marijuana cigarette. Much more common in Eng. than in U.S.; now archaic in both countries (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(16) Cheshire grin

- He grins like a Cheshire cat. Cheese was formerly sold in Cheshire moulded like a cat. The allusion is to the grinning cheese-cat, but is applied to persons who show their teeth and gums when they laugh. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also quoted in Small Change: "And the naked mannequins with their Cheshire grins."



(17) A nickel after two: meaning five minutes past two. Nickel: n. [1970s+] (US) the number five [nickel, a 5-cent coin] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(18) Olympia: Brand name of a beer brewed in Washington. Popular in the NW part of USA. Olympia's attempts to go nationwide like Coors have not done well as far as I can tell (Submitted by Gary Duncan. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(19) Eyeball v.: To eye; look at; look around a place. Harlem Negro use. Teenage and synthetic hipster use since c1950 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(20) Weiss, Chuck E.: Further reading: Chuck E. Weiss



(21) "High Blood Pressure" by George "Cryin in the Streets" Perkins: Referring to "Cryin' In The Streets (Part 1)" by George Perkins & The Silver Stars (Golden-110/ Silver Fox Records, 1969) and "High Blood Pressure" (Ace-7102, 1971). (Thanks to Floris Cooman for researching release details)





(22) No dice, no-dice:

- No; without success; being refused or refused permission (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

phr. [1930s+] (orig. US) impossible, out of the question, on no account [the refusal of a gambling-house proprietor to allow a player to start or continue playing] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(23) Riding high

- v.:Feeling very good. Occasionally meaning snobbish or egotistical. ("He was riding high after he got into the college he wanted.") (Source: The Online Slang Dictionary, Walter Rader)

- Quoting: That's Life. Writers: Kay, Gordon. Recorded by Frank Sinatra: "That's life, that's what people say. You're riding' high in April, Shot down in May. But I know I'm gonna change that tune, When I'm back on top in June. That's life, funny as it seems. Some people get their kicks,  Steppin' on dreams; But I don't let it get me down, 'Cause this ol' word keeps getting around. I've been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, A poet, a pawn and a king. I've been up and down and over and out And I know one thing: Each time I find myself flat on my face, I pick myself up and get back in the race That's life, I can't deny it, I thought of quitting, But my heart just won't buy it. If I didn't think it was worth a try, I'd roll myself up in a big ball and die."



(24) Change that tune: To speak or act in a different manner; to assume a different attitude. Dates back 600 years. First seen in John Gower's Confessio Amantis (1390):"O thou, which hast desesed the Court of France be thi wrong Now schalt thou singe an other song." (Source: "2,107 Curious Word Origins, Sayings and Expressions" by Charles Earle).

Change one's tunephr. [late 16C+] to alter one's opinions or statements, esp. to go back on what one has previously said [musical imagery] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(25) Parkay: American brand of butter (ConAgra Brands, Inc.) (Further reading: Parkay official site. Thanks to Scott Fisher, May 9 2005, for pointing out this reference)



(26) Manhole: n. [1970s] (US Black) a bar, a saloon, a club etc. esp. for men only (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(27) 23rd Street: New York City (Chelsea Hotel).

Tom Waits (1979): "This is a story here, takes place on 23rd Street, New York City, it is a place eh called Chelsea Hotel" (Intro to "Small Change", Cold Beer version), 1979)



(28) St. Moritz Hotel: Also mentioned in The One That Got Away, 1976: "Costello was the champion at the St. Moritz Hotel." Also mentioned in original intro by George Duke for Tom Waits at the Orpheum Theatre, Boston, November 9, 1974:

George Duke: "Ladies and gentlemen, direct from the St. Moritz Hotel on the Sunset Strip, a friend of ours from Los Angeles, Mister Tom Waits! Sodden and wistful as he might be. How are you doing, buddy? Your beard's getting very good. He holds the distinction of being the only person at the St. Moritz Hotel in Los Angeles able to room next to Ray Collins for longer than three weeks at a time." (Transcription by Ulf Berggren as sent to Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000) 





St. Moritz Hotel, Los Angeles. Photo credit: Dorene LaLonde



(29) El (train): n. [late 19C+] (US) the elevated railway, usu. that of New York, but also in other cities, e.g. Chicago, where such transport systems existed (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(30) Krupa, Gene: Born Eugene Bertram Krupa, January 15, 1909, in Chicago, IL; Died of heart failure, October 16, 1973, in Yonkers, NY. Drummer and swing band leader. Studied drums and performed with local Chicago groups in the 20's. Free-lanced with the bands of Bix Beiderbecke, Benny Goodman, and saxophonist Adrian Rollini. He joined Goodman's band and played on NBC-Radio's Let's Dance in 1934. Left Goodman to form Gene Krupa Orchestra four years later. He appeared at the last reunion of original Goodman Orchestra in 1973. In 1944 Krupa was voted: best drummer, Down Beat Readers' Poll.





(31) Glasspacks n.: A type of muffler which gives a nice throaty and loud sound. (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)



(32) Jam session n. : Orig. an informal gathering of jazz musicians to play for their own pleasure, usu. in free and lengthy improvisations on well-known themes; later a term applied commercially to public jazz performances (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(33) Pay through the nose

- To pay excessively (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 

- To pay reluctantly or to pay an exorbitant price. (Source: "2,107 Curious Word Origins, Sayings and Expressions" by Charles Earle)

- Lyrics might also refer to using cocaine.

- Also mentioned in The Wages Of Love, 1982: "You see, love has a graveyard nurtured for those, that fell on their sabers and paid through the nose."



(34) Leg akimbo: Leg bowed outward (Source: Webster's II New Riverside Dictionary, submitted by Cheryl Dillis. August, 2000)



(35) Earlier version:  as published in the Los Angeles Free Press. January, 1974: "You know there's a blurred drizzle down a plate glass. There's a neon swizzle stick a-stirrin' up a sultry night air, and a traffic jam session on Belmont as a yellow biscuit of a butter cueball moon is rollin' maverick across an obsidian sky... And you know the buses are groanin' and they're wheezin' down the corner I'm freezin' on restless boulevard, midnight road cross town from Easy Street. With the tight knots of moviegoers and out-of-towners on the stroll and the buildings tower high above lit like dominoes... Now you know the used car salesmen with all their Purina checkerboard slacks and Foster Grant wraparounds are pacing in front of that rainbow $39.95 Earl Scheib merchandise. Like barkers in an arcade, all dressed up in jackel-striped jackets with the blue denim dye and color TV test pattern, double-knit polyester slacks throwing out some kind of a Texas Guinan routine: " They say: 'Hello, sucker, we like your money, just as well as anybody else's here,' and luring all the harlequin sailors on the stroll. in search of like new; new paint, factory air and AM-FM dreams... But you know the piss yellow gypsy cabs are stacked up in the taxi zones And they're waitin' like pinball machines to take off a joy ride to some magical place or they're waitin' in line like Truckers Welcome diners with dirt-lots full of Peterbilts and Kenworths and Jimmy's and the like. Doing some serious highballin' with bankrupt brakes, and they got the overdriven, underfed, underpaid, a day late - a dollar short. With their eyes propped open and their eyelids at half mast and I'm on the corner... I'm standin' on the corner like a just-got-in-town jasper on a streetcorner with a gasper. Lookin' for some kind of a Cheshire billboard grin. Stroking a goateed chin and using parking meters as walking sticks... I'm out here on the inebriated stroll. I am... and you know the sun come crawlin' yellow out of a manhole at the foot of Twenty-third Street, and a Dracula moon is making its way back dodgin' shadows to its prepaid room at the St. Moritz Hotel and and the El train is tumblin' across the trestles. Soundin' like the ghost of Gene Krupa with an overhead cam and glass packs and over at Chub's Pool and Snooker it was a nickel after two... "Yeah, with a nickel after two and the cobalt steel blue dream smoked, the radio groaned out the hit parade. And the chalk squeaked and the floorboards creaked. And an Olympia sign winked through a torn yellow shade, and Jack Chance himself leaning up against a Wurlitzer seriously eyeballin' out a three-ball combination shot... "I'm looking for some kind of an emotional investment with romantic dividends and leaning up against a banister I'm held over... held over for another smashed weekend"



Nirvana

 



Not much chance, completely cut loose from purpose,

he was a young man riding a bus through North Carolina on the way to somewhere.

And it began to snow.



And the bus stopped at a little caf� in the hills and the passengers entered.

And he sat at the counter with the others, and he ordered, the food arrived.

And the meal was particularly good.

And the coffee.



The waitress was unlike the women he had known.

She was unaffected, and there was a natural humor which came from her.

And the fry cook said crazy things.

And the dishwasher in back laughed a good clean pleasant laugh.



And the young man watched the snow through the window.

And he wanted to stay in that caf� forever.

The curious feeling swam through him that everything was beautiful there.

And it would always stay beautiful there.



And then the bus driver told the passengers that it was time to board.

And the young man thought: "I'll just stay here, I'll just stay here."

And then he rose and he followed the others into the bus.

He found his seat and looked at the caf� through the window.

And then the bus moved off, down a curve, downward, out of the hills.



And the young man looked straight forward.

And he heard the other passengers speaking of other things,

or they were reading or trying to sleep.

And they hadn't noticed the magic.

And the young man put his head to one side,

closed his eyes, and pretended to sleep.



There was nothing else to do,

just to listen to the sound of the engine,

and the sound of the tires

in the snow.



Written by: Charles Bukowski(1) 

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:

(1) Nirvana:

Tom Waits (2002): "He (Charles Bokowski) was like a big bear. He had this enormous head, as big as Frankenstein. He had a big presence and huge shoulders; and that face that looks like a mask, a scary mask. I was still drinking so it was pre-- [his voice trails off] I was fascinated with him. He was like a, I don't know what you call it, mentor.... Well, he was many things, like all of us. But I think when he got towards the end of his life and did 'Last Night of the Earth Poems', it softened him. My favorite is called "Nirvana". You'd like that one. It's about a young boy on a bus, going nowhere in particular. It's snowing and he stops at a cafe, and everyone on the bus gets off at this little rest stop and everyone has coffee. He sits at the counter. He said the buy boy had a big healthy laugh and he's teasing the waitress and what not. And he says, "I could stay here my whole life. Just right here." Then he ends up getting back on the bus and going away. You should read it. Of course - he's a planet waiting to be explored." (Source: "Tom Waits", SOMA magazine (USA) July, 2002 by Mikel Jollett)

WORD (2006): "...the Charles Bukowski poem, Nirvana, about a young man on the road, stopping in a cafe and being struck dumb with a sense of wonder - "The curious feeling swam through him/ That everything was beautiful there/ That it would always stay beautiful there..." What I love about that Bukowski poem is that it's completely unapologetic in its sense of wonder, completely innocent and open-hearted. Tom Waits: Yeah, and we've all been on that bus, where you wish you could just freeze everything right now. Like people say, "Shoot me! Things are good. Shoot me right now!" [laughs] The moment in the church in Arizona was like that for me. 'Course, in that community you wouldn't want to say. "Shoot me". Because they would." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well, none of us really know what Bukowski's life was like. We know what we have read, and what we've gathered from the work and what we've imagined. Essentially, there's backstage and there's on-stage, when you're a performer. You know what we allow you to know. WORD: Did you meet Bukowski? TW: A couple of times. It's like when I met Keith Richards, you try to match them drink for drink. But you're a novice, you're a child. You're drinking with a roaring pirate. Whatever you know about holding your liquor you'd better let go of it right now. So I thought I could hang in there but I wasn't able to hang in there, with either one of them. They're made out of different stock. They're like dockworkers. But it was interesting. I met Bukowski at his house. Barbet Schroeder was a friend of mine, and they tried to get me to be in that movie, Barfly, playing Bukowski. They offered a lot of money, but I just couldn't do it, plus I didn't consider myself a good enough actor to do something like that. But Bukowski... I guess everybody when you're young and you enter the arts you find father figures. For me it was more profound because I had no father - no operating father - so I found other men that supplied all that for me. I was looking for those guys all the time." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown) 

Nirvana appears in: "In the Shadow of the Rose" (1991), "The Last Night of the Earth Poems" (1992) and "Run With the Hunted" (1993)

Further reading on Bukowski: Bukowski.netAnti Hero Art.



Nobody

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



Nobody, nobody

Will ever love you the way I loved you

Cause nobody is that strong



Love's bitter sweet

Life's treasure's deep

But no one can keep a love that's gone wrong



Nobody, nobody

Gonna love you the way I could

Cause nobody's that strong

No, nobody's that strong



Nobody, nobody

Gonna love you the way I loved you

Cause nobody, nobody is that strong, yeah



You've had many lovers

You'll have many others

But they'll only just break your poor heart in two



And nobody, nobody

Will love you the way that I could

Cause nobody, nobody's that strong

No, nobody's that strong



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Nobody



(Nighthawks At The Diner album version, 1975)



Nobody, nobody

Will ever love you the way I could love you

Cause nobody, nobody is that strong



Love's bitter sweet

And life's treasure's deep

And no one can keep a love that's gone wrong



Nobody, nobody

Will love you the way that I could

Cause nobody, nobody's that strong

Cause nobody is that strong



Nobody, nobody

Will ever love you the way I can love you

Cause nobody, nobody's that strong



You've had many lovers

You'll have many others

But they'll only just break your poor heart in two



Nobody, nobody

Will love you the way that I could

Cause nobody, nobody's that strong

Cause nobody is that strong



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975



Known covers:

The Piano Has Been Drinking. The Piano Has been Drinking. April, 1990 Chlodwig (BMG Germany). Performed in German/ K�lsch

Love Or Nothin', Caroline Henderson. August 11, 2006. Sundance (Denmark).



No One Can Forgive Me But My Baby

 



Crack a mean whip, carry a big gun

Cast a long shadow till the day is done

Do ninety miles an hour down the Devil's trail

Done hard time in a hundred jails

No one can forgive me but my baby

No one can forgive me but my baby

No one can forgive me but my baby



Now Jesus don't know, Mary don't know

Preacher don't know, Momma don't know

Daddy don't know, my brother don't know

St. John don't know, St. Peter don't know

No one can forgive me but my baby



I took a hundred dollars from a blind man's hand

I slept with the whores on the burnin' sand

Got twenty-seven children I've never seen

Got blood on my hands that will never come clean

I got long arms, tell big lies

Stole the pennies from my dear mother's eyes

I'm tall in the saddle, about six foot nine

I beat up revenuers all the time

No one can forgive me but my baby

Oh, no one can forgive me but my baby



I got a mean temper, I'm a big liar

Broke all the laws, set the house on fire

When I stand before Jesus and he asks me to kneel

I'll tell him maybe we can make a deal

No one can forgive me but my baby

No one can forgive me but my baby



I don't pay no bills, I don't say no prayers

Give back nothin', and I take all dares

Stole a car and I got me a gun

If there ain't no road I'm gonna make me one

Broke my baby's heart, and I whip my dog

I don't say nothin' when I meet my God

No one can forgive me but my baby

No one can forgive me but my baby



No one can forgive me but my baby

No one can forgive me but my baby

No one can forgive me but my baby

Forgive me, baby



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], copyright control � 1992

Official release: "Got Love If You Want It" John Hammond, Point Blank, 1992

Tom Waits does not perform on this recording



Known covers:

Got Love If You Want It. John Hammond. April, 1992. Charisma 86285. Emd/ Virgin

Other Sides. Hans Olson. 1999. Willing Wheels (France)

Only A Fool. Delta Roux (Milligan/ Bodine). September 30, 2002. Taxim

Big Lonesome Radio. Mark Lemhouse. October 17, 2002. Yellow Dog Records

St. Slide. Bj�rn Berge. 2004. Chicken Farm Records



No One Knows I'm Gone

 



(Alice demo version, 1992)(1)



Hell above and heaven below

All the trees are gone

The rain has such a lovely sound

To those who are six feet under ground(2)

The leaves will bury every year

And no one knows I'm gone



Live me golden tell me dark

Hide from Graveyard John

The moon is full here every night

And I can bathe here in his light

The leaves will bury every year

And no one knows I'm gone



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. October, 1999)

Further reading: Alice full story





 



No One Knows I'm Gone



(Alice studio version, 2002)(1)



Hell above and heaven below

All the trees are gone

The rain made such a lovely sound

To those who are six feet under ground(2)

The leaves will bury every year

And no one knows I'm gone



Live me golden tell me dark

Hide from Graveyard John

(But) The moon is full here every night

And I can bathe here in his light

The leaves will bury every year

And no one knows I'm gone



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), © 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

Summerland. Your Favorite Horse (Chris Jeely). 2004. Scareslight (USA)

Now We Are Dead & Other Stories. Jeremy Smoking Jacket. 2005. Self-released

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records



Notes:



(1) No One Knows I'm Gone: also known as: "Live Me Golden, Tell Me Dark". Sung by Alice in scene 1



(2) Six feet underphr. [1930s+] {orig. US) dead and buried (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



November

 



No shadows, no stars

There's no moon and no cars

November



Only believes in a pile of dead leaves

And a moon that's the color of bone

No prayers for November to linger longer

Stick your spoon in the wall(2)

And we'll slaughter them all



November has tied me to an old dead tree

Get word to April to rescue me

November's cold chain made of wet boots and rain

And shiny black ravens on chimney smoke lanes

November seems odd

You're my firing squad

November



With my hair slicked back with carrion shellac(3)

And the blood from a pheasant and the bone from a hare

Tied to the branches of a roebuck stag

Left to wave in the timber like a buck shot(4) flag

Go away, you rainsnout

Go away, blow your brains out

November



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990-1993-1998

Official release: "The Black Rider", Island Records Inc., 1993 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Sung by Robert in scene 2 (flashback scene with the roebuck stag)



(2) Stick your spoon in the wall: Stick one's spoon in the wall: phr. [19C] to die (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(3) Carrion shellac: Many American "Indians" in the Northwest used bear fat to make their hair look slick. In the 50's, American teenagers used Wildroot Cream Oil and other brands to do the same thing. Shellac is a gluey paint - type stuff you put on wood to treat it and make it look shiny. You can do the same with your hair. And if you make it from carrion, you will carry with you the aroma of rotting meat that vultures might fight you for ;-) (Submitted by Gary Duncan. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000) 



(4) Buck shot flag

- Flag shot with a shot gun; tattered (Submitted by El RayoX. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)

Buckshot n. 1. A large lead shot for shotgun shells, used especially in hunting big game (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition) 

- One variation of the little metal pellets that fill a shotgun shell. An individual piece of buckshot is larger and more damaging than some other types, like birdshot. Larger pellets for larger animals (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



---------- O--------



Ol' '55

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



Time went so quickly

I went lickety-splickly(2), out to my old '55

Pulled away slowly, feeling so holy

God knows, I was feeling alive



And now the sun's coming up

I'm riding with Lady Luck

Freeway cars and trucks

Stars beginning to fade

and I lead the parade

Just a-wishing I'd stayed a little longer

Oh, Lord, that feeling's getting stronger



Now it's six in the morning

gave me no warning

I had to be on my way

Lights passing and trucks are flashing

I'm on my way home from your place



And now the sun's coming up

I'm riding with Lady Luck

Freeway cars and trucks



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Ol' '55



(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



(one, two, three, four)



Well, my time went so quickly

I went lickety-splitly(2) out to my ol' fifty-five

As I pulled away slowly, feelin' so holy

God knows I was feelin' alive



Now the sun's comin' up, I'm ridin' with Lady Luck

Freeway cars and trucks

Stars beginnin' to fade, and I lead the parade

Just a-wishin' I'd stayed a little longer

Oh Lord, let me tell you that the feeling gettin' stronger



And it's six in the mornin'

Gave me no warnin', I had to be on my way

Well, there's trucks all a-passin' me, and the lights all a-flashin'

I'm on my way home from your place



And now the sun's comin' up, I'm ridin' with Lady Luck

Freeway cars and trucks

Stars beginnin' to fade, and I lead the parade

Just a-wishin' I'd stayed a little longer

Oh Lord, let me tell you the feeling gettin' stronger



And my time went so quickly

I went lickety-splitly out to my ol' fifty-five

As I pulled away slowly, feelin' so holy

God knows I was feelin' alive



And now the sun's comin' up, I'm ridin' with Lady Luck

Freeway cars and trucks

Freeway cars and trucks

Freeway cars and trucks



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: "Closing Time", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973 &

"Anthology Of Tom Waits", WEA/ Elektra, 1984

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

On The Border. The Eagles, 1974. Elektra/ Asylum LP 1004 (re-released by Elektra Entertainment in 1990)

Some Day You Eat The Bear... Some Day The Bear Eats You. Ian Matthews, 1974. Elektra

Be True To You. Eric Andersen, 1975. Arista Records. Recorded in Los Angeles, 1974. Arista AL 4033 (re-released in 1997)

Connections. Richie Havens, 1980. Elektra/ Asylum 6E-242

The Soul Of Many Places. Iain Matthews. May, 1993. WEA/ Elektra

Cover Girl. Shawn Colvin. 1994. Columbia/ Sony 477240 2

Cover Girl - Extra!. Shawn Colvin. 1994. Columbia/ Sony promo only 3-track CD

Songs Of Tom Waits. Dolphin Blue. 1995. Self-released demo (Germany)

Boys On The Side: Original Soundtrack. Various artists. January 31, 1995. Arista

Freedom Sessions. Sarah McLachlan. March, 1995. MMB/ Arista

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Dave Alvin

Collection. Eric Andersen. September, 1997. Archive Records (same version as on: "Be True To You", 1975)

Fumbling Towards Estacy/ Freed. Sarah McLachlan. February, 1998. Classis Records

In de Orangerie. Acda & De Munnik. September 27, 1998. SMART 491 678 2 (Holland) Bonus CD with "Op Voorraad" (in Dutch: "Ol' '55")

Master Poets. Bernardo Lanzetti. 1999. Azzurra Music

Afternoon Delight. Steve Stefanowicz. 1999. Self-released

Extra Cocoon (All Access). K's Choice. January, 1999. DTM (Belgium)

Ol' "55. Acda & De Munnik. October 18, 1999. SMART 66831-1 Holland (CD single in Dutch: "Ol' '55")

Everybody Has A Dream. Mitchell Howard. 2000. Cling Peaches Music

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Die Sunn geht boid auf")

Living In My Heart. Randa McNamara. July 24, 2001. Cornerstone

Ballads. Breit'N'Wark. March 13, 2002. Self-released

A Sigh, A Song. Lisa Bassenge Trio. August 19, 2002. Minor Music Records (Germany)

Homegrown. Nussbaumer/ Weber/ Kreil. 2003. Self-released

Bootleg 6. The Floating Men, 2003. Shade (live version)

Live at the City Lights Saloon. Pat Guadagno. 2004. Campbell Music

At This Moment. Karen Dunbar. June, 2004. Neon Records (Neon CD006, Scotland)

Something To Me. JJ Schultz band. 2005. Last Stop Records

Deep Forbidden Lake. Jazz Mandolin Project. May 3, 2005. Doyle Kos Dk.E.

Another Round. Dakota. September 17, 2005. Self-released

Dans Ton Lit. Simon Gerber. May 23, 2006. Langusta (Switserland)

The Scratch On My Vinyl Soul. Betsy Spivak. June 6, 2006. Self-released

PS: Döner. Various artists (performed by The Highway Angels). June 22, 2007. Döner Diskothek (Germany)

Rock & Poems. Massimo Priviero. November 1, 2007. Universal

American Garage. Don Campbell. November 8, 2007. Playbutton Records

From The Fountain. Queen Bees. January 5, 2009. Odeon/ Caroline (Norway)

Big Shoes. David Munyon. March 27, 2009. Stockfisch

From Dusk Till Dawn. Sass Jordan. September 1, 2009. Songs Of The South Records

Songs. Paul Harrington. February 26, 2010. Stereoplex Records



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Ol' '55". With: Larry Taylor (upright bass) and Smokey Hormel (guitar, banjo and percussion). Taken from VH-1 Storytellers concert documentary at Burbank Airport, Los Angeles.



Notes:



(1) Live intro from Passims, Cambridge, November 10, 1974"This a about a '55 Buick Roadmaster. I don't know if there's any real bona fide Buick owners out there tonight. But my goodness, that's an automobile that I swear by. It's a car that's seriously as slick as deer guts on the door knob. Climb aboard one of those suckers, make you feel like a new man. And eh... I always had these cars that I bought for like a hundred and twenty-five dollars. You sink 'bout thirty-five hundred into them, and you sell 'em for twelfe fifty or so. [A lot of noise adjusting the microphone] Rattle like a damned sewing machine... And eh... I stuck to the Buick line for several years. I had two Specials, one was a kind of... now how can I put this? It was kind of monkey brown and eh... monkey feces brown, you see what I mean. Two-tone. It was a lot of chrome, kinda looked like a Wurlitzer jukebox. And I had two of those Specials, the other was kinda vomit yellow, it [?]. And I had a couple of Centuries, finally I had a Super. And then I finally picked up on this Roadmaster, and lucky to get it! So this is called 'My Ol' '55'." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





Live intro from Westchester, PA, 1976"Here's a real old song for you. Actually, it's about the very first car I ever stole. You know... I don't know, I still remain somehow a victim of circumcision, in the sense that I have a tendency to be cursed with terminal car trouble. And I don't expect it to let up at all. I never paid more than a hundred and twenty-five dollars for a car. And I ain't about to change now. But I would like to have maybe a 1976 Chevrolet station wagon, and sand it down and primer the thing. [member of the audience shouts something] You saw me in a station wagon? (Yeah) Where did you see me in a station wagon? (something) In Philly? Yeah, I was in a station wagon once. (something) Oh, you mean it was there at the intersection? (Yeah, I was something, something out the window) You were the one, yeah! I'd like to have a big round of applause for my brother-in-law right there. Phil's been out of prison now for a couple of years, but... (No, they ain't caught me yet!) Yeah, I know, that child molesting charge really got you, didn't it? I mean after a second offense and everything, it's kinda hard to say, but... (No, lucky first time!) (or something) Eh... Well, this is eh..." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Live intro from Storyteller show, recorded April 1, 1999 in Los Angeles"This is a song about an automobile. I had a '55 Buick Roadmaster when I was a kid. Actually, this really eh... was inspired by an old friend of mine named Larry Beezer, who... I was staying at the Tropicana Hotel, and I got a knock on the door very late and... Was that a clap for the Tropicana? Excellent! I don't think I got any new towels for the whole like nine years I was there. But I never asked, I didn't wanna upset anybody. This is about eh... What was it about again? It was about eh... It was about the car! All right, Beezer came over at about 2 a.m. He said, 'I'm on a date, and she's only seventeen, and I gotta get her back to Pasadena. And all I got left on the car is reverse.' I said, 'How can I help?' He said, 'I need gas money', and so he sold me a couple of jokes. He said, 'You can have these jokes, and you don't even have to tell folks that they're mine, cause you paid for 'em for chrissake!' And I said, 'That sounds like a good deal to me.' Anyway, he rode home, in reverse, on the Pasadena freeway. In the slow lane. I think they should give awards for that kind of thing! But anyway, it was a '55 eh... what was it? Was it a '55 Caddy?" (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Tom Wairs (1975) on The Eagles' cover of Ol' '55: "I was in a bar one night and I ran into one of those guys and they said that they'd heard the record and they might want to do it on one of their records and then I was on the road for 3 months and I never heard anything about it and then it showed up on that album. I frankly was not that particularly crazy about their rendition of it. The song is about 5 years old, it's one of the first songs I wrote so I felt like it was kind of flattering that somebody wanted to do your song but at the same time I thought their version was a little antiseptic and then it got picked up by Ian Matthews and Eric Andersen - and I don't know, frankly I guess I'm a little more fond of my own version of it than I am theirs." (Source: WAMU Radio Interview. Date: Washington, DC. April 18, 1975)



Tom Waits (1976) on The Eagles' cover of Ol' '55: "Naw - I don't like the Eagles. They're about as exciting as watching paint dry. Their albums are good for keeping the dust off your turntable and that's about all." (Source: "Tom Waits: Would You Say This Man Was Attempting To Convey An Impression Of Sordid Bohemianism". New Musical Express (UK), by Fred Dellar. Date: June 5, 1976)



Louie Lista (2007) on The Eagles' cover of Ol’ ’55: "It put Tom on an entirely different level economically. The younger we were back then, the more likely we were to say, Oh, that guy sold out.' But in reality that kind of prosperity makes certain things possible.'Ol "55' gave Tom a certain prosperity and power that I think he used wisely." (Source: Louie Lista interview March 12, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



Barney Hoskyns (2009) on The Eagles’ cover of Ol’ ‘55: “So delighted was David Geffen that Asylum’s brightest hopes had given Waits a leg-up that he called Bones Howe to propose the band record a new version of "Ol' '55" with Waits singing. "David said to me, 'Put this all together and get these guys in the studio,"' Howe remembers. "One by one the Eagles became unavailable, so I assembled a group of the current hot studio players and we went in to Heider's to cut this one side live. We were there most of the night and never got a really good perfor¬mance. I made a rough mix for David and took it to his office the next day. He agreed that we should forget it, and the tapes went into the Asylum vaults.' Given Waits' antipathy to everything the Eagles stood for, the only surprising thing is that he agreed to the idea in the first place. "In that group of people, Tom was the sort of turncoat,' says Howe. "Even in a group that had its back turned to the com¬mercial record business, he turned his back on them. In a lot of ways it was his way of becoming an individual away from individuals." (Source: “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



Barney Hoskyns (2009) on Waits’s antipathy to the Eagles cover of Ol’ ’55: “The band's hackles quickly rose. I still remember Tom saying listening to the Eagles was like watching paint dry," says Jack Tempchin, whose song "Already Gone" was On the Border's euphoric opening track. "They read that and went, 'Well, okay, we ain't gonna record any more of his songs!"' Waits went even further in 1977, laying into the Eagles' peers and savaging lyrics by America and David Crosby. Not even Neil Young was spared. '(He's] another one who is embarrassing for displaying a third-grade mentality," Waits told ZigZag. "'Old man take a look at my life... 'That's real good." When, years later, I asked Waits about his comments, he seemed sincerely mortified. "I was a young kid , " he sighed. I was just corking off and being a prick. It was saying 'Notice me,'followed by 'Leave me the fuck alone,' sometimes in the same sentence." He added that he'd long since patched things up with Don Henley. But while one salutes the maturity of his regret, the young "prick" also deserves kudos for not playing along with the happy family conspiracy fostered by Asylum (which, let's not forget, briefly had even Waits’ beloved Bob Dylan on its roster). As much as it served his career well in the long run, Waits' lack of diplomacy about his musical dislikes was endearing” (Source: “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



Glenn Frey (1999) introducing Ol' '55 at The Eagles Millenium show on New Year's Eve, 1999: "Tom didn't really like our version of 'Ol' '55' when it first came out. Then he got the check. And since then, Tom and I, we're really close"



(2) Lickety-split adv.: Lickety splickly. Fast; at great speed (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



Ol' '55 (Story)

 



(Live version, 1974. Also known as: 12 Inches)



Well, before I do anything I gotta tell you a story 'bout Johnny Cash and June Carter. Unbeknownst to anybody in the entire metropolitan area, let me relate a little piece of metropolitan hot news. It's about Johnny Cash and June Carter. Yes, June Carter went and left Johnny Cash sittin' in his Winnebago playin' solitaire. Run off to Memphis to marry Hank Snow of all people. Yes, Hank Snow of all people. They hooked up matrimonially, and folks around those parts are sayin' that's the first time they've ever seen six inches of snow in June. Now I'm not gonna say anything...



Which reminds me of a story that I heard... I was down at a little place called Charlie's Place across the street from my motel in Harvard Square, a tweaky little... Twenty-three bucks a night they stick you for, ferchrissakes! I can stay at the Y for six. [edit]



There was a little sucker about four-five in there. With color television test pattern double-knit slacks. He had Foster Grant wrap-arounds and a jackal-striped jacket with blue denim dye. And he set that whole bar up, called the bartender over, set it up one elbow to the other, and we all had a beer. And I swear to God, a little twelve inch sucker jumped out of the guy's breast pocket, 'bout that big. Little sucker jumped down on the bar, went down all the way to one end, started spilling drinks, messing up people's hair, spilling ashtrays, making a hell of a nuisance of himself. Jumped back in the guy's pocket. The bartender come over and said, 'Ferchrissakes, I've been a bartender twenty-seven years, I've never seen anything like it. Sir, I run a respectable place here, ferchrissakes. This ain't no kind of joint!' 'Well,' the guy said, 'I'm sorry, Sir. It won't happen again!' Sure enough, that little twelve inch man jumped out of the guy's pocket, jumped down on the bar, tweaky little sucker, 'bout that big, starts spilling drinks, messing up people's hair. People tryin' to slap him on his way down. Sure enough, jumped back in the guy's pocket. The bartender come over and says, 'I've been a bartender for years and I've never seen anything like it. You're gonna have to cough up some sort of explanation.' The guy said, 'I do apologize.



But it all happened one afternoon in Atlantic City, New Jersey. In Atlantic City, New Jersey, I was walking on the beach, and what did I find but a Jos� Cuervo bottle. And I picked that sucker up and I stroked it. I stroked it till a big genie came out. And that genie took one look at me and said, 'You can have one wish, any wish. Any wish you want in the whole wide world.' And, well, I had to go and be a fool and wish for a twelve inch prick and that's just what I got.



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: unpublished

Unofficial release: Tales From The Underground Volume 4, PMS Records, 1999

Recorded at a Mothers of Invention concert at the Orpheum Theatre, Boston, November 9, 1974

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Ol' '55 Story.

Recorded at a Mothers of Invention concert at the Orpheum Theatre, Boston/ USA. November 9, 1974



Notes:



(1) Original intro from Orpheum Theatre, Boston, November 9, 1974:

George Duke: But as faith would have it, he went on out again. There weren't no way to keep him! He went out again... I don't know what to say... but if there're any friends in the house who want to see a changed man, come see him! Help him out! Help the brother out! [TW seems to appear out of nowhere, all laughs.] Cause he got a problem! Frank Zappa: Not only has he got a problem, he has a wino on his hands. [TW laughs some more in the background]. Where's that wino, man? Where is he? Is he back there drinking? [TW reappears from behind a speaker or something]. Ladies and gentlemen, direct from the St. Moritz Hotel on the Sunset Strip, a friend of ours from Los Angeles, Mister Tom Waits! Sodden and wistful as he might be. How are you doing, buddy? Your beard's getting very good. He holds the distinction of being the only person at the St. Moritz Hotel in Los Angeles able to room next to Ray Collins for longer than three weeks at a time. Tom, there's nothing to eat here. Why don't you sing 'em a little bit of your song, you know. The only one that we know. George Duke: What can you do with him? Frank Zappa: What can you do with him? TW: I just tried to get hold of a little change for something to eat. Frank Zappa: Well, you came to the right place. (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





St. Moritz Hotel, Los Angeles. Photo credit: Dorene Lalonde



Old Boyfriends

 



Old boyfriends

Lost in the pocket of your overcoat

Like burned out light bulbs on a Ferris Wheel

Old boyfriends



You remember the kinds of cars they drove

Parking in an orange grove

He fell in love, you see

With someone that I used to be



Though I very seldom think of him

Nevertheless sometimes a mannequin's

Blue summer dress can make the window like a dream

Ah, but now those dreams belong to someone else

Now they talk in their sleep

In a drawer where I keep all my



Old boyfriends

Remember when you were burning for them

Why do you keep turning them into

Old boyfriends



They look you up when they're in town

To see if they can still burn you down

He fell in love, you see

With someone that I used to be



Though I very seldom think of him

Nevertheless sometimes a mannequin's

Blue summer dress can make the window like a dream

Ah, but now those dreams belong to someone else

Now they talk in their sleep

In a drawer where I keep all my



Old boyfriends

Turn up every time it rains

Fall out of the pages in a magazine

Old boyfriends



Girls fill up the bars every spring

Not places for remembering

Old boyfriends

All my old boyfriends

Old boyfriends



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Old Boyfriends. Claire Martin. 1994. Linn Records (Scotland)

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records (performed by Preacher Boy)

Don�t Stop Lovin Me. Val Denn. September 4, 2001. Lone Wolf Pack

A Place That's Make Believe. Margret Avery. December 9, 2002. Queenmae

All Smiles. Andersson, Söderberg & Milder. August 25, 2008. EMI (Sweden)

Haunted Heart. Hilary Kole. February 10, 2009. Justin Time Records



Notes:



Jeff Burger (1975): Tom's recollection of an article by Nat Hentoff seems to sum up the singer's temporal displacement. "Hentoff was talking about the old days," Tom explains, as he reaches in his pocket for change to leave the waiter. "He said he ran into Miles Davis on the street; he hadn't seen him in several years and he was wondering how Davis would react to him 'cause they had been close before. He said they embraced and everything and Davis said, "We're from another time, Nat, and we need our old friends'," Tom leaves the restaurant booth, pulls on his coat and looks up reflectively. "We need our old friends," he repeats. "It was just real touching, I thought." (Source: "Waits: The Beats Go On" MelodyMaker. June 21, 1975 by Jeff Burger)



Dave Zimmer (1982): "Did you write any songs that were specifically designed for her (Gayle) to sing? Tom Waits"Is there Any Way Out of This Dream?" and "Take Me Home" were written for Crystal to sing. "Old Boyfriends" was originally for me, then for her, then it turned into a duet. "Picking Up After You" and "This One's From the Heart" were written as duets. I found that it was hard writing for a woman. There are certain words they're uncomfortable with. I can get away with a certain vernacular, while a woman singing it would have trouble. I had to change things around, put everything into her words. It was tough. I felt like I was writing lines for an actress (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)



Old Shoes

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



I'm singin' this song, cause it's time it was sung

I've been puttin' it off for a while

Cause it's harder by now, and the truth is so clear

That I'm cryin' when I'm seein' you smile



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes(1)

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



And every time that I tried to tell you that we'd

Lost the magic we had at the start

I would weep in my heart when I looked in your eyes

And I'd search once again for the spark



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



For you know, that there's somethin' callin' me, dear

And by morning I'm sure to be gone

For I'm older than you, and you know oh so well

That our time for the love was this song



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



Now I can see by your eyes, that it's time for to go

So I'll leave you cryin' in the rain

Though I held in my hand, the key to all joy

Honey, my heart was not born to be tamed



And goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Old Shoes



(& Picture Postcards)

(Closing Time studio version, 1973)



I'm singin' this song, it's time it was sung

I've been puttin' it off for a while

But it's harder by now, cause the truth is so clear

That I cry when I'm seein' you smile



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes(1)

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



Every time that I tried to tell you that we'd

Lost the magic we had at the start

I would weep in my heart when I looked in your eyes

And I'd search once again for the spark



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



I can see by your eyes, it's time now to go

So I'll leave you to cry in the rain

Though I held in my hand, the key to all joy

But honey, my heart was not born to be tamed



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me, dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



So goodbye, so long, the road calls me dear

And your tears cannot bind me anymore

And farewell to the girl with the sun in her eyes

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone

Can I kiss you, and then I'll be gone



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973



Known covers:

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Drugstore

Foundation. Foundation. 2001. FueledByRamen

We've Walked These Streets. Sam Lapides. 2002. Inbetweens Records

Big Daddy Bluegrass Band. The Big Daddy Bluegrass Band. 2002. Little King Records

The Morning After. Ben�che. January, 2003. Self-released

Around The Bend (soundtrack). Various artists (performed by David Baerwald). October 5, 2004. Rhino / Wea

Acoustic Alley Blues. Little Johnny Kantreed. May 24, 2005. ANJrecords

Hell Or High Water. Andrew Murray. July, 2005. White Cow (Ireland)

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: The Caseworker

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: Drugstore (same version as on Step Right Up, 1995) 

It's Not The Whiskey. The Mickey Finns. January 26, 2010. Mankeltray



Notes:



(1) Sun in one's eyes, to have the

- To be tipsy. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 

- phr. [mid-19C] to be drunk. [euph. play on Blind Drunk] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



Old Time Feelin'

 



That old time feeling

Goes sneaking down the hall

Like an old grey cat in winter

Keeping close to the wall



Written by: Guy Clark

Published by: unknown

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording Studios, Cotati, CA, on May 28, 1998

Tom Waits: guitar, vocals (with Ramblin' Jack Elliott and and Guy Clark)

Official release: Friends Of Mine - Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Old Time Feelin':

- Ramblin' Jack Elliott (on Old Time Feelin'): "We were kiddin' around in the studio and it found its way on tape. It was just a feelin'." (Source: Ramblin' Jack Elliott official site, 2006)

- Edvins Beitiks (1996): "Waits will be on Elliot's next album [Friends Of Mine" Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998], along with Arlo Guthrie, Jerry Jeff Walker, Guy Clark and Bob Weir. It was a labor of love, says Waits. "We did one song with Guy Clark - 'That Old Time Feeling' - that came off pretty good, I thought. Jack brings it with him when he comes, and that's rare these days. "You could say Jack wears in his songs - they're well used and well sung," says Waits, adding with a characteristically raspy chuckle, "Some people would say he wears 'em in and wears 'em out, but he wears 'em, that's for sure. "When he's learning a song he kind of tries it on like a pair of gloves. I got a chance to watch him do that when he recorded a song my wife and I wrote. He's got a way of doing things that's uniquely his own. He makes a song his own. That's the beauty of it." Waits has been itching to record with Elliott ever since he first heard his music getting good play, in the days when he was working as a doorman at the Heritage Club in San Diego's Mission Beach. "I was about 19, and his record was one of the most-played at this little coffee house. Jack's record was on the turntable all the time the one where he's on the cover with his horse and he's roping something [Ramblin' Jack Elliott: Young Brigham", Reprise R/RS 6284, 1968]. "It had '912 Greens' on there, spoken out, the song that so moved me. It had his version of "Tennessee Stud' and some Woody Guthrie songs," says Waits. He paused, then added that Elliott "was a real hero of mine - the idea of meeting him one day and recording with him is pretty fantastic." Waits, caught up in American music, did a lot of listening to Elliott, to Blind Lemon Jefferson, to Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, before stepping onstage at the Heritage Club to give the music a try himself. "I think I made more as a doorman than I did playing," he said. "Eight dollars a night on the door, $6 a night on stage. A little strange." Waits laughed at the memory of it, and the laughter was contagious. He called back easy-going roams with Elliott when both men were moving through Los Angeles in the high-water years of California folk. "We bumped into each other a couple of times," said Waits, making it matter-of-fact. "Hung with him in clubs in L.A., him and his dogs and his motorhome." After listening to the long-sleeve best of Elliott's stories, Waits is convinced "Jack should sit down somewhere with a tape recorder and talk all day and they should put it in the Library of Congress. "He's got one of those stories that is a novel unto itself, and I'd like to read it," says Waits. "Because his story is also the story of the country." (Source: "On The Road Tom Waits Talkin' About Hanging And Recording With Ramblin' Jack Elliott...". San Francisco Examiner, by Edvins Beitiks. August 4, 1996(?))





Source: Official Guy Clark website. W. Guy Clark and Ramblin' Jack Elliot.

Date: Prairie Sun Studios, Cotati. During the recording sessions for Ramblin' Jack Elliot's "Friends Of Mine".

Recorded between February 26, 1996 to October 14, 1997



On A Foggy Night

 



It was all upon a foggy(2) night, an abandoned road

In a twilight mirror mirage

With no indication of any kind of service station

Or an all-night garage

I was misinformed(3), I was misdirected

Cause the interchange never intersected

Leaving me marooned(4) beneath a bloodshot moon

All upon a foggy night, a foggy night

All upon a foggy night



It was kind of an abandoned road, in a blurred brocade collage

Is that a road motel, I can't really tell

You gotta tell me, is that a vacancy lodge

There's no consolation, what kind of situation

To be aimlessly askew amidst a powder blue(5)

No tell tail light clue



Spun just like the spell you spin

This precarious pandemonium

Roslyn, I'm stranded, all upon a foggy night



Like a sweepstakes ticket for a Broadway arcade

Heads you win, tails I lose

I'm ramblin', I'm gamblin'

All upon a foggy night

Foggy night

Foggy night

Foggy night



You got the vice grips on my personality

It's all upon a foggy night

All upon a foggy night

All upon a foggy night

On a foggy night

All upon a foggy

All upon a foggy night



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Intro from "Nighthawks At The Diner""Well, I think it's about time I took you on an improvisational adventure into the bowels of the Metropolitan region. Looks like a bona fide high voltage decked out in full regalia Angelino audience, driving in Subarus, Pintos, Malibus, Oldsmobiles. A small suburban community. This is kinda 'bout two thirty in the morning. You been standing on the corner of 5th and Vermouth, and you climb into the helm of a 1958 monkey-shit brown Buick Super, and you're on your way home. A luxury automobile, bought at Dollar Bill's Easy Autos for next to nothin'. You're cruisin' along, everything's goin' fine. Put a little smooth music on the stereo. Light up an Old Gold, save the coupon! Gotta think in terms of that patio furniture and that Toro mower, man. Yeah. You're on the Santa Monica freeway headed in an easterly direction, you just passed the La Cienega good turn-off, and you run into a cold fogbank... " (Transcript by Pieter from Holland as published on the Tom Waits Library. August, 2000)

Bonified/ Bona fide: adv. [20C] (US black) competent, qualified, the right man for the job [? Fr. bon, good + sfx, -ified or pron. of Lat. bona fide, genuine, lit. 'in good faith'] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)

Old Gold: American cigarette brandname. Produced by Lorillard Inc. "During the 1950s Old Gold Cigarettes sponsored quiz show commercials that featured models dressed in oversized replicas of Old Gold cigarette boxes. Called "The Dancing Butts," they danced across the stage during commercial spots Unseen but for their gorgeous legs, the models in these classic TV ad spots included Gloria Vestoff as "Regular," Dixie Dunbar as "King Size" and Whitey as the "Little Matchbox." The cover for Small Change shows a pack of Old Golds lying on the table





- Intro to On A Foggy Night (Folkscene, 1974): "This is the soundtrack for a film - the soundtrack was written quite a bit later than the film - the film came out about 1947 and I wrote it just a couple of weeks ago and it's about a foggy night on one of those "triangle" films that you see on The Late Show and this is just about the eternal triangle - like George Raft and Fred McMurray and Rosalind Russell - and somebody has to go and it's going to be George Raft in this case and Fred McMurray's got this old Plymouth and he's on this foggy road with McMurray in the trunk, a little bit of his lapel sticking out the back of the trunk and this song comes on the radio ...." (Source: Folkscene 1974, with Howard and Roz Larman (KPFK-FM 90.7) Source: audio tape. Date: Los Angeles/ USA. July 23, 1974 (June 10?))

Chip White (2007) on touring with Waits from 1976 on: "Waits knew the script of Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity by heart... The whole band knew it. One of us would take Fred MacMurray's character and another would take Barbara Stanwyck's. It was like learning the lines to a song" (Source: Chip White interview December 11, 2007 as quoted in “Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)

Intro to On A Foggy Night (Folkscene, 1975) "There's a stretch of highway from Blythe to San Diego - I drove all night from Nogalis and I got to Blythe and I hadn't washed my windshield. Driving through Blythe at about 3 o'clock in the morning I sort of imagined all these Eucalyptus trees hanging over the highway and these big radio towers which weren't really there. I was just driving a long time. And I've talked to truck drivers that say that same stretch of highway they imagined being in a forest - if you've been driving for a long time but there's something about coming into town on highway 8 that's exciting. But when we were going out there was a fog bank up around Hecumba(?) and - God, a mysterious wet fog was hanging over the highway and so we're coming down and this is about driving on a foggy night on an abandoned road late at night ..." (Source: Folkscene 1975, with Howard and Roz Larman (KPFK-FM 90.7) Source: audio tape. Date: Los Angeles/ USA. January 12 (February 13?), 1975)



(2) Foggy adj.: Confused; confusing, perplexing; unrealized, not specific enough (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) I was misinformed: This might be quoting from 'Casablanca': Louis: And what in heaven's name brought you to Casablanca? Rick Blaine: My health. I came to Casablanca for the waters. Louis: The waters? What waters? We're in the desert. Rick Blaine: I was misinformed.



(4) Maroon v. adj.: 1. To put ashore on a desolate island or coast and leave to one's fate 2. To place or leave in isolation or without hope of ready escape (Source: Merriam - Webster collegiate dictionary)



(5) Powder blue

- n. A moderate to pale blue or purplish blue. Etymology: From the color of powdered smalt (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)

- Notice the same phrase being used in Barber Shop, 1977: "I just bought myself a struggle buggy suckers powder blue." Downtown, 1980: "Just another dead soldier in a powder blue night."



Once More Before I Go

 



Once more before I go

Out to Killarney

Once more before I go

Beg me to stay



As the wind blows across my grave

I will be calling

Once more before I go

Once more forever more



Once more before I go

I will remember

Once more before I go

Beg me to stay



Once more before I go

I will be calling

La la la la la la la

La la la ever more



Once more before I go

I will be calling

Once more before I go

Beg me to stay



Written by: [?]

Published by: [?], � 1987

No official release: freeform singing by Tom Waits, from the movie Candy Mountain 1987



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Once More Before I Go.

Taken from the movie Candy Mountain (1987).



Once Upon A Town

 



I wish I had a dollar

for each time I took a chance

On all those two-bit(1) Romeos

who counterfeit romance



Somehow always thinking

of the last time I fell down

Knowing that you fall in love

once upon a town



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc./ Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Two-bit: adj. [mid 19C+] (US) second-rate, inferior (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



One, Two And Through

 



(Alice demo version, 1992. Scene 8 - Jabberwocky)(1)



'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimbel in the wabe.

All mimsy(2) were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.



"Beware of the Jabberwock, my son!

The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware of the Jubjub bird, and shun

The frumious Bandersnatch!"



He took his vorpal sword in hand;

Long time the manxome foe he sought.

So rested he by the Tumtum tree,

And stood awhile in thought.



And as in uffish though he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!



One, two! One, two! And through and through

The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.



"And has thou slain the Jabberwock?

Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

Oh frabjous day! Calooh! Callay!"

He chortled in his joy.



'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimbel in the wabe.

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe (3)



Written by: Lewis Caroll

(this is the Jabberwocky poem as featured in chapter 1 "Looking-Glass House" from the original Through The Looking-Glass, 1897)

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of One, Two And Through.

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg/ Germany, 1992.



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "One, Two And Through" (excerpt)

at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December, 1992.

Taken from The Late Show "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice" (1993)

BBC TV documentary presented by Beatrix Campbell. Aired March 4, 1993



Notes:



(1) One, Two And Through: Sung by Chorus Of Vicars in scene 8.

Stage directions from the play: "Eight Victorian Vicars dance on stage, singing. Alice and the White Knight watch."

- Humpty Dumpty: first verse from 'Through the Looking Glass''You seem very clever at explaining words, Sir,' said Alice. 'Would you kindly tell me the meaning of the poem called "Jabberwocky"?' 'Let's hear it,' said Humpty Dumpty. 'I can explain all the poems that ever were invented - and a good many that haven't been invented just yet.' This sounded very hopeful, so Alice repeated the first verse: 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves. Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.' 'That's enough to begin with,' Humpty Dumpty interrupted: 'there are plenty of hard words there. "Brillig" means four o'clock in the afternoon - the time when you begin *broiling* things for dinner.' 'That'll do very well,' said Alice: 'and "slithy"?' 'Well, "slithy" means "lithe and slimy." "Lithe" is the same as "active." You see it's like a portmanteau - there are two meanings packed up into one word.' 'I see it now,' Alice remarked thoughtfully: 'and what are "toves"?' 'Well, "toves" are something like badgers - they're somehing like lizards - and they're something like corkscrews.' 'They must be very curious-looking creatures.' 'They are that,' said Humpty Dumpty: 'also they make their nests under sundials - also they live on cheese.' 'And what's to "gyre" and to "gimble"?' 'To "gyre" is to go round and round like a gyroscope. To "gimble" is to make holes like a gimlet.' 'And "the wabe,' is the grass-plot round a sundial, I suppose?' said Alice, surprised at her own ingenuity. 'Of course it is. It's called "wabe", you know, because it goes a long way before it, and a long way behind it -' 'And a long way beyond it on each side,' Alice added. 'Exactly so. Well then "mimsy" is "flimsy and miserable" (there's another portmanteau for you). And a "borogove" is a thin shabby-looking bird with its feathers sticking out all round - something like a live mop.' 'And then "mome raths"?' said Alice. 'I'm afraid I'm giving you a great deal of trouble.' 'Well, a "rath" is a sort of green pig: but "mome" I'm not certain about. I think it's short "from home" - meaning that they'd lost their way, you know.' 'And what does "outgrabe" mean?' 'Well, "outgribing" is something between bellowing and whistling, with a kind of sneeze in the middle: however, you'll hear it done, maybe - down in the wood yonder - and when you've once heard it you'll be *quite* content. Who's been repeating all that hard stuff to you?' (Submitted by Ulf Berggren, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(2) Mimsy: "Aficionados of Lewis Carroll will know a (different) meaning, which appears in the poem called Jabberwocky in his Through the Looking-Glass: "All mimsy were the borogoves". Later in the book, Humpty-Dumpty explains its meaning as being a blend (he calls it a portmanteau word) of flimsy and miserable, so meaning "unhappy". Carroll either invented it afresh or borrowed an existing English dialect word and gave it a new meaning." (Source: World Wide Words, copyright C Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(3) Stage directions from the play: "The Victorian Vicars dance off. Alice and the White Knight remain."



On The Nickel

 



Sticks and stones will break my bones(2), I always will be true

And when your mama's dead and gone, I'll sing this lullaby just for you

And what becomes of all the little boys, who never comb their hair

They're lined up all around the block, on the Nickel over there



So better bring a bucket, there's a hole in the pail

And if you don't get my letter, then you'll know that I'm in jail

And what becomes of all the little boys, who never say their prayers

They're sleepin' like a baby, on the Nickel over there



And if you chew tobacco, and wish upon a star

You'll find out where the scarecrows sit, just like punch lines between the cars

And I know a place where a royal flush(3) can never beat a pair

And even Thomas Jefferson(4) is on the Nickel over there



So ring around the rosy(5), sleepin' in the rain

And you're always late for supper, man you let me down, let me down again

And I thought I heard a mockingbird, Roosevelt knows where

You can skip the light with Grady Tuck(6), on the Nickel over there(7)



So what becomes of all the little boys, who run away from home

The world just keeps gettin' bigger once you get out on your own(8)

So here's to all the little boys, the sandman takes you where

You're sleepin' with a pillow man, on the Nickel over there(9)



So climb up through that button hole and fall right up the stairs

And I'll show you where the short dogs(10) grow, on the Nickel

Over there



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980

Official release: Heartattack And Vine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)



Known covers:

Rites of Passage. Georgette Fry. 1995. Self-released

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Carla Bozulich

Ausgelacht. Arnim T�pel. September, 2002. Self-released



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "On The Nickel". Taken from "Tonight In Person" BBC television concert documentary filmed at the BBC television Theatre, London/ UK (aired July 26, 1979).



Notes:



(1) On The Nickel

Tom Waits (1979): "Well, you know.. most of my songs are kinda travelogues. It's difficult to say exactly where they come from . You gotta sleep with one eye open. This song here is entitled "On the nickel" In downtown Los Angeles, there's a place called fifth street, it's a place where all the hoboes are, and they call it "on the nickel". There was a motion picture called "On the nickel" that was written by Ralph Waite and this is a story, kinda a wino's lullaby." (Source: "Tom Waits on the Don Lane show", 1979. Transcribed by Luke Martin)

Tom Waits (1980): "That was written for the Ralph Waite motion picture of the same name. I don't think it's still showing anywhere. It was released about the time I got back from New York, in April sometime. It was a wonderful picture, I mean it, but it didn't make it. It wasn't no "Towering Inferno," just a small picture with a lot of feeling. It was set on skid row in Los Angeles, Fifth Street, downtown. The locals call it "the nickel." The film was about a couple of old friends who were reunited after some years. One had cleaned up and moved off the nickel and the other was still there, an dying from it. The one who'd cleaned up went back to find his old pal. It's a wonderful story. SP: What happened at the end? TW: You'll have to see it." (Source: "Heartattack and Vine". Us promo pack: Stephen Peeples. September 4, 1980)

Tom Waits (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1979): "I'd like to do a new song here. This is eh, it's about downtown Los Angeles on 5th Street. And eh all the winos affectionately refer to it as The Nickel. So this is kind of a hobo's lullaby." (Source: BBC - Tonight In Person, July 1979)

Tom Waits (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1979): "This is eh, a little wino's nursery rhyme. It's about a place in downtown Los Angeles they call 'The Nickel'. It's 5th Street and a gentleman named Ralph Waite... Eh Ralph Waite wrote a story entitled 'On The Nickel". This is about a couple of old partners, they were separated for many years and then re-united... on The Nickel. So, this is eh about eh, it's a little lullaby." (Source: Austin City Limits, 1979)

Tom Waits (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1979): "I'll do a song about a place in downtown Los Angeles, they call it 'The Nickel'. It's 5th Street, and eh... it's just a little nursery rhyme I wrote for a gentleman named Ralph Waite. Who wrote a story about two old hobos and eh they were re-united after many years. And this is a little story called 'On The Nickel'." (Source: Canada After Dark. January 5, 1979)

Tom Waits (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1982): "This is a song about eh, about downtown Los Angeles. And this is dedicated to all the little boys who are far away from home. There's a little park about two blocks off eh Main Street in downtown Los Angeles, where a lot of the gentleman of the area congregate around the 14th of April and do their taxes every year. And eh... and mostly all they talk about is Christmas and Easter, Thanksgiving and birthdays and eh..." (Source: Royal Oak Theatre Detroit, May 1982)

Tom Waits (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1982): "We're gonna do kind of a new song here. It's eh about eh... it's dedicated to all the little boys who've run away from home. In downtown Los Angeles on 5th Street, they call it the Nickel. And eh it's probably ...?... And eh, so this is dedicated to all the hobos and eh... April 14th is a big day for them. It's when they all come together and do their income tax." (Source: Tyrone Guthrie Theatre Minneapolis May 1982)

The Nickel: also mentioned in Red Shoes By The Drugstore, 1978: "She wore red shoes by the newsstand as the rain splashed the Nickel."



(2) Sticks and stones will break my bones: Quoting from the traditional American saying: "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me." A traditional children's reply to teasing, or being picked on or being called names. Implying words don't hurt



(3) Royal flush: An ace high straight flush is a royal straight flush, or a royal flush, or just a royal. Some traditionalists dislike the phrase "royal flush" (preferring "ace high straight flush"), but no one dislikes the hand. It's the most powerful hand in casino poker (Source: Dan's poker dictionary, Dan Kimberg)



(4) Jefferson, Thomas: Born: Shadwell, Va, April 13 1743 - Died Monticello, Va, July 4 1826. American politician, philosopher and artist. Considered to be one of the spiritual fathers of the American nation.





Thomas Jefferson is on the Nickel over there 



(5) Ring around the rosy: Quoting from the English nursery rhyme: "Ring around the Rosy. Pocket full of Posy. Ashes, Ashes, We all Fall Down". Traditionally sung by children holding hands in a circle, rotating slowly while singing the song, then collapsing in a giggling heap at its conclusion. The song actually has its origins in Europe during the 3 year period 1347-1350 when it was hit by the Black Plague



(6) Grady Tuck

Rick Miller (guitarist for Trailer Park Rangers, 2006); "My second big influence was Grady Tuck who taught me how to entertain and how to frail a banjo". "In the couple years I played with Grady in San Diego, I watched him do his thing like nobody I've seen before or since". "He bore a physical resemblance to Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull), crooned like Perry Como, and made me laugh my ass off like Richard Pryor". "Grady was immortalized in the Tom Waits song 'On The Nickel'". "I lost touch with him back in the early '70's and later learned through Michael Cooney, another of his runnin' buddies, that he'd passed away". "I'd love to hear from anybody who knows something about Grady, has any pictures of him or stories about him"! I started a page at www.myspace.com/gradytuck where folks can post comments or email with any information they might have." (Source: Rick Miller MySpace site, 2006).





Grady Tuck, photo courtesy of Bob Webb, as published on www.myspace.com/gradytuck



(7) Odd line from the 'Anthology' songbook: "And I thought I heard a mockingbird, Roosevelt knows where. Well, I'm whistling past the graveyard, and they're on the Nickel over there." Possibly this was the original line, later changed to the one about Grady Tuck. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000). 

- These lines also used for: Austin City Limits 1979, Canada After Dark 1979, BBC - Tonight In Person 1979.



(8) Patrick Humphries: "The version of the song used in the film has the lines 'You never know how rich you are, you haven't got a prayer/ Heads you win. tails they lose, on the nickel over there' which never made it onto the album." (Source: "Small Change, A life of Tom Waits". Patrick Humphries, 1989. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0-312-04582-4).

- These lines also used for: Austin City Limits 1979, Canada After Dark 1979, BBC - Tonight In Person 1979. Later live versions have the original album lines



(9) Extra verse "Canada After Dark, 1979": "Well you know I hate to leave you, but it's time to say goodbye. But the buffaloed can't find you, when you're on the other side."



(10) Short dogs: n. [1960+] (US Black) a small bottle of cheap wine (short neck) (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



On The Road

 



(On The Road studio version, 1999. Also known as: Home I'll Never Be)



Well, I left New York in nineteen forty-nine

To go across the country, without a dad-blame dime(1)

Montana in the cold cold fall

I found my father in a gamblin' hall



Father, father, where have you been?

I've been out in the world since I was only ten

Father, father, where have you been?

I've been out in the world since I was only ten



Don't worry about me, about to die of pleurisy

Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee

Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be

Home in ol' Medora, home in ol' Truckee(2)

Apalachicola, home I'll never be



For better or for worse, or thick and thin

I've been married to the little woman

God he loves me, like I love him

I want you to do just the same for him

Well, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind



So I left Montana on an old freight train

The night my father died in the cold cold rain

Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Rode to Oklahoma, rode to El Cajon(3)

Rode to old Tehatchapi(4), rode to San Antone



Hey! Hey!



Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Rode to Oklahoma, rode to El Cajon

Rode to old Tehatchapi, rode to San Antone



Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be



Written by: Jack Kerouac(5)

Published by: Duluoz Publishing Inc. (ASCAP) and Jalma Music (ASCAP)

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1997 (with Primus and Ralph Carney)

Official release: Jack Kerouac Reads "On The Road', 1999

Re-released (On The Road): Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.





 



On The Road



(Live version, 1997. Also known as: Home I'll Never Be)



I left New York nineteen forty-nine

To go across the country, without a dad-blame dime(1)

Montana in the cold cold fall

Found my father in a gamblin' hall



Father, father, where have you been?

I've been in the world since I was only ten

'Don't worry about me, I'm about to die of the pleurisy

Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee

Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be

Home in old Medora, home in ol' Truckee(2)

Apalachicola, home I'll never be



Better or for worse, and thick and thin

Well, I've been married to the little woman

God loved me, just like I loved him

I want you to do just the same for him

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind



So I left Montana on an old freight train

The night my father died in the cold cold rain

Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Home in old Medora, home in ol' Truckee

Apalachicola, home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be



Written by: Jack Kerouac(5)

Unofficial release: "Tales from the Underground Volume 5", PMS Records, 2000

From the Allen Ginsberg tribute at the UCLA Wadsworth Theatre, Westwood, CA, on June 21, 1997

Published by: Duluoz Publishing Inc. (ASCAP) and Jalma Music (ASCAP)

Official release (Home I'll Never Be): Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known cover:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of On The Road as sung by Jack Kerouac.

Taken from "Jack Kerouac Reads On The Road' (1999).



Notes:



(1) A dad-blame dime

- Dad-blame is slang roughly being a less cussy version of god-damn. (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001).

- Also transcribed as: "To go across the country, without a bad blame dime." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(2) In part four, chapter 2 of Kerouac's book "On the Road", Jack is singing a little song: "Home in Missoula, Home in Truckee, Home in Opelousas, Ain't no home for me, Home in old Medora, Home in Wounded Knee, Home in Ogallala, Home I'll never be" (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(3) El Cajon, is in California outside Los Angeles, around San Diego. I know that there is a very old railway there that goes through Cajon pass. I don't know much more. But I'm pretty sure of it. (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001)



(4) Tehatchapi: "which is a city in Kern county in California which I in fact live about 15 miles from. It was at one point the only way to get between Los Angles (or San Francisco in Kerouac's case) and Bakersfield. It also contained the Tehatchapi Loop, where the railway, after running through the Tehatchapi Mountain, loops around and crosses on itself by tunnel as the only possibility of getting over the tremendous grade between the two levels." (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001)



(5) Original version: "On The Road". Jack Kerouac Reads "On The Road', 1999. Written by: Jack Kerouac: "Left New York nineteen forty-nine. To go across the country. without a bad blame dime. Montana in the cold cold fall. I found my father in a gambling hall. Father, father, where have you been? I've been out in the world since I was only ten. Son, he said, don't worry 'bout me. I'm about to die of pleurisy. Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee. Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be. Home in ol' Medora, home in ol' Truckee. Apalachicola, home I'll never be. Better or for worse, thick and thin. Like being married to the little woman. God loved me, just like I loved him. I want you to do the same just for him. The worms eat away. But don't worry, watch the wind. The worms eat away. But don't worry, watch the wind. So I left Montana on an old freight train. the night my father died in the cold cold rain. Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee. Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be. Home I'll never be."

Tom Waits (2006): "One is a ballad and one is a blues. What happened, I made the song first with Primus, the rocker version, Home I'll Never Be. And then Hal Wiliner asked me to come down and play for an Allen Ginsberg memorial. There were a lot of people there talking about him. I didn't have a band. So I said, well, this is an actual song written by Jack Kerouac - an a capella song they found on one of the tapes. [Sings] "I left New York, 1949. To go across the country without a damn blame dime! Montana in the cold, cold fall! found my father in a gambling hall..." Kerouac sang it alone on a microphone - it's on a collection of his work - and it's beautiful, very touching. So I tried to do my version like that. I ended up liking it. Somebody had the tape from that night, so we stuck it on there." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown) 

Tim Perlich (2006); "Another song on the Bastards disc, Home I'll Never Be, was similarly born of a fragment from the past that serendipitously came his way. Despite the song's being credited to beat poet Jack Kerouac, the forlorn hymn to the highway life turns out to be one of Waits's most personally revealing. When he poignantly sings the lines "Father, father, where you been? I've been in this world since I was only 10," it's not really Kerouac's life he's singing about. Waits is calling out to his own father, who left home never to be seen again after a divorce in 1960, when Waits would've been 10 years old." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Tom Waits (2006): "Kerouac's nephew had this song of Jack's, or at least some of his words he wanted me to record. I guess Jack was at a party somewhere and snuck off into a closet and started singing into a reel-to-reel tape deck, like, 'I left New York in 1949, drove across the country....' I wound up turning it into a song, and I performed it at a memorial for Allen Ginsberg... "I found Kerouac and Ginsberg when I was a teenager, and it saved me. Growing up without a dad, I was always looking for a father figure, and those guys sorta became my father figures. Reading On The Road added some interesting mythology to the ordinary and sent me off on the road myself with an investigative curiosity about the minutiae of life." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well you know, he [Jack Kerouac] recorded it on a little reel-to-reel in a closet in the middle of a party one night, and uh... his uh... one of his nephews, Jim Sampas uh got a hold of it, and put it on a Kerouac compilation. Uhm so, I heard it and uh, yeah he was singing. It was really nice to hear Jack singing. I think it worked pretty well on that sequence after that Bukowski thing about the kid on the bus in North Carolina, and then it set ways on this piano, that's "Home I'll Never Be". (Source: "Tom Waits: Rock Classics, With A Gravelly Rasp", NPR's World Caf� from WXPN (USA) by David Dye. December 15, 2006)



Overturned Pot

Lullaby



(Also known as: Overturned Pot)



Sun is red; moon is cracked

Daddy's never coming back

Nothing's ever yours to keep

Close your eyes, go to sleep

If I die before you wake

Don't you cry don't you weep



Nothing's ever as it seems

Climb the ladder to your dreams

If I die before you wake

Don't you cry; don't you weep

Nothing's ever yours to keep

close your eyes; go to sleep



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits Blood Money" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Also published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

Mano Que Mece La Luna. Various artists. October 17, 2007. Sello Autor/ Spain (performed by La Chicana) 

The Love List. Kaya Brüel. April 21, 2008. Stunt Records

Come On Up. Dieter Weslowski. March 1, 2010. Self-released



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Listen to audio excerpt of Lullaby as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Kaya Br�el (as Marie).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by: Marie in act 1, scene 3 and by Karl the Fool in act 3, scene 2



---------- P Q--------



Papa's Got A Brand New Bag

 



Come on, sister, Papa's in the swing

Ain't too hip now, about that new breed babe

He ain't no drag

Papa's got a brand new bag



Come here, mama, and dig this crazy scene

Ain't too hip now, but his line is pretty clean

He ain't no drag Papa's got a brand new bag



He's doin' the Jerk, he's doin' the Fly

Don't play him cheap, cause you know he ain't shy

He's doin' the Monkey, the Mashed Potatoes

Jump back Jack, see you later alligator



Come on, sister, Papa's in the swing

Ain't too hip now, about that new breed, babe

He ain't no drag Papa's got a brand new bag



Papa, he's doin' the, doin' the Twist

He's doin' the Twist just like this

He's doin' the Fly every day and every night

And the Thing, like the Boomerang



Papa! I said Papa!

Come on Hey! Hey!

Come on

Hey! Hey!

It's so nice, it's out of sight

Come on Hey! Hey!

Come on

Hey!



Written by: James Brown(1)

Published by: Dynatone Publishing Co. (BMI), � 1965

Unofficial release: Tales From The Underground Volume 4, PMS Records, 1999

Recorded: Massey Hall. Toronto, Canada. October 7, 1987

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Papa's Got A Brand New Bag.

Recorded: Massey Hall. Toronto/ Canada. October 7, 1987.



Notes:



(1) Papa's Got A Brand New Bag:

(1975): What happened to the Thunderbird you used to talk about? Tom Waits: "I just parked it. I'm gonna use it for an office. It doesn't run much. It's kind of monkey shit brown and in terrible condition - I got in a 4 car pileup before I left town in Vermont in the rain. I was responsible. My first accident, I was out doing about 25 - the traffic - you know how the lights come down, they say they're all stacked up - but it looks like everybody's moving smoothly cause of the lights and the whole rainbow blur effect on the street and James Brown's Papa's Got A Brand New Bag just came on the radio and I was going crazy out of my mind. So it was worth getting in an accident over. First time I heard that song." (Source: Folkscene 1975, with Howard and Roz Larman (KPFK-FM 90.7) Source: audio tape. Date: Los Angeles/ USA. January 12 (February 13?), 1975)

- Original song "Papa's Got A Brand New Bag", by James Brown, 1965. Made famous by James Brown & Otis Redding

Version 1 (James Brown, 1965): "Come here sister.....Papa's in the swing He ain't too hip...about that new breed thing He ain't no drag Papa's got a brand new bag Come here mama....and dig this crazy scene He's not too fancy....but his mind is might clean He ain't no drag. Papa's got a brand new bag He's doing the Jerk.... He's doing the Fly Don't play him cheap 'cause you know he ain't shy He's doing the Monkey, the Mashed Potatoes, Jump back Jack, See you later alligator. Come here sister Papa's in the swing He ain't too hip now but I can dig that new breed babe; He ain't no drag He's got a brand new bag Oh papa! He's doing the Jerk Papa...he's doing the Jerk He's doing the twist ... just like this, He's doing the Fly ev'ry day and ev'ry night The thing's....like the Boomerang Hey....come on Hey! Hey.....come on Hey! Hey....he's up tight...out of sight... Come on. Hey! Hey!"

Version 2 (Otis Redding, 1965): "Come in sister Papa's in the den Ain't too hip 'Bout that new breed dance It ain't no drag Papa's got a brand new bag He's doing the jerk He's doing the fly Don't play him cheap You know he's not shy The mash potatoes, the alligator Jump back Jack See you later alligator Come in sister Papa's in the den Ain't too hip 'Bout that new breed dance It ain't no drag, Papa's bought himself a brand new bag Come on now, hey, hey Come on He's out of sight He's uptight Come on and groove me Oh you're out of sight He's doing the twist He's doing the fly Don't play him cheap You know he's not shy The mash potatoes, the alligator Jump back Jack See you later alligator Come in sister Papa's in the den Ain't too hip 'Bout that new breed dance It ain't no drag My mammy's got a brand new bag."



Paradise Alley

(Meet Me In) Paradise Alley



 



When the hawk's in the kitchen and the sirens in bloom

And the losers have been swept from the gin mills(2)

Hello sucker, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

34th Street good tidings to you



And will you meet me in Paradise Alley tonight

We'll leave town in a bottle of whiskey

And come on, you old scarecrow, and be a wheel(3), not a lamppost

Just put a saddle on a wishbone, and you're halfway there



You know, the heroes will wait where their dreams used to be

Go on and ask the hooligans(4) as they sweep down the midway

I'm going waltzing tonight with the Statue of Liberty

And come on, you old lazy-bones, let's get out of this place



Will you meet me in Paradise Alley tonight

We'll leave town in a bottle of whiskey

And come on, you old scarecrow, and be a wheel, not a lamppost

Just put a saddle on a wishbone, and you're halfway there



Now there's a counterfeit moon, and I'm seeing right through it

Cause the dawn spent it all in one place

And we'll rise to the top of the morning tonight

You can ride on my shoulders, and I'll show you the way(5)



If you meet me in Paradise Alley tonight

We'll leave town in a bottle of whiskey

So come on, you old scarecrow, and be a wheel, not a lamppost

Just put a saddle on a wishbone, and you're halfway there



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. � 1978

Official release: "Paradise Alley" soundtrack. MCA 1500 (MCA 1696), 1978.

Recorded September 7, 1978



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Paradise Alley: Lower East Side neighborhood in New York city (corner: 174 Street/ Avenue A.) "This was the site of Paradise Alley, tenement courtyard featured in Jack Kerouac's "Subterraneans" and Allen Ginsberg's "Howl." After the buildings were torn down, part of the site became the Chico Mendez Mural Garden, commemorating the murdered Brazilian environmentalist. After the garden was bulldozed, the Weinberg Apartments were built here by the Educational Alliance, a group originally dedicated to assimilating Jewish immigrants" (Source: "New York Songlines", by Jim Naureckas, 2003) 



(2) Gin mill, gin-mill, ginmill n.: Any cheap saloon, bar, or nightclub; orig. a speakeasy. Any kind of public drinking place, as saloon (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(3) Wheel n.: A person in authority (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Big wheel: n. [1930s] an important, influential person, esp. in business [the image of a smooth-running powerful machine] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000).

- Also mentioned in "The One That Got Away" (Could have been on Easy Street, could have been a wheel)



(4) Hooligan n.: A hoodlum; a ruffian; a tough guy (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) You can ride on my shoulders, and I'll show you the way: Might refer to the St. Christopher legend as also mentioned in Hang On St. Christopher (1987) and Tom Traubert's Blues (1976). St. Christopher Catholic patron saint of travellers, or the religious medal dedicated to him. There are several legends about him including the one in which he was crossing a river when a child asked to be carried across. When Christopher put the child on his shoulders he found the child was unbelievably heavy. The child, according to the legend, was Christ carrying the weight of the whole world. His former holy day is July 25. The religious medal dedicated to this saint says: "Protect me" or "Protect us



Pasties And A G-String

 



(At The Two O'Clock Club)(2)



Smellin' like a brewery, lookin' like a tramp

I ain't got a quarter, I got a postage stamp

Been five o'clock shadow boxin' all around the town

Talkin' with the old men, sleepin' on the ground



Bazanti bootin' al zootin' al hoot and Al Cohn(3)

Sharin' this apartment with a telephone pole

And a fishnet stocking, spike heeled shoes

Striptease, pricktease(4), car keys blues



And the porno floor show, live nude girls

Dreamy and creamy and brunette curls

Chesty Morgan(5) and Watermelon Rose

Raise my rent and take off all your clothes



With trench coats, magazines, a bottle full of rum

She's so good, it make a dead man cum(6)

Pasties and a G-string, beer and a shot(7)

Portland through a shot glass and a Buffalo squeeze



Wrinkles and Cherry and Twinkie and Pinkie

And Fifi live from Gay Paree

Fanfares, rim shots, backstage, who cares

All this hot burlesque for me



Cleavage, cleavage, thighs and hips

From the nape of her neck to the lipstick lips

Chopped and channeled and lowered and lewd(10)

And the cheater slicks(11) and baby moons(12)

She's a-hot and ready, creamy and sugared

And the band is awful and so are the tunes



Crawlin' on her belly, and shakin' like jelly

And I'm gettin' harder than Chinese algebra-ssieres

And cheers from the compendium here

Hey sweetheart, they're yellin' for more

You're squashin' out your cigarette butts on the floor



And I like Shelly, and you like Jane

And what was the girl with the snakeskin's name?

And it's an early bird matinee, come back any day

Get you a little something that you can't get at home

And get you a little something that you can't get at home



It's pasties and a G-string, beer and a shot

Portland through a shot glass and a Buffalo squeeze

Popcorn, front row, higher than a kite

And I'll be back tomorrow night

And I'll be back tomorrow night



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), � 1976

Official release: Small Change, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1976(13)



Known covers:

The Piano Has Been Drinking. The Piano Has been Drinking. April, 1990 Chlodwig (BMG Germany). Performed in German/ K�lsch

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Jeffrey Lee Pierce

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Andre Williams

Live! At The Blue Raccoon. Bill Sheffield. 2002. Mojo

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003. Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Pasties And A G-string". With: Frank Vicari (tenor saxophone), Fitz Jenkins (upright bass), Chip White (drums). Taken from Rockpalast, WDR television concert documentary. WDR Studio's/ Studio-L. Cologne/ Germany (aired April 18, 1977.  



Notes:



(1) Pasty, pastie n. One of a pair of small circular pieces of adhesive material, often decorated with sequins, etc., applied to the nipples by a burlesque performer, exotic dancer, etc., in order to satisfy laws banning the display of bare breasts, or as a gesture of propriety. Burlesque and theatrical use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang - Supplement, Wentworth/ Flexner)





(2) At The Two O'Clock Club: This would most likely refer to the famous Two O'Clock Club in Baltimore (Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.) The club is owned by Bella Fleming, aka Blaze Starr, a retired striptease artist which made the place famous in the 1950s. Two years before the release of Small Change, Blaze Starr had published her autobiography: "Blaze Starr: My Life As Told to Huey Perry by Blaze Starr and Huey Perry" (Published by Praeger Publishers, 1974). "The famous stripper, born Fannie Belle Fleming in a West Virginia mountain cabin, ten miles from the nearest town, attended a one-room schoolhouse during the Depression but had "filled out" by the age of 13, as they say... By the age of 16 she was off to see the world, in the form of a Washington, D.C., donut shop, where she was discovered and given her showbiz name by one Red Snyder. Snyder turned out to be another would-be rapist, but he had already performed his one service to mankind by convincing her to strip at the club where she thought she was going to be playing banjo and singing. As it turns out, she loved the applause. Pretty soon she was researching the subject for herself and, still 16, turned up on "The Block," the famous night-life district in Baltimore where burlesque still thrived in the fifties. Most of her stripping career would be spent at a joint called the Two O'Clock Club in Baltimore, with the exception of the years she spent in New Orleans at the Sho-Bar on Bourbon Street. That's where she met Governor Earl Long, who was a devotee of strip joints in general, and their fabled love affair eventually inspired the movie "Blaze," with Lolita Davidovich in the title role and Paul Newman as the guv."





(3) Cohn, Al: Alvin Gilbert Cohn. Born: Brooklyn, NY, November 24 1925 - Died: February 15 1988. American arranger, composer and jazz saxophonist. Also played on Jack Kerouac's "Blues and Haikus", 1960.

Tom Waits (1976): "Al [Cohn] played with me for a couple of weeks once and I hope to have him on my next album if everything fits in with his schedule. I admire him and his style. And he drinks about a quart of Johnnie Walker Red Label a night - though how he does it I just don't know." (Source: "Tom Waits: Would You Say This Man Was Attempting To Convey An Impression Of Sordid Bohemianism" New Musical Express (UK), by Fred Dellar. Date: June 5, 1976)





(4) Pricktease: n. [1950s+] a woman who appears to be offering unrestrained sexual favours but stops short of intercourse, leaving the male partner frustrated. v. [1950s+] to lead on sexually but to stop short of intercourse (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(5) Morgan, Chesty: Porn actress. Due to her popularity in the striptease scene in the 60's, Chesty came to the attention of filmmaker extraordinaire Doris Wishman. In 1973, Doris cast Chesty in the role of Krystal in the film "Deadly Weapons". In 1974, Doris again sought her to portray the sleuth in the film "Double Agent 73" (named for the freakishly endowed 73"-bosomed Chesty Morgan). In 1976, following her success in Wishman's films, Chesty was asked to appear in the film Casanova -- directed by none other than Frederico Fellini.You probably won't be surprised to hear there's a Chesty Morgan Worship page ...





(6) Make a dead man come: The phrase comes from Lucille Bogan's 1935 raunchy blues song "Shave 'Em Dry": (unexpurgated version) "I got nipples on my titties, big as the end of my thumb, I got somethin' between my legs'll make a dead man come, Oh daddy, baby won't you shave 'em dry? Aside: Now, draw it out! Want you to grind me baby, grind me until I cry. (Roland: Uh, huh.) Say I fucked all night, and all the night before baby, And I feel just like I wanna, fuck some more, Oh great God daddy, (Roland: Say you gonna get it. You need it.) Grind me honey and shave me dry, And when you hear me holler baby, want you to shave it dry. I got nipples on my titties, big as the end of my thumb, Daddy you say that's the kind of 'em you want, and you can make 'em come, Oh, daddy shave me dry, (Roland: She ain't gonna work for it.) And I'll give you somethin' baby, swear it'll make you cry. I'm gon' turn back my mattress, and let you oil my springs, I want you to grind me daddy, 'til the bell do ring, Oh daddy, want you to shave 'em dry, Oh great God daddy, if you can't shave 'em baby won't you try? Now if fuckin' was the thing, that would take me to heaven, I'd be fuckin' in the studio, till the clock strike eleven, Oh daddy, daddy shave 'em dry, I would fuck you baby, honey I'd make you cry. Now your nuts hang down like a damn bell sapper, And your dick stands up like a steeple, Your goddam ass-hole stands open like a church door, And the crabs walks in like people. Aside: Ow, shit! (Roland: Aah, sure enough, shave 'em dry?) Aside: Ooh! Baby, won't you shave 'em dry A big sow gets fat from eatin' corn, And a pig gets fat from suckin', Reason you see this whore, fat like I am, Great God, I got fat from fuckin'. Aside: Eeeeh! Shave 'em dry (Roland: Aah, shake it, don't break it) My back is made of whalebone, And my cock is made of brass, And my fuckin' is made for workin' men's two dollars, Great God, round to kiss my ass. Aside: Oh! Whoo, daddy, shave 'em dry." (Source: submitted by Floris Cooman, 2005. Lyrics: http://www.deltahaze.com/, 2005)



(7) Shot: n. A drink of straight whisky, usu. drunk in one gulp (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(10) Lewd: "Lewd is the most negative of all the words that refer to having or arousing sexual desire, such as lascivious, lecherous, licentious, lustful, prurient, salacious, and wanton. Dictionaries give the main sense as something like "inclined to, characterized by, or inciting to lust or lechery" (to quote the Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary) but add a subsidiary one of "obscene, indecent". (The Concise Oxford Dictionary defines the main sense as "lascivious", which has the merit of brevity, but little else, as surely that word is even less likely to be known to the enquirer than lewd, forcing him or her to the extra effort of turning that up in turn, where it is defined as "inciting to or evoking lust".)" (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004. All rights reserved)



(11) Cheater slicks: Customized cars slang from the 60's, slicks were treadless tires popular in drag racing (Submitted by Gary Tausch. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(12) Baby moons: Customized cars slang from the 60's, baby moons were a type of blank polished hub cap that was smaller than normal, moons were full size, blank, polished hub caps (Submitted by Gary Tausch. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(13) In the late 1970s Waits often used to perform this song as a medley with "Hokey Cokey" or "Saturday Night Fish Fry" or "Shake Rattle And Roll".



Hokey Cokey: Hokey Cokey (aka. "Hokey Pokey"). Words and music by: Jimmy Kennedy, 1942 Kennedy Music Co. Limited, England.

- Version 1 (Jimmy Kennedy): "Way out West where there ain't no swing Old time dancing's still the thing They've a little song they like to dance and sing It's called the Cokey Cokey! Ev'rybody on their toes This is the way it goes You put your left arm out, left arm in Left arm out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? You put your right arm out, right arm in Right arm out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? You put your left foot out, left foot in Left foot out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? You put your right foot out, right foot in Right foot out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? You put your left hip out, left hip in Left hip out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? You put your right hip out, right hip in Right hip out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? You put your chest right out, chest right in Chest right out and shake it all about You do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See? The folks away out West, 'way out west Dance this song and never take a rest They do the Cokey Cokey and turn around That's what it's all about. See?

- Version 2 (nursery rhyme): "You put your right foot in, You put your right foot out; You put your right foot in, And you shake it all about. You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your left foot in, You put your left foot out; You put your left foot in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your right hand in, You put your right hand out; You put your right hand in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your left hand in, You put your left hand out; You put your left hand in, And you shake it all about. You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your right side in, You put your right side out; You put your right side in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your left side in, You put your left side out; You put your left side in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your nose in, You put your nose out; You put your nose in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your tail in, You put your tail out; You put your tail in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your head in, You put your head out; You put your head in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around. That's what it's all about! You put your whole self in, You put your whole self out; You put your whole self in, And you shake it all about You do the Hokey-Pokey, And you turn yourself around." Source: Zelo Nursery Rhymes ((c)1996-2000 C. Thomas Wright III)



Saturday Night Fish Fry (Louis Jordan, Ellis Walsh, Al Carters. Transcribed from vocals by Louis Jordan, recorded 8/9/49): "Now, if you've ever been down to New Orleans Then you can understand just what I mean, Now all through the week it's quiet as a mouse, But on Saturday night, they go from house to house; You don't have to pay the usual admission If you're a cook or a waiter or a good musician. So if you happen to be just passin' by Stop in at the Saturday night fish fry! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! Now, my buddy and me was on the main stem, Foolin' around, just me and him, We decided we could use a little something to eat, So we went to a house on Rampart Street; We knocked on the door and it opened with ease, And a loose little miss said, "Come in please," And before we could bat an eye, We were right in the middle of a big fish fry! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! Now the folks was havin' the time of their life, And Sam was jivin' Jimmy's wife, And over in the corner was a beat-up grand Being played by a big, fat piano man! Some of the chicks wore expensive frocks, Some of them had on bobby socks, But everybody was nice and high At this particular Saturday night fish fry! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! Now, my buddy and me, we fell right in, And we hollered, "Let the joy begin!" Now, we figured this was a good place to play, 'Cause the party was already underway; But all of a sudden the lights went low, And everybody made straight for the front door, Man, I was so scared I didn't know where to go, I stood right there, then I fell on the floor! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! Now, the women was screamin' and jumpin' and yellin', The bottles was flyin' and the fish was smellin'; And way up above all the noise they made, Somebody hollered, "Better get out of here; this is a raid!" Now, I didn't know we was breakin' the law, But somebody reached up and hit me on the jaw, They had us blocked off from the front and the back, And they was puttin' 'em in the wagon like potatoes in a sack. It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! I knew I could get away if I had a chance, But I was shakin' like I had the St. Vitus dance, Now, I tried to crawl under a bathtub, When the policeman said, "Where you goin' there, bub?" Now, they got us out of there like a house on fire, Put us all in that Black Maria, Now, they might have missed a pitiful few, But they got both me and my buddy, too! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! We headed for jail in a dazed condition, They booked each one of us on suspicion; Now my chick came down and went for my bail, And finally got me out of that rotten jail; Now, if you ever want to get a fist in your eye, Just mention a Saturday night fish fry! I don't care how many fish in the sea, But don't ever mention a fish to me! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! It was rockin'! It was rockin'! You never seen such scufflin' and shufflin' till the break of dawn! [Spoken] Give me one of them there fish sandwiches! Get away from there, boy! Yowza!"



Shake, Rattle, And Roll (Words and music by Charles Calhoun. Originally recorded by Joe Turner. First performed by Bill Haley and His Comets in 1954).

- Version 1 (as performed by Joe Turner): "Get outta that bed, wash your face and hands Get outta that bed, wash your face and hands Well, you get in that kitchen, make some noise with the pots and pans Well, you wear low dresses, the sun comes shining through Well, you wear low dresses, the sun comes shining through I can't believe my eyes all that mess belongs to you I believe to my soul you're a devil in nylon hose I believe to my soul you're a devil in nylon hose Well, the harder I work, the faster my money goes I said, shake, rattle and roll, shake, rattle and roll Shake, rattle and roll, shake, rattle and roll

Well, you won't do right to save your doggone soul I'm like a one-eyed cat peeping in a seafood store I'm like a one-eyed cat peeping in a seafood store Well, I can look at you and tell you ain't no child no more Ah, shake, rattle and roll, shake, rattle and roll Shake, rattle and roll, shake, rattle and roll Well, you won't do right to save your doggone soul I said, over the hill and way down underneath I said, over the hill and way down underneath You make me roll my eyes, Baby, make me grit my teeth I said, shake, rattle and roll, shake, rattle and roll Shake, rattle and roll, shake, rattle and roll Well, you won't do right to save your doggone soul.
"

- Version 2: (as performed by Bill Haley and His Comets): "Get out from that kitchen and rattle those pots and pans, Get out from that kitchen and rattle those pots and pans. Well, roll my breakfast, 'cause I'm a hungry man. I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll; Well you never do nothin' to save your doggone soul Wearin' those dresses, your hair done up so right Wearin' those dresses, your hair done up so right; You look so warm, but your heart is cold as ice I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, Well you never do nothin' to save your doggone soul I'm like a one-eyed cat, peepin' in a sea-food store, I'm like a one-eyed cat, peepin' in a sea-food store; I can look at you, till you don't love me no more I believe you're doin' me wrong and now I know, I believe you're doin' me wrong and now I know; The more I work, the faster my money goes I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, I said Shake rattle and roll, Well you never do nothin' to save your doggone soul. Shake rattle and roll."



Picking Up After You

 



Here comes the bride, and there goes the groom

Looks like a hurricane went through this room

Smells like a pool hall, where's my other shoe

And I'm sick and tired of pickin' up after you



Looks like you spent the night in a trench

And tell me, how long have you been combin' your hair with a wrench

The roses are dead and the violets are too

And I'm sick and tired of pickin' up after you



Well, I've told you before, I won't tell you again

You don't defrost the icebox with a ball point pen

This railroad apartment is held together with glue

And I'm sick and tired of pickin' up after you



Because I know I've been swindled, I never bargained for this

What's more, you never cared about me

Why don't you get your own place so you can live like you do

And I'm sick and tired of pickin' up after you



Take all your relatives and all of your shoes

Believe me, I'll really swing when you're gone

I'll be living on chicken and wine after we're through

With someone I pick up after you

With someone I pick up after you

With someone I pick up after you

With someone I pick up after you



Written by: Tom Waits.

Published by: Warner Chapell Music Ltd. � 1982

Official release: One From The Heart, Sony Music Entertainment Inc. (Columbia), 1982

Alternate version (demo) released on the 2004 DVD re-issue of One From The Heart

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Picking Up After You:

- The last session Waits and Gayle had together was, in Howe's estimation, the most incredible one of all. They posed for the album-cover photos, and then they performed two duets, the centerpieces of the score: one was the angry lover's spat, "Picking Up After You"; and the other was "This One's from the Heart." Yet the perfect session came very close to being scuttled. While in L.A., Crystal learned that her mother had become gravely ill. She called Howe to say that she was too upset to come to the studio. "The rap on Crystal Gayle in those days was she had this beautiful voice but no soul," Howe recalls. "I thought she sounded really vulnerable and figured if I could get her to the studio now, I might really get something." He urged her to reconsider, saying that working might prove therapeutic for her - at the very least it would keep her mind off her mother's condition, a situation she couldn't control. "She came into the studio, and she and Tom sang those duets together that day. They sat at the piano together and sang those duets. It was such a wonderful, wonderful day in the studio." During that final session, Crystal also recorded the redemption piece of the score, a beam of sunlight that penetrates the dark, smoky atmosphere. Said Waits, "Toward the end of shooting, Francis said, Everything's so sad, we need something with hope in it.' That's when 'Take Me Home' came about. The musical idea came early on, but the words were some of the last ones I wrote. I tried to sing it and it sounded real soppy, so I gave it to Crystal. I sat down at the piano, played it three or four times for her, then she cut it. I liked the way she did it. " (Source: Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. Jay S. Jacobs, 2000)



(1982): Did you write any songs that were specifically designed for her to sing? TW: "Is there Any Way Out of This Dream?" and "Take Me Home" were written for Crystal to sing. "Old Boyfriends" was originally for me, then for her, then it turned into a duet. "Picking Up After You" and "This One's From the Heart" were written as duets. I found that it was hard writing for a woman. There are certain words they're uncomfortable with. I can get away with a certain vernacular, while a woman singing it would have trouble. I had to change things around, put everything into her words. It was tough. I felt like I was writing lines for an actress (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)




 




Picture In A Frame

 



The sun come up it was blue and gold

The sun come up it was blue and gold

The sun come up it was blue and gold

ever since I put your picture

in a frame



I come calling in my Sunday best

I come calling in my Sunday best

I come calling in my Sunday best

ever since I put your picture

in a frame



I'm gonna love you

till the wheels come off(2)

Oh yeah...



I love you baby and I always will

I love you baby and I always will

I love you baby and I always will

ever since I put your picture

in a frame



I love you baby and I always will

ever since I put your picture

in a frame

ever since I put your picture

in a frame

ever since I put your picture

in a frame



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Mule Variations, Anti Inc., 1999

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Mule Variations" (Amsco Publications, 2000)



Known covers:

33 Stars. Suzie Vinnick. September, 2002. Self-released

Son Of Dolly Bird. Liane Carroll. January 28, 2002. Ronnie Scott's Jazz House

The Dirtbros. Dirtbros. May 26, 2003. DirtMusic Records

It Really Don't Change Much. Dr. J. September, 2003. Self-released

Billy No Mates. Liane Carroll. September, 2003. Splash Point Records (UK)

Picture in a Frame. Kimmie Rhodes & Willie Nelson. 2003. Sunbird Records (duet with Willie Nelson)

Songs In The Key Of D. Shawn Barry. 2003. Self-released

It Always Will Be. Willie Nelson. October 25, 2004. Polydor

Mention Of You. Nicole Chillemi. March 26, 2006. RCAM Records

Deep River. Joanna MacGregor & Andy Sheppard. May 15, 2006. SoundCircus SC009

Seth Walker. Seth Walker. July 8, 2006. Pacific Blues

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)

Wies Merge. Ton Engels. December 12, 2007. Vulcano Records PlatCD7210 

Innocent When You Dream. Brandon Bernstein. February 26, 2010. Jazz Collective Records



Notes:



(1) Picture In A Frame:

- Tom Waits (1999): "Simple song. Sometimes I listen to Blind Lemon Jefferson or Leadbelly, and you'll just hear a line or a passing phrase. The way they phrase something sounds like the beginning of another whole thing, and they just use it as a passing thought, kind of a transitory moment in the song. But it sounds to me like it could have opened up into another whole thing. I heard that title, "Picture in a Frame," in another song. I don't even remember what the song was now. And I thought, that's a good title for a song. So I made it about Kathleen and me." (Source: A Q&A about Mule Variations. MSO: Rip Rense, early 1999)  



(2) I'm gonna love you till the wheels come off

Tom Waits (1999): "I'm gonna love you 'till the wheels come off." "That's prison slang. Means until the end of the world." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "Oh, that's an old expression yeah. That's an old eh.. one of those old jail house expressions yeah. I guess it means that you have to eh... you have to have your wheels looked at regularly. (laughs)" (Source: "KBCO Interview With Tom Waits" KBCO-C studios Los Angeles (USA), by Bret Saunders. October 13, 1999)

- The same line was used before in the closing scene of Alice the play (1992), later known as I'm Still Here (Alice, 2002): "You haven't looked at me that way in years You dreamed me up and left me here How long was I dreaming for What was it you wanted me for You haven't looked at me that way in years Your watch has stopped and the pond is clear Someone turn the lights back off I'll love you till the wheels come off I remember you with leaves in your hair But I'm still here"

- Also quoted in the movie Short Cuts (Robert Altman, 1993), Earl and Doreen Piggot (Tom Waits and Lily Tomlin): "'Till the wheels come off!"



Playin' Hooky

 



I'm playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

I can't walk cool when I got books underneath my arm

I'm playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

And I'm afraid I will be failing to be hearing the alarm



I refuse to go to school, think I'll play a little pool

And I will pass on the curriculum today

I apologize to educational supplies

Statistics just keep getting in my way

How will they teach me how to learn I don't want to be no attorney

Or receive a credential just like Raymond



I'm playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

I can't walk cool when I got books underneath my arm

Playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

And I'm afraid I would be failing to be hearing the alarm



Maximum security is some peculiarity

My educationality has brought me to a conclusion

Institutionality that tries to blow the malady

Can never seem to go to the release

So can you blame me if I'm tempted

And the chug down is pre-empted



Playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

I can't walk cool when I got books underneath my arm

I'm playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

And I'm afraid I would be failing to be hearing the alarm



Counselors said I'm maladjusted and I never can be trusted

Irreconcilable differences cause problems with the faculty

Conflicting interests in the area

But I should intend to be considering vocationally

I must be dealt with very gently and I might say incidentally

Playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

Can't walk cool when I got books underneath my arm

I'm playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

And I'm afraid I would be failing to be hearing the alarm



About this [?] called detention, with the captives aforementioned

Assuming the dilemma's to rile the guard

Here's a memo to communicate or maybe you should demonstrate

Instead of just divulging information in regard

Beyond the shadow of a doubt, you can trample yourself out



Playin' hooky, playin' hooky

I can't walk cool when I got books underneath my arm

I'm playin' hooky, I'm playin' hooky

And I'm afraid I would be failing to be hearing the alarm



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc., � 1977

Unofficial releases: A Nickle's Worth of Dreams, Triangle/ PYRAM PYCD 081,

Drunk On The Moon, Tales From The Underground 3

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Playin' Hooky

Foreign Affairs sessions, 1977.



Please Call Me, Baby

 



(Early demo version, 1971)



The evening fell just like a star

Left a trail behind

You spit as you slammed out the door

If this is love we're crazy

as we fight like cats and dogs

But I just know there's got to be more



So please call me, baby

wherever you are

It's too cold to be out walking in the streets

We do crazy things when we're wounded

everyone's a bit insane

I don't want you catching your death of cold

out walking in the rain



I admit that I ain't no angel

I admit I ain't no saint

Cause I'm selfish and I'm cruel and I'm blind

If I exorcise my Devils

well my angels may leave too

When they leave they're so hard to find



So please call me, baby

wherever you are

It's too cold to be out walking in the streets

We do crazy things when we're wounded

everyone's a bit insane

I don't want you catching your death of cold

out walking in the rain



We're always at each other's throats

it drives me up the wall(1)

Most of the time I'm just blowing off steam

I wish to God you'd leave me

and I wish to God you'd stay

Life's so different than it is in your dreams



Please call me, baby

wherever you are

It's too cold to be out walking in the streets

We do crazy things when we're wounded

everyone's a bit insane

I don't want you catching your death of cold

out walking in the rain



Written by: Tom Waits(2)

Published by: Warner Chappell Music Ltd., 1971-1992 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1992

Official release: "The Early Years 2". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1992

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)





 



Please Call Me, Baby



(The Heart Of Saturday Night studio version, 1974)



The evening fell just like a star

Left a trail behind

You spit as you slammed out the door

If this is love we're crazy

As we fight like cats and dogs

But I just know there's got to be more



So please call me, baby

wherever you are

It's too cold to be out walking in the streets

We do crazy things when we're wounded

everyone's a bit insane

I don't want you catching your death of cold

out walking in the rain



I admit that I ain't no angel

I admit that I ain't no saint

I'm selfish and I'm cruel but you're blind

If I exorcise my devils

Well my angels may leave too

When they leave they're so hard to find



Please call me, baby

wherever you are

It's too cold to be out walking in the streets

We do crazy things when we're wounded

everyone's a bit insane

I don't want you catching your death of cold

out walking in the rain



We're always at each other's throats

You know, it drives me up the wall(1)

Most of the time I'm just blowing off steam

And I wish to God you'd leave me

Baby, I wish to God you'd stay

Life's so different than it is in your dreams



Please call me, baby

wherever you are

It's too cold to be out walking in the streets

We do crazy things when we're wounded

everyone's a bit insane

I don't want you catching your death of cold

out walking in the rain



Written by: Tom Waits(2)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1974

Official release: The Heart Of Saturday Night, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1974



Known covers:

My Flame. Jim Nichols & Morning. 1992. Self-released

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Sally Norvell

My Room. Evi & das Tier. March, 2003. L�bbe 

Sugar On The Floor. Lisa Tingle. September 13, 2005. Dualtone

Grapefruit Moon: Songs of Tom Waits. Southside Johnny & La Bamba's Bigband. September 19, 2008. Evangeline (Soulfood Music)



Notes:



(1) Drive (someone) up the wall: To harass or torment; drive crazy (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang - Supplement, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(2) Bobi Thomas (2006):"Tom began going up to play at the Troubadour in Los Angeles, they had Hoot Nights there too (TWS: ca. 1971). I seem to remember that he'd take the bus up there sometimes, and at other times times he'd drive depending on whether he had transportation. Tom eventually (within that first year) caught the eye of Herb Cohen, who signed him up and later got him signed to the Asylum label. After Pam and I stopped playing music together I moved up to Los Angeles.Tom let me stay in his apartment until I got a job working at the Copper Penny on the corner of Gower and Sunset Blvd. I finally saved enough money to move out and got my own place. He and I hung around for several years together in those early years, before the music took him away to other places. Being Tom's best friend during all those years has provided me with many, many sweet memories. He even wrote a song for me (Please Call Me Baby). How sweet is THAT!!! When he was on the road during those early years, he would write me long lonely letters. I still have them (tucked away in a safe place). None of those memories will ever die, you know, they'll always be tucked away in the recesses of my silly brain, waiting to surface when I hear the sounds of "San Diego Serenade" or "Shiver Me Timbers" or any of the other instantly identifiable Tom Waits Songs."(Source: Email conversation with Bobi Thomas. September 2006). Further reading: The HeritageThe Troubadour.



Please Wake Me Up

 



I put my chips on her shoulder

running in the carnival time

She bought the things that I told her

made her eyes sparkle and shine



Together we'll ring in the new year

I know that she'll be my queen

And if I fall asleep in your arms

please wake me up in my dreams



Her out-fit was all made of vinyl

like nothing that I'd ever seen

When our divorces are final

she'll fit right into my scheme



Together we'll ring in the new year

I know that she'll be my queen

And if I fall asleep in your arms

please wake me up in my dreams



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: Frank's Wild Years, Island Records Inc., 1987

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Please Wake Me Up as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Performed by ...?... (as Yvette) and Tom Waits (as Frank O'Brien).

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1987): "Kathleen started out with the melody on that. It's just a little lullaby of some kind. With mellotron, baritone horn, upright bass." (Source: "From the set of Ironweed, Tom Waits talks with Rip Rense". New York Post: Rip Rense. Early 1987)



Poncho's Lament

 



Well the stairs sound so lonely without you

and I ain't made my bed in a week

Coffee stains on the paper I'm writing

and I'm too choked up inside to speak



And yes, I know that our differences pulled us apart

we never spoke a word heart to heart

And I'm glad that you're gone

but I wish to the Lord that you'd come home



And I'm glad that you're gone

got the feeling so strong

And I'm glad that you're gone

but I wish to the Lord that you'd come home



Well my guitar still plays your favorite song

though the strings have been outta tune for some time

Every time I strum a cord, I pray out to the Lord

that you'll quit your honkey-tonkin' sing my song



And I'm glad that you're gone

got the feeling so strong

And I'm glad that you're gone

but I wish to the Lord that you'd come home



So I'll throw another log onto the fire

and I'll admit I'm a lousy liar

As the coals die down and flicker

I hear that guitar picker

Play the song we used to sing so long ago



And I'm glad that you're gone

got the feeling so strong

Yes, I'm glad that you're gone

but I wish to the Lord that you'd come home



And I'm glad, damn glad you're gone

I got the feeling so strong

Yes, I'm glad that you're gone

but I wish to the Lord you'd come home



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)



Known covers:

La Danza. Span. 1993. Self-released (Switserland). "Jung", same version as on Be-Stoff, 2006

The Water Is Wide, Rita & Frank Eriksen. 1994. BMG (Norway)

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by The Blacks

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 2. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Ballads. Breit'N'Wark. March 13, 2002. Self-released.

The Rosinators. The Rosinators. June, 2003. PDC Music

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: The Caseworker

Tom Catmull And The Clerics. Tom Catmull. September 6, 2006. Self-released

Be-Stoff. Span. September 9, 2006. Phonag (Switserland). "Jung", same version as on La Danza, 1993

Middle River. Matt Novak. August 15, 2007. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Apparently this was one of the first songs Waits ever performed (The Heritage ca. 1971). Lou Curtiss (2007): "The first times I saw him play (at The Heritage) I thought, 'He's just another Dylan guy'. The first song of his own I ever remember him doing was called 'Poncho's Lament'. I was standing next to Bill Nunn and I said, 'That's a good song, He's got promise." (Source: Lou Curtiss interview March 22, 2007 as printed in �Lowside Of The Road: A Life Of Tom Waits" by Barney Hoskyns. Faber/ Broadway, 2009)



Pony

 



I've seen it all boys, I've been all over

Been everywhere in the whole wide world

I rode the high line with Old Blind Darby

I danced real slow with Ida Jane

I was full of wonder when I left Murfreesboro(2)

Now I am full of hollow on Maxwell Street(3)



And I hope my pony

I hope my pony

I hope my pony

knows the way back home



I walked from Natchez to Hushpukena(4)

I built a fire by the side of the road

I worked for nothin' in a Belzoni saw mill

And I caught a blind out on the B and O(5)

Talullah's friendly, Belzoni ain't so(4)

A 44 will get you 99(6)



I hope my pony

I hope my pony

I hope my pony

knows the way back home



I run my race with Burnt Face Jake

gave him a Manzanita cross(7)

I lived on nothin' but dreams and train smoke

somehow my watch and chain got lost

I wish I was home, in Evelyn's(8) kitchen

with old Gyp curled around my feet



I hope my pony

I hope my pony

I hope my pony

knows the way back home



I hope my pony

I hope my pony

I hope my pony

knows the way back home



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Mule Variations, Anti Inc., 1999

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Mule Variations" (Amsco Publications, 2000)



Known covers:

The Long Ride. Ramblin' Jack Elliott. September, 1999. Hightone

Song & Pony Show. Andy Coats. June 13, 2006. Andy Coats Music

Night Flyer: The Singer-Songwriter Collection. Tony Rice. July 29, 2008. Rounder Records

Sara Watkins. Sara Watkins. April 7, 2009. Nonesuch Records



Notes:



(1) Pony

Jody Denberg (1999): Was there a point for you when you realized that the sonic atmosphere of your song was almost as important as the lyrics? I'm thinking about "Pony" from the new album. It's a sad, desolate song and it has a sad, desolate sound. TW: "I guess that particular one we wanted to have it bare and by itself, like those Lomax recordings, those Library of Congress recordings that I love so much. Yeah, you try to find the right sound for the record. The whole challenge of recording is to find the appropriate environment and atmosphere for the song. What suits it. And that's kind of what you spend most of your time doing. Where should we record this? How should we record this? It worked -- on that one it worked." (Source: Mule Conversations. Austin Chronicle: Jody Denberg. April, 1999)

Rip Rense (1999): What's the story behind "Pony"? TW: "Oh, I've written those songs before. You're way out far away from home. How are you going to get back? It's that kind of song." (Source: A Q&A about Mule Variations. MSO: Rip Rense, early 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "... Q: Ida Jane. . .Old Blind Darby. . .some of these names in Mule Variations... are there stories behind them? TW: Well, they're all real people. They all come from history, or my history. Or letters received, or things read, or half-remembered. . .or made up!" (Source: "A Q&A about Mule Variations ". MSO: Rip Rense. January, 1999)

Bart Bull (2005): "Got a lot to do with Skip James, the so-called bluesman who played Belzoni. Who sang, in 'Hard Luck Child': "I've been to the Indian nation, and I've been to the territo' I've been to the nation, I've been to the territo' And I'm a hard luck child, catch the devil everywhere I go... " In 'Little Cow and Calf Is Gonna Die Blues', he sang: "... walked the levees from end to end, I was just tryin' to find my calf again," And he compares his .22 to your .44 for firepower. In Charlie Patton's 'Pony Blues', he hitches his pony, saddles up his mare, goes lookin' for a rider (woman) out in the world somewhere. Patton too did Belzoni time. And he's got the howlin' wolf growl voice that Waits' uses." (Source: email conversations Bart Bull/ Tom Waits Library October, 2005)



(2) I was full of wonder when I left Murfreesboro: Murfreesboro is South East of Nashville, more or less near the town of Baxter (from Putnam County: Nighthawks At The Diner, 1975)





(3) I am full of hollow on Maxwell Street: The Chicago Maxwell Street neighborhood is significant as the Midwest's largest and most important "port of entry" for international and internal immigrants, especially those of Jewish, African-American, and Mexican-American ancestry. It is also a place where the music known as "Chicago Blues" originated, a musical form that has influenced virtually all of modern popular music. Further reading: Preserve Maxwell Street



(4) I walked from Natchez to Hushpukena: Natchez also mentioned in Fish In The Jailhouse (Mule Variations tour, 1999/ Orphans-Brawlers, 2006): "From Natchez to Kenosha, runnin' down to New York."Hushpukena is misspelled, it should read "Hushpuckena". When walking from Natchez to Hushpuckena one would indeed encounter Talullah and Belzoni (Mississippi)





(5) Caught a blind out on the B and O: B&O: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. A Blind: n. [late 19C-1920s] (US tramp) a baggage car; thus beat the blind, jump the blind, to ride in such a car [blind, i.e. it has no windows] (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(6) Forty-four n.: A cup, or an order of a cup, of coffee. Some c1940 lunch counter use in relaying an order (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). Ninety-nine n.: The manager of a lunch counter or soda-fountain. Common lunch counter use since c1935. Use. used by employees to call the manager to hear a customer's grievance (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). Could be interpreted as: the narrator only wanting to have a cup of coffee, but being kicked out by the manager for being or looking like a bum. Also interpreted as: being sentenced to prision for 99 years, for using a 44. caliber gun.



(7) Manzanita n.: Any of various western North American evergreen shrubs (genus Arctostaphylos) of the heath family.

Tom Waits (1999): "Manzanita is a tree. Everything around the Sacramento River Valley seems to be named after Manzanita: Manzanita School, Manzanita Market, Manzanita Road. It's gnarled, twisted, blood-red wood." (Source: "Mojo Interview With Tom Waits" Mojo magazine (USA), by Barney Hoskyns. Date: Santa Rosa. April, 1999)





(8) Aunt Evelyn

Tom Waits (1999): "Evelyn's Kitchen," that's my Aunt Evelyn, who passed away during the making of the record. Her and my uncle had 10 kids and lived in a place called Gridley. I guess I've been far away from home, and have thought about her kitchen a lot and that a lot of people feel the same way when they've been far away from home. I dreamed about getting back home to her kitchen. That's why we put her in there -- a tribute to Evelyn. The other people are just different people I've come across over the years -- known, heard about, read about." (Source: Mule Conversations. Austin Chronicle: Jody Denberg. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "... My Aunt Evelyn died while we were making the record [Mule Variations]. She was my favorite aunt. She and my Uncle Chalmer had ten kids, and raised prunes and peaches. They lived in Gridley, and there have been a lot of times when I've been far away from home, and I've thought about Evelyn's kitchen. And I know there are a lot of people that loved them, that thought about that same kitchen. So that's why we put that in there. They had an old dog named Gyp. If you make up songs, sometimes you just get up in the morning and start singing something on the way to work. You don't know why, and maybe it's worth remembering, or maybe it's not." (Source: "A Q&A about Mule Variations ". MSO: Rip Rense. January, 1999)



Poor Edward

 



(Also known as: Chained Together For Life)(1)



Did you hear the news about Edward?(2)

On the back of his head he had another face

Was it a woman's face or a young girl?

They said to remove it would kill him

So poor Edward was doomed



The face could laugh and cry

It was his devil twin

And at night she spoke to him

Things heard only in hell

But they were impossible to separate

Chained together for life



Finally the bell tolled his doom

He took a suite of rooms

And hung himself and her from the balcony irons

Some still believe he was freed from her

But I knew her too well

I say she drove him to suicide

And took poor Edward to hell



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), C 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Alternate unofficial version on: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999.

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Poor Edward"

at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December, 1992.

Taken from The Late Show "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice"

BBC TV documentary presented by Beatrix Campbell. Aired March 4, 1993



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

"Poor Edward" as performed in the theatre play (excerpt)

Alice rehearsals at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December 14, 1992

Taken from "Visions D'Alice" (1993), French/ German TV documentary by Thierry Thomas for La SEPT/ ARTE



Notes:



(1) Chained Together For Life: Sung by the White Knight in knee 14.





Alice preview: "Poor Edward". Thalia Theatre, Hamburg. December, 1992.

Source: TV screenshot from "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice", The Late Show. BBC TV documentary. March 4, 1993



(2) Poor Edward

Tom Waits (2002): "That song is about Edward Mordake, one of those early last century characters. It's a true story about a man who had a woman's face on the back of his head. It's kind of a sad story, it eventually drove him to madness and suicide, so it has an operatic feeling to it. I tried to get into the mind of that man, but at the same time it's a metaphor for any kind obsession or compulsion that might be impossible to control." (Source: "Make Mine A Double", Black + White magazine (USA). Issue 61. June/ July 2002. By Clare Barker).

Tom Waits (1992): "We were trying to make the song text a different, some different things one would normally associate with "Alice In Wonderland". So, oh we did some things. We had a song called "Poor Edward" which is a true story actually. I took the same melody of "Alice" and. There's a true story about it [takes out a book]... a circus freak that was uh born with a woman's face on the back of his head [tries to find the article in the book]. Uh, sorry girls.. ooh. oooh! Anyway I'll just tell it. Uhm, poor Edward. He came from a very wealthy family and he was, you know, heir to a big fortune and, but he had this curse and he said that the face on the back of his head was his devil twin, and it spoke to him at night. And ultimately he couldn't take it anymore and he went and checked into a hotel and hung himself. So... I used that as an idea for a song for the play because I feel in any kind of obsession you feel like you are attached to somebody. And that to separate you, would kill you both. And so uh, that's what the song is about." (Source: "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice", The Late Show. BBC TV documentary presented by Beatrix Campbell. March 4, 1993)















Waits going through "Freaks: We Who Are Not Like Others".

Source: "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice", The Late Show. BBC TV. March 4, 1993



Freaks: We Who Are Not As Others. RE/ Search, 1990




The book Waits is holding is "Freaks: We Who Are Not As Others" by Daniel P. Mannix. This long out of print classic book based on Mannix's personal acquaintance with sideshow stars, holds many names/ stories Waits used in the Black Rider/ Alice. Originally published by Pocket Books in 1976, re-released by RE/Search Books in 1990.



Edward MordrakeAn even more grotesque and tragic case was Edward Mordake, a remarkably handsome young man who was gifted as a musician and a scholar. In addition, he was heir to a peerage. One would think that Edward have everything going for him and so he did--with one exception. On the back of his head he had the head of another face. It was said to be that of a girl. The head was functional, though it could not eat or speak. The eyes moved and followed the motions of anyone in the room. The head could also laugh and cry. Edward became obsessed with his "devil twin," as he called it. He demanded that it be removed even if the operation killed him, but no doctor would undertake the delicate surgery involved. At last, Edward shut himself up in a suite of rooms, refusing to see anyone. He claimed that at night the face would whisper awful things to him in his sleep, "such things as they only speak of in hell." Unable to stand the strain, he killed himself at age twenty-three." (Source: Chapter Five "Look Ma, Three Hands" from "Freaks: We Who Are Not As Others", Searchmedia by Daniel P. Mannix.)



Edward Mordrake often misspelled as Mordake): "One of the weirdest as well as most melancholy stories of human deformity is that of Edward Mordake, said to have been heir to one of the noblest peerages in England. He never claimed the title, however, and committed suicide in his twenty-third year. He lived in complete seclusion refusing the visits even of the members of his own family. He was a young man of fine attainments, a profound scholar, and a musician of rare ability. His figure was remarkable for its grace, and his face--that is to say, his natural face--was that of an Antinous. But upon the back of his head was another face, that of a beautiful girl, 'lovely as a dream, hideous as a devil.' The female face was a mere mask, 'occupying only a small portion of the posterior part of the skull, yet exhibiting every sign of intelligence, of a malignant sort, however.' It would be seen to smile and sneer while Mordake was weeping. The eyes would follow the movements of the spectator, and the lips would 'gibber without ceasing.' No voice was audible, but Mordake avers that he was kept from his rest at night by the hateful whispers of his 'devil twin,' as he called it, 'which never sleeps, but talks to me forever of such things as they only speak of in hell. No imagination can conceive the dreadful temptations it sets before me. For some unforgiven wickedness of my forefathers I am knit to this fiend--for a fiend it surely is. I beg and beseech you to crush it out of human semblance, even if I die for it.' Such were the words of the hapless Mordake to Manvers and Treadwell, his physicians. In spite of careful watching he managed to procure poison, whereof he died, leaving a letter requesting that the 'demon face' might be destroyed before his burial, 'lest it continues its dreadful whisperings in my grave.' At his own request he was interred in a waste place, without stone or legend to mark his grave." (Source: Gould, George M. & Walter L. Pyle, Anomolies and Curiosities of Medicine, New York: 1896, p.188. as published on the Mammoth Page).



Edward Mordrake"The only case of its kind was that of Edward Mordrake scion of a British aristocratic family who had another face on the back of his head! It had eyes, lips nose and ears. It could see (that is it could see through its eyes!). It could cry and laugh, but it could neither eat nor speak. Generally, it just leered and drooled. Little by little, the likeable, intelligent young man who was cursed with this face behind his back - this devil twin - lost his mind and died a raving lunatic." (Source: "Strange People" by MOZ/LSD. Grapevine magazine #8, 1992).




 




Poor Little Lamb

 



(Also known as: Slam On Little Sheep)



Poor little lamb, now his fleece is all cold

Wakes up in the morning alone

Poor little lamb knows what's coming

Life is an empty cup(1)



Poor little lamb, watch your shoulder

Coyote's waiting out there

Nobody will get any older

If we don't find a way out of here



So let's go on a bummer this summer

Where we won't have to be afraid

The world will be on a hummer, boys

And we'll laugh and we'll drink lemonade



Written by: Tom Waits and William Kennedy

Published by: Taft/ Barish Music/ Famous Mysic , LLC (ASCAP) and Jalma Music Inc., � 1987/ 2006

Demo recording 1987 (Ironweed soundtrack)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Life is an empty cup

Charles Champlin (1988): "Waits wrote a song for "Ironweed" with its novelist-screenwriter William Kennedy. It's called "Poor Little Lamb" and, Waits said, "It's based on a poem he saw on the side of a bridge when he was a kid. 'Life is an empty cup' is one of the lines. It's like those nursery rhymes you may understand one way when you're a kid and another way later on, like 'Ring Around the Rosy' is about scarlet fever and when they all fall down, they fall down dead." (Source: "Tom Waits: Eccentric In The Very Best Sense", by Charles Champlin. Los Angeles Times. January 14, 1988)



Tom Waits (2006): "There's one song I wrote with [Ironweed novelist] William Kennedy out in Albany. He came across this poem written on a bridge by some hobos, so he copied it down and saved it for years. He showed it to me and suggested we turn it into a song, so we did." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)



Potter's Field

 



Well, you can buy me a drink and I'll tell you what I've seen

And I'll give you a bargain from the edge of a maniac's dream

That buys a black widow spider with a riddle in his yarn

That's clingin' to the furrow of a blind man's brow

And I'll start talkin' from the brim of a thimble full of whiskey

On a train through the Bronx that will take you just as far

As the empty of a bottle to the highway of a scar

That stretched across the blacktop(2) of my cheek like that

And then ducks beneath the brim of a fugitive's hat

You'll learn why liquor makes a stool pigeon(3) rat on every face

That ever left a shadow down on Saint Mark's place



Hell, I'd double-cross(4) my mother if it was whiskey that they paid

And so an early bird says Nightstick's(5) on the hit parade

And he ain't got a prayer and his days are numbered

And you'll track him down like a dog

But it's a tough customer you're gettin' in this trade

Cause the Nightstick's heart pumps lemonade

And whiskey keeps a blind man talkin' all right

And I'm the only one who knows just where he stayed last night



He was in a wreckin' yard in a switchblade storm

In a wheelbarrow with nothin' but revenge to keep him warm

And a half a million dollars in unmarked bills

Was the Nightstick's blanket in a February chill

And the buzzards drove a crooked sky beneath a black wing halo

He was dealin' high Chicago(6) in the mud

And stackin' the deck(7) against a dragnet's eye(8)

And the shiverin' Nightstick in a miserable heap

With the siren for a lullaby singin' him to sleep

And bleedin' from a buttonhole, and torn by a slug

Fired from the barrel of a two dollar gun

That scorched a blister on the grip of a punk by now

Is learnin' what you have to pay to be a hero anyhow



He dressed the hole in his gut with a hundred dollar bandage

A king's ransom for a bedspread that don't amount to nothin'

Just cobweb strings on a busted ukulele



And the Nightstick leaned on a black shillelagh(10)

With the poison of a junkie's broken promise(14) on his lip

He staggered in the shadows screamin', 'I ain't never been afraid'

And he shot out every street light on the promenade

Past the frozen ham-and-eggers(11) at the penny arcade

Throwin' out handfuls of a blood stained salary

They were dead in their tracks at the shootin' gallery(12)

And they fired off a twenty-one gun salute

And from the corner of his eye he caught the alabaster orbs

Of a dime-a-dance-hall girl and stuffed a thousand dollar bill in her blouse

And caught the cruel and unusual punishment of her smile

And the Nightstick winked beneath a rain soaked brim

Ain't no one seen hide nor hair(13) of him since

No one 'cept a spade on Riker's Island and me



So if you're mad enough to listen to a full of whiskey blind man

And you're mad enough to look beyond where the bloodhounds(14) dare to go

And if you want to know where the Nightstick's hidin' out

You be down at the ferry landin', oh let's say 'bout half past a nightmare

When it's twisted on the clock, and you tell 'em Nickel sent you

Whiskey always makes him talk

And you ask for Captain Charon(15) with the mud on his kicks

He's the skipper of the Deadline steamer

And she sails from the Bronx across the river Styx

And a riddle's just a ticket for a dreamer



Cause when the weathervane's sleepin' and the moon turns his back

You crawl on your belly 'long the railroad tracks(16)

And cross your heart and hope to die, and stick a needle in your eye

Cause he'd cut my bleedin' heart out if he found out that I squealed(17)

Cause you see a scarecrow is just a hoodlum(18)

Who marked the cards that he dealed

And pulled a gypsy switch

Out on the edge of Potter's Field



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1977 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "Foreign Affairs", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1977 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Jay S. Jacobs: "Perhaps the most arresting Foreign Affairs cut is "Potter's Field," a spoken-word piece about a blind, alcoholic stool pigeon who tries to score some booze in exchange for his account of a gangland hit. Behind Waits's voice, drums pound, horns wail, and a short, wonderfully nuanced crime drama unfolds in the listener's mind. There is an immediacy, a catch-you-by-the-throat urgency to this track, which was the most successful of Waits's spoken-word pieces to date. Howe remembers that Waits said of "Potter's Field," "I've written this lyric, and I don't think I want it to be a song. I think I want to recite it." Responded Howe: "If you're going to recite it and not sing it, maybe we should score it like it's a little movie." Waits thought this was a great idea. "That's how [Bob] Alcivar got involved," says Bones. "Alcivar had been doing arrangements for me and had done some scoring and stuff for T.V. movies. I said [to Tom], you'll read it and the orchestra will play and we'll do it live. We'll score it live. We did it once, and it didn't exactly work out. But we had the tape of it. We took the tape back and Bob worked with the tape. I remember he shortened some places, and Tom wanted some things to be faster and some things to be slower, and we went back in and recorded it again... live." (Source: Wild Years, The Music and Myth of Tom Waits. Jay S. Jacobs, 2000)



Potter's field

- A public burial place for paupers, unknown persons, and criminals (Source: Websters Dictionary)

- "Potter's Field is in the East River, in between Williamsburg Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. The river makes a sharp bend there, an elbow. On an ebb tide there's an eddy in the elbow that picks up anything loose coming down river, afloat or submerged, and sweeps it into a stretch of backwater on the Brooklyn side. This backwater is called the Wallabout Bay on charts; the men on the dredges call it Potter's Field. The eddy sweeps driftwood into the backwater. Also, it sweeps drowned bodies into there. As a rule, people that drown in the harbour in winter stay down until spring. When the water begins to warm, gas forms in them and that makes them buoyant and they rise to the surface. Every year, without fail, on or about the fifteenth of April, bodies start showing up, and more of them show up at Potter's Field than any other place. In a couple of weeks or so, the Harbour Police always find ten to two dozen over there -- suicides, bastard babies, old barge captains that lost their balance out on a sleety night attending towropes, now and then some gangster or other." (Mitchell, Joseph. "The Bottom of the Harbour". 1960)

Tom Waits (1977): "Potter's Field is just a stone's throw from Riker's Island, you know, the prison. When someone is found cold on a street, with no identification, they freeze 'em until they're identified, and if nobody claims 'em, and they aren't identified, they just throw 'em in a pine box with all their personal belongings and effects... They put 'em on a barge and send 'em out to Potter's Field. Bela Lugosi (the original Hollywood Dracula), was buried in Potter's Field - he made eleven million dollars and died penniless on the Lower East Side. It's right out of Dante's Inferno, they put 'em on a barge that leaves at midnight, they scratch their name on the side of the coffin with a piece of chalk, they throw 'em in a mud ditch. They stack 'em twelve high in the excavation. So 'Potter's Field' is my story about a stool pigeon in a bar selling information to a hit man who's lookin' for a guy named 'Nightsticks' who's hidin' out in Potter's Field. It's mostly a mystery like 'Odd Man Out.' " (Source: "The Odyssey Of Tom Waits" Circus magazine (USA), by David Koepp. Issue nr. 171, December 22, 1977)

Tom Waits (1979): "Clarinet [for Potter's Field] was like the opening of 'Rhapsody In Blue'. That was what I had in mind '85 What I had in mind was Wildmark on the prow of a barge, bringing Thelma Ritter's coffin back from the pauper's burial ground of Potter's Field in a grey dawn: Pickup On South Street, Sam Fuller, 1952." (Source: "Wry & Danish to go". "MelodyMaker" magazine. Brian Case. Copenhagen. May 5, 1979)



(2) Blacktop

- n [20C] (US) a minor road, a back road, [its black asphalt surface] (Blacktop: A bituminous material, such as asphalt, used to pave roads) (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Notice the same phrase being used in Blow Wind Blow, 1987: "Mary's on the black top, there's a husband in the dog house."



(3) Stool pigeon: 1. A person serving as a decoy. From fact that pigeons were often tied to a stool as a decoy for other pigeons 2. An informer, usu. a police informer (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Double cross v.: To betray or cheat (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(5) Nightstick: The club carried by American policemen - painted black and with a short handle attached at a right angle to the main shaft at one end (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(6) High Chicago

- A variation of 7 card stud in poker, the difference being that the highest spade in the hole wins half the pot (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. September, 2000)

- The way we play high chicago in our weekly poker games- the game is seven card stud. the dealer deals 2 cards face down to every player and one face up. then there's a betting round. then everyone gets one more card up. then there's another betting round. this goes on until everyone's got 3 cards down and 4 cards up. the goal is to make your highest 5-card hand. the high chicago part is that the highest spade face down (in the hole) splits the pot with the high hand (Submitted by Django Bohren. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)



(7) Dragnet's eye n.:The cops (Submitted by Dorene LaLonde. September, 2000)



(8) Stackin' the deck: Stack the deck/ cards, to: phr. [early 19C+] (US) to arrange things in one's favour, use. dishonestly. [poker imagery] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(10) Shillelagh: (pronounce she-lay-lah). An oaken sapling or cudgel (Irish). (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd.)



(11) Ham-and-egger

- An average person; a worker limited to routine tasks; one as common as ham and eggs or one who may make average wages or live an average, unexciting life (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner).

- Also mentioned in A Nickel's Worth Of Dreams: "And the ham-and-eggers win the Irish Sweepstakes every day."



(12) Shooting gallery: 1. Any place where an addict or addicts can receive an injection of a narcotic drug; a pad. Addict use. 2. A gathering party of addicts who have assembled for the purpose of taking drugs by injection. Addict use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(13) Hide nor hair, neither: The reverse of the ancient saying "In hide and hair" meaning "wholly, entirely". The American phrase means "nothing whatsoever". First occurred in the early work of Josiah G. Holland The Bay Path 1857. (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. October, 2000. From "2,107 Curious Word Origins, Sayings and Expressions" by Charles Earle)



(14) Bloodhound: n. [early 19C+] a policeman. [reverse anthropomorphism] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(15) Charon: Charon, in Greek mythology, is the ferryman of the dead. The souls of the deceased are brought to him and Charon ferries them across the river Acheron (Styx). He only accepts the dead which are buried or burned with the proper rites, and if they pay him an obolus (coin) for their passage. For that reason a corpse had always an obolus placed under the tongue. Charon is depicted as an sulky old man, or as a winged demon carrying a double hammer. Only a couple times were the living able to catch a ride with Charon to enter the underworld.





Detail from Michelangelo's "Last Judgement"



(16) Quoting from "Scarecrow" (Unreleased track, from 'Foreign Affairs' sessions, July through August, 1977): "Buzzards drive a crooked sky Make a junkie's promise in a courier's eye And a bankrupt corduroy wad on the thigh A strangled acre by a thirsty stream A crucified body, just a three day stubble On the chin of a nightmare stampede And tomorrow'll be hirin' a two dollar gun And I tell you that someone's gonna pay Cause when the weathervane's sleeping And the moon turns its back And crawl on the belly on the railroad tracks And keep well hidden till the porchlight's dim And pump sixteen shells in the belly of a scarecrow And blame it all on him."



(17) Squeale: v.i.: to complain, to protest; to inform to the police: since c1900; orig. and mainly underworld use (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(18) Hoodlum: A Californian rough. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



Purple Avenue/ Empty Pockets

Empty Pockets



(Also known as: Purple Avenue)(1)



As I slow down on purple avenues

To march around in April's shoes

The weathervanes remind

Of summertimes that I've left behind

All the money's gone for Auld Lang Syne

I spent on Eastern Standard Time

What happened to my roll(2)

September fell right through the hole

All I've got is empty pockets now



Oh why does August try so hard

To hoist me on my own petard(3)

I've learned one thing from losing her

An ounce of prevention's worth a pound of cure

The shadows fall, I cannot thread

The tenor of the things you've said

All that's left is flesh and bone(4)

The lights are on but no one's home

All I've got is empty pockets now



I spill myself another drink

I count the whiskers in the sink(5)

The orchestra is blind

But I've never been the worrying kind

Subsequently and furthermore

I'll sleep right here on the draining board

I will never be paroled

I like to drink them while they're cold

All I've got is empty pockets now



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. [?], 1981

First official release on "Blame it On My Youth", Holly Cole, 1991.

Originally written in 1981 during "One From The Heart" recording studio sessions.

Tom Waits version first released on "One From The Heart" re-issue (CD/ DVD), 2004.

Read full story: One From The Heart



Known covers:

Blame It On My Youth. Holly Cole Trio, 1991/ 1992. Manhattan

Punishing Kiss. Ute Lemper. March 2000/ April 4, 2000. Polygram (Japan), Uni/ Decca (USA)



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Empty Pockets"

at the Expo Theatre, Montreal/ Canada (July 3, 1981).

As featured in Canadian television concert documentary "T�l�-Jazz - Montreal Jazz Festival"

With Teddy Edwards (tenor saxophone) and Greg Cohen (upright bass)



Notes:



(1) Empty Pockets: This song was originally composed for One From The Heart (1981), but didn't make it to the original soundtrack album. Tom Waits version first released on "One From The Heart" re-issue (CD/ DVD), 2004. The first released version of this song was by Holly Cole (Blame It On My Youth, 1992. with slightly altered lyrics). On that album it was titled "Purple Avenue", therefore the confusion over the original title of the song.

Tom Waits (on One From The Heart, 1982): "Francis and Richard Beggs were constantly trying different songs against different scenes. They were very experimental in that way, always thinking, "What would happen if we moved this song there and replaced it with another one?" There was a song called "Empty Pockets" that was originally designed for the opening. Francis' brother August had mentioned the line to me. I wrote it down and later developed it into a song. So it was in, then out, then in again... now it's been replaced by a song called "Wages of Love." "Broken Bicycles" was an orphan for a while, until Francis shot a separate scene with Freddie in the junkyard, despondent. We tried that song against the scene; it worked and stayed in the film." (Source: "Tom Waits: Hollywood Confidential" BAM magazine (US). Date: Travelers' Cafe/ Echo Park. February 26, 1982)

Paul Grein (1987) on Waits attending a Frank Sinatra swhow, 1987: "Frank Sinatra drew a lot of celebrities to his recent Greek Theatre shows, including at least one you might not expect: whiskey-voiced balladeer Tom Waits. Waits, who said he's been a Sinatra fan "forever," told Pop Eye he enjoyed the show: "It was magic. He waves his hand over the crowd like a wand when he sings." Other impressions? "He drank Jack Daniel's and soda. Waits noted that he's written a song, "Empty Pockets," that he wants to get to Sinatra but he hasn't tried yet. "I'm sure he's unlisted," Waits said dryly. Has Sinatra been a big influence on Waits? "Oh yeah, no question about it." In what way? "We have the same tailor." (Source: Los Angeles Times. Column Pop Eye, by Paul Grein. August 30, 1987)



(2) On a roll

- phr. [1970s+] (orig. US gambling) on a winning streak, enjoying a period of success, whether lit. or fig. Roll: n. [1970s+] a spell of good fortune, a winning streak, whether lit. or fig. [roll, the roll of a dice] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Also mentioned in Time, 1985: "And when they're on a roll, she pulls a razor from her boot And a thousand pigeons fall around her feet.", Depot, Depot, 1974: "I'm on a roll, just like a pool ball, baby."



(3) Hoist on his own petard: Caught in his own trap, involved in the danger he meant for others. The petard was a conical instrument of war employed at one time for blowing open gates with gunpowder. The engineers used to carry the petard to the place they intended to blow up, and fire it at the small end by a fusee. Shakespeare spells the word petar. "'Tis the sport to have the engineer hoist with his own petar." (Hamlet, ii. 4.) (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)

Petard: "A small bomb used to blow in a door or gate. If it wasn't for its appearance in Shakespeare's Hamlet: "For 'tis the sport to have the enginer / Hoist with his owne petar" and its fossil survival in the rather more modern spelling to be hoist with one's own petard, this term of warfare would have gone the way of the halberd, brattice and culverin. A petard was a bell-shaped metal grenade typically filled with five or six pounds of gunpowder and set off by a fuse. Sappers dug a tunnel or covered trench up to a building and fixed the device to a door, barricade, drawbridge or the like to break it open. The bomb was held in place with a heavy beam called a madrier. Unfortunately, the devices were unreliable and often went off unexpectedly. Hence the expression, where hoist meant to be lifted up, an understated description of the result of being blown up by your own bomb. The name of the device came from the Latin petar, to break wind, perhaps a sarcastic comment about the thin noise of a muffled explosion at the far end of an excavation." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(4) Flesh and bone: Might refer to "Flesh and Blood" meaning: Human nature, as "Flesh and blood cannot stand it." (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(5) Count the whiskers in the sink: One cover has been made of the song, by Ute Lemper on her album 'Punishing Kiss' 2000. He counts 'whiskers in the sink' instead of 'silver'. Ute Lemper uses the original lyrics. Maybe she has a cat? Or a sloppy boyfriend. (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Putnam County

 



I guess things were always kinda quiet around Putnam County

Kinda shy and sleepy as it clung to the skirts of the 2-lane

That was stretched out just like an asphalt dance floor

Where all the old-timers in bib jeans and store bought boots

Were hunkerin'(2) down in the dirt

To lie about their lives and the places that they'd been

And they'd suck on Coca Colas, yeah, and be spittin' Day's Work

Until the moon was a stray dog on the ridge and...

And the taverns would be swollen until the naked eye of 2 a.m.

And the Stratocasters slung over the Burgermeister beer guts

And swizzle stick legs(3) jackknifed over naugahyde(4) stools... yeah

And the witch hazel spread out over the linoleum floors

And pedal pushers(5) stretched out over a midriff bulge

And the coiffed brunette curls over Maybelline eyes

Wearing Prince Machiavelli(6), or something... yeah

Estee Lauder, smells so sweet

And I elbowed up(7) at the counter with mixed feelings over mixed drinks

As Bubba and the Roadmasters moaned in pool hall concentration and...

And knit their brows(8) to cover the entire Hank Williams(9) songbook

Whether you like it or not

And the old National register was singin' to the tune of $57.57... yeah

And then it's last call, one more game of eightball

Berniece'd be puttin' the chairs on the tables

And someone come in and say, 'Hey man, anyone got any jumper cables?'

'Is that a 6 or a 12 volt, man? I don't know...'

Yeah, and all the studs in town would toss 'em down

And claim to fame as they stomped their feet

Yeah, boastin' about bein' able to get more ass than a toilet seat(10)

And the GMC's(11) and the Straight-8 Fords were coughin' and wheezin'

And they percolated(12) as they tossed the gravel underneath the fenders

To weave home a wet slick anaconda of a 2-lane

With tire irons and crowbars a-rattlin'

With a tool box and a pony saddle

You're grindin' gears and you're shiftin' into first

Yeah, and that goddam Tranny's just gettin' worse, man

With the melody of see-ya-later's and screwdrivers on carburetors

Talkin' shop about money to loan

And Palominos and strawberry roans(13)... yeah

See ya tomorrow, hello to the Missus!

With money to borrow and goodnight kisses

As the radio spit out Charlie Rich(14), man,

and he sure can sing that son of a bitch

And you weave home, yeah, weavin' home

Leavin' the little joint winkin' in the dark warm narcotic American night

Beneath a pin cushion sky

And it's home to toast and honey, gotta start up the Ford, man

Yeah, and your lunch money's right over there on the drainin' board

And the toilet's runnin'! Christ, shake the handle!

And the telephone's ringin', it's Mrs. Randal

And where the hell are my goddam sandals?

What you mean, the dog chewed up my left foot?

With the porcelain poodles and the glass swans

Staring down from the knickknack shelf... yeah

And the parent permission slips for the kids' field trips

Yeah, and a pair of Muckalucks(15) scraping across the shag carpet... yeah

And the impending squint of first light

And it lurked behind a weepin' marquee in downtown Putnam

Yeah, and it'd be pullin' up any minute now

Just like a bastard amber Velveta yellow cab on a rainy corner

And be blowin' its horn in every window in town



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1975

Official release: Nighthawks At The Diner, Elektra/ Asylum Records, 1975



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Intro from "Nighthawks At The Diner": I wanna tell you a story here. It's about a place called Putnam County. Yeah... How's the service here? Yeah, it's all right? I mean, I gave you a beer and everything. Don't gotta pay or nothin'. Well, they hit you up at the door on your way out...  

Patrick Humphries quotes an unidentified Sound Magazine interview from 1976 by Mike Flood Page: "I used to listen to a lot of records by a guy called Lou Short. He made a lotta albums in the forties and nobody knew who he was. He used to pay to have them made. But everybody in Baxter, Putnam County knew who he was. And he was the town hypochondriac. I mean, there's a breeze coming up and he's got a little sniffle... Anyway, the town hypochondriac finally upped and died, and on his tombstone... it said 'Lou Short Died' and on the bottom it said 'I told you I was sick!'" (Source: "Small Change, A life of Tom Waits". Patrick Humphries, 1989. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0-312-04582-4).

- Baxter is in Putnam County Tennessee. It's east of Nashville, more or less near the town of Murfreesboro (Pony: Mule Variations, 1999)





- Tom Waits (introducing Putnam County, Coffee Break radio show, 1975): "Why don't I tell a story? I could do this piece called "Putnam County". This is about a place in Tennessee eh... It's a real town, a small town. It's one of those towns where... It's so small that the main drag is a transvestite... and eh... " (Source: Coffee Break Concert Interview: The Coffee Break Concert radio show on WMMS-FM (Cleveland/ USA). Conducted by Kid Leo (Lawrence James Travagliante). December 3, 1975)

Tom Waits (1976): "Those guys [country rockers like the Eagles] grew up in L.A. and they don't have cow-shit on their boots - they just got dog shit from Laurel Canyon. They wouldn't last two minutes in Putnam County, that's for sure. If somebody gets shot and killed there on a Saturday night, the Sunday papers say he just died of natural causes!" (Source: "Tom Waits: Would You Say This Man Was Attempting To Convey An Impression Of Sordid Bohemianism" New Musical Express (UK), by Fred Dellar. Date: June 5, 1976)



(2) Hunker: "It sounds like the most typically American of phrases, but it seems originally to have been Scots, first recorded in the eighteenth century. Nobody seems to know exactly what its origin is, though it has been suggested it's linked to the Old Norse huka, to squat; that would make it a close cousin of the modern Dutch huiken and German hocken, meaning to squat or crouch, which makes sense. That's certainly what's meant by the word in American English, in phrases like hunker down or on your hunkers. The Oxford English Dictionary has a fine description of how to hunker: "squat, with the haunches, knees, and ankles acutely bent, so as to bring the hams near the heels, and throw the whole weight upon the fore part of the feet". The advantage of this position is that you're not only crouched close to the ground, so presenting a small target for whatever the universe chooses to throw at you, but you're also ready to move at a moment's notice. Hunker down has also taken on the sense of to hide, hide out, or take shelter, whatever position you choose to do it in. This was a south-western US dialect form that was popularised by President Johnson in the mid 1960s. Despite its Scots ancestry, hunker is rare in standard British English." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004) 



(3) Swizzle stick

- n.: A stick used to stir mixed drinks (Source: Merriam - Webster collegiate dictionary).

- Also mentioned in "Nighthawk Postcards" (And as a neon swizzle stick is stirrin' up the sultry night air)



(4) Naugahyde: American trademark used for vinyl-coated fabrics (Source: Merriam - Webster collegiate dictionary)



(5) Pedal pushers

- A style of pants in which the pant leg ends right at the calf; three-quarter length trousers (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis. August, 2000). 

- Also mentioned in "Heartattack And Vine" (See that little Jersey girl in the see-thru top. With the pedal pushers, suckin' on a soda pop)



(6) Wearing Prince Machiavelli, or something: "A reference to a perfume that is in reality called Prince Matchabelli. This is a common confusion, one that Waits humorously plays up." (Submitted by Pablo Secca. May 24, 2007)



(7) Elbow one's way in: To push one's way through a crowd; to get a place by hook or crook. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(8) Knit the/one's brows

- To frown; to scowl. To bend the brow (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)

- Also mentioned in "Gin Soaked Boy": "The dogs are barking out back, and you're knittin' your brow"



(9) Williams, Hank: The father of contemporary country music. Williams was a superstar by the age of 25; he was dead at the age of 29. In those four short years, he established the rules for all the country performers that followed him. He lived a life as troubled and reckless as that depicted in his songs. Born in Mount Olive, Alabama, on September 17, 1923. "Move It On Over," released in 1947, became Hank Williams's first single for MGM. It was an immediate hit. In 1950 Williams began recording a series of spiritual records under the name Luke the Drifter. Williams continued to rack up hits in 1951, beginning with the Top Ten hit "Dear John" and its number one flip-side, "Cold Cold Heart." Hank had several other hits in 1951, including the number one "Hey, Good Lookin'" and "Howlin' at the Moon," "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still In Love With You)," Though his professional career was soaring, Hank Williams's personal life was beginning to spin out of control, he began to drink frequently. Hank turned completely reckless in 1952, spending nearly all of his waking hours drunk and taking drugs, while he was frequently destroying property and playing with guns. Williams continued to play a large number of concerts, but he was always drunk during the show, or he missed the gig altogether. The Grand Ole Opry fired him for that very reason. He was told that he could return once he was sober. Instead of heeding the Opry's warning, he just sank deeper into his self-destructive behaviour. Hank Williams was scheduled to play a concert on January 1, 1953. Before he and his chauffeur left Ohio, Williams was injected with two shots of the vitamin B-12 and morphine by a doctor. The driver was stopped for speeding when the policeman noticed that Williams looked like a dead man. Williams was taken to a hospital and he was officially declared dead at on January 1, 1953. Hank Williams had died in the back of the Cadillac, on his way to a concert. The last single released in his lifetime was "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive."





(10) To get more ass than a toilet seat: Have more arse than a toilet seat, to phr. [1960s+] of a man, to have an active, even excessive, sex live (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



(11) GMC: A car or engine built by GMC (General Motors Corp.). Hot-rod use since c1955 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(12) Percolate v.i.: 1. To become hot and boil over, said of early automobile engines. c1915-c1925. 2. To run smoothly and easily, said of automobiles and motors. Some use since c1920 (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner) 



(13) Palominos and Strawberry Roans

- Light golden color and auburn color horses. Roan actually means chestnut-colored. Roy Rogers's horse was Trigger, a beautiful palimino which made that color very popular (Submitted by Gary Duncan. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000)

- They're in a parking lot in that part of the song, chatting away while leaving for home. I thought they were talking about upholstery. Palomino leather and strawberry roan leather (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000) 



(14) Rich, Charlie: Born in Forrest City on December 14, 1934, to a poor Arkansas family. Rich was a multi talented artist, bridging Jazz, Blues, and Rock, in a more versatile way than many other artists. "I didn't dig country" Rich would say. As he struggled to find his musical niche, the bluesy "Don't Put No Headstone On My Grave" brought Rich underground fame. Rich with his famous grey streak of hair, recorded "Big Boss Man", and "Behind Closed Doors" in 1973. After making over $2 million in 1975 alone (the time Nighthawks was recorded), Rich settled into a quiet Memphis suburb. An interesting moment came when Charlie was presenting the Country Music Association's Entertainer of the Year Award. As Rich opened the envelope, he discovered to his horror that John Denver had won. Rich set fire to the award on stage, in a rage of fury and disbelief, later attributed to a painkiller reaction. Like Jerry Lee Lewis, Rich is haunted by a deeply religious upbringing which is at odds with his Rock n' Roll profession. Charlie's son Alan is an outstanding keyboard session man for major Rock bands today. Personal quote: "I really don't like happy music. I don't think it says anything." Waits opened shows for Rich in the early 70's.

Tom Waits (1976): "I played at Max's, Kansas City and opened a show for Charlie Rich." (Source: WNEW FM: Vin Scelsa's Idiot's Delight Date: Recorded MediaSound Studios NYC. December 14, 1976. Aired December 18, 1976 on WNEW-FM. Rebroadcast March 24, 1996 WNEW-FM.) Further reading: Perfomances.





(15) Muckalucks

- Tom Waits (1976): "Muckalucks are carpet slippers, a Peterbilt is a truck and Stacey Adams once were a very prestigious shoe..."(Source: "Tom Waits: Would You Say This Man Was Attempting To Convey An Impression Of Sordid Bohemianism" New Musical Express (UK), by Fred Dellar. Date: June 5, 1976)



Putting On The Dog

 



You gotta stomp, whistle and scream

You gotta wake right up in your dreams

You gotta jump, whittle and drive

And keep that feelin' alive

You gotta kick, holler and shout

I'm gonna tell you what it's all about

You gotta tell me that you love me

Tell me that you're mine

We're puttin' on the dog tonight

We're puttin' on the dog tonight



We'll be p-puttin' on the dog tonight

Puttin' on, puttin' on the dog tonight

We'll be puttin' on the dog tonight

Well, we'll be puttin' on the dog tonight

Puttin' on the dog

Puttin' on the dog



We'll flip, follow and fly

Just do it now and don't ask why

You gotta strut, wiggle and slide

Let everyone know that you're alive

You gotta crank, gallop and twist

Do it once, you'll never resist

Tell me that you love me

Tell me that you're mine

We're puttin' on the dog tonight, yeah

Puttin' on the dog tonight, all right



Well, we could go into a zuki jump

It's rainin', it pours

Big ol' Lincoln with the suicide doors(2)

Tip that bottle from the brim to the dregs

You ain't dancin' till you cross your legs

Puttin' on the dog tonight

We'll be puttin' on the dog tonight

We'll be puttin' on the dog tonight

Puttin' on the dog tonight

Puttin' on the dog

I'll be p-puttin' on the dog

Puttin' on the dog

Puttin' on the dog

Puttin' on the dog

Puttin' on the dog



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1998

Official release: Liberty Heights soundtrack album, 1999

Re-released on: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Put on dog, to

- phr. [mid-19C+] (orig. US) 1. to do something energetically. 2. to show off, to put on airs (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)

- "To put on the dog is first recorded only in 1871, in a book by L H Bagg called Four Years at Yale: "Dog, style, splurge. To put on dog, is to make a flashy display, to cut a swell", and is certainly a US expression. So there's really no chance at all of an English medieval origin. It has been suggested that it developed out of the rise in popularity of ladies' lap dogs in the period after the American Civil War. Such animals were presumably pampered and beribboned, and this might have suggested that to put on the dog was to show off. This has the ring of a story made up after the event, but it's the only explanation I've come across." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(2) Big old Lincoln with suicide doors

- door configuration rear-opening [front doors are hinged at the "B" pillars and the rear ones at the "C" pillars]. B-pillars: In sedan styles, the second set of roof supports (between the windshield and rear portion of the roof). C-pillars: In sedan styles, the third set of roof supports located between the rear window and �- window in the roof �-panel. (Source: The (new) Cadillac Database�, Glossary of Cadillac Terms and Definitions. � 1996, Yann Saunders and the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, Inc.)

- Also mentioned in Thousand Bing Bangs (Devout Catalyst, 1992. Re-released as First Kiss, Orphans 2006): "She drove a big ol' Lincoln with suicide doors and a sewing machine in the back."



---------- R--------



Rainbow Sleeves

 



You used to dream yourself away each night

To places that you've never been

On wings made of wishes that you whispered to yourself

Back when every night the moon and you would sweep away

To places that you knew you would never get the blues



Now whiskey gives you wings to carry each one of your dreams

And the moon does not belong to you

But I believe that your heart keeps young dreams

Well, I've been told to keep from ever growing old

And a heart that has been broken will be stronger when it mends



Don't let the blues stop your singing

Darling, you only got a broken wing

Hey, you just hang on to my rainbow

Hang on to my rainbow

Hang on to my rainbow sleeves



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1983(1)

Official release: "Girl At Her Volcano", Rickie Lee Jones. Warner Bros, 1983

Performed by Rickie Lee Jones



 



Known covers:

Girl At Her Volcano. Rickie Lee Jones. 1983. WEA

Women. Don Bouchat. August 31, 1994. Self-released

Britches. Barbara McAfee. 1996. Self-released

Against The Tide. Davis Gaines. November 19, 1996. Lap Records

Faithfull Covers. Andi Sexgang. April 4, 2000. Dressed to Kill

Soho Stories. Ian Shaw. May 21, 2001. Milestone

From The Heart. Eric Van Aro. April 23, 2002. The Orchard

Just You, Just Me. Joy Wright. 2003. High Dunes, LLC (medley w. "Two Little Clouds")

Delicate Hour. Patty Morabito. January 7, 2003. Lml Music

Painted Songs. Rainbow Sleeves (Eddie N�nning and Lara Schallenberg). Rough Trade

In His Eyes. Ellen Greene & Christian Klikovits. August 23, 2004. Rainbow Records

With One More Look At You. Deanna Dubbin. 2005. Self-released

Teargirl. Jane Lui. May, 2005. Self-released

The Blue-faced Sessions Part 1. La Kidda. May 23, 2005. Essential Dance Music (The Netherlands)

Under The Covers. Anna Beaumont. November 9, 2005. Indie Pool Inc.

Shiny And New. Jonathan Rayson. April 11, 2006. Lml Music

I'm Not Waiting. Julia Murney. May 9, 2006. Sh-K Boom Records

Keeping You In Mind. Emily Saxe. September 13, 2006. Self-released (USA)

Shed. Kyle Bronsdon. July 2008. Self-released



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Listen to audio excerpt of Rainbow Sleeves as sung by Rickie Lee Jones.

Taken from "Girl At Her Volcano" (WEA, 1983).



Notes:



(1) Rainbow Sleeves: Waits states he originally wrote the song for Bette Midler. Midler has indeed performed the song live (World Tour 1978, Divine Madness tour 1979-1980) but she didn't have the song released on any record. Earliest known live version by Midler is "September 20, 1978. The London Palladium - London, UK" thus dating the song back to 1978 (Blue Valentine era, when Waits and Rickie Lee Jones were dating) or earlier. It seems Rickie Lee Jones was already familiar with the song (and referring to it) in 1981 (Pirates): "And I won't need a pilot. Got a pirate who might sail. Somewhere I heard far away. You answer me. So I'm holding on. To your rainbow sleeves" One might assume she heard the song as performed by Midler, only to record it in 1983 (Girl At Her Volcano). Waits has never recorded nor performed the song. 



Tom Waits (1985): "Yeah, that was written for Bette Midler. She did it on the road, and then on a TV show once. Bette's one of my oldest friends. She's a real touchstone for me." (Source: "The Marlowe Of The Ivories" New Musical Express magazine (UK), by Barney Hoskyns. Date: May 25, 1985)

Tom Waits (1988): "I wrote some songs for her (Bette Midler). like "I Never Talk to Strangers" and "Rainbow Sleeves." As soon as I met her, I felt like I had already known her she can do an hour on your hair. We can talk about anything. I love her musical impulses; she has a great sense of history in terms of her involvement in show business. She wanted to open a lounge act together, featuring us as Edie and Edie Wednesday. We've been friends for a long time, you know, since '74." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview magazine: Francis Thumm. Livingston/ Montana. October, 1988)



Rain Dogs

 



(Rain Dogs studio version, 1985)



Inside a broken clock

Splashing the wine with all the rain dogs

Taxi, we'd rather walk

Huddle(2) a doorway with the rain dogs

For I am a rain dog too



Oh, how we danced and we swallowed the night

For it was all ripe for dreaming

Oh, how we danced away all of the lights(3)

We've always been out of our minds



The rum pours strong and thin

Beat out the dustman with the rain dogs

Aboard a shipwreck train

Give my umbrella to the rain dogs

For I am a rain dog too



Oh, how we danced with the Rose of Tralee(4)

Her long hair black as a raven

Oh, how we danced and you whispered to me

You'll never be going back home



Oh, how we danced with the Rose of Tralee

Her long hair black as a raven

Oh, how we danced and you whispered to me

You'll never be going back home



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985

Official release: Rain Dogs, Island Records Inc., 1985

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Further readingRaindogs full story





 



Rain Dogs



(Big Time live version, 1988)



Inside a broken clock, splash the wine with all the rain dogs

Taxi, taxi, taxi we'd rather walk

Huddle(2) a doorway with the rain dogs

For I am a rain dog, too



I know how we danced and we swallowed the night

Her long hair black as a raven

I know how we danced and she whispered to me(3)

We'll never be going back home



I know how we danced and we swallowed the night

Her long hair black as a raven

I know how we danced and she whispered to me

We'll never be going back home



Oh, how we danced with the Rose of Tralee(4)

Her long hair black as a raven

I know how we danced and she whispered to me

We'll never be going back home



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1985-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Further readingRaindogs full story



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Fyllhund")

Spiewomalowanie. Mariusz Lubomski. 1994. Self-released. In Polish "Zmokniete psy"

Bukowski Waits For Us - Vol. 1. Michael Kiessling. September 25, 2000. Buschfunk (Germany)

Being Tom Waits. Billy`s Band. 2001. Self-released demo album (Russia)

The Carnival Saloon Live. The Carnival Saloon. October, 2001. Self-released (Ireland)

A Postcard From... Billy's Band. 2003. Self-released (Russia)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003. Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Black As A Raven. The Jim-Jams. 2004. Flotainment

God Is A Tom Waits Fan. The Box Spring Hogs. May 2004. Self-released demo

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

We´re Not Bitter. Children Of Celebrities. July 28, 2007. Self-released



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Rain Dogs" taken from the Big Time concert video.

Recorded live at the Wiltern Theatre. Los Angeles/ USA. November 7/8, 1987.

PolyGram Video (Island Visual Arts)/ Fries Home Video (Fries Entertainment Inc.), 1988.

With: Michael Blair, Ralph Carney, Greg Cohen, Marc Ribot and Willy Schwarz.

Stage show concept: Kathleen Brennan & Tom Waits. Directed by Chris Blum.



Notes:



(1) Rain Dogs

Tom Waits (1985): "People who live outdoors. You know how after the rain you see all these dogs that seem lost, wandering around. The rain washes away all their scent, all their direction. So all the people on the album are knit together, by some corporeal way of sharing pain and discomfort." (Source: "The Sultan Of Sleaze" YOU magazine, by Pete Silverton. Date: New York. Early October, 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "It's a kind of word I made up for people who sleep in doorways. I mean, New York when it rains, all the peelings and cigarette butts, float to the surface like in Taxi Driver when he says, "someday a real raids gonna come along and wash all the scum of f the street". Looks better in the rain, like it's been lacquered." (Source: "Lower east side story". The Face: Elissa van Poznak. Ca. October, 1985)

Tom Waits (1985). "Maybe I should say something about the title of the album, "Rain Dogs". You know dogs in the rain lose their way back home. They even seem to look up at you and ask if you can help them get back home. 'Cause after it rains every place they peed on has been washed out. It's like "Mission Impossible". They go to sleep thinking the world is one way and they wake up and somebody moved the furniture." (Source: "Tom Waits for no man". Spin Magazine: Glenn O'Brien. November, 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "A Rain Dog is - you notice it more in lower Manhattan than anywhere else - after a rain in New York all the dogs that got caught in the rain, somehow the water washed away their whole trail and they can't get back home so about 4 in the morning you see all these stranded dogs on the street and they're looking around like - won't you help me get back home, sir, please - excuse me sir - excuse me sir - can you help me find my way back home - all makes and models, the short ones, the black ones, the tall ones, the expensive ones, the long ones, the disturbed ones, they all want to get home. So that's a Rain Dog. It's like falling asleep somewhere and you thought you knew where you were and when you woke up - it's like Mission Impossible - they changed the furniture and the walls and windows and the sky turned a different colour and you can never get back and most of the stories in this record have to do with people in New York who are experiencing a considerable amount of pain and discomfort." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985)

Tom Waits (1985) (What are Raindogs?): "Eh... I don't know... you can get 'em in Coney Island. They're little eh... It's eh... They come in a bun. And eh... It's just water in a bun. That's all... It's a bun that's been... It's a bun without a hot-dog in it. (laughs) It's just... it's been left out in the rain and they're called a Raindog. And they're less expensive then a standard hot-dog... ... ... No, a Raindog is a... is anybody who eh... people who sleep in doorways. People who don't have credit cards. People who don't go to church. People who don't have eh, y'know, a mortgage, y'know? Who fly in this whole plane by the seat of their pants. People who... are going down the road eh, y'know?" (Source: "Nightlines Interview" Nightlines on CBC Stereo (Canada) conducted by Michael Tearson. Date: New York. Late 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "You see all these dogs out on the street looking lost. They kind of look up at you like: `'scuse me sir, can you, uh, ...(deep voice) can you help me? 'cause the rain has washed away all the scents; the way they got wherever they got. So they can't find their way back home." (Source: "Enigmatic Waits survives, thrives" The San Diego Union-Tribune. By Rip Rense. November 1, 1985) 



(2) Huddle v.t.: To crowd (things) together to mingle confusedly; to assemble without order or system (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, I) 



(3) Oh, how we danced: Notice the musical and lyrical reference to "The Anniversary Waltz" (Words and music by Al Jolson and Saul Chaplin): "Oh, how we danced On the night we were wed; We vowed our true love Though a word wasn't said. The world was in bloom, There were stars in the skies Except for the few That were there in your eyes. Dear, as I held you So close in my arms, Angels were singing A hymn to your charms, Two hearts gently beating Were murmuring low, "My darling, I love you so." The night seemed to fade Into blossoming dawn; The sun shone anew But the dance lingered on. Could we but relive that Sweet moment sublime, We'd find that our love Is unaltered by time."



(4) Rose of Tralee: A yearly beauty contest in Ireland. The original Rose of Tralee was a young dairymaid turned children's maid named Mary O'Connor who caught the eye of young William Pembroke Mulchinock of the Mulchinock Estate where she was working. This soon turned to love, but due to staunch family pride and an accusation that he had killed a man this never turned to marriage. William fled and returned years later to find that she had just died. After an unsuccessful marriage in America and then living the rest of his days alone in Ireland, he died and was buried next to his beloved in 1864. (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)



Rains On Me

 



This is how the world will be

Everywhere I go it rains on me

Forty monkeys drowning in a boiling sea

Everywhere I go it rains on me

I went down into the valley to pray

Everywhere I go it rains on me

I got drunk and I stayed all day

Everywhere I go it rains on me



Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

It rains on me



All god's chilluns can't you see

Everywhere I go it rains on me

Louie Lista and Marchese(1)

Everywhere I go it rains on me

Robert Sheehan and Paul Body(1)

Everywhere I go it rains on me

I went down to Argyle, I went down to Dix

Everywhere I go it rains on me

To get my powders and to get my fix

Everywhere I go it rains on me



Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

It rains on me



Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

Everywhere I go

It rains on me



Written by: Chuck E. Weiss and Tom Waits

Published by: Chuck E. Weiss Music (ASCAP)/ Jalma Music (ASCAP), �1999.

Rykomusic, Inc. (ASCAP) a division of Evergreen Copyrights (both admin. by ICG)

Official release: Extremely Cool - Chuck E. Weiss, Slow River/ Rykodisc, 1999

Re-released on: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Pressure Island. Hack Mack Jackson. July 21, 2006. Triggerfish Music



Notes:



(1) Louie Lista and Marchese,...Robert Sheehan and Paul Body.

- Notice the subtitle for Jitterbug Boy, 1974/ 1976: "Sharing a Curbstone With Chuck E. Weiss, Robert Marchese, Paul Body And The Mug And Artie."

- Chuck E. Weis: Chicago born musician and longtime friend. Further reading: Chuck E. Weiss.

- Robert Sheehan: now deceased Blues Traveler's bassist Bobby Sheehan? (Bobby Sheehan died on August 30, 1999 at his New Orleans home due to an accidental drug overdose.)

Robert Marchese: manager of the troubadour in the 1970's

- Paul Body: doorman of the Troubadour in the 1970's. "... Paul Body, is active in the music and spoken word and literary community. He's released a solo compact disc, "Love Is Like Rasputin" for New Alliance Records, and participated in the laserdisc collection audio/visual document L.A. JOURNAL released by The Voyager Company. He's also just completed a reading in the July, '95 "Rock and Roll In Literature" series at The MET Theater in Hollywood that featured actors Ed Harris, Bill Pullman, Chloe Webb, Beverly D'Angelo and other musicians and poets. He's also a clerk at Video Journeys and a film fanatic. (Source: "From The B's Nest", Alternative Cinema issue #6 - pgs. 8-9, 1995). "... Paul Body has many claims to fame: poet, writer, accordionist, and longtime friend of Tom Waits. On his album Love Is Like Rasputin, Body lays out his humorous and sometimes-touching thoughts on 1965 Los Angeles in a series of diary entries. Thirty years after witnessing the Watts riots, his mother's death, and the rise of his beloved Rolling Stones, Body is still actively performing across the city where he came of age." (Source: "SXSW Spoken Word: 1996" by Phil West. The Austin Chronicle) 

- The Mug: Troubadour barman, blues harmonica player, actor, poet Louie Lista. Name checked in the Blue Valentine linernotes as Louis Lista. "Louie got his start in the field of blues and folk music in the early 1960's when he studied harmonica with the legendary blues musician Taj Mahal. After playing countless shows at such popular venues as the Ash Grove and Troubadour in Hollywood, he helped to found the seminal 1970's powerhouse roots rock group, The Sheiks of Shake. They recorded for Mystic Records and shared stages with such musical "national treasures" as Clifton Chenier and Muddy Waters. In the late 1970's, after David Wulff completed a year long performing stint with the Shieks, Louie and Wulff started playing as an acoustic duo covering a wide range of musical styles from folk to country to blues, jazz and even contemporary popular songs. They shared stages with a "who's who" list of then popular recording artists, including R.E.M., Black Flag, the Circle Jerks, X, and The Knitters. In the 1980's they added electric guitars, bass and drums to the mix, founded the Outer City Allstars and expanded our venues to include such unlikely performance opportunities as opening for Pro Wrestling matches. In the early 1990's, Louie signed with New Alliance Records and showcased his talent as a spoken word artist on two CDs, "To Sleep With the Lights On" and "Walkin' and Talkin'". The first CD contained several songs that David Wulff produced and the second was recorded with longtime friend David Crittendon, a talented singer, pianist and author. As the 1990's progressed, Louie's love of and training in theater (Santa Monica City College) led to a series of high profile acting jobs. He played opposite Emmy award winning Kay Lenz ("Rich Man, Poor Man", "The Big Chill") as Sir Toby Belch in Spike Stewart's modern day tribute to William Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" ("The 12th Nite"). He also was a featured actor working alongside none other than Ringo Starr in Century 21 Real Estate's television commercial "Perfect Hook-ups". (Source: "Louie Lista Benefit at La Ca�ada United Methodist Church", by David Wulff. March 8, 2003)





Art Fein, Tom Waits and Paul Body (late 1977)

Source: "Another Fein Mess/ Other Fein Messes" by Art Fein. March, 2003. Copyright Art Fein



Red Shoes (By The Drugstore)

Red Shoes By The Drugstore



(Blue Valentine studio version, 1978)



She wore red shoes by the news-stand

as the rain splashed the Nickle(1)

and spilled like Chablis all along the midway

There's a little bluejay

in a red dress, on a sad night



One straw in a rootbeer

A compact(2) with a cracked mirror

A bottle of evening in Paris perfume

What's this sad tune?



He told her to wait in by the magazines

To take care of some business it seems

Bring a raincoat

Bring a suitcase

Bring your dark eyes

and wear those red shoes



There's a dark huddle(3) at the bus stop

Umbrellas arranged in a sad bouquet

li'l Caesar (4) got caught

he was going down to second

He was cooled

Changing stations on the chamber

to steal a diamond ring

from a jewelry store for his baby

He loved the way she looked

in those red shoes



She waited by the drugstore

Caesar had never been this late before

The dogs bayed the moon(5)

and rattled their chain

and the cold jingle of taps in a puddle

was the burglar alarm

snitchin'(6) on Caesar



The rain washes memories from the sidewalks

and the hounds splash the Nickle full of soldiers

and Santa Claus is drunk

in the Ski Room(7)

and it's Christmas Eve

in a sad caf�

when the moon gets it's way

there's a little blue jay by the news-stand

Red shoes

Red shoes



So meet me tonight by the drugstore

Meet me tonight by the drugstore

Meet me tonight by the drugstore



Goin out tonight

Goin out tonight

Goin out tonight

Wear your red shoes



Red shoes

Red shoes

Red shoes

Red shoes



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1978

Official release: Blue Valentine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1978

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Big Time" (Amsco Publications, 1988)





 



Red Shoes



(Big Time live version, 1988)



She wore red shoes by the news-stand

and the rain splashed the Nickel(1)

and it spilled like Chablis, all along the midway

There's a little bluejay

wearing red shoes, on a sad night



One straw in a rootbeer

A compact(2) with a cracked mirror

A bottle of evening in Paris perfume

What is this sad tune?



He told her to wait in by the magazines

For, he told her to wait for the magazines

Oh, bring a raincoat

Oh, bring a suitcase

Oh, bring your dark eyes

Wear those red shoes, red shoes, red shoes

red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes

red shoes, red shoes



There's a dark huddle(3) at the bus stop

Umbrellas arranged in a sad bouquet

Caesar(4) got caught

Oh, Little Caesar got caught, going down to second

Little Caesar got caught, going down to second

He was cooled

Changing stations on the chamber

to steal a diamond ring from a jewelry store for his baby

He loved the way she looked in those red shoes

He loved the way she looked in those red shoes

He loved the way she looked in those red shoes

Red shoes, red shoes



You got to meet me tonight by the drugstore baby

Meet me tonight by the drugstore baby

Going out tonight

Going out tonight wear those red shoes

Going out tonight put on those red shoes

Going out tonight put on those red shoes

Red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes



Now the hounds splash the Nickle full of soldiers

Now Santa Claus is drunk in the Ski Room(7)

And it's Christmas Eve in a sad caf�

When the moon gets it's way

There's a little blue jay by the news-stand

Wearing red shoes

She wearing red shoes

You got to meet me tonight by the drugstore baby

Meet me tonight by the drugstore baby

Going out tonight

Put on your red shoes

Put on your red shoes

Put on your red shoes

Put on your red shoes

Put on your red shoes

Red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes

Red shoes

Put on your red shoes baby

Red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes

Red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes

Red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes, red shoes



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1978-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Big Time" (Amsco Publications, 1988)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by The Wedding Present

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "En r�d sko ved butikken")

Singles 1995-97. The Wedding Present. October, 1999. Cooking Vinyl Records - COOK CD 184 (same version as on "Step Right Up: The Songs Of Tom Waits", 1995)

Red Harmony. Riguelle & Hautekiet. 2000. LC Music (Belgium)



Notes:



(1) The Nickle/ The Nickel:

Tom Waits: (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1979): "In downtown Los Angeles, there's a place called Fifth Street, it's a place where all the hoboes are, and they call it "on the nickel". There was a motion picture called "On the nickel" that was written by Ralph Waite and this is a story, kinda a wino's lullaby." (Source: Tom Waits on the Don Lane show, 1979. Transcribed by Luke Martin) 

Tom Waits (introducing 'On The Nickel', 1979): "I'd like to do a new song here. This is eh, it's about downtown Los Angeles on 5th Street. And eh all the winos affectionately refer to it as The Nickel. So this is kind of a hobo's lullaby." (Source: BBC - Tonight In Person, July 1979)

The Nickel: also mentioned in On the Nickel, 1980: "Well they're lined up all around the block, on the Nickel over there.."



(2) Compact: a small portable case used to contain face powder, usually comes with a foldable mirror.



(3) Huddle n.: 1. A densely packed group or crowd, as of people or animals 2. A small private conference or meeting (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(4) Little Caesar: Might be inspired by or referring to Warner Bros.' classical gangster film "Little Caesar" from 1930. "One of the most well-known and best of the early classical gangster films is Warner Bros.' and director Mervyn LeRoy's Little Caesar (1930). It is often called the grandfather of the modern crime film, with its quintessential portrayal of an underworld character that rebelliously challenged traditional values. Although it was not the first gangster film of the talkies era, it is generally considered the prototype of future gangster films. It is a taut, fast-moving (at a brisk 80 minutes) and vivid film that set the genre's standards and launched the entire popular film type. Little Caesar reflects the technically primitive nature of early film-making, with a straight-forward, blunt narrative (composed of a series of tableaux), yet its hard-hitting gritty realism gripped audiences. Unlike many other gangster films, the film did not feature graphic bloodshed, depict violence on-screen, or sensationalize street language, but its tone was somber and tough. Its low-budget sets and cheap, sleazy atmosphere added to the film's impact. The crime film's impact at the start of the sound era was remarkable - its box-office popularity spawned many others like it (mostly from the Warner Bros. studios) in the decade of the 1930's. The film's title character was based, in part, after the character of real-life, ruthless gangster Al Capone - a vain and cruelly vicious Italian mobster who experienced a similar rise and fall. [Little Caesar also resembled Brooklyn underworld gangster Buggsy Goldstein.]" (Further reading: Little Caesar review at filmsite.org. Thanks to Floris Cooman for pointing out this reference).





(5) Bay the moon: To bark at the moon. (French, aboyer, to bark at.). (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(6) Snitch: 

- v.t.: To steal or take small items. v.i. To inform against, betray, squeal, esp. to another's superior or teacher (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). 

- Also mentioned in "Wrong Side Of The Road" (And get the eyeball of a rooster and the stones from a ditch and wash 'em down with bilge water and say you'll never snitch)



(7) Ski Room: A bar at 5851 Sunset Blvd. LA/ USA (close to Herb Cohen's office) that Waits, Chuck E. Weis and Rickie Lee Jones regularly frequented.



Reeperbahn

Down The Reeperbahn



(Alice demo version, 1992)(1)



Around the curve of The Parrot Bar

A broken-down old movie star

Hustling and Easterner

Bringing out the beast in him

A high dive on a swimming pool

Filled with needles and with fools

The memories are short but the tales are long

Down there in the Reeperbahn



They called her Rosie when she was a girl

For her bright red cheeks and strawberry curls

When she would sing the river would run

She said she'd be a comedian

Oh what a pity, oh what a shame

When she said "come calling" nobody came

Now her bright red cheeks are painted on

And she's laughing her head off in the Reeperbahn



Now little Hans was always strange

Wearing women's underthings

His father beat him but he wouldn't change

He ran off with a man one day

Now his lingerie is all the rage

In the black on every page

His father proudly calls his name

Down there in the Reeperbahn



Now if you've lost your inheritance

And all you're left is common sense

And you're not too picky 'bout the crowd you keep

Or the mattress where you sleep

Behind every window, behind every door

The apple's gone but there's always the core

The seeds will sprout up right through the floor

Down there in the Reeperbahn

Down there in the Reeperbahn



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Reeperbahn



(Alice studio version, 2002)



Around the curve of The Parrot Bar

A broken-down old movie star

Hustling and Easterner

Bringing out the beast in her

A high dive on a swimming pool

Filled with needles and with fools

The memories are short but the tales are long

When you're in the Reeperbahn(2)



Oh, they called her Rosie when she was a girl

For her bright red cheeks and strawberry curls

When she would laugh the river would run

She said she'd be a comedian

Oh what a pity, oh what a shame

When she said "come calling" nobody came

Now her bright red cheeks are painted on

And she's laughing her head off in the Reeperbahn



Now little Hans was always strange

Wearing women's underthings

His father beat him but he wouldn't change

He ran off with a man one day

Now his lingerie is all the rage

In the black on every page

His father proudly calls his name

Down there in the Reeperbahn



Now if you've lost your inheritance

And all you've left is common sense

And you're not too picky 'bout the crowd you keep

Or the mattress where you sleep

Behind every window, behind every door

The apple's gone but there's always the core

And the seeds will sprout up right through the floor

Down there in the Reeperbahn.



Down there in the Reeperbahn.



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP),) 1992

Official release: Alice, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Alice - Tom Waits" (Amsco Publications, 2002)

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Alice demo version: Extra song added to scene 7.



(2) Reeperbahn: Germany's famous red-light zone, located at the St. Pauli district in Hamburg. Notorious for its sex related entertainment. At a stone's throw (5-minute walk) you'll find Harry's Harbour Bazar (Balduinstrasse 18). Further reading: Hamburg city Reeperbahn (in German)Reeperbahn (in German).





Road To Peace

 



Young Abdel Madi Shabneh was only 18 years old

The youngest of 9 children, he'd never spent a nite away from home

And his mother held his photograph, up in the New York Times

You see the killing has intensified, along the road to peace



A tall thin boy with a whispy moustache, disguised as an Orthodox Jew

On a crowded bus in Jerusalem, some had survived World War II

And the thunderous explosion blew out windows, 200 yards away

More retribution and 17 dead, along the road to peace



Now at King George Avenue and Jaffa Road, passengers boarded bus 14A

In the aisle next to the driver Abdel Madi Shabneh

And the last thing that he said on earth was "God is great and god is good"

And he blew them all to kingdom come, upon the road to peace



Now in response to this, another kiss of death was visited upon

Yashir Tehah(2), Israel said is an Hamas Senior militant

Israel sent 4 choppers in, flames engulfed his white Opel

And it killed his wife and his 3-year-old child, leaving only blackened skeletons



They found a toddler's bottle and a pair of small shoes,

 and they waved them in front of the cameras

But Israel said they did not know that his wife and child were in the car

There are roadblocks everywhere and only suffering on TV

Neither side will ever give up their smallest right, along the road to peace



Israel launched its latest campaign against Hamas on Tuesday

And two days later Hamas shot back and killed five Israeli soldiers

Though thousands dead and wounded on both sides, most of them Middle Eastern civilians

They fill their children full of hate, to fight an old man's war and die, upon the road to peace



"And this is our land we will fight with all our force", say the Palastinians and the Jews

And each side will cut off the hand of anyone who tries to stop the Resistance

If the right eye offends thee, then you must pluck it out

And Machoud Abbas and Sharon had been lost, along the road to peace



Once Kissinger said: "We have no friends, America only has interests"

And now our president wants to be seen as a hero and he's hungry for re-election

But Bush is reluctant to risk his future, with the fear of his political failures(3)

So he plays chess at his desk and poses for the press, ten thousand miles from the road to peace



In a video that they found at the home of Abdel Madi Shabneh

He held a Kalashnikov riffle, and he spoke with the voice like a boy

He was an excellent student, he studied so hard, it was as if he had a future

He told his mother he had a test that day, out along the road to peace



The fundamentalist killing on both sides is standing in the path of peace

And tell me, why are we arming the Israeli army with guns and tanks and bullets?

And if god is great and god is good, why can't he change the hearts of men?

Well, maybe god himself is lost and needs help

Maybe god himself he needs all of our help

Maybe god himself is lost and needs help

He's out upon the road to peace



Maybe god himself is lost and needs help

Maybe god himself he needs all of our help

And he's lost upon the road to peace

And he's lost upon the road to peace

Out upon the road to peace



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Tom Waits: vocals. Marc Ribot: guitar. Casey Waits: drums.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Road To Peace: 

The Observer (2006): "'I was pissed off,' he sighs, rubbing his eyes. 'Started with a line I read in the paper one day: "He studied so hard it was as if he had a future." It was about this kid who got blown up in a suicide bomb on a bus in Israel. They say God doesn't give you anything he knows you can't handle. Well, I don't know if I believe that.' He'll probably get his ass kicked, I say, for the line '... why are we arming the Israeli Army with guns and tanks and bullets?' He nods. 'Maybe. Maybe. But, we are. That's just a fact.I guess any time anyone from outside a situation voices an opinion, it's going to be, "Who the fuck are you?" Don't matter what side you're on. But this song ain't about taking sides, it's an indictment of both sides. I tried to be as equitable as possible.' The places and the incidents referred to in the song are all real, and the names of the people, too. He's well aware, he says, of the risk of making a song carry that kind of weight. 'I don't really know what a song like that can achieve, but I was compelled to write it. I don't know if any genuine meaningful change could ever result from a song. It's kind of like throwing peanuts at a gorilla.' (Source: "Off Beat", The Observer Magazine (UK), October 29, 2006. By Sean O'Hagan) 

(2006): On Real Gone, you had "Day After Tomorrow." On the new CDs, there's the song "Road to Peace" with the underlying political message. Where did the song's message come from? Tom Waits: The New York Times. When you read the paper every day, it's hard to avoid that seeping into your consciousness. That was written not long ago. A lot of these were recorded within the last year. It's new stuff. I don't want to go into the origin of everything, but for me, they're from questionable sources. I didn't put any liner notes in because I didn't want to overexplain it." (Source: "Tom Waits Call And Response", Stop Smiling magazine No. 28 (USA). October 27, 2006) 

Tom Waits (2006): "I read an article in the New York Times about a young Palestinian suicide bomber who got on a bus in Jerusalem disguised as an Orthodox Jew. The story seemed to humanize what was going on in a significant way. It haunted me, and that's why I write many of my songs, because something's haunting me and I need to get it outta my head. What else could I do? Nobody in Washington is calling me up to discuss our foreign policy." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich) 

Tom Waits (2006): "Well, it's right out of the New York Times, really. It was a human-interest piece they did in the Times. They'll do a whole thing about a wedding planner in Baghdad, y'know, and the fact she has melting wedding cakes in the back of her Datsun. It's 2 in the afternoon and she's dodging bullets on the way to a wedding in somebody's backyard, things like that. This was about this guy, Abdel Madi Shabneh, who died. Never spent a night away from home, if you can imagine. This was the first night he spent away from home. So there were things like that in there. He studied so hard he had a seizure, things like that. I guess it stayed with me... Yeah. It's Marc Ribot on guitar and my son on drums." (Source: "Songwriter's Wandering Orphans' Will Always Find A Musical Home", The Plain Dealer (Cleveland/ USA). November 19, 2006. Telephone interview by John Soeder) 

Tom Waits (2006): "It came right out of The New York Times. It fell right out of the paper and onto the tape recorder. It's a hot topic and there were a lot of things in the article that moved me. All those lines [about the youthful suicide bomber] like, "He studied so hard, it's as if he had a future, he told his mother he had a test that day." Those were things I couldn't throw in the fireplace, so I thought maybe we can patch this into something without sounding too stiff. But then again that's probably the strength of it, that it reads like a news article." (Source: "Tom Waits Still In The Driver's Seat", The Chicago Tribune (USA). November 21, 2006. By Greg Kot)



(2) Yashir Tehah: This should read "Yasir/ Yasser Taha" (see articles below)



(3) But Bush is reluctant to risk his future: Orphans booklet has this transcribed as: "But HE is reluctant to risk his future."



Israeli Forces Take Aim at Hamas for Third Strike in 24 Hours



The New York Times. June 12, 2003. By Terence Neilan



A new round of violence erupted in the Mideast today as Israeli helicopters fired missiles at a car in Gaza City, killing a senior official of the militant group Hamas and at least six other Palestinians, news agencies reported.



The official was identified by Palestinian officials as Yasser Taha, Reuters said, adding that Mr. Taha's wife and 3-year-old daughter were among those killed. A baby bottle and child's shoes were among items pulled from the burning car, The Associated Press said.



The last of six missiles exploded among bystanders who had rushed to help the vehicle's passengers, injuring more than 40 people, witnesses and security officials told Reuters. A 3-year-old, unconscious and burned, was taken to Shifa Hospital in Gaza and died there, medical officials said.



The attack came after Prime Minister Ariel Sharon of Israel today repeated his determination to hunt down Palestinian militants.



At the same time, Hamas, which took responsibility for a suicide bus bombing in Jerusalem on Wednesday that killed 16 people, vowed that it would carry out more attacks and warned foreigners to leave Israel.



The sequence of attacks and counterattacks seemed to further dash hopes for peace in the region that grew after a meeting in Aqaba, Jordan, of Palestinian and Israeli leaders with President Bush. The participants committed themselves to the so-called road map for peace, which is backed by the United States, but since then the violence has increased rather than lessened.



The White House, which rebuked Israel on Wednesday for trying to assassinate a Hamas leader, today blamed Palestinian militants for the violence.



"The issue is not Israel, the issue is not the Palestinian Authority," Mr. Fleischer told reporters traveling with Mr. Bush in Connecticut, "the issue is the terrorists who are killing in an attempt to stop the process."



"The issue is Hamas, the terrorists are Hamas," he said.



At a cabinet meeting in Jerusalem, Mr. Sharon called Palestinian leaders "crybabies who let violence run rampant," news agencies quoted a cabinet official as saying.



Mr. Sharon also called the new Palestinian prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, a "chick that hasn't grown its feathers yet," adding that "We have to help him fight terror until his feathers grow," the agencies said. Mr. Sharon said Israel would not stand by while Mr. Abbas tried to get the militant groups to end the violence. The Palestinian leader has said he prefers dialogue over force to rein in the militant groups.



Hamas, however, struck a determined note of its own, saying in a statement sent to news agencies that the Jerusalem suicide bombing "is the beginning of a new series of revenge attacks."



It said it had ordered "all military cells" to carry out further attacks and warned foreigners "to leave the Zionist entity immediately to preserve their lives."



Today's attack was the fourth in Gaza in three days. On Tuesday, the Israelis failed in an attempt to assassinate Dr. Abdel Aziz Rantisi, a Hamas leader, in retaliation for a weekend attack by militant groups that killed four Israeli soldiers. Two others attacks were made on Wednesday, killing nine people, including four militants.





 



Israel Presses Its Assault on Hamas, Killing Leader in Gaza



The New York Times. June 12, 2003. By Greg Myre



JERUSALEM, June 12 - Israel pressed ahead with airstrikes against Hamas militants today as helicopters blasted a car with rockets in Gaza City, killing seven people, including a Hamas leader who was targeted, along with his wife and 3-year-old daughter.



Today's attack came as Israelis buried their dead from Wednesday's suicide bombing by a Hamas militant, who struck on a bus traveling along one of Jerusalem's main commercial arteries, killing 16 civilians and wounding about 100.



This week's bloodshed has been some of the worst in months and has imperiled the Middle East peace plan that was formally rolled out just last week at a summit meeting in Jordan.



In a grimly familiar pattern, signs of diplomatic progress have been greeted almost immediately with an escalation in attacks by extremists throughout the 32 months of violence.



Hamas, which has always opposed peace talks with Israel, rejected the latest peace plan and has renewed its efforts to carry out violence, bringing forceful Israeli reprisals.



A week ago, Israeli and Palestinians leaders had toned down their rhetoric and were speaking with hope about how to begin implementing the peace plan, known as the road map. Today, they are again trading bitter recriminations, with each attack increasing the likelihood that more will follow.



The Israeli helicopters appeared in the clear skies over Gaza City only hours after an Israeli cabinet meeting in which Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's government vowed to "completely wipe out" Hamas.



"Hamas leaders have no immunity, especially when this organization is doing everything it can to scuttle the political process," Tzachi Hanegbi, the minister for internal security, told the Israeli Army radio.



The Israelis struck in the Sheik Radwan neighborhood in northern Gaza City, a Hamas stronghold, and the target was Yasir Taha, described as a senior militant by Israel.



Four helicopters fired at least six missiles at his white Opel car, engulfing the vehicle in flames and leaving it a blackened skeleton. The three people in the car Mr. Taha, his wife and daughter were killed, along with four people on the street, according to witnesses and officials at Shifa Hospital.



About 25 people were injured, the hospital said.



Mr. Taha is part of a well-known Hamas family, and his father and brother are currently being held in Israeli prisons.



As the burnt-out car was being removed from the scene, a man on a mosque loudspeaker declared: "This is a result of the road map. We will cut off the hand of anyone who tries to stop the resistance."



In the last three days, Israel has carried out five helicopter strikes against Hamas militants traveling in cars in and around Gaza City.



Altogether, more than 20 Palestinians have been killed and more than 100 wounded. While the wanted Hamas men have been among the casualties, most of the dead and wounded have been Palestinian civilians.



This evening, an Israeli man, described in his 40's, was found dead in the West Bank near Jenin, his car and body riddled with bullets. The Israeli Army said the man, who was not identified, had been buying charcoal from Palestinians. His body was discovered by an army patrol.



Meanwhile, both Israelis and Palestinians mourned their dead from Wednesday's carnage. Two Israeli helicopter attacks in Gaza left 10 dead Wednesday.



In Gaza City, funerals were ending and some of the mourners were in the streets this afternoon near the area of today's attack.



Israel launched its latest campaign against Hamas on Tuesday, two days after Hamas took part in shooting attacks on Sunday that killed five Israeli soldiers.



Hamas called on foreigners to leave Israel for their own safety. "The Jerusalem attack is the beginning of a new series of revenge attacks," the group said in a statement faxed to Reuters. "We call on international citizens to leave the Zionist entity immediately to preserve their lives."



Just a week ago, the overall level of violence was down, and the discussion was focused on the initial phase of the road map, which calls for Palestinian security forces to act against militants, and for Israel to withdraw troops from Palestinian areas.



Israel said it was prepared to pull back in places where the Palestinians could resume control. But the Palestinians say they have been badly weakened by Israeli military operations during the months of fighting and are not yet in position to take over.



Avi Dichter, head of Shin Bet, Israel's security service, said the Palestinians still have 15,000 security personnel, most of them in Gaza and under the control of the Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, Israel radio reported.



Mr. Dichter said that this number was sufficient for the Palestinians to keep areas calm, and that Israel should not accept the Palestinians' position that they are unprepared to act. He said Mr. Arafat has not relinquished control of the security forces to Mr. Abbas and his government.





 



Suicide Bomber; A Sudden, Violent End for a Promising Youth



The New York Times. June 13, 2003, Friday By Ian Fisher (NYT); Foreign Desk

Late Edition - Final, Section A, Page 10, Column 1



EBRON, West Bank, June 12 - The puzzling thing was that he studied so much recently, his family said, as if he was planning on having a future.



The night before Abdel Madi Shabneh, just 18, blew himself up on the No. 14/A bus in Jerusalem, killing 17 others in the process, he sat preparing for his final high school English examination. He made no comment, his mother said, on the day's news that Israeli helicopters tried to assassinate a top leader in the Islamic militant group Hamas, Abdel Aziz Rantisi.



The next morning he merely told his mother and family he had to study more for the test.



"He took some papers and said he needed to photocopy them for his exam," his mother, Rahmeh, 54, said today. "He said, `I'll be right back.' He took his English book with him. He never disappeared before. This was the first time."



The next verified sighting of Mr. Shabneh came that evening when he lay dead in Jerusalem's Jaffa Road, wearing the black pants and a prayer shawl of an Orthodox Jew, the Israeli police say.



In the intensifying struggle between Hamas and Israel, Mr. Shabneh's attack is widely viewed, though Israeli officials dispute it, as retribution for the attack on Mr. Rantisi. But to his family, it is a mystery how this tall and thin young man with a wispy moustache, who planned to study electronics in college this year, ended up on that bus.



He is just the latest young man from this tense city south of Jerusalem to have attacked on Israelis on behalf of Hamas. Since January, more than 10 young men from Hebron have carried out such attacks. Many of them knew each other from the soccer team at the Jihad Mosque in the Abu Katila neighborhood. Five of them, including Mr. Shabneh, were suicide bombers.



A senior Israeli security official said tonight there was no immediate evidence that Mr. Shabneh was linked to the other bombers, but he said the possibility was being considered. He said intelligence officials were not certain why Hamas militants, always active in Hebron, have been especially so in recent months.



"They always had strong bases over there," the official said. "From time to time they have this ability to carry out these attacks that are very successful."



Family members said today they did not know he was a member of Hamas, and said he did not play for the Jihad Mosque team. He did love to play soccer, they said. "Wherever he goes," his mother said, "he plays soccer."



In interviews here today, though, his family was vague about what teams he played for. One family member said he played on a school team. Another said it was for a mosque team in his own neighborhood, Jabal al Rahmeh. One cousin said that a member of one of the teams was a suicide bomber, but did not provide any details.



Efforts to find his teammates here today were unsuccessful. Several people in his neighborhood said local soccer players had gone into hiding for fear of being arrested.



Unlike some families of Palestinian suicide bombers, who proudly proclaim their children "martyrs," Mr. Shabneh's family seemed more bewildered than anything else.



"I don't think this will achieve anything," said his cousin, Zakaria Shabneh, referring to the suicide attack. "Unfortunately this will bring us backward instead of forward."



He was the youngest of nine children; their father died five years ago. Neither he nor his two other brothers had ever been arrested, the family said, although family members said the brothers and several cousins were arrested after the bombing. Until Wednesday night, he had never even spent a night away from home, his mother said.



"I can't imagine how he managed to get to Jerusalem," his mother said. "If I knew I would have prevented him from doing this. Do you think a mother can accept to lose her son?"



While she said he had never expressed any particular interest in Hamas or any other militant group, she said he was affected by the hard life in Hebron, a city of 130,000 Palestinians with Israeli soldiers protecting an enclave of 400 hard-line Jewish settlers.



"Everyone is affected by the general atmosphere," she said. "Everything surrounding us is very difficult. When they go to school, they are checked. When you go around the neighborhood, there are roadblocks. When you watch television, you see suffering."



And she said he often commented when young Palestinian men carried out suicide attacks against Israelis. "These people who became martyrs, when he heard about them, he said, `He's lucky.' "



Today, a video appeared of Mr. Shabneh, in T-shirt and jeans, but carrying a Kalashnikov rifle over his shoulder and wearing the green Hamas headband that reads, "God is great." In a voice more a boy's than a man's, he gave a short speech that followed Hamas in rejecting the peace plan and urging a continuation of armed resistance to Israel.



"The martyrs have changed the course of this conflict, and declared that there is no alternative to resistance and no exchange for our full homeland, without divisions or separations," he said. "We won't give up our smallest right, whatever the price is, whatever the sacrifice. Our steadfast Palestinian people, you are great, your jihad is great. You are standing like men, providing heroes in the battlefield."





 



Israeli Assault on Hamas Leaves 7 More Dead



The New York Times. June 13, 2003. By Greg Myre



JERUSALEM, June 12 - Israel's Army escalated the battle with Hamas militants today, blasting a Palestinian car with helicopter-fired missiles in Gaza City and killing seven people, including the Hamas leader who was the target, his wife and his 3-year-old daughter.



The attack came as Israelis and Palestinians were still burying their dead from Wednesday's carnage. A Palestinian suicide bomber struck a bus on one of Jerusalem's main commercial arteries, killing 16 civilians. A 17th victim died of wounds today. In Gaza, two Israeli helicopter strikes directed at Hamas militants killed 10 Palestinians on Wednesday.



The bloodshed has been some of the worst in months and has imperiled the Middle East peace plan formally launched just last week at a summit meeting in Jordan attended by President Bush.



For a few days, Israeli and Palestinian leaders spoke with hope about how to begin carrying out the peace plan, known as the road map. Today, they were again trading bitter recriminations, with each attack increasing the likelihood that more will follow.



In a grimly familiar pattern, signs of diplomatic progress have been greeted almost immediately with a surge in violence throughout the 32 months of fighting.



The government-owned Israel Radio said the army had been ordered to "completely wipe out" the Hamas movement after the bus bombing in Jerusalem. The radio report said every Hamas militant was now considered a target, "from the lowliest member to Sheik Ahmed Yassin," the group's founder and spiritual guide.



Israel says it is moving against Hamas because the new Palestinian prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, has proved unable or unwilling to rein in militants since he assumed office six weeks ago.



Israel's prime minister, Ariel Sharon, said at a cabinet meeting that Mr. Abbas was "a chick that hasn't grown its feathers yet," according to a cabinet official who briefed reporters. "We have to help him fight terror until his feathers grow," he was quoted as saying.



But Palestinians said the Israeli actions had badly undercut Mr. Abbas and had made it impossible for him to resume cease-fire talks with Palestinian militants. Mr. Abbas has so far ruled out using force against the militants.



Ziad Abu Amr, the Palestinian minister of culture, who was in charge of the cease-fire talks until they broke down, said that "I don't think at this time we can talk about a truce" with the Palestinian factions. Hamas said the violence was likely to worsen, and it called on foreigners to leave Israel.



"The Jerusalem attack is the beginning of a new series of revenge attacks," the group said in a statement. "We call on international citizens to leave the Zionist entity immediately to preserve their lives."



The White House, which rebuked Israel on Tuesday for trying to kill a top Hamas leader, today blamed Palestinian extremists for the violence.



"The issue is not Israel; the issue is not the Palestinian Authority," Ari Fleischer, Mr. Bush's spokesman, said during a presidential trip to Connecticut. "The issue is Hamas; the terrorists are Hamas."



In Gaza, the Israeli helicopters struck in the Sheik Radwan neighborhood, a Hamas stronghold, and the target was Yasir Taha, described by Israel as a senior militant.



Four helicopters fired at least six missiles at his white Opel, engulfing it in flames and leaving it a blackened skeleton. The three people in the car - Mr. Taha, his wife and his daughter - were killed, along with four people on the street, according to witnesses and officials at Shifa Hospital. About 30 people were wounded, the hospital said.



As a frenzied crowd went through the wreckage, young men pulled out a toddler's bottle, a pacifier and small shoes and waved them at the television cameras.



As the burned-out car was removed from the scene, a man on a mosque loudspeaker declared: "This is a result of the road map. We will cut off the hand of anyone who tries to stop the resistance." The Israeli Army said in a statement today that it did not know Mr. Taha's wife and child were in the car.



Mr. Taha was part of a well-known Hamas family. When Israeli troops came looking for him in March, in the Bureij refugee camp south of Gaza City, they did not find Mr. Taha, but arrested his father and three brothers after a clash. The army said it had found explosives inside the family home, which was demolished by the military.



In the last three days, Israel has carried out five helicopter strikes against Hamas militants traveling in cars in and around Gaza City.



Altogether, more than 20 Palestinians have been killed and more than 100 wounded in those attacks. While the wanted Hamas men have been among the casualties, most of the dead and wounded have been Palestinian civilians.



Hamas, which has always opposed talks with Israel, rejected the latest peace plan and continued its attacks.



Israel launched its latest campaign against Hamas on Tuesday, two days after Hamas took part in shooting attacks that killed five Israeli soldiers.



A week ago, the level of violence was down, and the discussion focused on the initial phase of the road map, which calls for Palestinian security forces to act against militants and for Israel to withdraw troops from Palestinian areas.



Israel said it was prepared to pull back in places where the Palestinians could resume control. But the Palestinians said they had been badly weakened by Israeli military operations during months of fighting, and were not in a position to take over.



Avi Dichter, head of the Shin Bet security service, said the Palestinians still had 15,000 security personnel, mostly in Gaza and under the control of Yasir Arafat, the Palestinian leader, the Israel radio reported.



Mr. Dichter said that this number was sufficient for the Palestinians to keep areas calm, and that Israel should not accept the Palestinian position that they were unprepared to act. He said Mr. Arafat had not relinquished control of the security forces to Mr. Abbas and his government.



Rockin' Chair

 



Well, I'm sittin' right here in my rockin' chair

Runnin' my fingers right through my hair

Fire is a-flickerin' with a yellow and gold

Makin' me quiver in the snowy cold

I got a lazy old woman, screamin' 'bout my money

Man, she took every cent and she didn't leave me any



Times were never this good, got a fly for food

Got no woman to spend my money

The lil' blooey done take all my money(1)



So I'm sittin' right here in my rockin' chair

Runnin' my fingers right through my hair

Spider caught the fly in his web

Do believe that he might be dead



Times were never this good, got a fly for food

Got no woman to spend my money

The lil' blooey done take all my money



So I'm sittin' and I'm sittin'

And I'm sittin' right here in my rockin' chair

Watchin' my old dog loosing his hair



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music (ASCAP), 1971 & Bizarre/ Straight Records, 1991

Official release: "The Early Years 1". Issued under licence from Bizarre/ Straight Records by Edsel Records, 1991

Recorded July - December 1971, Los Angeles, CA

(Not authorized by Tom Waits)

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. July, 2000)



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Also transcribed as "Well, she blew and took all my money." or "The lil' blooey done take all my money."



Romeo Is Bleeding

 



Romeo is bleeding but not so as you'd notice

He's over on 18th Street as usual

Looking so hard against the hood of his car

puttin' out a cigarette in his hand

And for all the Pachucos(2) at the pumps

at Romero's Paint and Body(3)

they all seein' how far they can spit

Well it was just another night

and now they're huddled(4) in the brake lights

of a '58 Bel Air(5)

and listenin' how Romeo

killed a sherif with his knife



And they all jump when they hear the sirens

but Romeo just laughs

all the racket(6) in the world

ain't never gonna save that copper's(7) ass

He ain't never gonna see another summertime

for gunnin' down my brother

and leavin' him like a dog

beneath a car without his knife

Romeo says: hey man gimme a cigarette

and they all reach for their pack

and Frankie lights it for him

and pats him on the back

And throws a bottle at a milk truck

and as it breaks he grabs his nuts

They all know they could be just like Romeo

if they only had the guts



Romeo is bleeding but nobody can tell

sings along with the radio

with a bullet in his chest

And he combs back his fenders

and they all agree it's clear

and that everything is cool

now that Romeo's here



Romeo is bleeding

He winces now and then

He leans against the car door

Feels the blood in his shoes

And someone's cryin' at the 5 Points(8)

in the phone booth by the store

Romeo starts his engines

wipes the blood of the door



And he brodys(9) through the signal

with the radio full blast(10)

Leavin' the boys there hikin' up their chinos(11)

And then they all try to stand like Romeo

beneath the moon cut like a sickle

And they're talkin' now in Spanish

all about their hero



Romeo is bleeding

as he gives the man his ticket

He climbs the balcony at the movies

And he'll die without a whimper

like every hero's dream

Like an angel with a bullet

and Cagney on the screen(12)



And Romeo is bleeding

Romeo is bleeding, hey man

Romeo is bleeding, hey man

Romeo is bleeding, hey man

Romeo is bleeding



Andele pues!(13)

Hey Pachuco!

Hey Pachuco!

Hago la lucha!

D�me esa pistola, hombre!

Hijo de la chingada madre!

Ay, que pinche pancho!

Hey man!

Hago la lucha!

Hago la lucha!

Vamos a dormir, hombre

Hey man!



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music, Inc. (ASCAP),� 1978

Official release: Blue Valentine, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1978





 



Known covers:

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by MC 900ft Jesus

R�d Pust - Sven Henriksen synger Tom Waits, Sven Henriksen. 1996. Sonet (in Norwegian: "Romeo er s�ra")

New Coat Of Paint. Various artists. May, 2000. Manifesto Records. Performed by Dexter Romweber's Infernal Racket

Nach mir die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Romeo verliert Bluat")

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)



<object height="385" width="480"></object> 

Waits performing "Romeo Is Bleeding". With: Herbert Hardesty, Arthur Richards, John Tomassie and Greg Cohen. Taken from "Austin City Limits" PBS television concert documentary. KLRU-TV Studio, University Of Texas, Austin/ USA. Recorded December 5, 1978.



Notes:



(1) Romeo Is Bleeding:

- Tom Waits (1979): "Most of the stories on Blue Valentine took place in Los Angeles in the last few months," Waits continues. 'Romeo Is Bleeding' is about a Mexican gang leader who was shot and died in a movie house in downtown L.A." (Source: "Tom Waits For No One" Circus Weekly, by Stan Soocher. Date: January 23, 1979)



(2) Pachucoc1940s A Mexican-American youth or teenager, especially one who dresses in flamboyant clothes and belongs to a neighborhood gang (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(3) Paint and Body: Automobile shop/ repair facility typically found in the US, specialized in reconstructing/ repairing a damaged vehicle to pre-accident condition



(4) Huddle n.: 1. A densely packed group or crowd, as of people or animals 2. A small private conference or meeting (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(5) '58 Bel-Air: Car model produced in 1958 by General Motors-Chevrolet. One of the most popular production automobiles in the US during the late 1950's. The longer, lower, wider and larger 1958 model had distinctive new styling, with tasteful, moderately sized "gullwing'' fins. In 1978, of course, the car had an entirely different rock 'n' roll/ hotrod image.





(6) Racket: 1. Any shady or dishonest business or occupation; a swindle (Source: "Dictionary of American Slang". Wentworth and Flexner, 1975.Thomas Y. Crowell Company. ISBN 0-690-00670-5). 2. (Early 19C) any form of deception, criminal trickery, hoaxing (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(7) Copper n.: A policeman; esp., a tough policeman or one who is intent on enforcing the law to its fullest (Source: "Dictionary of American Slang". Wentworth and Flexner, 1975.Thomas Y. Crowell Company. ISBN 0-690-00670-5)



(8) 5 Points:1. An intersection of three streets, leaving five street corners. Kinda like Times Square in NYC on a smaller scale (Submitted by Russell Fischer. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000) 2. In the town that I grew up in there was an intersection where 5 different streets came together and it was referred to as the 5 Points - there was a store there called the 5 Points Variety Store - so I think this is probably something similar (Submitted by Gary Tausch. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. September, 2000) 3. There is a famous Five Points on the Lower East Side of Manhattan at the edge of present day Chinatown, which used to be a center for all kinds of illegal activities (Submitted by Mikael Borg. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. September, 2000)



(9) Brodie, brody v.: 1. n. (US) [1950s+] a spin made by a skidding vehicle. 2. To take a brodie: phr. [late 19C+] to commit suicide (do a brodie). [Steve Brodie, a 23-year old New York saloon-keeper who on 23 July 1886 allegedly leaped some 41,5m (135ft.) from the city's Brooklyn Bridge in order to win a $200 wager. He survived the fall and was scooped out of the East River by a friend in a small boat. He was subsequently charged by the police with attempted suicide. Whether he actually made the jump remains unproven (the witnesses, all of them his friends, claimed that he did, but the general consensus was that a dummy was tossed over the bridge and Brodie, hiding on shore, quickly swam underwater to the point where it had hit the river, in time to be 'rescued') This scepticism is reflected in theatrical jargon: a brodie, a (much touted) flop] (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(10) Full-blast, full blast adj.: Complete; on a large scale; intense. Adv. At or with maximum speed, efficiency, or intensity (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(11) Chino: A style of trousers having tapered legs, a belt in the back, and made of a cotton twill cloth (Source: "Dictionary of American Slang". Wentworth and Flexner, 1975.Thomas Y. Crowell Company. ISBN 0-690-00670-5)



(12) Like an angel with a bullet and Cagney on the screen:

- James Cagney, The epitome of rough manhood. Cagney's energetic acting style with raspy voice became synonymous with the Hollywood "tough guy" role. James Francis Cagney, Jr., born on July 17, 1899, was the child of an Irish father and Norwegian mother and was raised on New York's Lower Eastside. He was quite successful in the musical "Penny Arcade". He was signed to a contract by Warner Brothers and his role as Tom Powers in "The Public Enemy" made him a star. He went on to star in such classics as "Angels With Dirty Faces", "The Roaring Twenties", "White Heat". Cagney retired in 1961. He made a big screen comeback in 1981's "Ragtime" and starred in the small screen movie "Terrible Joe Moran" in 1984. He died of a heart attack on his farm in upstate New York on March 30, 1986. President Ronald Reagan delivered the eulogy at his funeral. Hayworth and Cagney both appeared in: "The strawberry blonde ", 1941 and the Warner Brothers musical "One Sunday Afternoon ", 1948.

- Also mentioned in Invitation To The Blues: "And you feel just like Cagney, she looks like Rita Hayworth"





"Angel with a bullet" might refer to Cagney starring in "Angels With Dirty Faces" as Rocky Sullivan, who is released from prison and returns to the old neighborhood. One might assume Waits has seen more than one of the famous "Dead End Kids" series. From 1937 through 1958 the comedy troupe "The Dead End Kids" (later: East Side Kids -- Bowery Boys) of lovable New York street kids entertained America in over 91 films and serials. Starring Leo Gorcey, Huntz Hall and Bobby Jordan as the comedy team centerpiece, the gang also played opposite stars including Humphrey Bogart, James Cagney and Boris Karloff. The stories centered around a gang of street kids who turn away from a life of crime towards positive alternatives that include boxing, friendship and family ties. The great mix of comedy, hardboiled action, and positive messages make these classics to be remembered. Through the years they changed their name from the Dead End Kids, to The East Side Kids and finally to The Bowery Boys. Hugely popular during their initial run, they entertained even more generations through the 1960s and 1970s as re-runs on television.



(13) Andele pues! [Come on, let's go!]. Hey Pachuco! [Hey jerk!]. Hago la lucha! [I'll take you on!]. D�me esa pistola, hombre! [Give me that pistol, man!]. Hijo de la chingada madre! [You son of a fucking whore!]. Ay, que pinche pancho! [Oh, what a fucking wimp!]. Vamos a dormir, hombre [Let's go to sleep, man] (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



Rosie

 



Well, I'm sitting on a windowsill, blowing my horn

Nobody's up except the moon and me

And a lazy old tomcat(1) on a midnight spree

And all that you left me was a melody



Rosie, why do you evade me?

Rosie, how can I persuade thee?

Rosie



And the moon's all up, full and big

Apricot tips in an indigo sky

And I've been loving you, Rosa, since the day I was born

And I'll love you, Rosie, till the day I die



Rosie, why do you evade me?

Rosie, how can I persuade thee?

Rosie



Rosie, why do you evade me?

Rosie, how can I persuade thee?

Rosie



And I'm sitting on a windowsill, blowing my horn

Nobody's up except the moon and me

And a lazy old tomcat on a midnight spree

All that you left me was a melody



Rosie, why do you evade me?

Rosie, how can I persuade thee?

Rosie



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), �1973

Official release: Closing Time, Elektra Entertainment/ WEA International Inc., 1973





 



Known covers:

The Pursuit Of Happiness. Beat Farmers, 1987. MCA 5993



Notes:



(1) Tomcat, Tom cat:

- v.i., v.t.: 1. Orig., to dress up in one's best clothes, as a dude or sport, and walk the street, visit public bars, nightclubs, and the like in search of a female; to seek a female, esp. a promiscuous one; esp., to dress in one's best clothes, visit a girl or young woman, and mix boasting and sweet talk in an attempt to persuade her to enter into sexual activity. n. A woman chaser (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)

- The male cat.(Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd).

- Also mentioned in "I Hope That I Don't Fall In Love With You" (Well, the night does funny things inside a man These old Tom-cat feelings you don't understand)



Ruby's Arms

 



(Heartattack And Vine studio version, 1980)



I will leave behind all of my clothes, I wore when I was with you

All I need's my railroad boots and my leather jacket

As I say goodbye to Ruby's arms, although my heart is breaking

I will steal away out through your blinds, for soon you will be waking



The morning light has washed your face, and everything is turning blue now

Hold on to your pillow case, there's nothing I can do now

As I say goodbye to Ruby's arms, you'll find another soldier

And I swear to God by Christmas time, there'll be someone else to hold you



The only thing I'm taking is the scarf off of your clothesline

I'll hurry past your chest of drawers and your broken wind chimes

As I say goodbye, I say goodbye, I say goodbye to

Ruby's arms



I will feel my way down the darkened hall, and out into the morning

The hobos at the freight yards have kept their fires burning

So Jesus Christ, this goddamn rain, will someone put me on a train

I'll never kiss your lips again, or break your heart

As I say goodbye, I say goodbye, I say goodbye to

Ruby's arms



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980 & Warner Bros. Music Ltd, 1986

Official release: "Heartattack And Vine", Elektra Entertainment/ WEA Entertainment Inc., 1980 &

"Asylum Years", WEA International Inc., 1986

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)





 



Ruby's Arms



(Big Time live version, 1988)



I will leave behind all of my clothes

I wore when I was with you

All I need's my railroad boots

and my leather jacket



As I say goodbye to Ruby's arms

although my heart is breaking

I will steal away out through your blinds

for soon you will be waking



The morning light has washed your face

and everything is turning blue now

Hold on to your pillow case

there's nothing that I can do now



As I say goodbye to Ruby's arms

you'll find another soldier

And I swear to God by Christmas time

there'll be someone else to hold you



The only thing I'm taking is

the scarf off of your clothesline

I'll hurry past your chest of drawers

and your broken wind chimes



As I say goodbye

I'll say goodbye

Say goodbye

to Ruby's arms



I steal away down the darkened hall

out into the morning

The hobos at the freight yards

have kept their fires burning



So, Jesus Christ this goddamn rain

will someone put me on a train

I'll never kiss your lips again

or break your heart



As I say goodbye

I say goodbye

I say goodbye

to Ruby's arms



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Fifth Floor Music Inc. (ASCAP), � 1980-1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Anthology" (Amsco Publications, 1988/ Nuova Carisch, 2000)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Rubys famn")

Vanity. Jan Vayne. 1994. EMI (The Netherlands)

Songs Of Tom Waits. Dolphin Blue. 1995. Self-released demo (Germany)

Step Right Up (The Songs Of Tom Waits). Various artists. November, 1995. Manifesto Records. Performed by Frente!

The Sweetheart Break-in. The Supreme Music Program/ Megan Mullally. 2000

Nach Mir Die Sintflut - Ambros singt Waits. Wolfgang Ambros. October 9, 2000. Ariol/ Gig Records 74321 797002 (in German: "Es is vorbei")

Wordless Dialogues. Diego Conti & Stefano Taglietti (instrumental). 2001.Ecamlab (Italy)

V.S.O.P. Casino Steel. February 26, 2001. The Orchard

Carlotta's Portrait. Trio Ptak/ Gonsior/ Mayerhofer. 2004. Turkish Bath Records

23. Golly. July, 2004. Media - Arte (Knopf Germany)

East Of Sunset - Soundtrack. Various artists. September 13, 2005. Manifesto Records. Performed by: The Caseworker

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



Notes:



(1) Tom Waits (1980): "I love Jerry's arrangement on it. He used a brass choir and made it sound like a Salvation Army band at the top of the tune. It really got me. It's a little bit like that Matt Monro thing, "I Will Leave You Softly" (sings a verse). I was trying to visualize this guy getting up in the morning before dawn and leaving on the train, with the clothesline outside. I just closed my eyes and saw this scene and wrote about it." (Source: "Heartattack and Vine". Us promo pack: Stephen Peeples. September 4, 1980)




 




Russian Dance

 



Davai yestshio! Davai yestshio!

Odeen, dva, tree, cheteeri(1)



Written by: Tom Waits �1993 Jalma Music, Inc.

Published by: no lyrics published

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Davai yestshio [Come on, once again]. 

- Odeen, dva, tree, cheteeri [One, two, three, four]. (Transcribed by Alexai in Moscow/ Ulf Berggren, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000).

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