Orphans (Bastards), 2006



Altar Boy

 



(Alice demo version. Also known as: What Became Of Old Father Craft?)(1)



Now he's an altar boy, bound up in leather and chains

What became of old Father Craft

I'll never forget the Sunday he left

And gave me something special in the rectory

He's an altar boy

Corrected me in the rectory

And that's why I'm feeling so blue

Cause I'm an altar boy, what about you?



  - "Pater noster, qui es in coelis(2)

  Sanctificetur nomen tuum

  Adveniat regnum tuum..."

  - "'Pater Noster', yeah"

  - "Yeah"



I can order in Latin

Make 'em au gratin, Joe

Cause I'm an old altar boy

That's why I'm so depressed

I never got the rest of the dream

Just the ritual

Now I'm habitual

Majoring in crimes that are unspeakable

I'm an altar boy

That's what happened to me, yeah



He's just an old altar boy

Laying out there in the street

He's an altar boy (anyone he can meet)

Hoping he can meet a woman dressed like a nun

He knows there's got to be some around here

Drinking across from the church

Just a little Father Cribari wine

On a Sunday morning time

Remembering when he was busier

Now he's getting dizzier

Fill it up, Joe

You know the routine, yeah

I'm an altar boy, oh yeah



Out there in the bar, the old altar boy

[untranscribable]

Making the scena with a novena

Why is he winking at this time in his life

He never took a wife, cause he's an old altar boy

Drinking Cribari wine

An altar boy, down here in his prime

What became of him

Well, he's looking up the dress of Sister Marie

He's rather depressed, as you can see

He hasn't been to mass since nineteen forty-three

Cause he's an old altar boy

He figures he got enough religion already in him

Now he's leafing through the dirty magazines

He's an altar boy, what became of him

He's an altar boy, yeah



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story





 



Altar Boy



(Orphans studio version, 2006)



He's an ol' altar boy

Lying out there in the street

He's an ol' alter boy

Bound up in leather and chains

That's why I'm feeling so blue

I'm an old altar boy

What about you?



Now, I can order in Latin

Make 'em au gratin, Joe

I'm an old altar boy

That's why I'm so depressed

I never got the rest of the dream

Just the ritual

Now I'm habitual

Majoring in crimes that are unspeakable

Cause I'm an old altar boy

That's what happened to me.



I'm an old altar boy

He's hoping he can meet a woman dressed like a nun

He knows there's got to be some around here

Drinking across from the church

A little Father Cribari wine

On a Sunday morn' time.



I'm an old altar boy.

Why is he winking at this time in his life?

He never took a wife, cause he's an old altar boy

Oh, yeah...

What about you?



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan, 1992

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Altar Boy.

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg/ Germany, 1992.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Duchess and Mad Hatter in knee 7. 

- Stage directions from the play: Knee 7 Letters II, "The Cheshire Cat walks slowly across the grass, dropping Dodgson's letters as he goes. Several Chessmen, the Queen's gardeners, enter. They find the letters and pick them up. Other Chessmen set up wickets for a croquet game. Meanwhile, the Duchess and the Mad Hatter, on their way to the croquet party, appear in a stage box. Duchess and Mad Hatter sing:"

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)



(2) PATER noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum: The Lord's Prayer: OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name (Submitted by Alicia Fontana, eGroups discussionlist. September, 2000)



Army Ants

 



The Whirligig Beetles are wary and fast with an organ to detect the ripples.

The Arachnid Moths lay their eggs inside other insects along the borders of fields or roads in clusters of white cocoons.

The Ribbed Pine Borer is a longhorn beetle, their antenna's are half the length of their body and they feed on dead red pine.

Robber Flies, with their immobile heads, inject a paralyzing fluid into their prey that they snatch from life in mid-air.

The Snow Flea's mode of locomotion, strange and odd, with a spiny tail mechanism with hooks and a protracted tube from the abdomen to enable moisture absorption.



The female Praying Mantis devours the male while they are mating. The male sometimes continues copulating even after the female has bitten off his head and part of his upper torso.

Every night wasps bite into the stem of a plant, lock their mandibles into position, stretch out at right angles to the stem and, with legs dangling, they fall asleep.



If one places a minute amount of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death.

The Bombardier Beetle, when disturbed, defends itself by emitting a series of explosions, sometimes setting off 4 or 5 reports in succession. The noises sound like miniature popgun blasts and are accompanied by a cloud of reddish coloured vile smelling fluid.

It is commonly known that ants keep slaves. Certain species, the so-called Sanguinary Ants in particular, will raid the nests of other ant tribes and kill the queen and then kidnap many of the workers. The workers are brought back to the captor's hive where they are coerced into performing menial tasks.



And as we discussed last semester, the Army Ants will leave nothing but your bones(1).

Perhaps you've encountered some of these insects in your communities, displaying both their predatory and defense characteristics, while imbedded within the walls of flesh and passing for, what is most commonly recognized... as human.



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan.

 "Insect facts gathered from The World Book Encyclopedia, Audubon Field Guide, reliable sources and the naked eye"(2)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006 (spoken word)

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

(Thanks to Dorene LaLonde for help with transcript)



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) The Army Ants will leave nothing but your bones: Waits referring to Earth Died Screaming (Bone Machine, 1992): "And the army ants, they leave nothin' but the bones."





(2) Army Ants:

- Tom Waits
 (2006): "It's just a dissertation. A lot of it is out of the field guides from the Audubon Society. It still requires organizing the facts in a meaningful fashion. I'm interested in all those things. They're all true, y'know." (Source: "Songwriter's Wandering Orphans' Will Always Find A Musical Home", The Plain Dealer (Cleveland/ USA), telephone interview by John Soeder, published November 19, 2006)

- Tom Waits (2006): "Well, most of that is from uhm... the Audubon Society field guides for insects, you know? So, you know I think we both like uh the arcane measures of life, you know? And the little things that hold us all together. And uh, I don't know. Those are "fascinating facts". And uh, I guess I'm hooked on "fascinating facts". ... But, I don't know. I thought those were interesting things about the insects, because they do live paralel lives with us I guess." (Source: "Tom Waits: Rock Classics, With A Gravelly Rasp", NPR's World Caf� from WXPN (USA) by David Dye. December 15, 2006)



Books Of Moses

 



Books of Moses, bringing stone news

Wet in the water, weeping in the sun

Books of Moses, got some splinters, didn't you?

Books of Moses, brought me right here back to you



Flaming heart, ain't it sweet

Lighting the world at your feet

Books of Moses, myth and truth

Books of Moses, bring me back to you



Hero's welcome, there stands your king

Where the serpent shudders, and the angels sing

Books of Moses, happening again

Yes, he knows us.

Well, welcome him, your friend



Books of Moses, bringing stone news

Wet is the water, blood covering the sun

Books of Moses, myth and truth

Books of Moses, bring me back to you



Written by: Alexander "Skip" Lee Spence

Originally released (Spence version) in July 1969 on the album 'Oar' by "Skip" Spence.

Published by: Alexander Lee Spence Music/� 1969. Adminstered by Maryanne Sarah Sheley Music (BMI)/ EMI Blackwood Music Inc. (BMI),

Official release (Waits version): "More Oar - A Tribute To The Music Of Skip Spence", 1999

Re-released in 2006 on the album "Orphans" (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Children's Story

 



Once upon a time there was a poor child,

with no father and no mother

And everything was dead

And no one was left in the whole world

Everything was dead



And the child went on search, day and night

And since nobody was left on the earth,

he wanted to go up into the heavens

And the moon was looking at him so friendly

And when he finally got to the moon,

the moon was a piece of rotten wood



And then he went to the sun

And when he got there, the sun was a wilted sunflower

And when he got to the stars, they were little golden flies.

Stuck up there, like the shrike(1) sticks 'em on a blackthorn(2)



And when he wanted to go back, down to earth,

the earth was an overturned piss pot(3)

And he was all alone, and he sat down and he cried

And he is there till this day

All alone...



Okay, there's your story!

Night-night!



Written by: Georg B�chner (Woyzeck, <1837)(4)

Published by: public domain

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Waits version originally from the theatre play Woyzeck (2000) as a spoken intro by Margret for Misery River.



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Children's Story as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Ulla Henningsen (as Margret).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Shrike or butcher bird, predatory songbird found in most parts of the world except Australia and South America. The plumage of the European and North American species is mostly gray, black, and white; the tail is long and rounded, and the wings are rather short. Some African species are brilliantly colored. The name butcher bird reflects its habit of impaling its prey-small birds and mammals and large insects-on a thorn or sharp twig before tearing it apart with its strong, tip-hooked beak. North American shrikes include the loggerhead, great gray or northern, and California shrikes. (Source: The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001)



(2) Blackthorn: A spreading thorny shrub or small tree (Prunus spinosa), with blackish bark, and bearing little black plums, which are called sloes. Despite their succulent appearance the fruits are far too bitter for human consumption, except as a flavouring in home-made liqueurs





(3) Overturned piss pot

- Compare story to "Lullaby" (aka "Overturned piss pot") from the Woyzeck play, 2000.

Q (2006): When you were a kid, what kind of stories were read to you? Nothing about the world being an "upside-down piss pot"? Tom Waits: An "overturned piss pot." I added that line. [Recites] "He is there to this day, all alone." Most children's stories have a dark element. There's the two brothers: One was kinda slow in the head, not very ambitious, and the other one left home early and got lost. They're always sad or frightening. Most of them are cautionary tales. When my kids were young, I would make stories up and say, "Give me the elements, what do you want in there? Okay, a tree, a polar bear and a typewriter. All right." That's how we usually start. Stories kind of tell themselves, especially when you're searching for the next chapter. It's kind of a real condensed version of what you do when you're really writing. When you're writing for kids, you have to come up with stuff on the spot." (Source: "Tom Waits Call And Response", Stop Smiling magazine No. 28 (USA). October 27, 2006)



(4) Children's story: original German text from Georg Büchner's Woyzeck: "GROSSMUTTER : Kommt, ihr kleinen Krabben! - Es war einmal ein arm Kind und hatt' kein Vater und keine Mutter, war alles tot, und war niemand mehr auf der Welt. Alles tot, und es is hingangen und hat gesucht Tag und Nacht. Und weil auf der Erde niemand mehr war, wollt's in Himmel gehn, und der Mond guckt es so freundlich an; und wie es endlich zum Mond kam, war's ein Stück faul Holz. Und da is es zur Sonn gangen, und wie es zur Sonn kam, war's ein verwelkt Sonneblum. Und wie's zu den Sternen kam, waren's kleine goldne Mücken, die waren angesteckt, wie der Neuntöter sie auf die Schlehen steckt. Und wie's wieder auf die Erde wollt, war die Erde ein umgestürzter Hafen. Und es war ganz allein. Und da hat sich's hingesetzt und geweint, und da sitzt es noch und is ganz allein."



Dog Door

 



Well she's as mean as a needle 

Don't get too close to the heater 

She's like a mean shop keeper, who got an extra gun 

She about 6'4" and she's a wreckin ball 

Now go ahead and kiss her 

She brought the bad weather with her 

She got you coming through the dog door 

She got you coming through the dog door.



Now pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered 

You ought to walk away 

Well you can’t but you ought to, climb the rickety stairs 

She got the long black hair, but don't sit there 

Electricity chair 

She got you coming through the dog door 

She got you coming through the dog door.



Pitchfork 

Crowbar 

Clawhammer 

Hot tar



She's got ruin in her name, but she can make it rain 

She's a small town jail, and you're starving in the belly of a whale 

She got you coming through the dog door 

She got you coming through the dog door.



Pitchfork (pitchfork) 

Crowbar (crowbar) 

Clawhammer (clawhammer) 

Hot tar (hot tar)



Written by: Mark Linkous/ Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Transcript based on Luis Medina's cover, 2008.

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), �2001 and WB Music Corp. (ASCAP) and Spirit Ditch Music (ASCAP)

All rights on behalf of itself and Spirit Ditch Music. Administered by WB Music Corp..

Official release (Waits version): "It's a Wonderful Life", Sparklehorse (Parlophone/ Capitol, 2001)

Mark Linkous: Bass. Tom Waits: vocals, train whistle. Lyrics by Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Re-released on: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Dog Door:

- Mark Linkous (2000) on the making of It's A Wonderful Life: "I did this one song that wasn't very good. I sent him [Tom Waits] a tape so he could do his part. He did and he sent it back, but it got lost in the mail. That was a big loss. That led to doing "Dog Door." I had done the music already but was having difficulty with the words and melody. It was more like a dirge than a pop song. I called Tom. I said "I have this cool sounding track, but I can't finish it. I wonder if you want to take a shot at it?" I sent it to him. He called and said "Yeah, come out here. I got something." I flew out and went to his studio." (Source: Sparklehorse: An interview with Mark Linkous" by Alexander Laurence for Free Williamsburg.com. February, 2002)



Dog Treat

 



Thanks, uh... You know uh, this is weird uh... Most of us have dogs, allright? (applause) I don't know if it's a local thing where I live, or if it's everywhere, and I'm checking it with you because uh, I don't get in the area that often and I'm just checking to see if... There's a new kind of a dog treat. And uh (where I live) and they're available in the pet store and for the longest time I just thought that it was some kind of a prank. Or uh... I wasn't really sure what it was, until I read the label on the back and it said "Bull Penis" (laughter). I was a little shocked! I know you can get just about ANYTHING in this world. You can get a whale's pancreas if you'd want one! I can get you one! (laughter) But com'on, a bull's penis! How busy they were their whole lives. And they throw it to a dog, like that, for a snack! (laughter) Now, are they available here in the Los Angeles area? They are, aren't they? Doesn't that make you a little weazy? Makes you wanna live a long time. And on the back, on the bottom it said: "100% natural"! I mean... that's the part that really got me. And it said: "A Real Meat Snack". There's just no dignity in that. Uh, anyway... The other thing is that they're 36 inches long! (laughter). They're so long they had to cut them into bite-size portions. And then they take two of them and braid them together. I know, I know! I never want it done. But uh... This is a song written for Gregory Peck for his dating my mom... That's a lie!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan (spoken word/ intro)(1)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Taped from the Musicares benefit: May 12, 2005, introducing "Invitation To The Blues". The second annual MusiCares (a Grammy Awards subsidiary) MAP Fund benefit concert, honoring singer/ songwriter/ guitarist and Metallica co-founder James Hetfield and concert promoter and manager Bill Silva. Tom Waits & Larry Taylor setlist: Tango 'Til They're Sore, Invitation To The Blues, Lucky Day,You Can Never Hold Back Spring. Further reading: Performances: 2006-2010.



(2) Bull Penis: Brand: "Beefeaters Dog Treats", "Beef Pizzle Sticks are hard chews that dogs love. Made from 100% bull penis, Pizzle Sticks are all natural, 100% digestible and contain no additives. The hard chew becomes moist as it becomes wet, making it an excellent chew to remove plaque and tartar buildup from your dogs teeth. Pizzle Sticks are also known as Bullies, Bull Sticks, Pizzles and Beef Chews. No two bulls are created equal, so girth of pizzle sticks may vary." Further reading: Beefeaters official site.




 




First Kiss

 



She drove a big ol' Lincoln with suicide doors(1)

and a sewing machine in the back

And a light bulb that looked like an alligator egg

was mounted up front on the hood



And she had an Easter bonnet that had been signed by Tennessee Ernie Ford(2)

And she always had saw dust in her hair

And she cut two holes in the back of her dress

and she had these scapular wings

that were covered with feathers and electrical tape

And when she got good and drunk

she would sing about Elkheart, Indiana

Where the wind is strong and folks mind their own business



And she had at least a hundred old baseballs that she'd taken from kids

And she collected bones of all kinds

And she lived in a trailer under a bridge

And she made her own whiskey and gave cigarettes to kids

And she'd been struck by lightning seven or eight times

And she hated the mention of rain



And she made up her own language

and she wore rubber boots

And she could fix anything with string

And her lips were like cherries

And she was stronger than any man

And she smelled like gasoline and Rootbeer Fizz(3)

And she put mud on a bee sting I got at the creek

And she gave me my very first kiss

And she gave me my very first kiss



Talking 'bout my little Kathleen

She's just a fine young thing

Someday she'll wear my ring

My little Kathleen(4)



Written by: Tom Waits and Ken Nordine, 1991(5)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1992/ 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.

Previously released as part of "Thousand Bing Bangs", Devout Catalyst (Ken Nordine), Grateful Dead Productions Inc., 1992.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Suicide doors: door configuration rear-opening [front doors are hinged at the "B" pillars and the rear ones at the "C" pillars]. B-pillars: In sedan styles, the second set of roof supports (between the windshield and rear portion of the roof). C-pillars: In sedan styles, the third set of roof supports located between the rear window and �- window in the roof �-panel. Also mentioned in Putting On The Dog (Liberty heights soundtrack, 1999): "Well, we could go into a zuki jump It's rainin', it pours Big old Lincoln with suicide doors." (Source: The (new) Cadillac Database�, Glossary of Cadillac Terms and Definitions. � 1996, Yann Saunders and the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, Inc.)



(2) And she had an Easter bonnet that had been signed by Tennessee Ernie Ford

- Original line (1992): "And she had a tattoo gun that she made herself from a cassette motor and a guitar string."

Tennessee Ernie Ford: Ernest Jennings Ford (February 13, 1919 - October 17, 1991), better known by the stage name Tennessee Ernie Ford, was a pioneering U.S. recording artist and television host who enjoyed success in the country & western, pop, and gospel musical genres.He released almost 50 country singles through the early 1950s, several of which made the charts.Ford scored an unexpected hit on the pop charts in 1955 with his rendition of Merle Travis' "Sixteen Tons," a sparsely arranged coal-miner's lament: "You load sixteen tons, what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt. Saint Peter, don't you call me, 'cause I can't go; I owe my soul to the company store..." Ford subsequently helmed his own primetime variety program, "The Ford Show," which ran on NBC from 1956 to 1961. Ford's program was notable for the inclusion of a religious song at the end of every show.



(3) And she smelled like gasoline and Rootbeer Fizz :Original line (1992): "And she smelled like nutmeg and piss."



(4) Talking 'bout my little Kathleen: extra verse added to the original 1992 text



(5) First Kiss:

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)



Heigh-Ho

 



(Also known as: The Dwarfs' Marching Song)



Well, we dig dig dig

Well, we dig in our mine the whole day through

Dig dig dig, that is what we like to do

And it ain't no trick to get rich quick

If you dig dig dig, with a shovel and a pick

Dig dig dig, the whole day through

Got to dig dig dig, it's what we like to do

In our mine, in our mine

Where a million diamonds shine

We got to dig dig dig, from the morning till the night

Dig dig dig up everything in sight

We got to dig dig dig, in our mine, in our mine

Dig up diamonds by the score

A thousand rubies, sometimes more

But we don't know what we are diggin' for



Heigh-ho, heigh-ho

It's off to work we go

We keep on singing all day long

Heigh-ho



Heigh-ho, heigh-ho

Got to make your troubles go

Well, you keep on singing all day long

Heigh-ho



Heigh-ho, heigh-ho



Words by: Larry Morey(1)

Music by: Frank Churchill, �1938

First performed by: Horace Heidt/ Musical Knights in the Walt Disney movie 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' 1938. Published by: Bourne Company (ASCAP)

Official release (Waits version): "Stay Awake - Various Interpretations of Music from Vintage Disney Films", 1988. "Hollywood" Paul Litteral: trumpet. Reworked version (Charlie Musselwhite harmonica) released on Orphans (Bastards), Anti 2006



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Heigh-Ho:

- Tom Waits 
(1988): "I love Yma Sumac on that, and the Replacements. Those were the two cuts they were trying to get rid of. Disney thought they were changing the lyrics and turning "Cruella" into a striptease number. And they thought I bastardized "Heigh Ho". I think there should be a "Heigh Ho" ride in Disneyland where they just pick these people up in their shorts and put 'em to work for eight hours." (Source: "Tom Waits" Graffiti Magazine (Canada), by Tim Powis. December 1, 1988 (Volume 4, number 12))

Tom Waits (1988): "Disneyland is Vegas for children. When I went with the kids, I just about had a stroke. It's the opposite of what they say it is. It's not a place to nurture the imagination. It's just a big clearance sale for useless items. I'm not going back, and the kids won't be allowed to return until they're 18, out of the house. And even then, I would block their decision." (Source: "Tom Waits, 20 Questions" Playboy magazine, by Steve Oney. Published: March, 1988)

Tom Waits (1989): "It's an adult view of work. Off to work we go. It's a little more of a grown up approach to the concept of the American work ethic... It's a little more out-of-focus, it's a little scratchier, it's a little violent, I think."(Source: "Neither Vinyl Nor Film Can Contain Waits" Film Threat magazine 18, by Steve Dollar. 1989)

Tom Waits (1988): "You listen to those songs now as an adult and you can't really escape back into what they represented for you when you were that age. Work takes on new meaning when you do it for a living We used tools-machinery from an airplane hangar and some jail doors and pile drivers. I played it for my daughter, and she said, "That must be where they push the witch off the cliff into the boiling water." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years" Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)

Tom Waits (2006); "Actually, Disney tried to sue us after the record came out, cause they said: "You may have changed all the words." RS: No those are.. I went and gone back at the lyrics, and those are the lyrics! Those are the lyrics actually. TW: They are the same! Exactly what we were saying. So I thought, that was kind of ironic. And then uh... RS: I'm not surprised they tried to sue you though just the same because you did... you did sort of strip the song of it's cheery whimsical quality! (laughs). TW: But sometimes that's what a song needs in order to survive the time it was born in. It worked, and uh.. the other thing I find interesting is that when I listen to it, it doesn't sound like I'm saying: "We dig in the mine", it sounds like: "We're digging in our minds." And that even takes on another quality to it. "We dig in our minds all day long. Dig, dig, dig, that's what we like to do. Ain't no trick to get rich quick. If you dig, dig, dig, with a shovel and a pick." You know, we ARE all digging in our minds. And uh, so that was a hoot." (Source: "Tom Waits: The Whiskey Voice Returns", All Things Considered, episode 123. NPR radio show (USA). November 21, 2006. By Robert Siegel)



Original version: Covering: Heigh-Ho. Words by: Larry Morey. Music by: Frank Churchill, � 1938. First performed by: Horace Heidt/ Musical Knights in the Walt Disney movie 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs' 1938: "We dig dig dig dig dig dig dig in our mine the whole day through. To dig dig dig dig dig dig dig is what we really like to do. It ain't no trick to get rich quick. If you dig dig dig with a shovel or a pick. In a mine! In a mine! In a mine! In a mine! Where a million diamonds shine! We dig dig dig dig dig dig dig from early morn till night. We dig dig dig dig dig dig dig up everything in sight. We dig up diamonds by the score. A thousand rubies, sometimes more. But we don't know what we dig 'em for. We dig dig dig a-dig dig. Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho. Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho Heigh-ho. Chorus: Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho. It's home from work we go (Whistle). Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho. (Chorus). Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho (Whistle). Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho Heigh-ho hum. (Chorus three times). Heigh-ho."





Home I'll Never Be

On The Road



(On The Road studio version, 1999. Also known as: Home I'll Never Be)



Well, I left New York in nineteen forty-nine

To go across the country, without a dad-blame dime(1)

Montana in the cold cold fall

I found my father in a gamblin' hall



Father, father, where have you been?

I've been out in the world since I was only ten

Father, father, where have you been?

I've been out in the world since I was only ten



Don't worry about me, about to die of pleurisy

Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee

Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be

Home in ol' Medora, home in ol' Truckee(2)

Apalachicola, home I'll never be



For better or for worse, or thick and thin

I've been married to the little woman

God he loves me, like I love him

I want you to do just the same for him

Well, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind



So I left Montana on an old freight train

The night my father died in the cold cold rain

Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Rode to Oklahoma, rode to El Cajon(3)

Rode to old Tehatchapi(4), rode to San Antone



Hey! Hey!



Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Rode to Oklahoma, rode to El Cajon

Rode to old Tehatchapi, rode to San Antone



Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be



Written by: Jack Kerouac(5)

Published by: Duluoz Publishing Inc. (ASCAP) and Jalma Music (ASCAP)

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1997 (with Primus and Ralph Carney)

Official release: Jack Kerouac Reads "On The Road', 1999

Re-released (On The Road): Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.





 



On The Road



(Live version, 1997. Also known as: Home I'll Never Be)



I left New York nineteen forty-nine

To go across the country, without a dad-blame dime(1)

Montana in the cold cold fall

Found my father in a gamblin' hall



Father, father, where have you been?

I've been in the world since I was only ten

'Don't worry about me, I'm about to die of the pleurisy

Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee

Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be

Home in old Medora, home in ol' Truckee(2)

Apalachicola, home I'll never be



Better or for worse, and thick and thin

Well, I've been married to the little woman

God loved me, just like I loved him

I want you to do just the same for him

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind



So I left Montana on an old freight train

The night my father died in the cold cold rain

Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Home in old Medora, home in ol' Truckee

Apalachicola, home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be



Written by: Jack Kerouac(5)

Unofficial release: "Tales from the Underground Volume 5", PMS Records, 2000

From the Allen Ginsberg tribute at the UCLA Wadsworth Theatre, Westwood, CA, on June 21, 1997

Published by: Duluoz Publishing Inc. (ASCAP) and Jalma Music (ASCAP)

Official release (Home I'll Never Be): Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known cover:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of On The Road as sung by Jack Kerouac.

Taken from "Jack Kerouac Reads On The Road' (1999).



Notes:



(1) A dad-blame dime

- Dad-blame is slang roughly being a less cussy version of god-damn. (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001).

- Also transcribed as: "To go across the country, without a bad blame dime." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(2) In part four, chapter 2 of Kerouac's book "On the Road", Jack is singing a little song: "Home in Missoula, Home in Truckee, Home in Opelousas, Ain't no home for me, Home in old Medora, Home in Wounded Knee, Home in Ogallala, Home I'll never be" (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(3) El Cajon, is in California outside Los Angeles, around San Diego. I know that there is a very old railway there that goes through Cajon pass. I don't know much more. But I'm pretty sure of it. (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001)



(4) Tehatchapi: "which is a city in Kern county in California which I in fact live about 15 miles from. It was at one point the only way to get between Los Angles (or San Francisco in Kerouac's case) and Bakersfield. It also contained the Tehatchapi Loop, where the railway, after running through the Tehatchapi Mountain, loops around and crosses on itself by tunnel as the only possibility of getting over the tremendous grade between the two levels." (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001)



(5) Original version: "On The Road". Jack Kerouac Reads "On The Road', 1999. Written by: Jack Kerouac: "Left New York nineteen forty-nine. To go across the country. without a bad blame dime. Montana in the cold cold fall. I found my father in a gambling hall. Father, father, where have you been? I've been out in the world since I was only ten. Son, he said, don't worry 'bout me. I'm about to die of pleurisy. Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee. Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be. Home in ol' Medora, home in ol' Truckee. Apalachicola, home I'll never be. Better or for worse, thick and thin. Like being married to the little woman. God loved me, just like I loved him. I want you to do the same just for him. The worms eat away. But don't worry, watch the wind. The worms eat away. But don't worry, watch the wind. So I left Montana on an old freight train. the night my father died in the cold cold rain. Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee. Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be. Home I'll never be."

Tom Waits (2006): "One is a ballad and one is a blues. What happened, I made the song first with Primus, the rocker version, Home I'll Never Be. And then Hal Wiliner asked me to come down and play for an Allen Ginsberg memorial. There were a lot of people there talking about him. I didn't have a band. So I said, well, this is an actual song written by Jack Kerouac - an a capella song they found on one of the tapes. [Sings] "I left New York, 1949. To go across the country without a damn blame dime! Montana in the cold, cold fall! found my father in a gambling hall..." Kerouac sang it alone on a microphone - it's on a collection of his work - and it's beautiful, very touching. So I tried to do my version like that. I ended up liking it. Somebody had the tape from that night, so we stuck it on there." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown) 

Tim Perlich (2006); "Another song on the Bastards disc, Home I'll Never Be, was similarly born of a fragment from the past that serendipitously came his way. Despite the song's being credited to beat poet Jack Kerouac, the forlorn hymn to the highway life turns out to be one of Waits's most personally revealing. When he poignantly sings the lines "Father, father, where you been? I've been in this world since I was only 10," it's not really Kerouac's life he's singing about. Waits is calling out to his own father, who left home never to be seen again after a divorce in 1960, when Waits would've been 10 years old." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Tom Waits (2006): "Kerouac's nephew had this song of Jack's, or at least some of his words he wanted me to record. I guess Jack was at a party somewhere and snuck off into a closet and started singing into a reel-to-reel tape deck, like, 'I left New York in 1949, drove across the country....' I wound up turning it into a song, and I performed it at a memorial for Allen Ginsberg... "I found Kerouac and Ginsberg when I was a teenager, and it saved me. Growing up without a dad, I was always looking for a father figure, and those guys sorta became my father figures. Reading On The Road added some interesting mythology to the ordinary and sent me off on the road myself with an investigative curiosity about the minutiae of life." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well you know, he [Jack Kerouac] recorded it on a little reel-to-reel in a closet in the middle of a party one night, and uh... his uh... one of his nephews, Jim Sampas uh got a hold of it, and put it on a Kerouac compilation. Uhm so, I heard it and uh, yeah he was singing. It was really nice to hear Jack singing. I think it worked pretty well on that sequence after that Bukowski thing about the kid on the bus in North Carolina, and then it set ways on this piano, that's "Home I'll Never Be". (Source: "Tom Waits: Rock Classics, With A Gravelly Rasp", NPR's World Caf� from WXPN (USA) by David Dye. December 15, 2006)



King Kong

 



They shot him down

They shot him down

They thought he was a monster

But he was the King



They came to his island

And they brought her with them

They wanted to get his picture

But they were surprised by his enormous size



And when he saw the woman

He took her without question

Because after all

He was the King



And he loved the woman

He loved the way she looked

And she wouldn't stop screaming



But he loved the woman

And he fought a Tyrannosaurus Rex

And it was a bloody battle

But he fought it for his woman



And he climbed up a mountain

And he looked around

Some kind of forest

With all these dinosaurs



And he stripped his woman

He stripped her bare

But there was a pterodactyl

There!



And then a hero

Came and took his woman

And they fell off the mountain

Into some water



And then later

He came looking for his woman

But they were waiting

And they threw a bomb



And they tied him

And took him across the ocean

And they chained him

And put him in the show



And when he saw his woman

He broke loose

And everyone fled in terror

And he was looking for her



And he overtook a train

And he was looking in the street

And then he found her in her apartment



And he climbed up the Empire State building

It was like a phallic symbol

And he took his woman

To the top of that towering temple



And he climbed up and looked around

Some kind of city

With all those skyscrapers

And all the cars



Just him and his screaming woman

And they were finally alone

He loved his woman

You could see it in his eyes

His great big eyes



He loved his woman

From the moment that he saw her

He was all choked up inside



But when the airplanes came

He was soon to die

But he hung on long enough to set his woman down

And make sure that she was safe



And as the bullets pierced

He looked at her so sincere

Before he fell

Because he loved his woman



And they shot him down

They thought he was a monster

But he was the King



Who killed the monkey

'Twas beauty that killed the beast



And Willis O'Brien died

A tragic death

There wasn't much

That he had left



And Ray Harryhousen said

That when Willis died

That's when the King was really dead



They shot him down

They shot him down

They thought he was a monster

But he was the King



Written by: Daniel Johnston (Yip/ Jump Music, 1983)(1)

Published by: �2004 Eternal Yip Eye Music (BMI). Administered by BUG.

Official release (Waits version): "The Late Great Daniel Johnston - Discovered, Covered". Various artists (Gammon. September, 2004)

Re-released on Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) King Kong:

Tom Waits (1992): "Lately I like Daniel Johnston, he's got a lot of records out.. Most of the records sound like they were done in his basement and his mom is at the top of the stairs telling him to come up to dinner. The Replacements have done some of his songs. One called King Kong I really love so much. We don't have that one here. He sounds like a kid and he records on inferior equipment and I always think that's brave. Technology has gotten to the point where I think both in sound and in video - we've seen what it can be when it's well produced and expensive. I think that our ears and our eyes go to that which is - it's just the old pendulum - and when things are produced in a more low rent way you'll listen more carefully. Daniel Johnston's part of that world." (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic", Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well, Jim Jarmusch played me his version of "King Kong," and I tried to stay as true to that as I could. If you hear the original, you'll see what I mean. I got all his records. I thought I'd really discovered this: it's real outsider art. The interesting thing about outsider art is that it's such big business. These outsider artists are creating false biographies for themselves, saying they're victims of mental illness and child abuse, and they grew up poor in the South and they're creating these false backgrounds. You aren't really qualified as an outsider unless you've had no formal art education, so you have to prove that you have no art education at all. It's an interesting turn of the tables." (Source: "Tom Waits Call And Response", Stop Smiling magazine No. 28 (USA). October 27, 2006)

- Further reading: Rejected - UnknownOfficial Daniel Johnston Site




 




Missing My Son

 



I was in a line at the supermarket the other day, and uhm... y'know, I had all my things on the little conveyor belt there. And uh... there's a gal in front of me that is uh.. well, she's staring at me and I'm getting a little nervous and uh, she continues to stare at me. And I uh, I keep looking the other way. And then, finally she comes over closer to me and she says: "I apologise for staring, that must have been annoying. I, I... You look so much like my son, who died. I just can't take my eyes off you." And she precedes to go into her purse and she pulls out a photograph of her son who'd died. And uh, he looks absolutely nothing like me. In fact he's... Chinese. Uh... anyway, we chatted a little bit. And uh, she says: "I'm sorry, I have to ask you. Would you mind, as I leave the supermarket here, would you mind saying "Goodbye mom" to me? I, I know it's a strange request but I haven't heard my son saying "Goodbye mom" to me, and "So long" and it would mean so much to me to hear it. And uh, if you don't mind I... " And I said: "Well, you know, okay, yeah, sure. Eh.. uh... I can say that." And, and so, she uh gets her groceries all checked out. And uh, as she's going out the door she waves at me and she hollers across the store: "Goodbye son!" And I look up and I wave and I say: "Goodbye mom!" And then she goes, and uh... So I get my few things there, on the conveyor belt and the checker checks out my things. And uh, and he gives me the total and he says: "That'll be four hundred and seventy nine dollars." Uh... and I said: "Well, how is that possible! I've only got a little tuna fish, and uh some skimmed milk, and uh mustard and a loaf of bread..." He goes: "Well, well you're also paying for the groceries for your mother. She uh, told me you'd take care of the bill for her." And I said: "Well, wait a minute! That's not my mother!" And he says: "Well I distinctly heard her say as she left the store "Bye son!" and you said "Bye mom!" and so what are you trying to say here, uh..." I said: "Well, JESUS!" And I looked out into the parking lot and she was just getting into her car. And I ran out there. And she was just closing the door, and she had a little bit of her leg sticking out of the door and she was pulling away and I grabbed her leg and I started PULLING it! Just the way... I'm pulling yours...



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(1)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & �2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) The entire story (and the way it is told) reminds of the Christmas story from the movie Smoke (Wayne Wang, 1995) as told by Harvey Keitel.



Nirvana

 



Not much chance, completely cut loose from purpose,

he was a young man riding a bus through North Carolina on the way to somewhere.

And it began to snow.



And the bus stopped at a little caf� in the hills and the passengers entered.

And he sat at the counter with the others, and he ordered, the food arrived.

And the meal was particularly good.

And the coffee.



The waitress was unlike the women he had known.

She was unaffected, and there was a natural humor which came from her.

And the fry cook said crazy things.

And the dishwasher in back laughed a good clean pleasant laugh.



And the young man watched the snow through the window.

And he wanted to stay in that caf� forever.

The curious feeling swam through him that everything was beautiful there.

And it would always stay beautiful there.



And then the bus driver told the passengers that it was time to board.

And the young man thought: "I'll just stay here, I'll just stay here."

And then he rose and he followed the others into the bus.

He found his seat and looked at the caf� through the window.

And then the bus moved off, down a curve, downward, out of the hills.



And the young man looked straight forward.

And he heard the other passengers speaking of other things,

or they were reading or trying to sleep.

And they hadn't noticed the magic.

And the young man put his head to one side,

closed his eyes, and pretended to sleep.



There was nothing else to do,

just to listen to the sound of the engine,

and the sound of the tires

in the snow.



Written by: Charles Bukowski(1) 

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:

(1) Nirvana:

Tom Waits (2002): "He (Charles Bokowski) was like a big bear. He had this enormous head, as big as Frankenstein. He had a big presence and huge shoulders; and that face that looks like a mask, a scary mask. I was still drinking so it was pre-- [his voice trails off] I was fascinated with him. He was like a, I don't know what you call it, mentor.... Well, he was many things, like all of us. But I think when he got towards the end of his life and did 'Last Night of the Earth Poems', it softened him. My favorite is called "Nirvana". You'd like that one. It's about a young boy on a bus, going nowhere in particular. It's snowing and he stops at a cafe, and everyone on the bus gets off at this little rest stop and everyone has coffee. He sits at the counter. He said the buy boy had a big healthy laugh and he's teasing the waitress and what not. And he says, "I could stay here my whole life. Just right here." Then he ends up getting back on the bus and going away. You should read it. Of course - he's a planet waiting to be explored." (Source: "Tom Waits", SOMA magazine (USA) July, 2002 by Mikel Jollett)

WORD (2006): "...the Charles Bukowski poem, Nirvana, about a young man on the road, stopping in a cafe and being struck dumb with a sense of wonder - "The curious feeling swam through him/ That everything was beautiful there/ That it would always stay beautiful there..." What I love about that Bukowski poem is that it's completely unapologetic in its sense of wonder, completely innocent and open-hearted. Tom Waits: Yeah, and we've all been on that bus, where you wish you could just freeze everything right now. Like people say, "Shoot me! Things are good. Shoot me right now!" [laughs] The moment in the church in Arizona was like that for me. 'Course, in that community you wouldn't want to say. "Shoot me". Because they would." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well, none of us really know what Bukowski's life was like. We know what we have read, and what we've gathered from the work and what we've imagined. Essentially, there's backstage and there's on-stage, when you're a performer. You know what we allow you to know. WORD: Did you meet Bukowski? TW: A couple of times. It's like when I met Keith Richards, you try to match them drink for drink. But you're a novice, you're a child. You're drinking with a roaring pirate. Whatever you know about holding your liquor you'd better let go of it right now. So I thought I could hang in there but I wasn't able to hang in there, with either one of them. They're made out of different stock. They're like dockworkers. But it was interesting. I met Bukowski at his house. Barbet Schroeder was a friend of mine, and they tried to get me to be in that movie, Barfly, playing Bukowski. They offered a lot of money, but I just couldn't do it, plus I didn't consider myself a good enough actor to do something like that. But Bukowski... I guess everybody when you're young and you enter the arts you find father figures. For me it was more profound because I had no father - no operating father - so I found other men that supplied all that for me. I was looking for those guys all the time." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown) 

Nirvana appears in: "In the Shadow of the Rose" (1991), "The Last Night of the Earth Poems" (1992) and "Run With the Hunted" (1993)

Further reading on Bukowski: Bukowski.netAnti Hero Art.



On The Road

 



(On The Road studio version, 1999. Also known as: Home I'll Never Be)



Well, I left New York in nineteen forty-nine

To go across the country, without a dad-blame dime(1)

Montana in the cold cold fall

I found my father in a gamblin' hall



Father, father, where have you been?

I've been out in the world since I was only ten

Father, father, where have you been?

I've been out in the world since I was only ten



Don't worry about me, about to die of pleurisy

Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee

Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be

Home in ol' Medora, home in ol' Truckee(2)

Apalachicola, home I'll never be



For better or for worse, or thick and thin

I've been married to the little woman

God he loves me, like I love him

I want you to do just the same for him

Well, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind



So I left Montana on an old freight train

The night my father died in the cold cold rain

Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Rode to Oklahoma, rode to El Cajon(3)

Rode to old Tehatchapi(4), rode to San Antone



Hey! Hey!



Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Rode to Oklahoma, rode to El Cajon

Rode to old Tehatchapi, rode to San Antone



Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be



Written by: Jack Kerouac(5)

Published by: Duluoz Publishing Inc. (ASCAP) and Jalma Music (ASCAP)

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 1997 (with Primus and Ralph Carney)

Official release: Jack Kerouac Reads "On The Road', 1999

Re-released (On The Road): Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.





 



On The Road



(Live version, 1997. Also known as: Home I'll Never Be)



I left New York nineteen forty-nine

To go across the country, without a dad-blame dime(1)

Montana in the cold cold fall

Found my father in a gamblin' hall



Father, father, where have you been?

I've been in the world since I was only ten

'Don't worry about me, I'm about to die of the pleurisy

Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee

Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be

Home in old Medora, home in ol' Truckee(2)

Apalachicola, home I'll never be



Better or for worse, and thick and thin

Well, I've been married to the little woman

God loved me, just like I loved him

I want you to do just the same for him

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind

Oh, the worms eat away

But don't worry, watch the wind



So I left Montana on an old freight train

The night my father died in the cold cold rain

Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee

Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be

Home in old Medora, home in ol' Truckee

Apalachicola, home I'll never be

Home I'll never be

Home I'll never be



Written by: Jack Kerouac(5)

Unofficial release: "Tales from the Underground Volume 5", PMS Records, 2000

From the Allen Ginsberg tribute at the UCLA Wadsworth Theatre, Westwood, CA, on June 21, 1997

Published by: Duluoz Publishing Inc. (ASCAP) and Jalma Music (ASCAP)

Official release (Home I'll Never Be): Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known cover:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of On The Road as sung by Jack Kerouac.

Taken from "Jack Kerouac Reads On The Road' (1999).



Notes:



(1) A dad-blame dime

- Dad-blame is slang roughly being a less cussy version of god-damn. (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001).

- Also transcribed as: "To go across the country, without a bad blame dime." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(2) In part four, chapter 2 of Kerouac's book "On the Road", Jack is singing a little song: "Home in Missoula, Home in Truckee, Home in Opelousas, Ain't no home for me, Home in old Medora, Home in Wounded Knee, Home in Ogallala, Home I'll never be" (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(3) El Cajon, is in California outside Los Angeles, around San Diego. I know that there is a very old railway there that goes through Cajon pass. I don't know much more. But I'm pretty sure of it. (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001)



(4) Tehatchapi: "which is a city in Kern county in California which I in fact live about 15 miles from. It was at one point the only way to get between Los Angles (or San Francisco in Kerouac's case) and Bakersfield. It also contained the Tehatchapi Loop, where the railway, after running through the Tehatchapi Mountain, loops around and crosses on itself by tunnel as the only possibility of getting over the tremendous grade between the two levels." (Submitted by Drew Slayton. E-mail message to Tom Waits Library. October, 2001)



(5) Original version: "On The Road". Jack Kerouac Reads "On The Road', 1999. Written by: Jack Kerouac: "Left New York nineteen forty-nine. To go across the country. without a bad blame dime. Montana in the cold cold fall. I found my father in a gambling hall. Father, father, where have you been? I've been out in the world since I was only ten. Son, he said, don't worry 'bout me. I'm about to die of pleurisy. Cross the Mississippi, cross the Tennessee. Cross the Niagara, home I'll never be. Home in ol' Medora, home in ol' Truckee. Apalachicola, home I'll never be. Better or for worse, thick and thin. Like being married to the little woman. God loved me, just like I loved him. I want you to do the same just for him. The worms eat away. But don't worry, watch the wind. The worms eat away. But don't worry, watch the wind. So I left Montana on an old freight train. the night my father died in the cold cold rain. Rode to Opelousas, rode to Wounded Knee. Rode to Ogallala, home I'll never be. Home I'll never be."

Tom Waits (2006): "One is a ballad and one is a blues. What happened, I made the song first with Primus, the rocker version, Home I'll Never Be. And then Hal Wiliner asked me to come down and play for an Allen Ginsberg memorial. There were a lot of people there talking about him. I didn't have a band. So I said, well, this is an actual song written by Jack Kerouac - an a capella song they found on one of the tapes. [Sings] "I left New York, 1949. To go across the country without a damn blame dime! Montana in the cold, cold fall! found my father in a gambling hall..." Kerouac sang it alone on a microphone - it's on a collection of his work - and it's beautiful, very touching. So I tried to do my version like that. I ended up liking it. Somebody had the tape from that night, so we stuck it on there." (Source: "My Wild Years And The Woman That Saved My Life", Word magazine (UK), November 9, 2006. By Mick Brown) 

Tim Perlich (2006); "Another song on the Bastards disc, Home I'll Never Be, was similarly born of a fragment from the past that serendipitously came his way. Despite the song's being credited to beat poet Jack Kerouac, the forlorn hymn to the highway life turns out to be one of Waits's most personally revealing. When he poignantly sings the lines "Father, father, where you been? I've been in this world since I was only 10," it's not really Kerouac's life he's singing about. Waits is calling out to his own father, who left home never to be seen again after a divorce in 1960, when Waits would've been 10 years old." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Tom Waits (2006): "Kerouac's nephew had this song of Jack's, or at least some of his words he wanted me to record. I guess Jack was at a party somewhere and snuck off into a closet and started singing into a reel-to-reel tape deck, like, 'I left New York in 1949, drove across the country....' I wound up turning it into a song, and I performed it at a memorial for Allen Ginsberg... "I found Kerouac and Ginsberg when I was a teenager, and it saved me. Growing up without a dad, I was always looking for a father figure, and those guys sorta became my father figures. Reading On The Road added some interesting mythology to the ordinary and sent me off on the road myself with an investigative curiosity about the minutiae of life." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Tom Waits (2006): "Well you know, he [Jack Kerouac] recorded it on a little reel-to-reel in a closet in the middle of a party one night, and uh... his uh... one of his nephews, Jim Sampas uh got a hold of it, and put it on a Kerouac compilation. Uhm so, I heard it and uh, yeah he was singing. It was really nice to hear Jack singing. I think it worked pretty well on that sequence after that Bukowski thing about the kid on the bus in North Carolina, and then it set ways on this piano, that's "Home I'll Never Be". (Source: "Tom Waits: Rock Classics, With A Gravelly Rasp", NPR's World Caf� from WXPN (USA) by David Dye. December 15, 2006)



Poor Little Lamb

 



(Also known as: Slam On Little Sheep)



Poor little lamb, now his fleece is all cold

Wakes up in the morning alone

Poor little lamb knows what's coming

Life is an empty cup(1)



Poor little lamb, watch your shoulder

Coyote's waiting out there

Nobody will get any older

If we don't find a way out of here



So let's go on a bummer this summer

Where we won't have to be afraid

The world will be on a hummer, boys

And we'll laugh and we'll drink lemonade



Written by: Tom Waits and William Kennedy

Published by: Taft/ Barish Music/ Famous Mysic , LLC (ASCAP) and Jalma Music Inc., � 1987/ 2006

Demo recording 1987 (Ironweed soundtrack)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Life is an empty cup

Charles Champlin (1988): "Waits wrote a song for "Ironweed" with its novelist-screenwriter William Kennedy. It's called "Poor Little Lamb" and, Waits said, "It's based on a poem he saw on the side of a bridge when he was a kid. 'Life is an empty cup' is one of the lines. It's like those nursery rhymes you may understand one way when you're a kid and another way later on, like 'Ring Around the Rosy' is about scarlet fever and when they all fall down, they fall down dead." (Source: "Tom Waits: Eccentric In The Very Best Sense", by Charles Champlin. Los Angeles Times. January 14, 1988)



Tom Waits (2006): "There's one song I wrote with [Ironweed novelist] William Kennedy out in Albany. He came across this poem written on a bridge by some hobos, so he copied it down and saved it for years. He showed it to me and suggested we turn it into a song, so we did." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)



Spidey's Wild Ride

 



The smoke from the battle fish and the rain soaked through

and the wheelman left the shore

and barns tumbled and silos flew across fifteen miles bad road tar

And big Bull Trometer hung on to the side

and the pig dogs trembled on Spidey's wild ride



And big John Jizom from downtown Chizom

flew away with old mrs. Storm(2)

And they found Bird Lundy neath a keg of nails crooked as a dog's hind leg

Keeping warm after twenty-nine days on hard assed bread

he drilled to the big outside and clung like a tick to his waterfront

life mooned and clouded, blued and skied

And all the clocks blew up on Spidey's wild ride



And the hills stood up in a great big 3

and left me whipped by the forces that were inside me(3)

Loud as the ocean, cold as a desk, red as the water on the river of flesh

And he was sewing up his pants while he was shoeing a mule

And he was bucking a head wind gale

But the crooked ass beauty was trapped to the side

and he shook on Spidey's wild ride



And all the statue ass makers, and the uprooted trees

And I shouted way up to where the rabbit digs his hole

and the wheelman, the jockeys the landlords and thee

were bucking a head wind south

and with nine lives spent, he landed on his rent

composed with a steele head salmon in his mouth(4)

and I never did see another day outside

cause I'd had enough travel on Spidey's wild ride



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording studios. Cotati, CA/ USA, 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Spidey's Wild Ride:

Tom Waits (2006): "I had fun doing that song - just some singing and some beatboxing. It's very rudimentary yet, at the same time, very complete. "What's interesting to me about hiphop is that it doesn't have any conventional wisdom -- the form is still being defined. You can put some hot sauce in the milkshake because it's still largely a lawless territory. If you want, you could record a mariachi calypso foxtrot with a Samoan singer in a bull ring... "The production can also be very cheap -- all you need is three fingers, a drum machine and a sampler and you can record a hit song in your closet. I've done some recording in the closet myself and the washroom, in the garage and in the car too, whatever." (Source: "Tom Waits: Haunted songster's revelatory dispatch from the Twilight Zone", Now Magazine (Canada). Vol. 26, no. 11. November 16 - 22, 2006. By Tim Perlich)

Greg Kot (2006): "You've got that human beat-box thing going on "Spidey's Wild Ride." Has hip-hop had an influence on how you sing?" Tom Waits: "Yeah. Hip-hop is still kind of the Old West. It's a reasonably unsettled territory and truly the cutting edge of blues. They're still trying to put hot sauce in a milkshake. No one is going to pull you over and give you a ticket for it because it's still defining itself." (Source: "Tom Waits Still In The Driver's Seat", The Chicago Tribune (USA). November 21, 2006. By Greg Kot)



(2) Mrs. Storm

- Also mentioned in Kentucky Avenue (Blue Valentine, 1978): "Mrs. Storm will stab you with a steak knife, if you step on her lawn."

Tom Waits (1999): "When I was a kid, I had a friend whose dad was a truck driver. His name was Gale Storm. We had moved to National City, and his dad was coming through town, and he picked me up and he took me back up to L.A., to Whittier, to stay for a weekend. And I rode in the truck all the way up there. I was just like, "I'm gonna -- I don't know what I'm gonna do, but I'm changed." (Source: "Gone North, Tom Waits, upcountry" L.A. Weekly. Robert Lloyd. April 23-29, 1999)

Tom Waits (1976): "And there was a woman called Mrs. Storm. She lived with her sister. She used to sit in her kitchen with her window open and a twelve-gauge shotgun [sticking] out of it ... so we took the long way around." (Live at the Apollo Theatre, London, UK. March 23, 1976)



(3) Whipped by the forces that were inside me:

- Also mentioned in Come On Up To The House (Mule Variations, 1999): "And you been whipped by the forces that are inside you Gotta come on up to the house."

- Austin Chronicle (2002): Where are you, in an office or a small room fielding calls? Tom Waits: I'm out on my own recognizance in the day room, gluing pieces of macaroni on cardboard and painting it gold. After that I get to make a belt that says, "Whipped by the forces within me" on the back." (Source: "This Business Called Show", Austin Chronicle (USA) Vol. 21, No. 26. May 10-16, 2002 by Margaret Moser)



(4) Composed with a steele head salmon in his mouth:





Source: Orphans booklet, 2006. Date: unknown. Credits: unknown



The Pontiac

 



Well, let's see... we had the eh Fairlane. Then the u-joints went out on that,

and the bushings. And then your mother wanted to trade it in on the Tornado,

so we got the Tornado. God, I hated the color of that sonufa bitch! And

the dog destroyed the upholstery on the Ford. Boy, that was long before you

were born. We called it the Yellowbird, two-door, three on the tree. Tight

little mother. Threw a rod, sold it to Jacobs for a hundred dollar



Now the special eh... four-holer, you've never seen body panels line up

like that. Overhead cam, dual exhaust. You know I had... let's see I had...

four Buicks, loved 'em all



Now your Uncle Emmet, well he drives a Thunderbird, it used to belong to your

Aunt Evelyn(1). Well, she ruined it, drove it to Indiana with no gear oil. That

was the end of that! Sold that Cadillac to your mom. Your mom loved that

Caddy. Independent rear suspension, Landau top, good tires. Gas hog. I swear

it had the power to repair itself



I loved the Olds... Dan Steele used to give 'em to me at a discount. Showroom

models and that. And then there was the Pontiac and...



God, I loved that Pontiac.

Well, it was kind of an oxblood god

but It handled so beautifully.

Yeah, I miss that car.

Well, that was a long time ago

a long time ago



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(2)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1987/ 2006

Official release: "Smack My Crack", 1987 (spoken word)

Re-released on: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Aunt Evelyn

- Also mentioned in Pony, 1999: "I wish I was home, in Evelyn's kitchen."

Austin Chronicle (1999): The song "Pony" has a lot of characters. These names, "Burn-Face Jake," "Blind Darby." I think you're in "Evelyn's Kitchen." Are these real people that live in these songs? Tom Waits: "Evelyn's Kitchen," that's my Aunt Evelyn, who passed away during the making of the record. Her and my uncle had 10 kids and lived in a place called Gridley. I guess I've been far away from home, and have thought about her kitchen a lot and that a lot of people feel the same way when they've been far away from home. I dreamed about getting back home to her kitchen. That's why we put her in there -- a tribute to Evelyn. The other people are just different people I've come across over the years -- known, heard about, read about." (Source: Mule Conversations. Austin Chronicle: Jody Denberg. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "My Aunt Evelyn died while we were making the record [Mule Variations]. She was my favorite aunt. She and my Uncle Chalmer had ten kids, and raised prunes and peaches. They lived in Gridley, and there have been a lot of times when I've been far away from home, and I've thought about Evelyn's kitchen. And I know there are a lot of people that loved them, that thought about that same kitchen. So that's why we put that in there. They had an old dog named Gyp. If you make up songs, sometimes you just get up in the morning and start singing something on the way to work. You don't know why, and maybe it's worth remembering, or maybe it's not." (Source: "A Q&A about Mule Variations ". MSO: Rip Rense. January, 1999)



(2) The Pontiac:

The Plain Dealer (2006): "How autobiographical is "The Pontiac"? Tom Waits: "That's my father-in-law, a ride down to the corner store with my father-in-law, talking about endless catalog of cars he's owned and the detail with which he remembers each one lovingly." (Source: "Songwriter's Wandering Orphans' Will Always Find A Musical Home", The Plain Dealer (Cleveland/ USA). November 19, 2006.Telephone interview by John Soeder)



Two Sisters

 



There was an old woman, lived by the seashore

Bow and balance me(2)

There was an old woman, lived by the seashore

A number of daughters: one, two, three, four

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



There was a young man come there to see them

Bow and balance me

There was a young man come there to see them

and the oldest one got stuck on him

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



He bought the youngest a beaver hat

Bow and balance me

He bought the youngest a beaver hat

and the oldest one got mad at that

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Oh, sister oh, sister let's walk the seashore

Bow and balance me

Oh, sister oh, sister let's walk the seashore

and see the ships as they're sailing on

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



While these two sisters were walking the shore

Bow and balance me

While these two sisters were walking the shore

the oldest pushed the youngest o'er

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Oh, sister oh, sister please lend me your hand

Bow and balance me

Oh, sister oh, sister please lend me your hand

and you will have Willy and all of his land

And then I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



I'll never, I'll never will lend you my hand

Bow and balance me

I'll never, I'll never will lend you my hand

but I'll have Willy and all of his land

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Some time she swam and some time she swam

Bow and balance me

Some time she sank and some time she swam

untill she came to the old mill dam

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



The miller, he got his fishinghook

Bow and balance me

The miller, he got his fishinghook

and fished that maiden out of the brook

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Oh, miller oh, miller here's five gold rings

Bow and balance me

Oh, miller oh, miller here's five gold rings

to push the maiden in again

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



The miller received those five gold rings

Bow and balance me

The miller received those five gold rings

and pushed that maiden in again

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



The miller was hung in the old mill gate

Bow and balance me

The miller was hung in the old mill gate

for drowning little sister Kate

And I'll be true to my love

if my love will be true to me



Written by: folk traditional arranged by Waits/ Brennan(1)

Official release: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Two Sisters:

- Folk ballad also known as "Twa Sisters", first printed version from 1656 known as "The Miller and the King's Daughter". Variants and alternate titles include: The Cruel Sister, The Bonnie Milldams of Binnorie, The Bonny Bows o' London, Binnorie and Sister and Dear Sister. Maybe best known as "Child #10" (Francis J. Child's five volume work, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads). Child has 21 versions of the lyrics of "The Twa Sisters"...

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)

Early version as printed in Jamieson's Popular Ballads (1806): "There was twa sisters in a bowr, Edinburgh, Edinburgh There was twa sisters in a bowr, Stirling for ay There was twa sisters in a bowr, There came a knight to be their wooer. He courted the eldest wi glove an ring, But he lovd the youngest above a' thing. He courted the eldest wi brotch an knife, But lovd the youngest as his life. The eldest she was vexed sair, An much envi'd her sister fair. Into her bowr she could not rest, Wi grief an spite she almost brast. Upon a morning fair and clear, She cried upon her sister dear: "O sister, come to yon sea stran, An see our father's ship come to lan." She's taen her by the milk-white han, An led her down to yon sea stran. The youngest stood upon a stane, The eldest came and threw her in. She tooke her by the middle sma, And dashd her bonny back to the jaw. "O sister, sister, tak my han, An Ise mack you heir to a' my lan." "O sister, sister, tak my middle, An yes get my goud and my gouden girdle." "O sister, sister, save my life, An I swear Ise never be nae man's wife." "Foul fa the han that I should tacke, It twin'd me and my wardles make." "Your cherry cheeks an yallow hair, Gars me gae maiden for evermair." Sometimes she sank, and sometimes she swam, Till she came down yon bonny mill-dam. O out it came the millers son, An saw the fair maid swimmin' in. "O Father, father, draw your dam, Here's either a mermaid or a swan." The miller quickly drew the dam, An there he found a drownd woman. You couldna see her yallow hair, For gold and pearle that were so rare. An by there came a harper fine, That harped to the king at dine. When he did look that lady upon, He sighd and made a heavy moan. He's taen three locks o her yallow hair, An wi them strung his harp sae fair. The first tune he did play and sing, Was, "Farewell to my father the king." The nextin tune that he playd syne, Was, "Farewell to my mother the queen." The lasten tune that he playd then, Was, "wae to my sister, Fair Ellen."



(2) Bow and balance me: refrain also interpreted as: "Bow and balance to me", "Binnorie, O Binnorie", "With a hy downe downe a downe-a", "Stirling for aye", "And the swan swims bonnie O", "At the bonnie bows o London town", "On the banks of the Banna, ohone and aree", "Bow down, bow down, bow down", "And the bough it was bent to me", "Fa la la la la la la la".



What Keeps Mankind Alive?

 



You gentlemen who think you have a mission

To purge us of the seven deadly sins(2)

Should first sort out the basic food position

Then start your preaching, that's where it begins



You lot, who preach restraint and watch your waist as well

Should learn, for once, the way the world is run

However much you twist, or whatever lies that you tell

Food is the first thing, morals follow on(3)



So first make sure that those who are now starving

get proper helpings, when we all start carving

What keeps mankind alive?



What keeps mankind alive? The fact that millions

are daily tortured, stifled, punished, silenced and oppressed

Mankind can keep alive thanks to its brilliance

in keeping its humanity repressed

And for once you must try not to shirk the facts

Mankind is kept alive

by bestial acts!



Written by: Original words by Bertolt Brecht

Translation by Ralph Manheim and John Willett

Published by: European American Music Corporation, � 1928. Weill-Brecht-Harms Music Co., Inc. (ASCAP)

& Kurt Weill Foundation for Music Inc. (ASCAP). All rights adminsetered by WB Music Corp.

Music by: Kurt Weill (Second finale, Drei Groschenoper)

Official release: "Lost In The Stars - The Music Of Kurt Weill". Various artists, 1985.

Engineer: Bob Musso. Accordian by Guy Klucevsek.

Re-released on: Orphans (Bastards), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) What Keeps Mankind Alive?:

- "This is a song from Kurt Weill's and Berthold Brecht's 'Die Dreigroschenoper' ('The Threepenny Opera'). The correct title of the piece is originally 'Zweiter Dreigroschenfinale' (or 'Second Threepenny Finale), but 'What Keeps Mankind Alive?' has caught on as title after this translation. In the "opera" (it's really more of a musical cabaret) it is sung by the bandit Macheath (aka Mack the Knife) and Celia Peachum, wife of the proprietor of 'Beggar's Friend', a shop where London's beggars can acquire the correct raggedy appearance." (Submitted by Ulf Berggren. Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)

- The anti-capitalist 'Dreigroschenoper' was originally staged at Berlin's Theater on August 31, 1928. In 1931 German director G.W. Pabst (Pandora's Box, 1929) made his famous filmversion with Rudolf Forster, Lotte Lenya, ea. Brecht originally collaborated on the film, but the script was rewritten when his ideas clashed with those of Pabst. Brecht and Weill were displeased with the filmmaker's interpretation, and took out a lawsuit over the material's copyright. The film was released on the eve of Hitler's seizure of power in Germany. Pabst captured the essence of the atmosphere which allowed the existence of the Nazi state, and all original German prints were destroyed by the Third Reich. The film was shot simultaneously in both German and French, with different casts. 

Tom Waits (1999): "Well, the weird thing about Kurt Weill is that after I made a few records in the '80s, people started to tell me that I was sounding like this guy, or that I must be listening to this guy. So I figured I should probably go out and listen to him, because I'd never heard of him before. I did listen, and then I thought, 'Oh, I hear that.' " (Source: "Tom Waits, In Dreams" Exclaim: Michael Barclay. April/ May 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "That macarbe, dissonant style, yeah. See, when I hear Weill I hear a lot of anger in those songs. I remember the first time that I heard that Peggy Lee tune, Is That All There Is?, I identified with that. (Sings.) "Is that all there is? If that's all there is, then let's keep dancing". So you just find different things that you feel your voice is suited to. I didn't really know that much about Kurt Weill until people started saying, "Hey, he must be listening to a lot of Kurt Weill." I thought, I better go find out who this guy is. I started listening to The Happy End, and the Threepenny Opera and Mahagonny and all that really expressionistic music." (Source: "Mojo interview with Tom Waits". Mojo: Barney Hoskyns. April 1999)



(2) Seven deadly sins: Pride, Wrath, Envy, Lust, Gluttony, Avarice, and Sloth. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(3) Food is the first thing, morals follow on (Erst kommt das Fressen, dann kommt die Moral): This famous quote said by both Macheath and Jenny in the ballad is kind of hard to translate into English. Brecht's use of the German word "Fressen", instead of the usual word "Essen," is not accidental and alludes to his low opinion of humanity as mere animals hidden under a thin veneer of culture and manners. It differentiates between the animal-like frenzy of eating and the human concept of eating. The reader expects to read the phrase: "Erst kommt das Essen, dann kommt die Moral" using the usual German word "Essen" to mean, "First comes the meal, then comes the moral." Brecht's almost shocking use of the word "Fressen" implies we are nothing more than animals, and our first priority is to be fed.



Translation of the song from the Second Finale

of Die Dreigroschenoper (The Threepenny Opera):



MACHEATH: You gentlemen who think you have a mission

to purge us of the seven deadly sins,

should first sort out the basic food position,

then start your preaching! That's where it begins.

You lot who preach restraint and watch your waist as well,

should learn, for once, the way the world is run:

However much you twist, whatever lies you tell,

food is the first thing, morals follow on.

So first make sure that those who now are starving

get proper helpings when we all start carving.



VOICE OFF-STAGE: What keeps mankind alive?



MACHEATH: What keeps mankind alive? The fact that millions

are daily tortured, stifled, punished, silenced, oppressed.

Mankind can keep alive thanks to its brilliance

in keeping its humanity repressed.



CHORUS: For once you must try not to shirk the facts:

Mankind is kept alive by bestial acts.



MRS. PEACHUM: You say that girls may strip with your permission.

You draw the line dividing art from sin.

So first sort out the basic food position,

then start your preaching! That's where we begin.

You lot who bank on your desires and our disgust

Should learn for once the way the world is run:

Whatever lies you tell, however much you twist,

food is the first thing, morals follow on.

So first make sure that those who are now starving

get proper helpings when we all start carving.



VOICE OFF-STAGE: What keeps mankind alive?



MRS. PEACHUM: What keeps mankind alive? The fact that millions

are daily tortured, stifled, punished, silenced, oppressed.

Mankind can keep alive thanks to its brilliance

in keeping its humanity repressed.



CHORUS: For once you must try not to shirk the facts:

Mankind is kept alive by bestial acts.



Adapted from John Gay's 'The Beggar's Opera' (1728),

translated from English to German by Brecht's assistant Elisabeth Hauptmann,

This translation back into English was made by Ralph Manheim and John Willett for a later staging.

(In another translation, made by Michael Feingold in 1989,

the song would instead be called 'How Do All Humans Live?')



Original German text:

(Wovon lebt der Mensch)



Ihr Herrn, die ihr uns lehrt, wie man brav leben 

Und Sünd und Missetat vermeiden kann 

Zuerst müßt ihr uns was zu fressen geben 

Dann könnt ihr reden: damit fängt es an.



Ihr, die euren Wanst und unsre Bravheit liebt 

Das eine wisset ein für allemal: 

Wie ihr es immer dreht und wie ihr's immer schiebt 

Erst kommt das Fressen, dann kommt die Moral.



Erst muß es möglich sein auch armen Leuten 

Vom großen Brotlaib sich ihr Teil zu schneiden. 



(Jenny): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 



(Macheath): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 

Indem er stündlich Den Menschen peinigt, auszieht, anfällt, abwürgt und frißt. 

Nur dadurch lebt der Mensch, daß er so gründlich 

Vergessen kann, daß er ein Mensch doch ist.



(Choir): Ihr Herren, bildet euch nur da nichts ein: 

Der Mensch lebt nur von Missetat allein!



(Jenny): Ihr lehrt uns, wann ein Weib die Röcke heben 

Und ihre Augen einwärts drehen kann 

Zuerst müßt ihr uns was zu fressen geben 

Dann könnt ihr reden: damit fängt es an.



Ihr, die auf unsrer Scham und eurer Lust besteht 

Das eine wisset ein für allemal: 

Wie ihr es immer dreht und wie ihr's immer schiebt 

Erst kommt das Fressen, dann kommt die Moral.



Erst muß es möglich sein auch armen Leuten 

Vom großen Brotlaib sich ihr Teil zu schneiden.



(Macheath): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 

(Jenny): Denn wovon lebt der Mensch? 

Indem er stündlich Den Menschen peinigt, auszieht, anfällt, abwürgt und frißt. 

Nur dadurch lebt der Mensch, daß er so gründlich 

Vergessen kann, daß er ein Mensch doch ist.



(Choir): Ihr Herren, bildet euch nur da nichts ein: 

Der Mensch lebt nur von Missetat allein!



Glitter And Doom (2009) (Live compilation)



Lucinda - Ain't Goin Down

Lucinda



Well, they call me William the Pleaser

I sold opium, fireworks and lead

Now I'm telling my troubles to strangers

when the shadows get long I'll be dead



Now, her hair was as black as a bucket of tar

her skin as white as a cuttlefish bone(1)

I left Texas to follow Lucinda

Now I'll never see heaven or home



I made a wish on a sliver of moonlight

A sly grin and a bowl full of stars

Like a kid who captures a firefly

and leaves it only to die in the jar



As I kick at the clouds at my hanging

As I swing out over the crowd

I will search every face for Lucinda's

And she will go off with me down to hell



I thought I'd broke loose of Lucinda

The rain returned and so did the wind

I cast this burden on the god that's within me

and I'll leave this old world and go free



The devil dances inside empty pockets(2)

but she didn't want money or pearls

No, that wasn't enough for Lucinda

She wasn't that kind of girl



Now I've fallen from grace for Lucinda

Whoever thought that hell be'd so low

I did well for an old tin can sailor

but she wanted the bell in my soul



I've spoken the god on the mountain

And I've swam in the Irish sea

I ate fire and drank from the Ganges(3)

and I'll beg there for mercy for me



I thought I'd broke loose from Lucinda

the rain returned and so did the wind

I was standing outside the Whitehorse

Oh but I was afraid to go in



I heard someone pull the trigger

her breasts heaved in the moonlight again

There was a smear of gold in the window

and then I was the jewel of her sin



They call me William the Pleaser

I sold opium, fireworks and lead

Now I'm telling my troubles to strangers

when the shadows get long I'll be dead



Now her hair was a black as a bucket of tar

skin as white as a cuttlefish bone

I left Texas to follow Lucinda

I know I'll never see heaven or home

I know I'll never see heaven or home

I know I'll never see heaven or home



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan(4)

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2006

Official release: Orphans (Brawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Cuttlefish bone: A cuttlefish bone (the white calcareous internal shell of a cuttlefish, a cephalopod) is used as a dietary supplement for birds and reptiles (especially turtles), as it is usually very soft and dry. Often found washed ashore on beaches.



(2) The devil dances inside empty pockets: The devil dances in an empty pocket. 18th Century proverb of German origin: poverty tempts one to do evil.



(3) Drank from the Ganges: Devout Hindus begin to give their offerings of flowers or food, throwing handfulls of grain or garlands of marigolds or pink lotuses into the Ganges river India. Others will float small oil lamps on its surface. Or as stated in "Banaras City of Light" by Diana L. Eck, "they may take up her water and put it back into the river as an offering to the ancestors and the gods" (Eck 212). In cupped hands they will also take the ritual drink of the Ganges and then fill a container to take with them to the temple.



(4) Lucinda:

Tom Waits (2006): "On Orphans there is a mambo about a convict who breaks out of jail with a fishbone, a gospel train song about Charlie Whitman and John Wilkes Boothe, a delta blues about a disturbing neighbor, a spoken word piece about a woman who was struck by lightening, an 18th century Scottish madrigal about murderous sibling rivalry, an American backwoods a cappella about a hanging. Even a song by Jack Kerouac and a spiritual with my own personal petition to the Lord with prayer... There's even a show tune about an old altar boy and a rockabilly song about a young man who's begging to be lied to." (Source: Anti Records Orphans promo pack. August 2006)



Singapore

 



We sail tonight for Singapore, we're all as mad as hatters(2) here

I've fallen for a tawny moor, took off to the Land of Nod(3)

Drank with all the Chinamen, walked the sewers of Paris(4)

I danced along a colored wind, dangled from a rope of sand

You must say goodbye to me



We sail tonight for Singapore, don't fall asleep while you're ashore

Cross your heart and hope to die, when you hear the children cry

Let marrowbone and cleaver choose, while making feet for children's shoes(5)

Through the alley, back from hell, when you hear that steeple bell

You must say goodbye to me.



Wipe him down with gasoline, till his arms are hard and mean

From now on, boys, this iron boat's your home

So heave away, boys



We sail tonight for Singapore, take your blankets from the floor

Wash your mouth out by the door, the whole town's made of iron ore

Every witness turns to steam, they all become Italian dreams

Fill your pockets up with earth, get yourself a dollar's worth

Away boys, away boys, heave away



The captain is a one-armed dwarf, he's throwing dice along the wharf

In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is King(6)

So take this ring



We sail tonight for Singapore, we're all as mad as hatters here

I've fallen for a tawny moor, took off to the Land of Nod

Drank with all the Chinamen, walked the sewers of Paris

I drank along a colored wind, I dangled from a rope of sand

You must say goodbye to me



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1985-1998

Official release: "Rain Dogs", Island Records Inc., 1985 &

"Beautiful Maladies", Island Records Inc., 1998

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Unplugged. Anne B�renz & Frank Wolff. 2003. B�chergilde (Germany)

The Silverhearts Play Raindogs. The Silverhearts. October 5, 2005. Banbury Park Records

Sex In Obertrubach. Feinton. March 1, 2006. TP9 Records (Germany)

Bye-Bye. Anne B�renz. October, 2006. Stalburg Theater (Germany)

Dolphin Blue Live. Dolphin Blue. December, 2007. Rising Sun Productions (German CDR)



Notes:



(1) Singapore

Tom Waits (1985): "Sometimes I close my eyes real hard and I see a picture of what I want, the song. 'Singapore' started like that, Richard Burton with a bottle of festival brandy preparing to go on board ship. I tried to make my voice like his - "In the kingdom of the blind the one-eyed man is king" - I took that from Orwell I think. NME - Which book? TW - Mary Poppins, one of the big ones." (Source: "Hard Rain". New Musical Express: Gavin Martin. October 19 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "Nowadays, if you want a certain sound you don't have to get it now, you can get it later. When you're mixing, electronically. I wanted to get it now, so I felt I cooked it and I ate it. You can establish percussion sounds later electronically. But I ended up banging on things so I felt that it really responded. If I couldn't get the right sound out of the drum set we'd get a chest of drawers in the bathroom and hit it real hard with a two-by-four. Things like that. That's on "Singapore". Those little things made me feel more involved that sampling on a synthesizer." (Source: "Tom Waits for no man". Spin Magazine: Glenn O'Brien. November 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "Singapore is kind of like Dick Burton in Taiwan and he can't get a drink." (Source: "Rain Dogs Island Promo Tape" (taped comments on songs as sent to radio stations). Date: late 1985)

Tom Waits (1985): "Ehm... I was thinking about what would happen if Richard Burton got stranded in Hong Kong somewhere or... y'know. He's this burly English with... y'know? You know a sheet mantras of... somewhere in eh...somewhere off. y'know? Taiwan or Guam, Hong Kong, Canton, Shanghai eh Philippines, somewhere over there y'know? So I tried to imagine what would be going through eh... Make it like a Richard Burton number." (Source: "Nightlines Interview" Nightlines on CBC Stereo (Canada) conducted by Michael Tearson. Date: New York. Late 1985)

Tom Waits (1998): "It's an adventure song. I like adventure songs and I always remembered that in the studio the drum sound that we used was a two by four attacking somebody's chest of drawers and the whole song played and all the backbeats were played with a two by four hitting the chest of drawers repeatedly and on the last bar of the song the whole piece of furniture had collapsed and there was nothing left of it and the song was over but it was just a - That's what I think of when I hear the song. I see the pile of wood and it excites me. Michael Blair was the percussionist. It wasn't a very expensive chest of drawers - it was just one that we'd found out on the sidewalk." (Source: "KCRW-FM: Morning Becomes Eclectic (interviewed by Chris Douridas)" Date: March 31, 1998) 



(2) Mad hatter

- Someone who sells drugs and other illegal substances. ("I'm going to go pick some stuff up from the madhatter up on Main.") (Source: The Online Slang Dictionary, Walter Rader).

- Mad as a hatter phr. [mid-19C] very mad, utterly insane. [the use in 18C of mercurous nitrate in tanning of felt hats. This was absorbed by the hatters, in whom the effects could produce mental problems]. (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9).

- Might also refer to the Alice character. Also mentioned in "Diamonds And Gold": "There's a hole in the ladder, a fence we can climb Mad as a hatter, you're thin as a dime."

- "These days we associate mad as a hatter with a bit of whimsy in Lewis Carroll's famous children's book Alice in Wonderland of 1865. Carroll didn't invent the phrase, though. By the time he wrote the book it was already well known; the first example I can find is from a work by Thomas Chandler Haliburton (Judge Haliburton), of Nova Scotia, who was well-known in the 1830s for his comic writings about the character Sam Slick; in The Clockmaker; or the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slickville of 1836, he wrote: "Father he larfed out like any thing; I thought he would never stop-and sister Sall got right up and walked out of the room, as mad as a hatter". As the author felt no need to explain it, by then it was clearly well known in his part of North America. Whether it was invented there, I don't know, but it seems likely. An early British reference is in Pendennis by William Makepeace Thackeray, serialised between 1848-50: "We were talking about it at mess, yesterday, and chaffing Derby Oaks-until he was as mad as a hatter". Note, by the way, that mad is being used in both these cases in the sense of being angry rather than insane, so these examples better fit the sense of phrases like mad as a wet hen, mad as a hornet, mad as a cut snake, mad as a meat axe, and other wonderful similes, of which the first two are American and the last two from Australia or New Zealand. But Thomas Hughes, in Tom Brown's Schooldays, used it in the same way that Lewis Carroll was later to do: "He's a very good fellow, but as mad as a hatter". Few people who use the phrase today realise that there's a story of human suffering behind it; the term actually derives from an early industrial occupational disease. Felt hats were once very popular in North America and Europe; an example is the top hat. The best sorts were made from beaver fur, but cheaper ones used furs such as rabbit instead. A complicated set of processes was needed to turn the fur into a finished hat. With the cheaper sorts of fur, an early step was to brush a solution of a mercury compound-usually mercurous nitrate-on to the fur to roughen the fibres and make them mat more easily, a process called carroting because it made the fur turn orange. Beaver fur had natural serrated edges that made this unnecessary, one reason why it was preferred, but the cost and scarcity of beaver meant that other furs had to be used. Whatever the source of the fur, the fibres were then shaved off the skin and turned into felt; this was later immersed in a boiling acid solution to thicken and harden it. Finishing processes included steaming the hat to shape and ironing it. In all these steps, hatters working in poorly ventilated workshops would breathe in the mercury compounds and accumulate the metal in their bodies. We now know that mercury is a cumulative poison that causes kidney and brain damage. Physical symptoms include trembling (known at the time as hatter's shakes), loosening of teeth, loss of co-ordination, and slurred speech; mental ones include irritability, loss of memory, depression, anxiety, and other personality changes. This was called mad hatter syndrome. It's been a very long time since mercury was used in making hats, and now all that remains is a relic phrase that links to a nasty period in manufacturing history. But mad hatter syndrome remains common as a description of the symptoms of mercury poisoning." (Source: World Wide Words is copyright � Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(3) Nod, the land of

- To go to the land of Nod is to go to bed. There are many similar puns and more in French than in English. Of course, the reference is to Gen. iv. 16, "Cain went ... and dwelt in the land of Nod;" but where the land of Nod is or was nobody knows. In fact, "Nod" means a vagrant or vagabond, and when Cain was driven out he lived "a vagrant life," with no fixed abode, till he built his "city." (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd) 

- Jonathan Swift turned the phrase into a pun when he wrote that he was "going into the Land of Nod" meaning that he was going to sleep. (Submitted by Cheryl Dillis, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist. October, 2000. From "2,107 Curious Word Origins, Sayings and Expressions" by Charles Earle).

- Could be inspired by: "The Land Of Nod." Children's song. Written by: Robert Louis Stevenson. Copyright: unknown: "From breakfast on all through the day At home among my friends I stay; But every night I go abroad Afar into the land of Nod All by myself I have to go, With none to tell me what to do. All alone beside the streams And up the mountainsides of dreams The strangest things are there for me, Both things to eat and things to see, And many frightening sights abroad Till morning in the land of Nod Try as I like to find the way, I never can get back by day, Nor can remember plain and clear The curious music that I hear."



(4) Walked the sewers of Paris

- Might refer to the club that used to be behind the Ivar Theatre in L.A. It was later called "The Gaslight" and it has been remodeled and renamed "The Opium Den" in 1996. 1605 1/2 N. Ivar Hollywood, CA USA

Ross MacLean (2004): "The T. Waits quote, "Andr� is at the piano behind the Ivar in the sewers" (The One That Got Away, 1976) probably refers to a piano player at a gay bar, located down the alley by the stage door, called "The Sewer of Paris." There was a garbage dumpster in the corner between the two doorways, and girls could go from the theater straight to the bar. The bar held 70's glitter queens, lots of ageing closet cases, servicemen (the U.S.O. was half block down the street from the Ivar), runaways fresh from the Greyhound bus station who had come to Hollywood to become famous, thugs fresh out of jail, and drag queens of any race. I had a couple pretty scarey nights there." (Source: email message by Ross MacLean to Tom Waits Library. February, 2004. Copyright 1994 from "The Ivar Memoirs" by Ross MacLean, produced & published playwright. Ross has written a memoir on the Ivar, and is completing a play on the same subject)

Tom Waits in 1981 on the Ivar Theatre: "A burlesque house in Hollywood, right next door to the library. It was originally a legitimate theatre. Lord Buckley and Lenny Bruce played there. Now it's just a strip joint, full of transsexuals. Behind the Ivar is another nightclub called The Gaslight(9). Used to be called the Sewers Of Paris." (Source: "Tom Waits: Waits And Double Measures" Smash Hits magazine by Johnny Black. March 18, 1981)



(5) Making feet for children shoes: To have sex. (Source: Tom Waits Digest, Seth Nielssen)



(6) In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is King: Attributed to Desiderius Gerhard Erasmus, Dutch scholar, philosopher and writer (1465 - 1536). [Lat., In regione caecorum rex est luscus.] - Adagia (III, IV, 96)



Get Behind The Mule

 



Molly Be Damned smote(2) Jimmy the Harp(3)

With a horrid little pistol and a lariat(4)

She's goin' to the bottom and she's goin' down the drain(5)

Said she wasn't big enough to carry it



She got to get behind the mule, yeah

in the morning and plow

Got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Choppity chop(6) goes the axe in the woods

You gotta meet me by the fall down tree

Shovel of dirt upon a coffin lid

And I know they'll come lookin' for me, boys

I know they'll come lookin' for me



Got to get behind the mule, yeah

in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Big Jack Earl(7) was eight foot one

And he stood in the road and he cried

He couldn't make her love him, couldn't make her stay

But tell the good Lord that he tried



Got to get behind the mule, yeah

in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow, yeah

You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Dusty trail from Atchison to Placerville(8)

On the wreck of the Weaverville stage(9)

Beaula fired on Beatty for a lemonade

I was stirring my brandy with a nail, boys

Stirring my brandy with a nail



Got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow

You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow, yeah

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Well, the rampaging(10) sons of the widow James

Jack the Cutter and the Pockmarked Kid

Had to stand naked at the bottom of the cross

And tell the good Lord what they did

Tell the good Lord what they did



You got to get behind the mule, yeah

in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule, yeah, in the morning and plow

You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Punctuated birds on the power line

In a Studebaker with Birdie Joe Hoaks(11)

I'm diggin' all the way to China with a silver spoon

While the hangman fumbles with the noose, boys

The hangman fumbles with the noose



You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow

You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Pin your ear to the wisdom post

Pin your eye to the line

Never let the weeds get higher than the garden(12)

Always keep a sapphire in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind



You got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow

Got to get behind the mule in the morning and plow



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Mule Variations, Anti Inc., 1999

Arrangements and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Mule Variations" (Amsco Publications, 2000)



Known covers:

Wicked Grin. John Hammond. March 13, 2001. Emd/ Virgin

The Last Castle. Various artists. November, 2001. Decca Music Group 440-016-193-2. Performed by John Hammond

Something Borrowed Something Blue. Chris Ramey. November 20, 2002. Kinkajou Records

Under The Influence - The songs of Tom Waits. Barry Charles. 2003. Tara Hall Productions (Australia)

Triple Trouble. "Sir" Oliver Mally. June, 2003. Extraplatte EX 557-2

Live at the Rogue: Field of Blues.Various Artists. July 22, 2003. Rockin Rogue Records. Performed by John Hammond

Careless Love. 2 Blue Shoes. 2004. Self-released (re-release in 2006)

New History. Derrin Nauendorf. February 2005. Self-released

Song Of Jealousy. Pulp Dogs. April 30, 2006. Self-released (Italy)

Hope Waits. Hope Waits. September 18, 2007. Radarproof Records

This is Your Chance France Baby! Fried Okra band. 2007. Gateway Music (Denmark)

When It Rains. Anna Beljin. June 30, 2010. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Get behind the mule

Rip Rense (1999): "Get Behind the Mule." Tom Waits: "That's what Robert Johnson's father said about Robert, because he ran away. He said, 'Trouble with Robert is he wouldn't get behind the mule in the morning and plow,' because that was the life that was there for him. To be a sharecropper. But he ran off to Maxwell Street, and all over Texas. He wasn't going to stick around. Get behind the mule. . .can be whatever you want it to mean. We all have to get up in the morning and go to work. Kathleen says, "I didn't marry a man. I married a mule." And I've been going through a lot of changes. That's where Mule Variations came from." Q: What did she mean by that? TW: "I'm stubborn." (Source: A Q&A about Mule Variations. MSO: Rip Rense, early 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "I don't know what people are going to think Mule Variations are. We'd done the song, "Get Behind the Mule." We'd done it several times. We did a Chinese version, and we did a cha-cha version, and a raga version -- and a cappella. And so, at one point, somebody mentioned that we had all these different variations on the same song. We had these mule variations. So we started referring to the record as Mule Variations, but in kind of a humorous way. And then it stuck." (Source: Mule Conversations. Austin Chronicle: Jody Denberg. April, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "My wife called me a mule. She once said, "I didn't marry a man; I married a mule!" I kept thinking about it. It was in the back of my head. I think it makes a good title for an album. Sounds like you're pretty stubborn... Of course, I am. She didn't call me a mule for nothing. But I'm rather consequent in my stubbornness. I think they're pretty straight animals. They don't listen to anybody else." (Source: "Interview with Tom Waits". NY Rock: Gabriella. May, 1999)

James Sullivan (1999): He says the title phrase of the slow-roasting blues ``Get Behind the Mule'' comes from something the late bluesman Johnson's father told his shiftless son: ``You gotta get behind the mule in the morning and plow.'' For years Waits lived out the gutter-trawling lifestyle of his characters. ``There have been plenty of days when I've gotten up too late in the morning and the mule is gone,'' he says. ``Or somebody else is behind the mule, and I have to get behind the guy who's behind the mule.' (Source: "Waits plays out `Variations' on a twisted persona". San Francisco Chronicle: James Sullivan. April, 1999)



(2) Smote v.: Past tense and a past participle of smite. 1. To inflict a heavy blow on, with or as if with the hand, a tool, or a weapon 2. To drive or strike (a weapon, for example) forcefully onto or into something else 3. To attack, damage, or destroy by or as if by blows (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(3) Molly Be Damned/ Jimmy the Harp:

Kaufman/ Goldberg (1999): ... On "Get Behind the Mule" you have these characters like Molly Be Damned, Jimmy the Harp, the Pock Mark Kid. You hear the name and immediately that image comes to mind... Who are they? Are they real people? TW: " Yeah, they're all real people. Trade secret -- they're just folks, just plain folks. Read the paper, listen to the radio, look out the window, go to a cafe and eavesdrop. Correspond with people. It's just people I've come across in ... just names of people. Some I know, some I've heard of , some are famous blues guys from the '30s, some are people I used to go to school with all mixed together." (Source: "Tom Waits '99, Coverstory ATN" . Addicted to Noise: Gil Kaufman en Michael Goldberg. April, 1999)

- Slightly abridged passage from: "The Miners" volume from the Time-Life series "The Old West. Chapter "Highjinks in the hard-living mine camps": "A number of the prostitutes were piquantly named -- the Irish Queen and the Spanish Queen, Little Gold Dollar, Molly b'Damn, Em' Straight-Edge, Peg-Leg Annie, and Contrary Mary. (The names of the customers of these ladies also were not without distinction: Jack the Dude, Johnny Behind the Rock, Coal-Oil George, Jimmy the Harp, and Senator Few Clothes.) Moreover, the reputations of the ladies were adorned with sentimental tales that helped to promote the legend of the Whore with the Golden Heart... Molly b'Damn was described by an Idaho contemporary as "an uncommonly ravishing personality. Her face gave no evidence of dissipation, her clothes no hint of her profession. About her, at times, was an atmosphere of refinement and culture." Occasionally, "she quoted with apparent understanding from Shakespeare, from Milton, from Dante." (Submitted by Kurt Gegenuber. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. August 2, 1999)



(4) Lariat n.: A lasso; a rope for picketing grazing horses or mules (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(5) Goin' down the drain: Down the drain: phr. [1930s+] lost, wasted, useless (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000). Notice same phrase being used in All Stripped Down, 1992: "All the men we got. Well, they're goin' down the drain."



(6) Choppity chop: Might be referring to American traditional/ cooking rhyme "Choppity-chop" or "Sing, Song, Swing" as made famous by Ella Fitzgerald (Laserlight, 1940)

- Chopitty Chop (American traditional): "Chop, chop, choppity, chop Chop off the bottoms Chop off the tops Chop, chop, choppity, chop Cut into pieces Dump in the pot."

- Sing, Song, Swing (Prime Artist: Ella Fitzgerald. Written by: Charles L. Cooke): "Choppity chop chop, chop chopsticks Choppity chop chop, chop till six Choppity chop chop, chops the thing When Charlie Chingee make his sing song swing Charlie Ching Make his sing song swing With a tingaling On the ding dong ding With a tingaling on the ding dong ding Makee plenty sing song swing Choppity chop chop, chop chopsticks Choppity chop chop, chop till six Choppity chop chop, chops the thing When Charlie Chingee make his sing song swing Foo Yung Foo Makee doodle-doo With a toot or two On the flute bamboo And the doodle-doo and the tingaling Makee plenty sing song swing Choppity chop chop, chop chopsticks Choppity chop chop, chop till six Choppity chop chop, chops the thing When Charlie Chingee make his sing song swing And a tingaling on the ding dong ding Makee plenty sing song swing Chop chop choppity, chop chopsticks Chop chop choppity, chop till six Choppity chop chop, chops the thing When Charlie Chingee make his sing song swing Choppa choppa choppity, chop chopsticks Choppity choppity, chop till six Choppity chop chop, chops the thing When Charlie Chingee make his swing."



(7) Big Jack Earl: Jack Earle was born Jacob Ehrlich, a baby so tiny that doctors feared he wouldn't live. He weighed four pounds. But immediately, he began to grow incredibly; by age ten he was over six feet tall. He finally topped out at 7 feet, 7 1/2 inches (other sourves claim he was 8' 6 1/2" tall). He was discovered by Hollywood as a teenager and offered a job acting in comedies. He made over fifty of them, until one day on the set when he fell from a scaffolding. When he woke, he found he was blind, due to a newly-discovered tumor on his pituitary gland. Doctors attempted to shrink the tumour with X-rays which miraculously both returned his sight and stopped his incredible growth. He enrolled in college, during which he went to see the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus where he saw Jim Tarver, billed as the tallest man in the world. Jack considered that odd, since he was taller than Tarver by several inches. He joined the circus and travelled with them for fourteen years. Upon retiring from the circus, Jack became a successful travelling salesman and was intensely creative. He painted, sculpted, was a prize-winning photographer and a poet. He even published a book of poetry called "The Long Shadows". He starred in Tod Browning's "Freaks" (1932)

Jonathan Valania (1999): Who is Big Jack Earl? Tom Waits: "Tallest man in the world. Was with Barnum & Bailey. If you see old archival photographs, they used to put him next to some guy that was like a foot tall. Big hat, tall boots. That's why "Big Jack Earl was eight-foot-one an d stood in the road and he cried." Imagine a guy eight-foot-one standing in the middle of the road crying. It breaks your heart." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/ July, 1999)





(8) Dusty trail from Atchison to Placerville: This might refer to the historic "Overland Stage Line" to California (Overland Mail Company: Atchison, Kansas to Placerville, California). In 1861 the Overland Stage Line was an answer to the need for a reliable, commercial transportation company to carry passengers from one side of the country to the other. Traveling by stagecoach in those early years required grit, patience and determination. The distance from Atchison to Placerville was 1,913, with stops at 153 stage stations, which were located from 10 to 15 miles apart. Mark Twain rode the Overland Stage from St. Joseph, Missouri to California in 1861, the year Mark Twain's brother, Orion Clemens, was named Secretary of Nevada Territory. Twain joined his brother for the trip west. Eleven years later Twain described his journey in the book "Roughing It". Further reading: The Overland Stage To California



(9) Weaverville: In the gold mining days the historical Weaverville stage coach crossed a rugged mountain range along the then-Weaverville Stage Road between California's Northern Sacramento valley to Weaverville California. The town of Weaverville is located in Trinity County just northwest of Redding between Willow Creek and Redding along Highway 299 on the banks of the Trinity River near Clair Engle Lake and Shasta Lake. There is also a Weaverville, North Carolina



(10) Rampaging v. intr.: To move about wildly or violently (The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition) The chapter on the Jesse James gang from: "The Gunfighters" volume from the Time-Life series "The Old West" is titled "The rampaging sons of the widow James." (Submitted by Kurt Gegenuber. Raindogs Listserv discussionlist. August 13, 1999)



(11) Birdie Joe Hoaks

Tom Waits (1999): "I read in the newspaper about this gal, 12 years old, who had swindled Greyhound. She ran away from home and told Greyhound this whole story about her parents and meeting them in San Francisco. She had this whole Holden Caufield thing, and she got an unlimited ticket and criss-crossed the U.S. And she got nabbed." What did they do to her? TW: "They took her bus pass, for starters. I don't think she did hard time. Me and my wife read the paper and we clip hundreds of articles, and then we read the paper that way, without all the other stuff. It's our own paper. There is a lot of filler in the paper and the rest is advertising. If you just condense it down to the essential stories, like the story about the one-eyed fish they found in Lake Michigan with three tails, you can renew your whole relationship with the paper." (Source: "The Man Who Howled Wolf ". Magnet: Jonathan Valania. June/July, 1999)

Tom Waits (1999): "This one gal, her name was Pretty Jo Hoax. Her name was Birdy Jo Hoakes. She pulled this beautiful hoax. She told the ticket vendor at Greyhound that her aunt in California had sent a dispatch to the office in West VA. Some money had exchanged hands, and there was supposed to be some sort of cyber ticket. This was going to make it possible for her to ride the Greyhound continuously. One of those all-day passes. The whole thing was that she created in her mind, she managed to three card molly a ticket! They finally busted her and took away her ticket! But, before they caught her, she crossed the US something like 100 times! But, if you're out there, Birdy, my hat's off to you!" (Source: Sonicnet: host: Goldberg. April, 1999)

Also mentioned in Lost At The Bottom Of The World (Orphans - Brawlers, 2006): "Jesse Frank and Birdy Joe Hoaks But who is the king of all these folks?"



(12) Never let the weeds get higher than the garden

Addicted to Noise (1999): You reminded me when you said the weeds grew higher. You said, "Always keep a sapphire in your mind/ always keep a diamond in your mind/ never let the weeds get higher than the garden." I took that as, 'Don't let the bullshit get in the way of seeing the truth or the gems in life.' TW: "There you go, yeah, sure. [laughs] You got it. Yeah, that sounds good." Goldberg: What were you intending when you wrote that? TW: "Just that, you got it, you hit it right on the head. You got the message." (Source: Tom Waits '99, Coverstory ATN. Addicted to Noise: Gil Kaufman en Michael Goldberg. April, 1999)



Fannin Street

 



(John Hammond version, 2001)(1)



There's a crooked street in Houston town,

It's a well worn path I've traveled down

Now there's ruin in my name, I wish I never got off the train,

I wished I'd listened to the words you said.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

You'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

don't go down to Fannin Street



Once I held you in my arms, I was sure

But I took that silent step through the guilded door

The desire to have much more, all the glitter and the roar,

I know this is where the sidewalk ends.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

You'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

don't go down to Fannin Street



When I was young I thought only of getting out

I said goodbye to my street, goodbye to my house

Give a man gin, give a man cards, give an inch he takes a yard,

and I rue the day that I stepped off this train.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

You'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

don't go down to Fannin Street.



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2001

Official release (John Hammond version): Wicked Grin, John Hammond. 2001. Emd/Virgin

John Hammond: Acoustic Guitar and Vocal. Larry Taylor: Bass. Tom Waits: Piano and Acoustic Guitar





 



Fannin Street



(Orphans studio version, 2006)(1)



There's a crooked street in Houston town,

It's a well worn path I've followed down

Now there's ruin in my name, I wish I never got off the train,

And I wished I'd listened to the words you said.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Oh, yeah

You'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

Don't go down to Fannin Street



Once I held you in my arms, I was sure

Til I took that silent step through the gilded door

But the desire to have much more, all the glitter and the roar

Now I know that this is where the sidewalk ends.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

You'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

Don't go down to Fannin Street



When I was young I thought only of getting out

I said good-bye to my street, good-bye to my house

Give a man gin, give a man cards, give an inch he takes a yard,

and I rue the day that I stepped off this train.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Oh, yeah

You'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

Don't go down to Fannin Street.



Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Cause tou'll be lost and never found

you can never turn around

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street

Don't go down to Fannin Street



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2001/ 2006

Official release (Tom Waits version): Orphans (Bawlers), (P) & � 2006 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Wicked Grin, John Hammond. 2001.Emd/ Virgin

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records



Notes:



(1) Fannin Street: Waits paying homage here by referring to Leadbelly's version. "Fannin Street (Mr. Tom Hughes' Town): This song is autobiographical, telling the story of how Huddie (Lead Belly) Ledbetter left his parent's home as a young teenager to go to the bars and bawdy houses on Fannin Street in Shreveport, only ten miles from his home in Mooringsport. John Lomax described it as the gayest and saddest song in his repertoire. His drinking and carousing that began on Fannin Street certainly served to make his life more difficult than it might have been, yet his craving for fun and action also fed his talent for making music." (Source: Harry Lewman Music) 

Tom Waits (2006): "Yeah he's [Leadbelly] got one with the same title. Uhm, he died the day after I was born... And uh, I read a lot about him and you know, I heard all the records. Yeah I really... He really speaks to me. And I had a chance at one point to be part of a compilation, pick a Leadbelly song. One of his distant relatives had his guitar, that had been beneath her bed for the last fifty years or whatever, and uh she was gonna let everybody on the record play his guitar and do a song. But I don't think they can get clearance from Alan Lomax, who has a lot of his songs tied up. I guess that whole Lomax estate, you know? So it's kind of a mess legally." (Source: "Tom Waits: Rock Classics, With A Gravelly Rasp", NPR's World Caf� from WXPN (USA) by David Dye. December 15, 2006)



Dirt In The Ground

 



What does it matter, a dream of love or a dream of lies

We're all gonna be in the same place when we die

Your spirit don't leave knowing your face or your name

And the wind through your bones is all that remains



And we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said we're all gonna be just dirt in the ground(1)



The quill(2) from a buzzard, the blood writes the word

I want to know, am I the sky or a bird

'Cause hell is boiling over and heaven is full(3)

We're chained to the world and we all gotta pull



And we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be just dirt in the ground



Now the killer was smiling with nerves made of stone

He climbed the stairs and the gallows groaned

And the people's hearts were pounding, they were throbbing, they were red

As he swung out over the crowd, I heard the hangman said



We're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be just dirt in the ground



Now Cain slew Abel(4), he killed him with a stone

The sky cracked open and the thunder groaned

Along a river of flesh, can these dry bones live?

Take a king or a beggar, and the answer they'll give



Is we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be

Yeah yeah

I said, we're all gonna be just dirt in the ground



We're all gonna be just dirt in the ground

I said, we're all gonna be just dirt in the ground

We're all gonna be just dirt in the ground



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)



Known covers:

Secret World. Astrid Seriese. October, 1994 (re-released in 2003). Brigadoon

The Dark Gift of Time. Christine Collister. 1998. Fledg'ling Records

Saving All My Love For You (a tribute to Tom Waits). Claudia Bettinaglio. January, 2001. Taxim Records (Germany)

Wrecked. The Tim Malloys. 2002. Fabulous Records

Pornoshow - Laura Fedele Interpreta Tom Waits. Laura Fedele. May, 2003.Auditorium, AUD 00902 (in Italian)

Demo 2005. Brudevalsen. April 4, 2005. Self-released

Murmurmur. We Versus The Shark. December 1, 2008. Hello Sir Records



Notes:



(1) Dirt In The Ground:

Tom Waits (1994): "Dirt in the Ground". umm, That Ralph Carney played all the saxes on that. I think he has kind of an Allen Tonian sound he got on that, with the horn section. I just play a very simple piano, um, ya know. I tried to sing in my high, my Prince voice...ha. I can only do that once or twice and then it's gone. If I try to sing like that on the road every night, forget about it. So when you're in the studio, you're taking better care of your voice, umm, you can do things like that. On the road, my throat becomes ravaged by the weather and from just little sleep and bad food. So, and the song is based on something that was a, Teddy Edwards used to say to me all the time. Ya know, we're all going to be dirt in the ground. So hey, he used to tell girls that in hotel lobbies. He'd try to get them to come up to his room. He'd say "Listen darling, we're all gonna be dirt in the ground." So I always thought that would be a good song title." (Source: Bone Machine Operator's Manual. November 30, 1994)

Tom Waits (1994): "That's what (jazz tenor sax great) Teddy Edwards said to me. That's his line. That's what he used to tell girls in the lobby of the hotel. Trying to get 'em to come up to his room. Well, listen, darlin', we're all just goin' be dirt in the ground. So that kind of explains itself. There were some verses that we left out. It was getting too long. One of them was Mata Hari was a traitor, they sentenced her to death/ The priest was at her side and asked her if she would confess/ She said, 'step aside, Father, it's the firing squad again/ And you're blockin' my view of these fine lookin' men/ And we're all gonna be dirt in the ground ... That's what people say that were present, that just before the firing squad opened up she opened up her blouse a little bit, and then she winked, and then they took her down. Ralph Carney played the horns, and he gave it those low Ellington kind of voicings --- bass clarinet, tenor and the alto together." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)

Tom Waits (1992): "You know, you get here, even though on the compass it says north and south and east and west, you know that you're only really headed in one direction and that's from here to the grave and the only way it can be measured is with time. We're all going to the same place. Some of us are taking different routes and some of us are leaving earlier and arriving later but we 're all going to the same place. Seems like a legitimate topic to uncover once you get to a certain point. I don't mean it to be morbid. I'm not morbid. I think if you talk about it then it disarms it and makes it seem more easier to handle. Someday we're all going to be in a little box, it's gonna be real dark, and they put the lid on, put you down six feet and that's where we'll spend the rest of what there is of time." (Source: "Telerama Interview" (French promo CD). Date: September 9, 1992)



(2) Quill n.: 1. The hollow stemlike main shaft of a feather. Also called calamus 2. Any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(3) Heaven is full: Notice the same phrase being used in Earth Died Screaming, 1992: "Well, hell doesn't want you and heaven is full."



(4) Cain slew Abel:

- Genesis 4: 1-16. 'Abel and Cain' The Mahometan tradition of the death of Abel is this: Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. (Source: The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer). 

- Also mentioned in Walk Away, 1995: "Dot King was whittled from the bone of Cain"



Such A Scream

 



Well Pale Face(2) said

to the Eyeball Kid(3)

She just goes clank and boom and steam

A halo, wings, horns and a tail

Shoveling coal inside my dreams

There are no laws

She's made of cream

She's such a scream



Qui bon tres bien(4), nails in cement

A Donnie gal from mortal clay

The plow is red

The well is full

inside the dollhouse of her skull

A cheetah coat fills up with steam

She's such a scream



All crooked lines

Her fireplace

A milktrain so clean

Machine gun haste

You'll ride the only wall of shame

And drag that chain across the state

Her lips are red

She is the queen

She's such a scream



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Such A Scream:

(1992): "There are some horrific sounds on the record [Bone Machine]. I seem to hear choking demons on "Such a Scream." TW: "Oh, yeah --- that little field recording going through there. I wanted more of that stuff on it, and Kathleen and I had to play cards for it. I liked that stuff. Sounds like it was made in hell." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992) 

Tom Waits (1992): "It just came real fast. The plow is red, the well is fill inside the doll house of her skull --- there's more of that bone. It's a love song. It's Kathleen. It's like when you see people write the names on the rocks when you're drivin' across country. It's the same thing." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)



(2) Paleface, pale-face:

- n : 1. A white person. Negro use

A white homosexual (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). 

- Waits might be mis-quoting from Eddie Campbell's stories about the god of wine, Bacchus (1986). The tales tell the histories of Bacchus also known as Deadface in stead of Paleface



(3) Eyeball kid: full story here. Also featured in: Hang Me In The Bottle (Alice, 1992) and as the 1999 track from Mule Variations



(4) Que bon tres bien: French for "how good, very good"



Circus

 



We put up our tent on a dark

green knoll, outside of town by

the train tracks and a seagull dump

Topping the bill was Horse Face Ethel

and her 'Marvellous Pigs In Satin'(2)



We pounded our stakes in the ground

All powder brown

And the branches spread like scary

fingers reaching

We were in a pasture outside Kankakee



And One Eyed Myra, the queen of

the galley who trained the

ostrich and the camels

She looked at me squinty with her

one good eye in a Roy Orbison

T-shirt as she bottle fed

an orangutan named Tripod(3)



And then there was

Yodeling Elaine the

queen of the air who wore a

dollar sign medallion and she

had a tiny bubble of spittle

around her nostril and a

little rusty tear, for she had

lassoed and lost another

tipsy sailor



And over in

the burnt yellow tent

by the frozen tractor, the

music was like electric sugar

And Zuzu Bolin played

'Stavin' Chain'(4) and Mighty

Tiny on the saw and he

threw his head back with a

mouth full of gold teeth

And they played 'Lopsided heart'

And 'Moon over Dog Street'(5)



And by the time they played 'Moanin Low'(6)

I was soakin' wet and wild eyed

And Doctor Bliss slipped me a

preparation and I fell asleep with

'Livery Stable Blues'(7) in my ear



And me and Molley Hoey drank

Pruno and Koolaid(8) and she had a

tattoo gun made out of a cassette

motor(9) and a guitar string and

she soaked a hanky in 3 Roses(10)

and rubbed it on the spot

and drew a rickety heart and

a bent arrow and it hurt like hell



And Funeral Wells spun

Poodle Murphy(11) on the target

as he threw his hardware,

Only once in Sheboygan did he miss

at a matinee on Diamond Pier and

she'd never let him forget it



They were doing two shows and she

had a high fever and he took

off a piece of her ear and

Tip Little told her she should

leave the bum

but Poodle said, "He fetched me(12)

last time I run."

But I'd like to hammer this ring into a bullet

And I wish I had some whiskey and a gun

my dear



And I wish I had some whiskey and a gun

my dear(13)



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Circus:

- Tom Waits
 (2004): "It was a song first, that I did with some hip-hop I looped from the radio," "But it felt too cheerful, too bouncy. I wanted it more pathetic and tawdry. So I spoke it, and got my son to play drums on it, and it worked out better." It suited him fine that Casey, who was recorded separately, didn't know what he was playing for. Like Frank Zappa, with whom Waits toured for a couple of years during the late seventies as an opening act, Waits likes to keep people working for ends that only he can see clearly. (Source: "Old Man Waits Is New Again" The Globe and Mail (Breaking News: Entertainment). October 4, 2004)

Tom Waits (2004): "It's a daydream. We were just sort of dreaming of the place I'd like to work. If I was a kid and wanted to run away to the circus, this is the circus I would want to run away to." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. October, 2004)



(2) Marvellous Pigs In Satin: This seems to be taken from Roald Dahl's first children's book called "James and the Giant Peach" (Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1961). Released as a Disney movie in 1996 (directed by Henry Selick). "There's a part in the book when James is telling his bug friends that marvelous things will happen. The glow worm is hard of hearing and says, "Marvelous pigs in satin?" (Source: email sent by Marc Apodaca/ SevenRepeat to Tom Waits Library. October 12, 2004).



(3) Tripod

Jonathan Valania (2004): "Circus" is the kind of William S. Burroughs hurdygurdy narrative you've been honing to perfection your entire career. A lot of your albums have some great spoken-word piece-"Shore Leave," "Ninth And Hennepin," "What's He Building?", but I think "Circus" is the best. You've got Horse Face Ethel, You've got one-eyed Myra in her Roy Orbison T-shirt bottle-feeding an orangutan named Tripod. Is that because he's three-limbed? TW: [Laughs] Naw, naw. I think he got his name because he always had an erection." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. October, 2004)



(4) Zu Zu Bolin/ Stavin'Chain

- Classic "dirty" blues "Stavin' Chain" (Transcribed from vocals by Lil Johnson, recorded 1937): "If you don't shake, you won't get no cake, If you don't hum, I ain't gonna give you none! Now, you can't ride, honey, you can't ride this train, I'm the chief engineer, I'm gonna run it like Stavin' Chain! I ask you in the morning to treat me right, You put me off, tell me, "Wait 'til night!" Now, you can't ride, honey, you can't ride this train, I'm the chief engineer, I'm gonna run it like Stavin' Chain! Back your horse out my stable, back him out fast, I've got another jockey, get yourself another mare! Now, you can't ride, honey, you can't ride this train, I'm the chief engineer, I'm gonna run it like Stavin' Chain! Stavin' Chain was a man of might, He'd save up his money just to ride all night, Now, you can't ride, honey, you can't ride this train, I'm the chief engineer, I'm gonna run it like Stavin' Chain! [spoken] Oh, grind, baby, grind! I was at your house last night, 'bout half past four, Found another woman comin' out your door, Now, you can't ride, honey, you can't ride this train, I'm the chief engineer, I'm gonna run it like Stavin' Chain!" (Source: Heptune Jazz and Blues Lyrics Page. www.heptune.com/lyrics.html. Megaera and Brenna Lorenz)

- "Zu Zu Bollin was a Texas blues guy, who first recorded back in the days of shellac 78rpms and specialized in jump blues. Born in Frisco, Collin Co., 1922. Died in Dallas, 1990. Influenced by T-Bone Walker. Recorded 4 sides for Bob Sutton's Torch label in 1952: - Why Don't You Eat Where You Slept Last Night b/w Matchbox blues (also the debut of tenor man David "Fat Head" Newman, who went on to play with Ray Charles; Leroy Cooper, another Ray Charles associate, played on this as well) and - Stavin' Chain b/w Cry, Cry, Cry (with members of Jimmy McCracklin's band). Inspired Lil' Son Jackson & U.P. Wilson a.o. Some of his stuff regularly makes it onto specialized Texas blues V.A. comps. 2 sides recorded in '54 are untraceable. Worked with Joe Morris and Jimmy Reed in the fifties until retiring at the end of the decade. Started a dry-cleaning business in '64. Rediscovered in the late 80s by Chuck Nevitt, there's a 1989 cd out of new recordings called "Texas Bluesman" (as by "Zuzu Bolin" rather than "Zu Zu Bollin" this time) on Antone's (owned by Clifford Antone, who owned the Antone's club in Austin), the recording of which was sponsored by the Dallas Blues Society, of which he may or may not have been a founding member. (There's also something called a Zu Zu Bolin Memorial Award.) Singles from this cd, including a re-recording of "Why don't you eat", appeared on Topflight and should be readily and cheaply available on ebay (although - the horror - they are described as 'Chicago blues', but then, that is to be expected, seeing as 'Chicago' and 'Delta' are the only words people remember when it comes to blues). On the cd he played with "Fat Head" Newman again, saxist Mark "Kaz" Kazanoff (Marcia Ball, Solomon Burke, Albert Collins, Buddy Guy, Earl King, Barbara Lynn, Otis Rush etc etc), and Duke Robillard, who produced the thing. Tracks from that cd apparently made the playlist of quite a few blues stations, and musicians who played with him proudly mention this collaboration on their own websites. Toured Europe then & was working on a second album when he died." (Submitted by Floris Cooman. February 22, 2007)



(5) Moon over Dog Street: notice same mention in Top Of The Hill, 2004: "The moon rises over Dog Street"



(6) Moanin' Low: Blues classic (Ralph Rainger/ Howard Dietz, 1929). Performed by many artists, but made famous by Billy Holliday: "Moanin' low, my sweet man, I love him so Though he's mean as can be He's the kind of man needs the kind Of a woman like me Gonna die if my sweet man should pass me by If I die where'ii he be He's the kind of a man needs the kind Of a woman like me Don't know any reason why He treats me so poorly What have I gone and done Makes me troubles double with his worries When surely I ain't deserving of none Moanin' low My sweet man is gonna go When he goes, oh Lordy He's the kind of a man needs the kind Of a woman like meMoanin' low, my sweet man, I love him so Though he's mean as can be He's the kind of man needs the kind Of a woman like me Gonna die if my sweet man should pass me by If I die where'ii he be He's the kind of a man needs the kind Of a woman like me Don't know any reason why He treats me so poorly What have I gone and done Makes me troubles double with his worries When surely I ain't deserving of none Moanin' low My sweet man is gonna go When he goes, oh Lordy He's the kind of a man needs the kind Of a woman like me."



(7) Livery Stable Blues: regarded to be the first "Jazz" record. Recorded in 1917 by the all-white Original Dixieland Jazz Band from New Orleans. The record was an immediate smash hit and sold more than any previous record. (copyright dispute over ownership: Original Dixieland Jazz Band vs. Ray Lopez and Alcide Nunez).



(8) Pruno and Koolaid:

- Pruno, a prison wine created from fruit, sugar and ketchup, is such a vile and despicable beast in the California state penal system that prisoners can't eat fresh fruit at lunch. (Source: "Make Your Own Pruno And may God Have Mercy On Your Soul" By Eric Gillin. The Black Table).

- "Recipe For Prison Pruno", poem by Jarvis Jay Masters: "Take ten peeled oranges, Jarvis Masters, it is the judgment and sentence of this court, one 8 oz. bowl of fruit cocktail, that the charged information was true, squeeze the fruit into a small plastic bag, and the jury having previously, on said date, and put the juice along with the mash inside, found that the penalty shall be death, add 16 oz. of water and seal the bag tightly. and this Court having, on August 20, 1991, Place the bag into your sink, denied your motion for a new trial, and heat it with hot running water for 15 minutes. it is the order of this Court that you suffer death, wrap towels around the bag to keep it warm for fermentation. said penalty to be inflicted within the walls of San Quentin, Stash the bag in your cell undisturbed for 48 hours. at which place you shall be put to death, When the time has elapsed, in the manner prescribed by law, add 40 to 60 cubes of white sugar, the date later to be fixed by the Court in warrant of execution. six teaspoons of ketchup, You are remanded to the custody of the warden of San Quentin, then heat again for 30 minutes, to be held by him pending final secure the bag as done before, determination of your appeal. then stash the bag undisturbed again for 72 hours. It is so ordered. Reheat daily for 15 minutes. In witness whereof, After 72 hours, I have hereon set my hand as Judge of this Superior Court, with a spoon, skim off the mash, and I have caused the seal of this Court to be affixed thereto. pour the remaining portion into two 18 oz. cups. May God have mercy on your soul, Guzzle down quickly! Mr. Jarvis Masters. Gulp Gulp Gulp!" (Source: Free Jarvis Jay Masters.www.freejarvis.org ). Further reading: The Black Table

- Koolaid: traditional American fruit drink marketed as: "Original KOOL-AID� is a good source of Vitamin C and is caffeine free. It's a classic flavour combination you and the whole family can enjoy."



(9) A tattoo gun made out of a cassette motor:

Robert Sabbag (1987): "Speaking about the need to impose limitations, about constructing a framework within which to write, he draws an analogy. TW: "Like the guy in prison who made a tattoo machine out of a Bic pen, a guitar string and a cassette loader. Some red ink. He wrapped the handle in such a way, with a T-shirt, it felt just like a bird in your hand." (Source: "Tom Waits Makes Good" Los Angeles Times: Robert Sabbag. February 22, 1987)

Tom Waits (1988): "I'll tell you, the best thing I ever saw was a kid who had a tattoo gun made out of a cassette motor and a guitar string. The whole thing was wrapped in torn pieces of T-shirt, and it fit in your hands just like a bird. It was one of the most thrilling things I'd ever seen, that kind of primitive innovation. I mean, that's how words develop, through mutant usage of them. People give new meaning, stronger meaning, or they cut the meaning of the word by overusing if, or they use it for something else... I just love that stuff." (Source: "Tom's Wild Years". Interview Magazine (USA), by Francis Thumm. October, 1988)

- From Thousand Bing Bangs (1992): "And she had a tattoo gun that she made herself from a cassette motor and a guitar string And she always had leaves in her hair." ("Devout Catalyst" - Ken Nordine, Grateful Dead Productions Inc., 1992)

Tom Waits (2004): "I know a guy who applied for a job teaching guitar to prison inmates, some kind of rehab therapy. This was at San Quentin, one of the toughest prisons we've got. The first day he gave them all a guitar and the next day everybody needed strings. Not just one string. They aII needed six more strings. So the guards all thought, "That's it. End of the programme. They're using the guitar strings for weapons." But they were aII being used to make needles for tattoo guns And they would wrap the device in cut up pieces of T-shirt and make the most beautiful handle for it." (Source: "Coffee With Tom Waits" Zembla magazine - Issue 7, by Richard Grant. December, 2004)



(10) Three Roses: 3 Roses Hair Tonic (Lucky Tiger). "A Classic tonic with a masculine scent for light control, conditioning and grooming."



(11) Poodle Murphy

Jonathan Valania (2004): What about Poodle Murphy? TW: She's a girl from Funeral Wells' knife act who was strapped to the spinning board. I don't know if I would want to work for a guy named Funeral Wells, especially if he threw knives." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. October, 2004)



(12) He fetched me: Fetch v. [14C+] to hit, esp. as fetch someone one. (Source: "Cassel's Dictionary Of Slang. Jonathan Green. Cassel & Co, 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



(13) And I wish I had some whiskey and a gun my dear

Jim Christy (2004): "He worked on Robert Wilson's play Black Rider with William Burroughs; there is a BBC documentary in which he and Wilson visit Burroughs in Kansas, and Waits does a little Burroughs imitation at the end of "Circus". (Source: "Tom Waits". Interview for Georgia Straight (Canada) by Jim Christy. October 7, 2004)



Goin' Out West ​​​​​​​

 



I'm goin' out west where the wind blows tall

Cause Tony Franciosa(2) used to date my ma

They got some money out there, they're giving it away

I'm gonna do what I want and I'm gonna get paid

Do what I want and I'm gonna get paid



Little brown sausages lying in the sand

I ain't no extra(3), baby, I'm a leading man

Well, my parole officer will be proud of me

With my Olds '88 and the devil on a leash

My Olds '88 and the devil on a leash



I know karate, voodoo too

I'm gonna make myself available to you

I don't need no make up, I got real scars

I got hair on my chest, I look good without a shirt



Well, I don't lose my composure(4) in a high speed chase

Well, my friends think I'm ugly, I got a masculine face

I got some dragstrip(5) courage, I can really drive a bed

I'm gonna change my name to Hannibal(6) or maybe just Rex

Change my name to Hannibal or maybe just Rex



I know karate, voodoo too

I'm gonna make myself available to you

I don't need no make up, I got real scars

I got hair on my chest, I look good without a shirt



I'm gonna drive all night, take some speed

I'm gonna wait for the sun to shine down on me

I cut a hole in my roof, the shape of a heart

And I'm goin' out west where they'll appreciate me

I'm goin' out west where they'll appreciate me

Goin' out west where they'll appreciate me

Goin' out west where they'll appreciate me



Goin' out west

Goin' out west

Goin' out west

Goin' out west

Goin' out west

Goin' out west

Goin' out west

Goin' out west



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), 1992

Official release: Bone Machine, Island Records Inc., 1992



Known covers:

Detroit Rust City. Various artists. 1996. Small Stone Records (performed by Wig)

On The Road Again. Dr. Feelgood. August 1996. Grand

Seelenwalzer. Richthofen. 1997. BMG Ariola (Germany)/ Gun

25 Years Of Dr. Feelgood 1972-1997. Dr. Feelgood. March 24, 1997. Grand

Disturbed Folk Vol. 2. Jeff Lang. 1999. Self-released/ Black Market Music, JL CD9901

Just Like Home. The Blacks. March 7, 2000. Bloodshot Records

I'm Boss Here. Slow Andy. 2002. Self-released promo

True Underground vol. II. Various artists. 2002. Smerck, Canada (performed by: Unitus/ Daniel Ross)

To The West Pole. The Prayerbabies. February 2002. Croxton Records

Super Mediocrity. Lung Cookie. September 2002. Naked Jain Records

Live And It Ain't No Jive. King Bee. September 25, 2003. Self-released

I Don't Believe. Ash Grunwald. 2004. Self-released (Australia)

God Is A Tom Waits Fan. The Box Spring Hogs. May 2004. Self-released demo

The Truckee Brothers Live at The Casbah. The Truckee Brothers. June 16, 2004. The Casbah/ eMusicLive

Shovel's Length Short. Forty Watt Bulb. August 17, 2004. Aquarium Records

Soul Deeper - Live At The Basement. Jimmy Barnes. September 2, 2004. Liberation

Tall Stories. Lloyd Spiegel. August, 2004. New Market Music (re-released in 2005 on Black Market Music)

Warren Haynes Presents The Benefit Concert Vol. 2. Various artists. December, 2004. Evil Teen (performed by Gov't Mule/ Dave Schools)

Live At The Corner. Ash Grunwald. 2005. Self-released (Australia)

Every Day Is Marked. Blitzkriegbliss. January, 2005. Self-released

Live And It Ain't No Jive II. King Bee. May 11, 2005. Self-released

Out West. Gomez. June 7, 2005. ATO

Why Not. Adam Hole. August, 2006. Self-released

Rivington Hotel. Tina Mancusi. November 17, 2006. Self-released

The Musical. Key Note Speaker. January 24, 2007. Self-released

3's & 7's (3-track 7" vinyl). Queens Of The Stone Age. June 4, 2007. Universal

Sick Sick Sick (CD single). Queens Of The Stone Age. June 7, 2007. Universal



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Music video promoting "Goin' Out West" (Island Records/ Boss Films 7/7/92)

Directed by Jesse Dylan. Crew: Angus Wall, Harris Savides, Eli Miller, Brent Boates, Ellen Somers.

Video blocked in Germany by Universal Music Group (UMG).



Notes:



(1) Goin' Out West:

Tom Waits (1992): "Yeah, that's out there. I figured, let's do a rocker. We'll just slam it and scream. And my wife said, "No, this is about those guys who come to California from the Midwest with very specific ideas in mind." That's how the line about Tony Franciosa fits. There are people who come to California with less than that to go on. A phone number somebody gave them, you know, for a psychic who used to work with Ann-Margaret. "And if I meet him, maybe I can get somewhere, maybe if I play my cards right..." (Source: "Tom Waits at work in the fields of song". Reflex nr. 28: Peter Orr. October 6, 1992)

Tom Waits (1992):"It's just one of those three chords and real loud things. When you live somewhere other than California, you do have this golden image that everything will be all right when you get here, no matter how twisted your imagination. Orange trees, bikinis, sunglasses. It's like a guy that gets out of jail and he's going to out there and shake things up, show 'ern what a real man's like. I'm goin' out west where the wind blows tall, because Tony Franciosa used to date my ma. That's the only real contact you need." (Source: Bone Machine press kit, Rip Rense. Late 1992)

Tom Waits (1992): "The best songs are written real fast I think. You just make 'em. You just need a little bone, a little hair - you make 'em real fast. That was a song that was written REAL fast" (Source: "KCRW-FM Radio: Evening Becomes Eclectic" Date: Santa Monica/ USA. October 9, 1992 (?))



(2) Franciosa, Tony: American TV-star in the 60's and 70's. He gained most of his fame by playing the playboy/ detective in the NBC's series "Name of the Game". Over his career, he has been billed as both 'Anthony' and 'Tony'. Franciosa was married to actress Shelley Winters from 1957 to 1960.





(3) Extra n.: One who plays a minor role in a movie or a play; specif., one who has no speaking part in a movie but who takes part in crowd scenes (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Composure n.: A calm or tranquil state of mind; self-possession (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(5) Dragstrip n.: Any straight and flat ground, road, or strip of concrete, at least a quarter of a mile long, used for drag racing (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(6) Hannibal: Carthaginian general (247- Bithynia 182 BC), leader of the march across the Alps. Hannibal is primarily known for his efforts in the second Punic war. With the conquest of Saguntum (Sagunto, Spain) in 218, he clashed with the Roman army. The Romans claimed that this was a break of an existing treaty, and demanded Hannibal surrender. With the refusal of Carthage, the second Punic war started. Hannibal set out on his legendary march from New Carthage (Cartagena, Spain) in 218. He first crossed the Pyrenees, later the Alps through narrow and dangerous passes heading more than 2000 metres above sea level. The exact pass is not known. It is believed that he lost about 15,000 men in the whole campaign. Soon after he invaded Roman territory, but never came closer than 150 km to Rome. The Roman general Quintus Fabius had as a strategy to avoid decisive battles, yet he managed to keep Hannibal away from Rome. Hannibal did not attack Rome untill 211, but with a failure here, many of Hannibal's allies fell from him. Hannibal kept on fighting the Romans, but he had to escape to Crete, and later Bithynia. Rather than having to surrender Hannibal committed suicide by taking poison



Falling Down

 



I've come 500 miles just to see your halo

Come from St. Petersburg, Scarlett and me

When I open my eyes, I was blind as can be

And to give a man luck(2), he must fall in the sea

And she wants you to steal and get caught

For she loves you for all that you are not

When you're falling down, falling down

When you're falling down, falling down, falling down



You forget all the roses don't come around on Sunday

She's not gonna choose you for standing so tall

Go on take a swig(3) of that poison(4) and like it

And now don't ask for silverware, don't ask for nothing

Go on and put your ear to the ground

You know you'll be hearing that sound, falling down

You're falling down, falling down

Falling down, falling down

Falling down



When you're falling down, falling down, falling down



Go on down see that wrecking ball come swing in on her now

Everyone knew that hotel was a goner

They broke all the windows and took all the door knobs

And they hauled it away in a couple of days

Now someone yelled timber, take off your hat

We all look smaller down here on the ground

When you're falling down, falling down, falling down

Falling down, falling down

Falling down



Someone's falling down, falling down, falling down

Falling down, falling down

Falling down



Written by: Tom Waits(1)

Published by: Jalma Music, Admin. by Ackee Music, Inc. (ASCAP), � 1988

Official release: "Big Time", � Island Visual Arts Inc. (P) Island Records Inc., 1988

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: Big Time full story



Known covers:

Fjorton S�nger. Bad Liver & Hans Brustna Hj�rtan. 1989. Nonstop Records (1989), City Records (re-release May, 1993) NSM 33-15 (in Swedish: "Fall p� kn�")

Temptation. Holly Cole, 1995. Blue Note Records/ Capital (Japan/ USA)

Falling Down (single). Scarlett Johansson. April 8, 2008. Rhino Records/ Atco. (same version as on Anywhere I Lay My Head, 2008) 

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records



Notes:



(1) Falling Down:

Tom Waits (1988): "Falling Down." That was cut in the studio. That's kind of.. Song I was doing on the road but we never got a good take of it. So, I got home, rather than bring a band out from New York to Los Angeles, I worked with people who were already there: Larry Taylor and Fred Tackett, and Richie Hayworth, so it... We put that on there, too, so, you know, you can get a subscription to Playboy if you send in $5 and eh, I'll send you some Spencer steaks, we're having a contest..." (Source: "Mixed Bag, WNEW New York" Date: October, 1988)



(2) Luck, give a man: Orig. "Give a man luck and throw him into the sea". Meaning that his luck will save him even in the greatest extremity. Referring to Jonah and Arion, who were cast into the sea, but carried safely to land, the one by a whale and the other by a dolphin. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(3) Swig n.: A swallow, gulp, or mouthful, esp. of whisky (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner). Also mentioned in "Burma Shave" (Why don't you have another swig, and pass that car if you're so brave)



(4) Poison: n. [19C+] an ironic term for drink in general; thus [1910+] (Aus.) poison-shop, a public house (name your poison). (Source: "Cassell's Dictionary Of Slang". Jonathon Green. Cassel & Co., 1998. ISBN: 0-304-35167-9)



The Part You Throw Away

 



(Ute Lemper version, 2000)



You dance real slow

And you wreck it down

Walk away and you turn around

What did that old blonde guy say

That's the part you throw away



I want that beggar's eyes

The winning horse

A tidy Mexican divorce

St. Mary's prayers Houdini's(1) hands

And a barman who always understands



Will you loose the flowers

Hold on to the vase?

Will you wipe all those teardrops away from your face?

And I can't help feeling as I close the door

I have done all of this many times before



The bone must go

The wish can stay

A kiss don't know what the lips will say

Forget I ever hurt you

Put stones in our bed

Remember to never mind instead



But all of your letters burned up in the fire

And time is just memory mixed with desire(2)

That's not the road It's only the map, I say

Gone just like matches from a closed down cabaret



In a Portuguese saloon(3)

A fly is circling round the room

You'll soon forget the tune that they play

For that's the part you throw away

For that's the part you throw away



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Punishing Kiss - Ute Lemper, 2000 (performed by Ute Lemper)





 



The Part You Throw Away



(Blood Money studio version, 2002)



You dance real slow

You wreck it down

Then you walk away you turn around

What did that old blonde gal say?

That is the part you throw away



I want that beggar's eyes

a winning horse

A tidy Mexican divorce

St. Mary's prayers, Houdini's(1) hands

And a barman who always...

understands



Will you loose the flowers

Hold on to the vase?

Will you wipe all those teardrops

away from your face?

I can't help feeling as I close the door

I have done all of this...

many times before



But the bone must go

The wish can stay

The kiss don't know what the lips will say

Forget I've hurt you

Put stones in our bed

And remember to never...

mind instead



But all of your letters burned up in the fire

And time is just memory mixed with desire(2)

That's not the road It is only the map, I say

Gone just like matches...

from a closed down cabaret



In a Portuguese saloon(3)

A fly is circling around the room

You'll soon forget the tune that you play

Cause that is the part...

you throw away

Oh that is the part...

you throw away



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: Blood Money, Epitaph/ Anti Inc., 2002



Known covers:

Punishing Kiss. Ute Lemper. March 2000/ April 4, 2000. Polygram (Japan), Uni/ Decca (USA)

Kazik Staszewski "Piosenki Toma Waitsa". Kazik Staszewski. March, 2003. VIP Production / Luna Music: LUNCD 093-2 (in Polish)

Steve Evans Quartet, 2 Sets. Steve Evans. December 4, 2006. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Houdini: Erich Weiss. Born: Appleton, WI, 1874 - Died: Detroit, 1926. American actor/ magician. He became famous for sensational stunts, escaping from: cuffs, ropes, chains, straitjackets and locked suitcases, submerged in water.

- Also mentioned in The One That Got Away (Small Change, 1976): "Someone tipped her off, and she'll be doin' a Houdini now any day."



(2) Memory mixed with desire

- Might be inspired by or referring to "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" (short story by J.D. Salinger first published in the January 31, 1948 issue of The New Yorker, and later collected in 1949's 55 Stories from the New Yorker, as well as his 1953 collection, Nine Stories.): "Sybil immediately stooped and began to dig in the sand. "Let's go in the water," she said. "All right," said the young man. "I think I can work it in." "Next time, push her off," Sybil said. "Push who off?" "Sharon Lipschutz." "Ah, Sharon Lipschutz," said the young man. "How that name comes up. Mixing memory and desire." (Submitted by Zs�fi Szab� as sent to Tom Waits Library. January, 2006)

- Might be inspired by the opening of T.S Eliot's The Wasteland: "... April is the cruelest month, breeding lilacs out of the dead land, mixing memory and desire, stirring dull roots with spring rain" (Submitted by Silvio Darío, October 2008).



(3) In a Portuguese saloon

Terry Gilliam (2002): I'm looking down at [lyrics I've written] here and I keep seeing things like, "On the porch, geese salute."Is that the way the lyrics go? Tom WaitsOh no. That's even better. "In a Portuguese saloon." But I like that better. I'm going to write that down. [Terry repeats as Tom writes] (Source: "Grimm's Reapers": Black Book magazine (USA) June, 2002 by Terry Gilliam. Date April 10, 2002)

Tom Waits (2002): "I like the missing pieces. I don't like things too tidy. (Filmmaker) Terry Gilliam heard the line "in a Portuguese saloon" (from The Part You Throw Away), and he thought I was saying, "On the porch, the geese salute." That's better! I hope more people misunderstand me." (Source: "I hope more people misunderstand me": USA Today (USA), by Edna Gundersen. Date: Published: June 17, 2002)



Trampled Rose

 



Long way going to

get my medicine(1)

Sky's the autumn grey of a lonely wren



Piano from a window played

Gone tomorrow, gone yesterday



I found it in the street

At first I did not see

Lying at my feet

a trampled rose



Passing the hat in church

It never stops going around



You never pay just once

to get the job done



What I done to me,

I done to you

What happened to the trampled rose?



In the muddy street

with the fireworks and leaves



A blind man with a cup I asked

Would he sing 'Kisses Sweeter Than Wine'(2)



I know that rose,

like I know my name

The one I gave my love,

it was the same

Now I find it in the street,

a trampled rose



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Bangin' On The Table With An Old Tin Cup. Pascal Fricke. April 12, 2007. Self-released (Germany)

Raising Sand. Robert Plant and Alison Krauss. October 23, 2007. Rounder

You Can Always Turn Around. Lucky Peterson. September 28, 2010. Dreyfus Records



Notes:



(1) Get my medicine 

Tom Waits (2004): "When you're making words for songs, the first thing you do is just make sounds. 'I waa for miiiles and miiiiiles and woosh auck through mordor...' You're just making sounds. And then you listen to that back, and you try to get it to explain what it's trying to say to you. Sometimes it sounds like, 'It's something about a sewing machine', or 'Jeez, it's something about going to get my medicine.' So, I get mystified by the spontaneous incantations. It's a perfectly valid musical approach to me. I consider anything that makes a sound valid. It's just how it's orchestrated and how it's organized." (Source: "Thrasher Interview With Tom Waits Thrasher Magazine (USA), by Eben Sterling. November 1, 2004)



(2) Kisses Sweeter Than Wine: "Kisses Sweeter Than Wine", by Jimmie Rodgers -Words by Paul Campbell and Music by Huddie Ledbetter -peak Billboard position # 3 in 1958-58 (21 total weeks in the Top 100) -originally a # 19 hit for the Weavers in 1951: "Well, when I was a young man never been kissed I got to thinkin' it over how much I had missed So I got me a girl and I kissed her and then, and then Oh, lordy, well I kissed 'er again CHORUS: Because she had kisses sweeter than wine She had, mmm, mmm, kisses sweeter than wine (Sweeter than wine) Well I asked her to marry and to be my sweet wife I told her we'd be so happy for the rest of our life I begged and I pleaded like a natural man And then, whoops oh lordy, well she gave me her hand CHORUS Well we worked very hard both me and my wife Workin' hand-in-hand to have a good life We had corn in the field and wheat in the bin And then, whoops oh lord, I was the father of twins CHORUS Well our children they numbered just about four And they all had a sweetheart a'knockin' on the door They all got married and they wouldn't hesitate I was, whoops oh lord, the grandfather of eight CHORUS Well now that I'm old and I'm a'ready to go I get to thinkin' what happened a long time ago Had a lot of kids, a lot of trouble and pain But then, whoops oh lordy, well I'd do it all again Because she had kisses sweeter than wine She had, mmm... kisses... sweeter... than... wine."




 




Metropolitan Glide

 



Are you ready!?

Are you ready!?

Are you ready!?



Knocky Parker told Bowlegged Sal(2)

They all know how to kick it in Cal

They're playing this dope and this-a money tune

Dancing baby with a 7 mile broom

Things are bulging out the rafters like hell

Down there at the Hush Hotel

They're jumping right out of their seats,

dancing to the bran' new beat



Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide

Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide



The floor is polished and your momma's gone

You can quake and roll and moan

29 gypsies in a Cadillac stoned

Turn off the ringer on your cellular phone

Whip the air like a Rainbow Trout

Drag your tail pipe till you bottom out



Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide

Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide



Hey! Hey!



Do... ... the Metropolitan Glide



The low bottom of the China moon

The black swan and the way too soon

Ace pocket and the dog bone gone

The peacock and the mean black swan

The rain shower and high heeled shoe

Bombay money and I know I can do it

The sink hole and the victory dance

It's in the pocket in the real tight pants



Do.... the Metropolitan Glide

Do.... the Metropolitan Glide



Hey!



The Metropolitan!

The Metropolitan!



Show your teeth, bray(3) like a calf

You kill me with your machine gun laugh

You make me trouble with the floor that's creaking

I've been ready to ka-boom for a week

Put on your stockings and your powder and blush

Keep it all on the hush, hush, hush



Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

The Metropolitan!



Do..... the Metropolitan Glide

Do..... the Metropolitan Glide



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Metropolitan Glide:

- Tom Waits
 (2004): "Instructional dance songs are a rarity these days," he says. "When I was a kid, it seemed that every single that came out was an instructional dance song. Like "The Locomotion," "The Jerk," "The Peppermint Twist," "The Grind," "The Mess Around" - there were a million of them." (Source: "Songs Of Decay From Waits." Toronto Star (Canada). October 5, 2004. By Vit Wagner)

Tom Moon (2004): Undisguised glee creeps into Tom Waits' voice when he talks about the instructional dance song he heard on the radio the other day. He can't quite believe he stumbled onto such a thing, a hip-hop station in 2004 playing what amounts to the bling generations Mashed Potato. It's Terror Squad, featuring Fat Joe, doing 'Lean Back', but in his telling, the song becomes a pearl in the order of "The Twist." "It was so wild, they're telling you how to do it. The only phrase I caught was "lean back," but you couldn't mistake it. I mean, I haven't had anybody tell me how to do a dance in a long, long time." (Source: "Tom Waits: Dancing In The Dark". By Tom Moon. Harp Magazine (USA). December, 2004)



(2) Knocky Parker told Bowlegged Sal

Jonathan Valania (2004): Who is Knocky Parker? TW: Old Delta-blues guy. JV: Bowlegged Sal? TW: Singer. I think from St. Louis. Sorry, Bo. [Laughs]" (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits by Jonathan Valania. Magnet magazine (UK). October 2004)



(3) Bray like a calf

- To bray: 1. To utter a loud, harsh cry, as an ass. Laugh, and they Return it louder than an ass can bray. --Dryden. 2. To make a harsh, grating, or discordant noise. Heard ye the din of battle bray? --Gray. (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)




 




I'll Shoot The Moon

 



I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll be the pennies on your eyes

For you baby

I want to take you out to the fair

Here is a red rose ribbon for your hair

I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



A vulture circles over your head

For you baby

I'll be the flowers after you're dead

For you baby

I want to build a nest in your hair

I want to kiss you and never be there

And I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



You know I love you, baby

So why don't you call me?

You know my number

392-7704

Call any time



I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll be the flowers after you're dead

For you baby

I want to build a nest in your hair

I want to kiss you and never be there

I'll shoot the moon right out of the sky

For you baby

I'll shoot the moon for you



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

From Memorial Crossing, Pinkie MacLure. June, 2000. Ghost Train/ Liqo30cdl (UK)

Bukowski Waits For You. Michael Kiessling. June 14, 2004. Buschfunk (Germany)

Exotic Bird. Jessie Kilguss. August 2, 2007. Self-released

Hairy Cornflake. Clinker. February 15, 2008. Self-released



Notes:



(1) Sung in scene 9 by K�tchen as she sits on the bed.

Mark Richard (1994): "A telephone rings in a nearby office just as Waits finishes dubbing the vocal for "I'll Shoot the Moon", singing through cupped hands. Dawes cringes when the phone rings again, it's audible in the mix. "Leave it in, leave it in," says Waits. "The songs says 'Call me!'" (Source: The Music Of Chance" Spin magazine (USA), by Mark Richard. Date: June, 1994)



Green Grass

 



Lay your head where my heart used to be

Hold the earth above me

Lay down in the green grass

Remember when you loved me



Come closer don't be shy

Stand beneath a rainy sky

The moon is over the rise

Think of me as a train goes by



Clear the thistles and brambles

Whistle 'Didn't He Ramble'(1)

Now there's a bubble of me

and it's floating in thee



Stand in the shade of me

Things are now made of me

The weather vane will say:

It smells like rain today



God took the stars and he tossed 'em

Can't tell the birds from the blossoms

You'll never be free of me

He'll make a tree from me



Don't say good bye to me

Describe the sky to me(2)

And if the sky falls, mark my words

we'll catch mocking birds(3)



Lay your head where my heart used to be

Hold the earth above me

Lay down in the green grass

Remember when you loved me



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

The Shine Of Dried Electric Leaves. Cibelle. April, 2006. Crammed Discs

Green Grass (7” limited edition). Cibelle. July 23, 2007. Self-released

Anywhere I Lay My Head. Scarlett Johansson. May 20, 2008. Atco Records

Died Of Love. Amy LaVere. March 27, 2009. Archer Records

Triple Distilled. Kiosk. October 8, 2010. 9821 Productions



Notes:



(1) Whistle 'Didn't He Ramble': A traditional New Orleans funeral song, played as the procession returned from the burial site. "(Oh) Didn't He Ramble", by H. Bolton (Recorded by Louis Armstrong with his All Stars on April 26, 1950, and again in 1956): "Didn't he ramble.... he rambled Rambled all around.... in and out of town Didn't he ramble....didn't he ramble He rambled till the butcher cut him down His feet was in the market place..his head was in the street Lady pass him by, said..look at the market meat He grabbed her pocket book..and said I wish you well She pulled out a forty-five..said I'm head of personnel Didn't he ramble...I said he rambled Rambled all around...in and out of town Didn't he ramble...oh didn't he ramble He rambled till the butcher shot him down (instrumental break) He slipped into the cat house..made love to the stable Madam caught him cold..said I'll pay you when I be able Six months had passed ..and she stood all she could stand She said buddy when I'm through with you Ole groundhog gonna be shakin yo' hand And didn't he ramble...he rambled Rambled all around...in and out of town Oh didn't he ramble......he rambled You know he rambled...till the butcher...cut him down I said he rambled..lord...'till the butcher shot him down."



(2) Describe the sky to me: Notice this is sung from the grave.



(3) We'll catch mocking birds: The quote from Harper Lee's novel of racial injustice in a small Southern town goes: "Atticus said to Jem one day, 'I'd rather you shoot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.' That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. 'Your father's right,' she said. 'Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don't eat up peoples gardens, don't nest in corncribs, they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.'"(Source: "To Kill A Mockingbird", chapter 10. Harper Lee, 1960)



Make It Rain

 



She took all my money

and my best friend

You know the story

Here it comes again

I have no pride

I have no shame

You gotta make it rain

Make it rain!



Since you're gone

deep inside it hurts

I'm just another sad guest

on this dark earth(1)



I want to believe

in the mercy of the world again(2)

Make it rain, make it rain!



The nite's too quiet

Stretched out alone

I need the whip of thunder

and the wind's dark moan



I'm not Able, I'm just Cain(3)

Open up the heavens

Make it rain!



I'm close to heaven

Crushed at the gate

They sharpen their knives

on my mistakes



What she done, you can't give it a name

You gotta make it rain

Make it rain, yeah!



Without her love

Withour your kiss

Hell can't burn me

more than this

I'm burning up all this pain

Put out the fire

Make it rain!



I'm born to trouble

I'm born to fate

Inside a promise

I can't escape

It's the same old world

But nothing looks the same

Make it rain!

Make it rain!



Got to make it rain

Make it rain

You got to make it rain

Got to make it rain

You got to...



I stand alone here!

I stand alone here!

Sing it:

Make it rain!

Make it rain!



Written by: Tom Waits and Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 2004

Official release: Real Gone, (P) & � 2004 Anti Inc.



Known covers:

Passport To The Blues. Duke Robillard. August 17, 2010. Stony Plain Music



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "Make It Rain" on the Late Show With David Letterman (2004)

CBS TV television talkshow with David Letterman. 

Ed Sullivan Theater. New York/ USA (broadcast September 28, 2004)



Notes:



(1) I'm just another sad guest on this dark earth:

- Notice same phrase being used in Baby Gonna Leave Me (Real Gone, 2004) ("Well I'm just another sad guest on this dark earth").

- Could be quoted from Goethe: "Und so lang du das nicht hast, Dieses: Stirb und werde! Bist du nur ein tr�ber Gast, Auf der dunklen Erde." (Trans: And as long as you haven't experienced this, to die and so to grow. You are only a troubled guest, on this dark earth) From: "Selige Sehnsucht", 1814.



(2) I want to believe in the mercy of the world again

Jonathan Valania (2004): Well, that's why I think if you had to distill the essence of Real Gone down to one line, it's where you say, "1 want to believe in the mercy of the world again." I think so many people feel that way right now. TW: "Do you know who said that? Bob Dylan. He didn't say it in a song; he said it in an interview. He was just talking about the state of the world, so I threw that in there." (Source: "Magnet Interview With Tom Waits", by Jonathan Valania. October, 2004)



(3) I'm not Able, I'm just Cain

- Refering to Abel and Cain: According to Genesis 4: 1-16. 'The Mahometan tradition of the death of Abel is this: Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. (Source: The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer).

- Notice earlier references to Cain and Abel: Dirt In The Ground, 1992 ("Now Cain slew Abel, he killed him with a stone"), Walk Away, 1995 ("Dot King was whittled from the bone of Cain") and Sins Of The Father, 2004 ("Written in the book of tubold Cain, A long black overcoat will show no stain")




 




Story (Spoken Word)

Story



(spoken word: Glitter And Doom tour, 2008)



"(crowd yells) Okay, I love you too babe! Uhhh... oh, oh! I knew if I'd stop talking YOU would start! (laughter). That's why I... that's why I'm compelled to continue here. Uh, okay... I went on eBay. I went on eBay, I shouldn't have gone on eBay, I was warned about eBay. I didn't even know what the fuck eBay was! Uh, but I was warned about it. They said: "Stay away from eBay!" And uh..: "Especially when you have money in your pocket". And uhm I had both.



I was on eBay and I had money in my pocket and I made a big mistake. Well, I don't think it was a mistake, I was TOLD I made a big mistake. You see how easy I am? I made a purchase. Okay, so what!? I made a purchase and it was my money and I spent it. Okay? Uh, now you be the judge... I bought (I swear) the last dying breath of Henry Ford (laughter).



Wait a minute! It was trapped in a Coke bottle with a corck in it. REALLY tight in there. And uh, I probably paid more then I should have for it, but when you think about it... it's a first edition you know? I mean, there's only one of them. And uh... okay let's get to something else... Uh, what's the first thing we're gonna do here? Oh, oh.. I guess... (attempts "Lucky Day", but can't get the right note) No, I'll stick with a different one (laughter). Oh, hell they ALL start like that! (laughter)."



Written by: Tom Waits

Official release: Glitter And Doom, Anti Inc. 2009



Known covers:

N/A



Lucky Day

 



The prettiest girl in all the world

Is in a little Spanish town

But I left her for a Bonnie lass(2)

And I told her I'd see her around

But that Bonnie lass and her heart of glass

Could not hold a candle to bummin' around(3)



So don't cry for me, cause I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



Well, tell the boys back home

that I'm doin' just fine

I've left all my troubles and woe

So sing about me, for I can't come home

I've many, many many more miles to go



Why, there's Miss Kelsey

She taught dance in our school

And old Johnny O'Toole

I'll still beat you at pool



So don't cry for me, for I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



Well, when I was a boy, my daddy sat me on his knee

And he told me, he told me many things

And he said son, there's a lot of things in this world

That you're gonna have no use for

And when you get blue(4) and you've lost all your dreams

There's nothin' like a campfire and a can of beans



Why, there's Miss Kelsey

She taught dance in our school

And old Johnny O'Toole

I'll still beat you at pool



So don't cry for me, for I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



So don't cry for me, for I'm goin' away

and I'll be back some lucky day



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music Inc., � 1990, 1993

Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993

Arrangement and lyrics published in "Tom Waits - Beautiful Maladies" (Amsco Publications, 1997)

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

Long Honeymoon. Mary Coughlan. June 12, 2001. Evangeline



Notes:



(1) Sung by Wilhelm in scene 11 as he goes mad after having shot K�tchen.



(2) Lass(ie) n.: A girl or young woman (who is unmarried); A sweetheart (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin - Third Edition)



(3) Bum around: To loaf; to wander idly; to do nothing (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(4) Blue: adj. 1. [late 18C-19C] confused, terrified, disappointed. 2. [late 18C+] miserable, depressed (Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



Tom Tales (Spoken Word)

Tom Tales



(spoken word: Glitter And Doom tour, 2008)



"Okay, alright, thank you, alright… now we can chat a bit. Okay, um, this is really weird. You know, vultures, I’ve seen a lot of vultures since I’ve entered the Texas border, a lot of vultures. The interesting thing about vultures is that, well, the reason they spend so much time in the air is because they’re so light because they eat so infrequently. So they’re mostly feathers, so a lot of times you’ll see them doing this and you’ll think “Oh, he’s probably going to land soon and eat,” but a lot of times he’s thinking to himself “How the fuck am I gonna get down there?” Now here’s the sad part and imagine if you had to make the same choice yourself. After dining, and frankly most vultures that are injured, this is according to the Bird Rescue… most vultures that are injured were injured while dining. That’s kinda sad… to be hit by a car while you’re eating, but the problem is that once they’ve landed and they’d eaten a lot, they eat so much cause they eat so infrequently, they eat so much that they can’t take off without throwing up. I know, that’s tough… so what a choice, you know, you just had a big meal and you have to lose the whole damn thing just to get back up in the sky again. I think of that all the time when I’m having hard times.



Here’s another interesting thing about them, the gas company has started using them to spot gas leaks in the field, because, well… think about it. They think it’s a dead animal but it’s just a gas leak, you know, so they gather… anyway, I find it interesting anyway. Okay, enough about me. Okay, uh, one last thing… you know during World War II, they made, this is in Germany… they made a soup, like an alphabet soup, only instead of the alphabet it was swastikas and they called it pastika soup and apparently it was very popular in Berlin. I’m sorry about that one too.



Okay, here’s something really interesting, I found interesting anyway. You know, rats don’t eat because they are hungry… they’re just grinding down their teeth, and if you don’t believe that, well… my dad found a rat in a room, a concrete room where there was absolutely nothing to eat, not even a rock… and he’d been in there for two weeks and hadn’t had nothing to eat. What happened with his lower teeth is they’d grown through the roof of his mouth and had come out through the top of his head and his uppers had gone down through his chin and they looked like a little goatee. I know, I know… it’s hard to find people that are as interested in these things as I am.



One last thing. Now, they found out that elephants in India, you know they have to wear a big bell around their necks so people know where they are all the time, and you can imagine how fucking annoying that must be, you know, especially in the middle of the night when you’re hungry. So now, elephants scoop up a big hunk of mud and they stick it in the bell to dampen the clapper and then they go off in the middle of the night and steal bananas. Pretty good.



Okay, well… we were in Oklahoma for a while, boy it’s weird in Oklahoma… well it’s weird everywhere if you think of it like that but in Oklahoma, they’ve got laws, there’s laws down there that are still on the books that they feel compelled to enforce. That’s what bothers me and I’m not traveling with an attorney so it makes it difficult, you know, you can’t wash your car on Sunday using wooled underwear, especially if you are wearing an unusual haircut. I never got the connection there between the haircut and the underwear… the other thing that’s weird is that chewing tobacco is strictly enforced, that took some getting used to. Uh, what else? You can’t photograph a rabbit in the middle of the week for some reason, it’s okay on the weekends, I guess they like it better on the weekends… I don’t get it. The other thing is you can’t eat some place that is also on fire. That really limited our choices. Okay, uh, let’s see… there’s something else, here’s another weird one… you can’t get a fish drunk in Oklahoma. They just had a lot of problems with that, they finally had to put an end to it… and you can’t make a monkey smoke a cigarette, that’s the other thing… I know, I know, I know…



Okay, let’s see. Do you know that shrimp, this is really disturbing though, but shrimp... they never give anything to charity. I’ve never known a shrimp to give anything to charity and it’s always bothered me and finally someone told me that basically they’re shellfish and it’s gonna happen… okay, I knew I went too far with that. Thank you for putting a stop to it. Okay, does anybody out there have a parrot? Do you own a parrot is the question. Does anybody in the whole audience own a parrot? Okay, well then you can understand why I went on E-Bay and bought a year’s supplies of parrot diapers. Man, I’m telling you… parrots, I like the conversations; I like the fellowship, but damn… get a grip. Here’s a theory that I have and I’ll run it by you because you’re here… my theory is that if everybody in China, on the very same day, at the very same time, on the very same day, got up on a ladder and jumped as high as they could and came down on the ground, you know, that it would throw the whole Earth off its axis. I haven’t been able to get anybody to go with me with that, like the United Nations or anything… uh, anyway, we should be ready on our side. We’ll pick a day, buy a ladder, get ready… uh, just to keep things… okay.



Okay, what else? Oh, the graveyard shift. Now, when I was a kid I always worked jobs at night and I always had graveyard shifts and everybody kind of threw that expression around very loosely and I wondered what the hell is a graveyard shift is anyway? Other than the fact that you’re working at night, okay I know that much, but what’s the origin of the expression graveyard shift? And then I worked for a while in a graveyard and my boss, Joe Corvello, he explained it to me. What happened in the old days, way, way, way back, hundreds of years ago, people were very nervous about being buried alive, not anymore nervous than we are today it’s just that the technology was not really with it, you could be taking a nap and they’d fucking bury you. So, there was a law that everybody who got buried had to have a string tied around their wrist in the coffin and then they’d run it up through the roof of the coffin and then they’d go up through the dirt and then they’d go over the branch of a tree on which they’d put a bell… and then there’s a guy who sits in the graveyard all night long waiting to hear a bell… that’s the graveyard shift. You’ll like this one too… the bell and the whole apparatus and everything, you know if you find the guy who actually is alive and underground, he’s called a dead ringer. I’m not kidding.



You know, about a year ago… this is really weird and I don’t tell everybody this… during the summer I ingested some pond water, you know, and it’s the weirdest thing… a couple of days later I started to feel something moving in there. I thought, am I pregnant? I don’t know… Anyway, several months went by and I finally had to go to the doctor and they put an ultrasound on me and they found three toads in my stomach… oh boy. But you know they’re off to themselves, they’re off to one side, and you know… why put them on such a bummer… it’s only a drag when we’re watching television and they get really loud and other than that, you know, I’m fine with it, it’s just a thing.



Okay, who has the largest brain in proportion to its body? No, no, no… the ant, swear to god. Who has the largest penis in proportion to its body? No, no, no, no… the barnacle, thank you. Okay, we’ll get on to some actual songs in a minute here… there are more insects in one square mile of Earth then there are people on the entire Earth, think about that, more insects in one square mile than there are people! Imagine if they got to vote or drivers licenses or anything… now, um, you know what the moon smells like? (People yell: “cheese!”) Wrong again, you’ll love this… fireworks. That’s what Neil Armstrong told me, “It smells just like fireworks, man.” And it makes perfect sense, doesn’t it? That’s where we’ve been shooting them for all these years. He says it’s just crazy up there with the fireworks… Do you know how many omelets you can get out of an ostrich egg? Fourteen… that’s a lot of omelets. I’ve gotten along with most of the ostriches I met and um okay… let’s see…



Here’s one… you know the word “bamboozled”… didn’t you ever wonder what the hell they mean when they say “bamboozled”… well way, way, way back, thousands of years ago in China when you got busted for something, they take a piece of bamboo and they’d whack you. You know if you took like fourteen candy bars, you get fourteen whacks. You see the connection though? Bamboozled, bamboo, bamboo, bamboozled… okay, that’s all. One last thing about Sara Bernhardt, the famous American actress… hey, she was a babe, man… she was a total babe. She had her own train car, she slept in a coffin and when she was seventy, she was playing Juliet, babe. Think about that, Juliet… at seventy… and she lost a leg and when she lost her leg, Barnum and Bailey bought her leg, of course… and put it in formaldehyde and charged like, six, eight bucks to come see it. And that was depressing for her, of course… cause she was working across the street, you know, the full her… and to know that your leg is over there making more money than you was so depressing for her… but that’s the business, that’s the business that we’re in. One day, Moe Green got a bullet in the eye but this is the business that we’re in. (Man yells: “Hey Tom, I want to have your baby.” Oh Jesus… well you know, nowadays, I think it’s possible. See my manager, Stuart Ross, but I gotta tell you, my sperm is very expensive now. I’m like a fucking race horse, baby.



Have you’ve wondered why you can never swat a fly? How do they know we’re coming? They don’t know what a swatter is. Do they say “Yeah, swatter coming, swatter coming…”They have no idea what a swatter is. I’ll tell you what happens… they take off backwards. It’s that simple… they’ve taken off backwards their entire lives… okay, that’s all. (Audience members yelling) Uh, my health? My health is fine… you know what, write it down and pass it forward and I’ll take a look at it.



Anyway, Neil Armstrong was the first man on the moon who actually walked on the moon and the guy right behind him on the ladder going down to get to the surface of the moon, now that was Buzz Aldrin… he said “Neil, you are the first man to walk on the moon… I am the very first man to wet his pants on the moon.” He said that, really, he did. He said it to me personally. I know Neil and I know Buzz, so there… and you don’t… okay. But then again, Science Magazine said that the compression of actual moon rocks, the closest thing that they can find on Earth that is closest to the compression of the rocks from the moon is provolone cheese or Vermont cheddar… I’m not shitting you, I wouldn’t shit you… and pig fetuses, you know, they are injecting pig fetuses now with human hormones because they want to use their organs to transplant them into humans so they want to give them some kind of humanistic juice in there so that when the transfer happens, it’ll be a little more commensurate with the… it’s crazy. But now pigs, the fetuses are being born with strangely human faces… one looked just like my Uncle Phil, exactly like my Uncle Phil, even Phil said it looked like him. Ok, I know, I know… we’ll get on, we’ll get on, we’ll get on… What was that for? Because we’re getting on, right? Oh, I see… you’re trying to push me into a song… I know that trick. You know the problem here? The problem here is you guys have never worked together before and you have no actual elected officials so it’s kind of like the early days of America, you know, and everybody’s kind of yelling shit out and somebody’s going “Shut up, shut up…” What? See… you have no President; this is what we call Marshall law.



Ah, okay, do you want another little story or a song? What do you want? That sounded like a cross between a story and a song… you see you can’t get all in line… get in line, babe. Okay, alright, it’s up to me, that’s it… I’m gonna have to take over… Oh, oh, way down in Oklahoma we went to the Spam museum, that was really amazing. They’ve got stuff carved out of Spam, they have portraits of people carved out of Spam… never seen anything like it, but as a Spam fan, I took some of that home with me and I got some of that in my living room and all like little portraits, you know, and “Whoa, whoa… what is that Tom, what is that?” and I said: “Whoa, it’s Spam, it’s Spam”. The thing is it never really deteriorates, the smell is not like it’s decomposing… it’s impossible for it to decompose… and that’s what you’re smelling is really the freshness of it, the eternal freshness of it… it’s kind of embalmed meat is what it really is… what? Oh, oh, oh…I read today that one out of every ten men is important. One out of every ten… and then I realized I read it wrong, I went back and it said “One out of every ten men is impotent”. I don’t know how I changed… I left the R out… so which are you, are you important or are you impotent? I guess that’s all there is to choose from.



I don’t know about you but I spent my entire day at the lost baggage center, you know, have you ever been over there? Fascinating… how they advertise it… things from all over the world… at incredible prices. Its lost baggage is basically what it is… if you ever have lost a bag, your bag is there being sold to somebody else… and it’s right here in Birmingham, I swear to God. So, here’s the ironic thing… I flew in to go to the last baggage center early so that I could shop for basically underwear and socks and they lost my bag. Isn’t that crazy? Okay… here’s one that maybe you’ll like… spiders, spiders, our little eight legged friends, the spider… when the male spider is done building his web, you know those elaborately beautiful webs that they build at night while you’re sleeping and you wake up in the morning and it’s glistening and beautiful like that… when he’s done building the web, he reaches out one of his legs… we assume it’s a leg that he’s reaching out, not certain but we assume it’s a leg… and he strums the web and the sound that that makes… that’s not the actual sound, how could I know the actual sound? But it’s not bad, is it? I mean, if you were a female spider, you’d be like… anyway, what happens is that the sound that the web makes is irresistible to the female spider and she comes… some of them come in from different states when they hear that and they get in line for the big guy. Anyway, it’s just kind of a kooky thing that happens in the world.



In Oklahoma, you can get in trouble for kissing a stranger. Think about that, I mean you can go to jail for kissing a stranger. I mean, we’re all strangers at a certain point, how could the world continue if somebody didn’t kiss a stranger, right? But, uh, I travel with an attorney so… here’s another thing; you know that a mink and an ermine are the same thing? And you know that a mink and an ermine are all members of the weasel family? And if you see a beautiful woman wearing a mink, you can walk right up to her and say “I love your weasel.” And she can’t slap you… I mean, theoretically she can’t slap you. I would do it with an attorney present at all times… so every time in the world there’s a male ejaculation, I know that’s a tough word so from now on we’re just gonna say “it”… whenever “it” happens, it releases two hundred and fifty million sperm… now only one of those sperm obviously can actually fertilize the egg… so if you’re here, you’re already a winner. You know what I mean? That’s the way I see it.



Okay, here’s a little story for everybody now… you know what really gets me? I was in a community, let’s just say it was a bad neighborhood and I used to refer to it and I’d say 9th and Hennepin, boy, 9th and Hennepin… here’s what bothers me, they really cleaned the place up and every time I said 9th and Hennepin, people looked at me like I was doing card tricks for a dog… and some guy would say “You know my wife, she got some sandals down there… they have a little frozen yogurt place”. And I went: “You could get killed for sandals down there!”

Anyway… okay, you know I’ve always been a word guy, I like weird words and I like American slang and all that and words that are no longer being used… I like to drag them out of the box and wave them around… this is an interesting one, it’s amazing how in addition to punctuation just a little pause in the wrong place can just completely transform the meaning of something. I’ll give you a really good example… you know, you’re at the ball game and you got your hot dog and you look around and say “Where are all the condiments?” and they point over there and you go “Oh, okay there’s the condiments.” I’m so glad that they said it like that because when I said it I heard “Where are the condom mints?” That’s just me and I have to live with me. I didn’t say it back to her or she would have slapped me but then I thought that’s not a bad idea… someone could get a hold of something like that and come up with a whole new product… I just offer it to you tonight and we’ll just wait and see what happens.



I made one really ridiculous purchase… you know this is really weird… somebody took a picture of me and they got a picture of my watch, you know, and they said “Well he was wearing a really ratty suit but I think he had about $300,000 watch on. I really got a kick out of that… $9.99 at CVS, but hey, if it looks like $300,000, it is! I’m in show business. (Audience member yells: play everything!) Everything? Play everything? I don’t have that much time. I was out there earlier and I sat in some of those chairs you’re sitting in now… pretty damn comfortable, maybe a little too comfortable. You have your own TV? You mean in the chair? You see some of the seats are better than others… she has a VCR and an I-Pod thing you can hook into. Does your chair vibrate? That’s the vibrating chair. I heard it’s against the law to have an unusual haircut here… and you can’t buy booze without a note from your wife. That’s really weird… I travel with an attorney, of course…



Here’s another thing… a little food thing. You know how every time you get a piece of fish they give you a little piece of lemon with it and everybody thinks that it’s because the flavor is so much better with lemon on it… untrue. The idea was when people ate fish originally, they were so afraid of ingesting bones and having the bone caught in their throat and dying, somebody told them if you put a little lemon in your mouth after you have a bite of fish, it will kill the bone, it’ll dissolve the bone, it’ll just disintegrate the bone, which of course is total bullshit but that’s what happened and now we’ve got lemon and fish and all that… I had a math teacher when I was a kid whose name was Mr. Falby and he had a piece of fish during a test we were having and he choked on a fish bone and he died in the middle of our math test… it was kind of an answer to a prayer that I made earlier. It wasn’t that specific… I didn’t mention anything about the fish or the bone or even on that day… but we have a connection I guess.



I’m sorry, what? You’re still working at the airport? I’m happy for you. I’ll see you on our way out. Here’s a deal… pardon me? Piano is just on beer and wine now. You know what really bothers me is when somebody tells you that their cell phone is also a camera. I just hate that. What’s wrong with having something that’s just what it is and being happy about it? It makes me want to say to them… “My sunglasses are also a tricycle.” But I don’t… okay, we’ve been traveling for about two months now so the laws change from community to community. It’s just bizarre the kind of laws that are still on the books… that’s one of the laws here in Edinbourough that you can no longer order eggs and sausage and it’s sad but it’s just the way it happened with that new mayor. What do we have, what do we have, what do we have? Oh we were gonna try and do this one, we’ll see, this is um…"



(Picture In A Frame, solo at the piano)



Written by: Tom Waits

Transcript: Anti, 2009. 

Official release: Glitter And Doom, Anti Inc. 2009



Known covers:

N/A



Miscellaneous



Tijuana (1973)

Tijuana



(Live version, 1973)



I got lost on my way home from Tijuana

I didn't think the main road was that far

But I had to stop some place to ask directions

And I guess that's how I wound up in this bar



Now I'm stuck in this bar, and I can't find my car

And I'm wishing on a star like a fool in the night

In my mind things keep changing, but outside it just keeps raining

The lonesome night can be so cruel



Then I (...?...) that eight ball [they're singing different words!]

He made a fancy railshot one time

I bet him that he couldn't do it again

And that's when I lost my last dime



And I'm stuck in this bar, and I can't find my car

And I'm wishing on a star like a fool in the night

In my mind things keep changing, but outside it just keeps raining

The lonesome night can be so cruel



This reminds me of the time, drinking red mountain wine

In the back of a Volkswagen bus

And I wound up in jail, with no one to go my bail

But at least I knew where I was



And I'm stuck in this bar, and I can't find my car

And I'm wishing on a star like a fool in the night

And in my mind things keep changing, but outside it just keeps raining

The lonesome night can be so cruel



Written by: Tom Waits and Jack Tempchin

No official release

Transcribed from live version by Ulf Berggren (Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)





 



Tijuana



(Studio version, 1978)



Well, I got lost on my way home from Tijuana

I didn't think highway five went that far

But I had to stop someplace and get directions

And I guess that's how I wound up in this bar.



Now I'm stuck in this bar 'Cause I can't find my car

I'm wishing on a star like a fool

I need a dime for the phone I wish I was home

The lonesome night can be so cruel.



Well, I lost all my paycheck playing eight ball

Foxy waitress made a rail shot one time.

I bet her that she couldn't do it again.

And that's when I lost my last dime.



And now I'm stuck in this bar 'Cause I can't find my car

I'm wishing on a star like a fool

I need a dime for the phone God, I wish I was home

The lonesome night can be so cruel.



Well, this reminds me of the time We were drinkin' Red Mountain wine

In the back of a Volkswagen bus

And I wound up in Jail with no one to go my bail

But at least, I knew where I was



Written by: Tom Waits and Jack Tempchin

Published by: Night River Publishing, � 1978

Official release: "Jack Tempchin". Jack Tempchin, (1978, Arista AB 4193)

(Submitted by Hans Nijs. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist, 2000)



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Live intro from: Folk Arts Rare Records, San Diego, USA. November 16, 1973 (also lists as: November 10, 1973 KCRW-FM Snap Sessions and November 19, 1973 KPFK Snap sessions). "TW: Jack, you wanna come up and do that... song? [off-mike confusion over the title of the thing]. JT: I don't know... TW: Eh... maybe... You got me in a spot there! I don't know. JT: Tijuana... Sun? TW: Tijuana... eh... Tijuana! We'll just call it 'Tijuana'!"



Friday's Blues (1973)

Friday's Blues



 



The coffee has gotten so cold on the stove

And the morning is just about gone

I'm getting out of bed to find the paper's been read

Cause my lady's been up since the dawn



I stumble good morning and she answers good day

She's out the door and she's on her way

Leaving me searching for a reason why I was born

And it looks like Friday's blues have made it into Saturday morn'



The silence is shattered by the slam of the door

My echoing head starts to pain

I'd hoped for the sun, ah but since there was none

Well, I expect that it's got to rain



And to me it seems such a shame

There's no one reason that we can blame

There ain't no reason for anyone's feelings to be torn

And it looks like Friday's blues have made it into Saturday morn'



The coffee has gotten so cold on the stove

And the morning is just about gone

I'm getting out of bed to find the paper's been read

Cause my lady's been up since the dawn



I stumble good morning, she answers good day

Out the door and she's on her way

Leaving me searching for the reason why I was born

And it looks like Friday's blues made it into Saturday morning

and Friday's blues have made it into Saturday morning

Friday's blues made it into Saturday morn'



Written by: Ray Bierl(1)

Published by: [?], � [?]

Unofficial release: Snap Sessions, KPFK FM, Santa Monica, November 10, 1973



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Friday's Blues.

Snap Sessions, KPFK FM, Santa Monica, November 10, 1973.



Notes:



(1) Friday's Blues:

- Original version: "Fridays Blues". Written by Ray Bierl: "The coffee has gotten so cold on the stove. And the morning is just about gone. I'm getting out of bed to find the paper's been read. Cause my lady's been up since the dawn. I stumble good morning and she answers good day. She's out the door and she's on her way. Leaving me searching for a reason why I was born. And it looks like Friday's blues have made it into Saturday morn' The silence is shattered by the slam of the door. My echoing head starts to pain. I'd hoped for the sun, ah but since there was none. Well, I expect that it's got to rain. And to me it seems such a shame. There's no one reason that we can blame. There ain't no reason for anyone's feelings to be torn. And it looks like Friday's blues have made it into Saturday morn'. The coffee has gotten so cold on the stove. And the morning is just about gone. I'm getting out of bed to find the paper's been read. Cause my lady's been up since the dawn. I stumble good morning, she answers good day. Out the door and she's on her way. Leaving me searching for the reason why I was born. And it looks like Friday's blues made it into Saturday morning. and Friday's blues have made it into Saturday morning. Friday's blues made it into Saturday morn'"

- Further reading: The Heritage.



Getting Drunk On A Bottle (1973)

Getting Drunk On A Bottle



Some woman told me today

You're wasting your life away

Sitting around in your prime

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



I like to sleep late in the morning

I don't like to wear no shoes

Making love to the women while I'm living

Getting drunk on a bottle



Some woman told me today

You're wasting your life away

Sitting around in your prime

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



I like to sleep late in the morning

I don't like to wear no shoes

Making love to the women while I'm living

Getting drunk on a bottle



Some woman told me today

You're wasting your life away

Sitting around in your prime

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



I like to sleep late in the morning

And I don't like to wear no shoes

Making love to the women while I'm living

Getting drunk on a bottle



Why don't we try a couple of verses?

It's real simple...



Some woman told me today

You're wasting your life away

Sitting around in your prime

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



Well, I like to sleep late in the morning

I don't like to wear no shoes

Making love to the women while I'm living

Getting drunk on a bottle



Some woman told me today

You're wasting your life away

Sitting around in your prime

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



And I like to sleep late in the morning

I don't like to wear no shoes

Making love to the women while

I'm living Get drunk on a bottle



One more time



Wasting your life away

Sitting around in your prime

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



But I like to sleep late in the morning

I don't like to wear no shoes

Making love to the women while I'm living

Get drunk on a bottle

Get drunk on a bottle

Getting drunk on a bottle of wine



Written by: (?)(2)

No official release: Snap Sessions, KPFK FM, Santa Monica. November 10, 1973

Tom Waits: vocals and guitar

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. January, 2000)



Known covers:

None



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Getting Drunk On A Bottle.

Santa Monica/ USA. November 10, 1973.



Notes:



(1) Getting Drunk On A Bottle:

Live intro from"Snap Sessions, KPFK FM, Santa Monica. November 19, 1973": "This's only got... this one's got one verse. I first heard Pam (?) sing it, around the Heritage, and then a lot of people started singing it. It's real simple and it goes like this... " (probably Pam Ostergren, further reading: The Heritage).



(2) Jeremy Perrone: "...I have a couple old Dave Bromberg discs and remembered the song he has recorded called "I like to sleep late in the morning". This song is basically the song Waits is singing with a few changes. According to the liner notes it says the original version (which is a bit different from Waits) is written by S. David Cohen. The Bromberg recording of this was done in 1974" (Source: Jeremy Perrone email december 2008).



 



Apartment For Rent (1975)

Apartment For Rent



 



Well, it ain't no use, it ain't no good

And there's too many ghosts in this neighborhood

A quaint(1) little walk up is bringing me down

I have to find another crib(2) on the other side of town



The old Murphey bed(3)and the empty chest of drawers

And a little dinette set, I'll stroll across the floor

And the trash cans in the alley, well they're rattlin' and sayin'



That, there's an apartment for rent

On a rainy September day

Apartment for rent

Furnished with blue lights(4), baby

Apartment for rent

And the market's open all night

Well you see, I'm sweeping out the cobwebs

The lady she got away

There's an apartment for rent

On a rainy September day



Well, I'm pouring over the classified section

You see, she's lost all her affection for me

I was drinking and smoking

I was staying out all night long

When you needed me here with at home



There's an apartment for rent

Furnished with blue lights baby

Apartment for rent

And the market's open all night

Yeah, I've been sweeping up the cobwebs

The lady got away

There's an apartment for rent

There's an apartment for rent

There's an apartment for rent

On a rainy September day

Apartment for rent



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1975

Unofficial release: A Nickle's Worth of Dreams, Triangle/ PYRAM PYCD 081

"WMMR Radio", The Main Point. Bryn Mawr, Philadelphia/ USA. June 25, 1975.



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Apartment For Rent.

The Main Point. Bryn Mawr, Philadelphia/ USA. June 25, 1975.



Notes:



(1) Quaint: Means odd, peculiar. A quaint phrase means a fanciful phrase, one not expressed in the ordinary way. (Source: "The First Hypertext Edition of The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable", E. Cobham Brewer. � 1997-99 Bibliomania.com Ltd)



(2) Crib n.: A room, apartment, or other living quarters; a "pad" (Source: Dictionary Of American Slang, Wentworth/ Flexner)



(3) Murphey bed: Trademark for beds manufactured by "Murphey" (beds that fold into a wall or closet for storage). Later held to be incapable of serving as trademark because it had become, in the minds of consumers, a generic term for that product.



(4) Blue light: n. [1940s] (W.1) an obcenity, a swearword, a coarse, vulgair expression.(Source: Cassel's Dictionary of Slang. Jonathon Green 1998. Cassel & Co., 2000)



The Goodnight Loving Trail (1974)

The Goodnight Loving Trail



 



Well, you're too old to wrangle or ride in the swing

You beat the triangle and you curse everything

Now if dirt were a kingdom, well you would be king



On the Goodnight trail, on the Loving trail

Our old woman's lonesome tonight

And your French harp is crying just like a lone bawling calf

Well, it's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Get in there and blow out the light



Now the cook fire's out, the coffee's all gone

Now the old boys are up and they're raising the dawn

You're sitting there, you are lost in a song



On the Goodnight trail, on the Loving trail

Our old woman is lonesome tonight

Now your French harp is crying just like a lone bawling calf

It's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Get in there and blow out the light



Ah, with your snake oils, your herbs and your liniment too

You can do anything that a doctor can do

Well, except find a cure for your own goddam stew



On the Goodnight trail, on the loving trail

Our old woman is lonesome tonight

And your French harp is crying like a lone bawling calf

It's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Get in there and blow out the light



Some day I know that I'll be just the same

I'll be wearing an apron instead of a name

Now no one can change it, no one's to blame

Cause the desert's a book writ in lizards and sage

You know, it's easy to look just like an old torn out page

You're all faded and cracked with the colors of age



On the Goodnight Trail, on the Loving Trail

Our old woman is lonesome tonight

And your French harp is crying like a lone bawling calf

It's a wonder the wind don't tear off your skin

Go in there and blow out the light



Written by: Bruce "Utah" Phillips

Published by: Strike Music, � (?)

No official release: Ebbets Field, Denver, Colorado. October 8, 1974

Tom Waits: Vocals and guitar

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. January, 2000)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of The Goodnight Loving Trail.

Ebbets Field, Denver/ USA. October 8, 1974.



Notes:



(1) Live intro from "Ebbets Field, Denver, Colorado. October 8, 1974": "This is a song by Utah Phillips, the golden voice of the great Southwest. And it's about a... it's about a... like a cook on a wagon trail, you know. They used to call him the old woman... Oh, hush up now, I'm trying to sing this damned thing now! I ain't opening the show tonight! Well, this is Utah Phillips, the golden voice of the great Southwest, and it's about a cook on a wagon trail. And they used to call him... they called him the old woman, see. Cause he can't work anymore and he can't ride. So it's kinda like... Charlie Wooster. They'd give him an apron. Always got a five o'clock shadow, and they'd just whop up a good mess of (?) And it's called 'The Goodnight-Loving Trail', which is an old cattle trail, named after Mister Goodnight and Mister Loving." (Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. January, 2000)



Scarecrow (1977)

Scarecrow



 



Buzzards drive a crooked sky

Make a junkie's promise in a courier's eye

And a bankrupt corduroy wad on the thigh

A strangled acre by a thirsty stream

A crucified body, just a three day stubble

On the chin of a nightmare stampede

And tomorrow'll be hirin' a two dollar gun

And I tell you that someone's gonna pay

Cause when the weathervane's sleeping

And the moon turns its back

And crawl on the belly on the railroad tracks

And keep well hidden till the porchlights dim

And pump sixteen shells in the belly of a scarecrow(1)

And blame it all on him



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: [?], � 1977

Unofficial release: A Nickle's Worth of Dreams, Triangle/ PYRAM PYCD 081

Recorded during the 'Foreign Affairs' sessions, July through August, 1977



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of Scarecrow

Foreign Affairs sessions, 1977.



Notes:



(1) Scarecrow was recorded during the "Foreign Affairs" sessions in 1977. It was never officially released. Waits did however recycle parts of the song for "16 Shells From A Thirty Ought Six" (Swordfishtrombones, 1983) and "Potter's Field" (Foreign Affairs, 1977)



Gee Baby 'Aint I Good To You? (1979)

Gee Baby, Ain't I Good To You



 



It must be love that makes me treat you the way that I do

Gee baby, gee baby, ain't I good to you

But there's nothing in this world too good for a girl like you

Gee baby, ain't I good to you



I bought you a fur coat for Christmas

And I bought you a diamond ring I bought you a Cadillac

That sucker set me back to way next

Spring Oh, if it's not love I need to have my head examined

Gee baby, ain't I good to you



If it's not love, if it's not love I must be going out of my mind

Gee baby, baby ain't I good I said now ain't I good

Ain't I good, gee baby, ain't I good I said now ain't I good, ain't I good

Gee baby, ain't I good



[music stops, the rest is spoken]



Oh baby, I mean for chrissakes

Here I am, out here, playing toilets

And you're back home probably shacking up with my booking agent

Sheila...

Never go out with a girl named Sheila

Sheila means heartbreak

Sheila means trouble

Sheila means trash day

All right now, baby, I found about you and Hercules Melville

The secret's out of the bag

Yeah, you might as well cop to it, yeah



Out here working for nearly nothing

Playing the Zebra Room for shit's sake

Baby, I'm afraid our ship will never come in

It's like Vesuvius marching for Pompeii

Nothing but cinders

Return to cinders

That's my motto

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust

And that's all there is left of us



But the way I look at it, maybe there's a chance I don't know

Love is so peculiar, love is so strange

I bought you the refrigerator and the range



Oh Christ!

That's it baby, just a little lower there, right here

That's it, good

That's the spot, yeah

No, I don't think we're gonna make it, darling

I think we're all washed up but...

That's it, a little lower

That's it

I said oh baby

I said gee baby, ain't I good to you



Written by: Don Redman and Andy Razaf, 1929(1)

Published by: [?], � 1929

Unofficial release: October 7 1978, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, USA.

First performed by: McKinney's Cotton Pickers in 1929. Recorded by: Nat "King" Cole in 1946

(Transcribed by Ulf Berggren. Listserv Raindogs discussionlist. January, 2000)



Known covers:

N/A



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Listen to audio excerpt of Gee Baby, Ain't I Good To You.

Paramount Theatre, Seattle/ USA. October 7, 1978.



Notes:



(1) Covering: Gee Baby, Ain't I Good To You? Written by: Don Redman and Andy Razaf. First performed by: McKinney's Cotton Pickers in 1929. Recorded by: Nat "King" Cole in 1946: "You know it's love that makes me treat you. The way I do. Gee baby, ain't I good to you? You know there's nothing too good. For a girl like you. Gee baby, ain't I good to you? I bought you a fur coat for Christmas. And I bought you a diamond ring. I bought you a Cadillac car. I tried to buy you everything. But it's love that makes me treat you. The way that I do. Gee, gee baby, ain't I good to you? You know it's love that makes me treat you. The way I do. Gee baby, ain't I good to you? You know there's nothing too good. For a girl like you. Gee baby, ain't I good to you? I bought you a fur coat for Christmas. And I bought you a diamond ring. I bought you a Cadillac car. I tried to buy you everything. But it's love that makes me treat you. The way that I do. Gee baby, gee baby, ain't I good to you? Gee ain't I good to you?"




 




In A Suit Of Your Dreams (1986)

In A Suit Of Your Dreams



 



Come on down to Zookie's 

Join our Zookie's team 

So come on down to Zookie's 

You're in a suit of your dreams 

You're in a suit of your dreams



So come on down to Zookie's 

And join our Zookie's team 

Come on down to Zookie's 

You're in a suit of your dreams



Of your dreams 

You're in a suit of your dreams 

Of your dreams 

You're in a suit of your dreams



Written by: Tom Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1986-1987

Official release: no official release (Frank's Wild Years theatre play, 1986) 

Further reading: Frank's Wild Years the play



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of In A Suit Of Your Dreams as performed in the theatre play Frank's Wild Years.

The Briar Street Theatre (Steppenwolf Theatre Company). Chicago/ USA. June 17, 1986.

Ripped from low resolution audience tape



Notes:



(1) In A Suit Of Your Dreams: wordplaying on "Innocent When You Dream" which was the theme song of the theatre play Frank's Wild Years (1986) 



One, Two And Through (1992)

One, Two And Through



(Alice demo version, 1992. Scene 8 - Jabberwocky)(1)



'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimbel in the wabe.

All mimsy(2) were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.



"Beware of the Jabberwock, my son!

The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware of the Jubjub bird, and shun

The frumious Bandersnatch!"



He took his vorpal sword in hand;

Long time the manxome foe he sought.

So rested he by the Tumtum tree,

And stood awhile in thought.



And as in uffish though he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!



One, two! One, two! And through and through

The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.



"And has thou slain the Jabberwock?

Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

Oh frabjous day! Calooh! Callay!"

He chortled in his joy.



'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimbel in the wabe.

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe (3)



Written by: Lewis Caroll

(this is the Jabberwocky poem as featured in chapter 1 "Looking-Glass House" from the original Through The Looking-Glass, 1897)

Unofficial release: "Alice, The Original Demos", 1999 and "Alice PMS", 1999

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg, Germany, 1992

Further reading: Alice full story



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of One, Two And Through.

Demo recording. Recorded in Hamburg/ Germany, 1992.



<object height="344" width="425"></object> 

Waits performing "One, Two And Through" (excerpt)

at the Thalia Theater, Hamburg/ Germany. December, 1992.

Taken from The Late Show "Tom Waits & Robert Wilson's Alice" (1993)

BBC TV documentary presented by Beatrix Campbell. Aired March 4, 1993



Notes:



(1) One, Two And Through: Sung by Chorus Of Vicars in scene 8.

Stage directions from the play: "Eight Victorian Vicars dance on stage, singing. Alice and the White Knight watch."

- Humpty Dumpty: first verse from 'Through the Looking Glass''You seem very clever at explaining words, Sir,' said Alice. 'Would you kindly tell me the meaning of the poem called "Jabberwocky"?' 'Let's hear it,' said Humpty Dumpty. 'I can explain all the poems that ever were invented - and a good many that haven't been invented just yet.' This sounded very hopeful, so Alice repeated the first verse: 'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves. Did gyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.' 'That's enough to begin with,' Humpty Dumpty interrupted: 'there are plenty of hard words there. "Brillig" means four o'clock in the afternoon - the time when you begin *broiling* things for dinner.' 'That'll do very well,' said Alice: 'and "slithy"?' 'Well, "slithy" means "lithe and slimy." "Lithe" is the same as "active." You see it's like a portmanteau - there are two meanings packed up into one word.' 'I see it now,' Alice remarked thoughtfully: 'and what are "toves"?' 'Well, "toves" are something like badgers - they're somehing like lizards - and they're something like corkscrews.' 'They must be very curious-looking creatures.' 'They are that,' said Humpty Dumpty: 'also they make their nests under sundials - also they live on cheese.' 'And what's to "gyre" and to "gimble"?' 'To "gyre" is to go round and round like a gyroscope. To "gimble" is to make holes like a gimlet.' 'And "the wabe,' is the grass-plot round a sundial, I suppose?' said Alice, surprised at her own ingenuity. 'Of course it is. It's called "wabe", you know, because it goes a long way before it, and a long way behind it -' 'And a long way beyond it on each side,' Alice added. 'Exactly so. Well then "mimsy" is "flimsy and miserable" (there's another portmanteau for you). And a "borogove" is a thin shabby-looking bird with its feathers sticking out all round - something like a live mop.' 'And then "mome raths"?' said Alice. 'I'm afraid I'm giving you a great deal of trouble.' 'Well, a "rath" is a sort of green pig: but "mome" I'm not certain about. I think it's short "from home" - meaning that they'd lost their way, you know.' 'And what does "outgrabe" mean?' 'Well, "outgribing" is something between bellowing and whistling, with a kind of sneeze in the middle: however, you'll hear it done, maybe - down in the wood yonder - and when you've once heard it you'll be *quite* content. Who's been repeating all that hard stuff to you?' (Submitted by Ulf Berggren, Tom Waits eGroups discussionlist, 2000)



(2) Mimsy: "Aficionados of Lewis Carroll will know a (different) meaning, which appears in the poem called Jabberwocky in his Through the Looking-Glass: "All mimsy were the borogoves". Later in the book, Humpty-Dumpty explains its meaning as being a blend (he calls it a portmanteau word) of flimsy and miserable, so meaning "unhappy". Carroll either invented it afresh or borrowed an existing English dialect word and gave it a new meaning." (Source: World Wide Words, copyright C Michael Quinion, 1996-2004)



(3) Stage directions from the play: "The Victorian Vicars dance off. Alice and the White Knight remain."



Old Time Feelin' (1998)

Old Time Feelin'



 



That old time feeling

Goes sneaking down the hall

Like an old grey cat in winter

Keeping close to the wall



Written by: Guy Clark

Published by: unknown

Recorded at Prairie Sun Recording Studios, Cotati, CA, on May 28, 1998

Tom Waits: guitar, vocals (with Ramblin' Jack Elliott and and Guy Clark)

Official release: Friends Of Mine - Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998



Known covers:

N/A



Notes:



(1) Old Time Feelin':

- Ramblin' Jack Elliott (on Old Time Feelin'): "We were kiddin' around in the studio and it found its way on tape. It was just a feelin'." (Source: Ramblin' Jack Elliott official site, 2006)

- Edvins Beitiks (1996): "Waits will be on Elliot's next album [Friends Of Mine" Ramblin' Jack Elliott, Warner Entertainment, 1998], along with Arlo Guthrie, Jerry Jeff Walker, Guy Clark and Bob Weir. It was a labor of love, says Waits. "We did one song with Guy Clark - 'That Old Time Feeling' - that came off pretty good, I thought. Jack brings it with him when he comes, and that's rare these days. "You could say Jack wears in his songs - they're well used and well sung," says Waits, adding with a characteristically raspy chuckle, "Some people would say he wears 'em in and wears 'em out, but he wears 'em, that's for sure. "When he's learning a song he kind of tries it on like a pair of gloves. I got a chance to watch him do that when he recorded a song my wife and I wrote. He's got a way of doing things that's uniquely his own. He makes a song his own. That's the beauty of it." Waits has been itching to record with Elliott ever since he first heard his music getting good play, in the days when he was working as a doorman at the Heritage Club in San Diego's Mission Beach. "I was about 19, and his record was one of the most-played at this little coffee house. Jack's record was on the turntable all the time the one where he's on the cover with his horse and he's roping something [Ramblin' Jack Elliott: Young Brigham", Reprise R/RS 6284, 1968]. "It had '912 Greens' on there, spoken out, the song that so moved me. It had his version of "Tennessee Stud' and some Woody Guthrie songs," says Waits. He paused, then added that Elliott "was a real hero of mine - the idea of meeting him one day and recording with him is pretty fantastic." Waits, caught up in American music, did a lot of listening to Elliott, to Blind Lemon Jefferson, to Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, before stepping onstage at the Heritage Club to give the music a try himself. "I think I made more as a doorman than I did playing," he said. "Eight dollars a night on the door, $6 a night on stage. A little strange." Waits laughed at the memory of it, and the laughter was contagious. He called back easy-going roams with Elliott when both men were moving through Los Angeles in the high-water years of California folk. "We bumped into each other a couple of times," said Waits, making it matter-of-fact. "Hung with him in clubs in L.A., him and his dogs and his motorhome." After listening to the long-sleeve best of Elliott's stories, Waits is convinced "Jack should sit down somewhere with a tape recorder and talk all day and they should put it in the Library of Congress. "He's got one of those stories that is a novel unto itself, and I'd like to read it," says Waits. "Because his story is also the story of the country." (Source: "On The Road Tom Waits Talkin' About Hanging And Recording With Ramblin' Jack Elliott...". San Francisco Examiner, by Edvins Beitiks. August 4, 1996(?))





Source: Official Guy Clark website. W. Guy Clark and Ramblin' Jack Elliot.

Date: Prairie Sun Studios, Cotati. During the recording sessions for Ramblin' Jack Elliot's "Friends Of Mine".

Recorded between February 26, 1996 to October 14, 1997



Big Face Money (1999)

Big Face Money



 



When the show is over and the work is through

I want the big face money



I'll get all that cash and bring it home to you

I'll get the big face money



I'll get the big face money

I want the big face money

I'll get the big face money



Written by: Tom Waits and Casey X. Waits

Published by: Jalma Music (ASCAP), � 1999

Official release: Hold On, Anti Inc., 1999



Known covers:

None



It's Just The Way We Are Boys (2000)

It's Just The Way We Are Boys



(Woyzeck theatre version only)(1)



Because it's just the way we are boys

Just the way we are

Don't try to change us

Because it's just the way we are



There was a young soldier named Dice

Who remarked, they say, bigamy's nice

Even two are a bore

I prefer three of four

For the plural of spouse it is spice(2)



Because it's just the way we are boys

Just the way we are

Don't try to change us

Because it's just the way we are



A damsel seductive and handsome

Got wedged in a sleeping room transom

When she offered much gold

For release she was told

That the view was worth more than the ransom



Because it's just the way we are boys

Just the way we are

Don't try to change us

Because it's just the way we are



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story



Known covers:

None



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Listen to audio excerpt of It's Just The Way We Are

as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck by Morten L�tzh�ft (as Andres). 

Betty Nansen Theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Andres and Woyzeck in act 2, scene 4.

- An early version of "Just The Way We Are" was previously used in the theatre version of "Frank's Wild Years" (Act 1: scene 1, 1986).



(2) When the play went on tour in 2001, this song was performed with various alternate (and more risky) limericks, not published in the theatre programs or songbooks. Apparently they changed limericks every show.



There was a young fellow named Cas

Whose bullocks were made out of brass

When they tinkled together

They played 'Stormy Weather'

And lightning shot out of his ass


(Woyzeck 2001 tour)



There was a young fellow named Kent

His dick was so big that it bent

So to save him the trouble

He put it in double

And instead of coming he went


(Woyzeck 2001 tour)



There was a young man from Florida

who liked a friends wife so he borrowed her

once in the bed

he cried God strike me dead

this ain't a cunt it's a corridor


(Woyzeck 2002 tour. Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, December, 2002)



There was a young fellow named Rummy

who delighted in whipping his dummy

he'd play pocket pool

with his happy old tool

'til his pants and his shorts were all cummy


(Woyzeck 2002 tour. Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, December, 2002)



There was a young man from Darjeeling

who's tool reached up to the ceiling

in the electric light socket

he put it and rocked it

my God what a wonderful feeling


(Woyzeck 2002 tour.Submitted by Dorene LaLonde, December, 2002)



Diamond In Your Mind (2002)

Diamond In Your Mind



(Woyzeck theatre version, 2000)(1)



Always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander

Wherever you may roam

Always keep a diamond in your mind



Zerelda Samuels said she ain't never prayed

'til her right arm was blown off in a Pinkerton raid(2)

They lashed her to a windmill with '3-fingered Dave'

now she's 102 and drinking juleps(3) in the shade



Always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander

Wherever you may roam

Always keep a diamond in your mind



Sissy's hanging laundry down by the brook

Penfield Morgan's taking more than a look

if it weren't for the squawk of the rocker(4)

that's kept out in the rain

There would be nothing to complain about

except for the trains...oh,



Always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander

Wherever you may roam

Always keep a diamond in your mind



As published in the Woyzeck songbook (Betty Nansen Teatret, 2000)

Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Further reading: Woyzeck Full Story





 



Diamond In Your Mind



(Solomon Burke version, 2002)(5)



I shook the hand of the president and the pope in Rome

I've been to parties where I've had to be flown

They said everything was sacred, nothing was profane

And money was something that you throw off the back of trains(6)



Ooh, always keep a diamond in your mind

You gotta always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander, wherever you may roam

You gotta always keep a diamond in your mind



Steam of the gravy with little fried pearls

Floating like a necklace on a beautiful girl

Joan says "thanks" for the food and land

And [...?...] on my hands(7)



Ooh, always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander, wherever you may roam

You gotta always keep a diamond in your mind



She's got the milk of human kindness and the fat of the lamb

Scared like a baby, but she drives like a man

She lives outside of Natchez where she operates a crane

She's like a wrecking ball no longer connected to the chain



Ooh, Zerelda Samuels said she almost never prayed

Said she lost her right arm, blown off in a Pinkerton raid(2)

Then they lashed her to a windmill with old '3-fingered Dave'

Now she's 102, drinking mint juleps(3) in the shade



Always keep a diamond in your mind

You gotta always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander, wherever you may roam

Your gotta always keep a diamond in your mind



Always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander, wherever you may roam

Your gotta always keep a diamond in your mind



Always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Wherever you may wander, wherever you may roam

Your gotta always keep a diamond in your mind



Always keep a diamond in your mind

Always keep a diamond in your mind

Thank you



Written by: Tom Waits/ Kathleen Waits-Brennan

Published by: Jalma Publishing (ASCAP), � 2000

Official release: "Don't Give Up On Me. Solomon Burke"

Label: Fat Possum Records, 2002



Known covers:

Don't Give Up On Me. Solomon Burke. July 23, 2002. Fat Possum Records

Propeller. Heather Waters. April 29, 2008. Self-released



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Listen to audio excerpt of Diamond In Your Mind as performed in the theatre play Woyzeck.

Sung by Jens J�rn Spottag and Morten L�tzh�ft (as Woyzeck and Andres).

Betty Nansen theatre. Copenhagen/ Denmark. November 20, 2000.



Notes:



(1) Sung by Woyzeck and Andres in act 1, scene 2



(2) Pinkerton: Scottish-born American detective. His agency was notorious for breaking strikes and disrupting labor efforts to unionize (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)



(3) Juleps: A sweet syrupy drink, especially one to which medicine can be added. (Source: The American Heritage� Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright � 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company)



(4) Squawk of the rocker: Squawk: n. Act/ noise of squawking; a harsh squeak (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)

Rocker: A chair mounted on rockers; a rocking-chair (Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, � 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.)



(5) Solomon Burke version:

Don Waller (2002): "BOOM! BOOM! BOOM! "What's that noise in my earphones?" soul giant Solomon Burke calls into the studio control room from the vocal isolation booth. "That's the kick drum," producer Joe Henry explains. "Sounds like somebody let Sister Jackson in here," Burke chuckles. "Sounds like the Salvation Army band. I like that! OK, let's go to church." And for the next several minutes, the five musicians in Hollywood's Sound Factory studio take Tom Waits' rasping, wheezing demo of the previously unreleased Diamond In Your Mind to a woozy midnight service at a storefront church; Burke tossing an extra shovelful of grit into his customary coffee n' cream vocals as he negotiates the eccentric true-life tales of Waits' relatives that make up the tune's verses. "What's this lady's name here?" Burke asks between takes. "Zazu? Not Sally Sue? 'Cos it says here she's 101 years old. She's been waiting 100 years to hear her name on a record, so I better get it right." And the next take, he does. Henry suggests they try a fourth time, just to see if they can better the performance. Afterwards, the band crowds into the control room to listen to playbacks. Turns out the third time was the charm, and they pop in the next demo." (Source: "Go On Back To Him" by Don Waller, MOJO/ anti.com, June 2 - 2002)

Jonathan Valania (2002): That song was written by Tom Waits. Have you met him? Solomon Burke: "No. We had one discussion on the phone, and that was the lyric change where he wrote that "she never prayed," and I said, "No, no, no--you have to call him, you have to get him on the phone." I don't care how big of a sinner you are: If someone cuts off your arm, you are going to pray to God. They said, "With all due respect, Dr. Burke, you do not change the words to a Tom Waits song." I told them, "With all due respect, as a man of God, I am telling you this song is religiously incorrect." We stopped the whole session until we got a call back from him, and he said, "Okay.""(Source: "Solomon Burke Brings It Home" by Jonathan Valania. Philadelpia Weekly. July 17, 2002 Volume XXXI, No. 29, � 2003 Review Publishing)

Solomon Burke (2003): "I want him [Tom Waits] to give me the address to where this lady [in the song] is at. When we starting to change some of Tom's lyrics, Andy came into the studio and said quietly, 'Dr. Burke, no disrespect, but you just don't change Tom Waits' lyrics. That message came from his office; I just wanted to let you know.' They got Tom on the phone, and I don't know what Andy said, but afterwards he came in and said, 'You won't believe this, but Tom said it's okay!'" (Source: "Solomon Burke: Return Of The King" by Gil Kaufman. January 15, 2003. VH1.com, � 2003 MTV Networks)



(6) And money was something that you throw off the back of trains: same phrase mentioned in Long Way Home (Big Bad Love soundtrack, 2002/ Orphans, 2005): "Money's just something you throw off the back of a train. I got a head full of lightning and a hat full of rain."



(7) Tom Waits version (Healing The Divide benefit concert: Lincoln Center in New York/ USA September 21, 2003): "And something about god that I just don't understand."



But He's Not Wilhelm (2004)

But He's Not Wilhelm



 



I am growing old

who she loves is not the answer.

Don't try to change my mind

she will marry who I want her to.



Can't you see she's not a child

she's a woman after all.

You cannot change what's in her heart

when she loves Wilhelm.



I will protect you, my love

with a sword of ice brook temper.

I will bring you the moon

and I always will be true.



I would go anywhere with you

but my father won't approve.

For you see, you're not a huntsman

my dear Wilhelm.



There is more to life

than to fill your heart with dreams.

You don't build your house

from the willow by the stream.



But what is life without the willow

she must listen to her heart.

When her head is on her pillow

she loves Wilhelm.



Open up your heart

please remember we were young once

and we felt like they do.

Have you forgotten all you know.



I have chosen someone for her

and I know his aim is true

and she will grow to love him.



But he's not Wilhelm!



Written by: Tom Waits

Original Musical Arrangement by Greg Cohen and Tom Waits

Lyrics as published in "The Black Rider" program book. Barbican Theatre. London/ UK, 2004

No official release.

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Sung by K�tchen, Wilhelm, Bertram and his wife Anne.



In The Morning (2004)

In The Morning



He'll wear your heart and you will wear his ring

and you'll go rolling down a mustard hill

Play a lullaby on a fishbone harp

ride away on the gray mare's tail



In the morning

In the morning

In the morning when I/you rise

In the morning

In the morning

In the morning I/you will be my/your true love's bride



Weave a rosemary wreath in your auburn hair

and you'll be the envy of all the girls

He'll wear your heart - and you will wear his ring

and you'll go rolling down a mustard hill

Play a lullaby on a fishbone harp

ride away on the gray mare's tail



In the morning

In the morning

In the morning when I/you rise

In the morning

In the morning

In the morning I/you will be my/your true love's bride



Oh the blood of the lamb(2) is in the well

and it runs from the crack along the wedding bell

Perhaps a wind has blown the barrel from its mark

I heard the bird but could not hit it in the dark

I have bought and sold my only love

and my rifle, it has let me down



In the morning

In the morning

In the morning when I/you rise

In the morning

In the morning

In the morning will I/she ever be his/my bride?



Written by: Tom Waits

Original Musical Arrangement by Greg Cohen and Tom Waits

Lyrics as published in "The Black Rider" program book. Barbican Theatre. London/ UK, 2004

No official release.

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) Duet sung by Bridesmaid, K�tchen and Wilhelm (and entire cast)



(2) The blood of the lamb

- Also mentioned in "Down There By The Train" ("American Recordings", Johnny Cash, 1994/ Orphans, 2006): "There's a place I know, where the train goes slow Where the sinners can be washed in the blood of the lamb."

- "Through Moses, God told the Israelites to prepare a special meal to be eaten in haste the evening before their escape from Egypt, with a whole roasted lamb as the main dish. The blood from the lamb was to be used to mark the Israelites' houses. That night, God would send the angel of Death to kill the firstborn males of the Egyptians, but God would see the blood on the Israelites' houses, and he would command his angel to "pass over" - to kill no one there. God told Moses that the Israelites were to repeat the meal each spring on the anniversary of their departure from Egypt. The Jews keep the festival of Passover to this day." (Source: The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. 2002)

- "And one of the elders answered, saying unto me, What are these which are arrayed in white robes? and whence came they? And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me, These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. Therefore are they before the throne of God, and serve him day and night in his temple: and he that sitteth on the throne shall dwell among them. They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes." (Source: The Holy Bible: King James Version. 2000. The Revelation of St. John the Divine, 7)



News From The Duke (2004)

News From The Duke



 



I have news from the Duke

On the feast of St. George

all his guests wish to gorge on fresh meat

This rasher of wind

and the beast he has skinned

he must still try to win for the Duke



To hit is the key

a wooden bird from a tree

it is then we will know if you're true



A score of wild boar

and a partridge or four

fifteen pheasants, a goose and a hare



Ten cornish game hens

and plenty of venison

peacocks and lamb



In the morning

in the morning

in the morning when I rise



When you hear sweet syncopation(1)

And the music softly moans

T'aint no sin to take off your skin

T'aint no sin to take off your skin

and dance around in your bones



Just like those bamboo babies

down in the South Sea tropic zone

T'aint no sin to take off your skin

and dance around in your bones



Written by: Tom Waits

Original Musical Arrangement by Greg Cohen and Tom Waits

Lyrics as published in "The Black Rider" program book. Barbican Theatre. London/ UK, 2004

No official release.

Further reading: The Black Rider Full Story



Known covers:

None



Notes:



(1) When you hear sweet syncopation: Verse from: T'aint No Sin: Words by Edgar Leslie. Music by Walter Donaldson. Published by: Edgar Leslie, Lawrence Wright Music Co. Ltd/ EMI Music Publishing Ltd., � 1992. Official release: The Black Rider, Island Records Inc., 1993.

Part of the Tom Waits Library ©1999-2020